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July 31 Tuesday's News

 

Apple Invents a New Audio-Sharing Network Feature for iPhone

Apple Invents a New Audio-Sharing Network Feature for iPhone

Last week Apple filed a detailed patent application relating to a new iPhone audio-sharing network concept. While the filing touches on hearing aid technology, it is by no means limited to that narrow definition. Another application applies to teleconferencing, for example. In fact, one of the benefits of this technology relates to a "conference telephone." The technology is designed to cut out background murmurs and general noise while executives discuss business with distant colleagues and/or potential clients. At the end of the day, the patent relates to both students and the enterprise. Yes, the Devil is in the details. -- .

Apple wins auto-focus speed, exposure metering camera patents

Apple wins auto-focus speed, exposure metering camera patents

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday granted Apple two patents related to the operation of a digital camera, one which helps speed up auto-focus time based on object recognition and another for dynamic exposure metering. -- AppleInsider.

Apple granted patent for predictive text input UI

Apple granted patent for predictive text input UI

Apple on Tuesday was granted a U.S. patent for the graphical user interface used in iOS which changes the "hit region" size of a virtual keyboard's buttons based on predictive text data. -- AppleInsider.

Apple seeds new OS X 10.7.5 Lion builds, iCloud Control Panel to developers

Apple seeds new OS X 10.7.5 Lion builds, iCloud Control Panel to developers

Apple on Monday seeded new builds of OS X Lion, Lion Server and the Windows-only iCloud Control Panel beta to developers with no known issues. -- AppleInsider.

One Man's Opinion: Mountain Lion Redux

One Man's Opinion: Mountain Lion Redux

I just finished installing OS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion) on my box here at work. The installed via a copy of the installer I had on my thumb-drive. It took 80 minutes. The first thing that happens after booting is a notice to install Java 6 and Flash since they are not part of the 10.8 installer. After that you are good to go.

Personal OS X 10.8 (12A269) Mountain Lion Benchmarks - Xbench 1.3 benchmarking of my 2.8 GHz Intel iMac (2.8 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 6GB 800 MHz DDR2 SDRAM) against the previous versions of OS X. (* = running 64-bit kernel.) I am running this version and have not had any problems. Your mileage may vary.

 
2.8 GHz Intel iMac
10.5.8 10.6.8* 10.7* 10.7.4* 10.8*
Over All 120.06 154.69 157.41 131.35 133.04
CPU Test 167.28 198.19 198.21 193.92 201.41
Thread Test 324.99 325.72 392.92 396.80 415.66
Memory Test 208.79 189.99 198.20 188.72 208.43
Quartz Graphics Test 225.70 222.95 223.68 270.42 311.66
OpenGL Graphics Test 170.48 180.94 145.93 130.29 106.09
User Interface Test 306.80 337.31 335.72 273.39 270.89
Disk Test 32.36 52.45 53.02 49.52 52.61

Apple TV quietly gets Hulu Plus app

Apple TV quietly gets Hulu Plus app

Apple's streaming video box gets one of the most-requested streaming video services. The new app also comes on the heels of the new AirPlay mirroring functionality. -- c|net.

Force Microsoft Word To Use Retina Display

Force Microsoft Word To Use Retina Display

Even though Apple's Pages app is a pretty solid word processing tool, a lot of Mac users still love to use Microsoft Word. If you're one of them, that's cool, we won't judge you. The biggest problem with using Word on a new MacBook Pro with Retina display is that it looks pretty ugly because it hasn't been updated to take advantage of the Retina display yet. The great news for Word fans is there's a really easy work around that will force your Microsoft Word app to use your MacBook Pro's Retina display. -- Cult of Mac.

Bring Back Save As To Mountain Lion, Weep With Joy

Bring Back Save As To Mountain Lion, Weep With Joy

When OS X Lion debuted, our old-friend Save As... had been sent packing for a new impostor, Duplicate. We tried to like this new one, but wow was it not the same. Luckily, Mountain Lion has brought Save As… back, only in a sneaky, less than obvious way. -- Cult of Mac.

This Musician's iPad Has Utterly Changed The Way He Teaches, Learns, And Practices Music

This Musician's iPad Has Utterly Changed The Way He Teaches, Learns, And Practices Music

Redditor GrandHarbler is a musician and music teacher. He took to the popular social news sharing site today to start a conversation about how the iPad has improved his own practice, teaching, and music learning workflow. -- Cult of Mac.

Digging Deep into iWork Document Sharing in Mountain Lion

Digging Deep into iWork Document Sharing in Mountain Lion

If you use Apple's iWork apps, and you sync documents across multiple Macs and iOS devices, get OS X Mountain Lion. Now. It's okay; I'll wait till you get back.... Got it? Good. Now let's talk about why you're about to be overjoyed. -- The Mac Observer.

Mountain Lion: Backing Up to Multiple Time Machine Drives

Mountain Lion: Backing Up to Multiple Time Machine Drives

Time Machine is the backup system Apple built into OS X for the Mac, but has always felt a little limited -- especially since it has always supported backing up your important files to only a sigle location. With the launch of OS X Mountain Lion, however, you can now choose multiple drives for Time Machine to use, and it's easy to set up. -- The Mac Observer.

Use launchd to schedule repeating tasks

Use launchd to schedule repeating tasks

OS X uses a framework called launchd for starting, stopping and managing daemons, applications, processes, and scripts. You can use launchd to schedule any task you want to run at specific times or intervals. Nathan Grigg has posted a simple, clear tutorial, Schedule jobs using launchd which gives an introduction into how this process works, and how you can use it to schedule repeated tasks on your Mac.

Another place to look is this tutorial on the Doug's AppleScripts for iTunes web site. Doug presents launchd as a way of running his Update Expired Podcasts script at regular intervals.

AirPlay only the audio from your Mac using OS X Mountain Lion

AirPlay only the audio from your Mac using OS X Mountain Lion

One of the new features in OS X Mountain Lion is the new AirPlay Mirroring feature. AirPlay Mirroring makes it easy to give presentations, watch Flash videos (Hulu, anyone?) or show off photos from your recent vacation on a TV. If you want to see AirPlay Mirroring on OS X in action, make sure to check out Jason Parker's video demonstration. -- MacFixIt.

How to enable Web Sharing in OS X Mountain Lion

How to enable Web Sharing in OS X Mountain Lion

The Sharing services in OS X allow for a number of connectivity options, including screen sharing, file sharing, printer sharing, and the capability to use your computer as an Internet router. In past versions of OS X, Apple has also included a full Web sharing service using the open-source Apache server that allows you to host Web pages on your computer, but this option has been removed from the system preferences in Mountain Lion. -- MacFixIt.

Apple aims for salted earth in Samsung fight

Apple aims for salted earth in Samsung fight

As the high-stakes patent trial between Apple and Samsung Electronics moves into its second day Tuesday, one thing is clear: Apple is committed to waging total war. Like the Roman Empire in its victory over Carthage, Apple seems determined to salt the earth so that its competitor can never rise again. -- CNNMoney.

Take a Memo: Ten Tips for Successful Voice Dictation

Take a Memo: Ten Tips for Successful Voice Dictation

Perfect speech recognition is one of the Holy Grails of computing -- shouldn't our computers be able to transcribe exactly what we say, complete with proper spelling and punctuation, as has been the case in science fiction for many years? In fact, speech recognition software is nothing new in computing. Windows users have long taken advantage of the excellent Dragon Naturally Speaking from Nuance. On the Mac, this software has gotten good enough only in the past couple of years, since MacSpeech licensed the Naturally Speaking engine and was subsequently acquired by Nuance, after which the MacSpeech app was renamed to Dragon Dictate. -- TidBITS.

WinOnX Roars With OS X Mountain Lion Support

WinOnX Roars With OS X Mountain Lion Support

NES Software today announced Apple OS X Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) is now supported in WinOnX, the application that makes it possible for Apple Macintosh computers to run Microsoft Windows software quickly, easily and affordably. In addition to Mountain Lion, WinOnX sharpens its claws with support for multiple virtual environments of the Windows operating system as well as the MacBook Pro Retina display.

Opinion: Customers should be wary of the Mac App Store

Opinion: Customers should be wary of the Mac App Store

Last week, developer Marco Arment kicked off a fresh round of Mac App Store debate when he claimed that the store was headed toward a future of irrelevance. Here's a look at why developers are concerned about the Mac App Store, and what this all means for Mac users. -- Macworld.

Software Base Station in Mountain Lion Adds Modern Encryption

Software Base Station in Mountain Lion Adds Modern Encryption

Years after Wi-Fi's original encryption method, WEP, was proven to be broken and insecure, Apple finally switches the software base station option in Mac OS X to use the safer WPA2. -- TidBITS.

Mountain Tweaks

Mountain Tweaks

After the success with Lion Tweaks, helping houndreds of thousands of users in OS X Lion – Mountain Tweaks is set to do the same with Mountain Lion. The release focus on a user friendly user-interface, even more tweaks and the ability to do simple maintenance on your Mac – we think this makes it the best tweaking tool for Mac, ever!

July 30 Monday's News

 

Deducer, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) for R

Deducer, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) for R

Deducer provides a GUI for the open-source statistical package R that encourages less-technical users to learn and perform analyses in the R environment without writing code. It uses menus and dialogs for data manipulation and analysis to increase the efficiency of expert R users when performing common tasks by replacing lines of programming codes with a few points and clicks. Deducer also allows you to build plots using the ggplot2 framework via its GUI plot builder, providing a large selection of graph types and elegant data visualization. Deducer is designed to be used with JGR, though it supports a number of other R environments.

Installation of Deducer is much like any other package in R. Briefly, open R and enter the following:

install.packages(c("JGR","Deducer","DeducerExtras"))
library(JGR)
JGR()

The JGR console should now be open. To load Deducer, go to 'Packages & Data' > 'Package Manager' and select Deducer and DeducerExtras.

Deducer documentation can be found here.

For more on R you can check OIT's Bob Muenchen's website r4stats or check out his book, R for SAS and SPSS Users.

Apple updates high quality OS X speech with Voice Update 2.0

Apple updates high quality OS X speech with Voice Update 2.0

Tom and Jill are going uphill, version 2.0 that is. The high quality voices, first introduced in OS X Lion as optional downloads, now have updates available through Software Update. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Invents a New Audio-Sharing Network Feature for iPhone

Apple Invents a New Audio-Sharing Network Feature for iPhone

Last week Apple filed a detailed patent application relating to a new iPhone audio-sharing network concept. While the filing touches on hearing aid technology, it is by no means limited to that narrow definition. Another application applies to teleconferencing, for example. In fact, one of the benefits of this technology relates to a "conference telephone." The technology is designed to cut out background murmurs and general noise while executives discuss business with distant colleagues and/or potential clients. At the end of the day, the patent relates to both students and the enterprise. Yes, the Devil is in the details. -- Patently Apple.

Workgroup Manager 10.8

Workgroup Manager 10.8

The installer includes the latest version of Workgroup Manager for use with Mountain Lion and OS X Server. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Server, simplified: A power user's guide to OS X Server

Server, simplified: A power user's guide to OS X Server

With Lion Server and now Mountain Lion Server, the software has followed the hardware in becoming cheaper and simpler, and in shifting its focus from large businesses to small ones. At $50, Lion Server cost only five percent of what Leopard Server did; at $20, Mountain Lion Server costs less than half of that. As the product has gotten cheaper and within reach of regular people, the tools used to administer it have become correspondingly less complex, both in terms of how difficult they are to use and in how powerful they are. -- Ars Technica.

Mountain Lion AirPlay mirroring v. AirParrot: fight!

Mountain Lion AirPlay mirroring v. AirParrot: fight!

Mountain Lion brings AirPlay Mirroring from iOS to OS X, allowing users to mirror their Mac screen to an HDTV or projector attached to an Apple TV. Beyond sharing your Mac's screen for demonstrations, AirPlay Mirroring can be useful in several other scenarios: giving presentations (no VGA adapter needed), streaming the iTunes visualizer during a party, watching TV shows via Hulu, playing Diablo III on your huge flat screen... Well, you get the idea. -- Ars Technica.

Why Apple users are happy to be more inept than Microsoft's

Why Apple users are happy to be more inept than Microsoft's

Critics of Apple's new Genius Bar ads declare that they make Apple users look "inept and foolish." But isn't that a good thing? -- c|net.

HydraPro Easy HDR Pictures

HydraPro Easy HDR Pictures

One of the coolest parts of digital photography is being able to use software to make your photos better than you could ever had imagined. I'm not just talking about fixing exposures or adding special effects--both of those things are very cool--I'm talking about things like HDR photography. HDR (High Dynamic Range) is entails taking several images (one correctly exposed and several over and under exposed) and combining them into a new image that make the picture much more like how we see the world. -- Cult of Mac.

YouTube might be the best place to watch the Olympics (if it doesn't break)

YouTube might be the best place to watch the Olympics (if it doesn't break)

If you are living in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Brunei, Bhutan, Cambodia, East Timor, India, Indonesia, Iran, Laos, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, or Vietnam and want to watch the London Olympics today I'm told your only choice is YouTube.  Ten events are available at any time through the International Olympic Committee (IOC) YouTube channel. -- I, Cringely.

Retina MacBook Pros get Power Nap

Retina MacBook Pros get Power Nap

A firmware update released today has enabled the Power Nap feature to Apple's Retina MacBook Pro. The update follows a similar patch released yesterday for the MacBook Air. The update also fixes several sleep/wake issues and improves stability for Retina MacBook Pro models. -- MacNN.

Mac 101: Safari 6 in OS X Mountain Lion

Mac 101: Safari 6 in OS X Mountain Lion

Learn about using Safari 6 in Mountain Lion, as well as ways to personalize your browsing experience. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Lotus Notes and OS X Mountain Lion

Lotus Notes and OS X Mountain Lion

Lotus Notes 8.5.3 has some challenges running on Mountain Lion, which we have documented in IBM technote 159984. IBM has been working with Apple for several months in an effort to address these issues, but unfortunately there was no simple path to resolution prior to Apple's release. -- Ed Brill.

Apple disappoints at first Black Hat briefing

Apple disappoints at first Black Hat briefing

Apple's first Black Hat presentation was one of the most highly anticipated talks at this year's infosec gathering in Las Vegas, but many delegates were left feeling more than a little short-changed. -- The Register.

How an advanced photographer uses the iPhone and iPad

How an advanced photographer uses the iPhone and iPad

I find myself straddling a line with my photography. One foot sits on the side where I don't need anything advanced; the other foot enjoys taking photographs of sporting and musical events that require decent cameras and fast lenses. Today I'm going to share with you how Apple products have completely taken over my work flow -- GigaOM.

Mountain Lion Facts

Moutain Lion Facts

July 27 Friday's News

 

Apple Reveals New Annotation App & Back-Sensitive iPad

Apple Reveals New Annotation App & Back-Sensitive iPad

On July 26, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an exciting new annotation application that's in the works. If you consider that ten extremely detailed applications were published on this one project alone today, I'd have to say that it's likely a priority project. The applications cover new navigation and annotation modes that will assist readers working with electronic documents, digital books, newspapers and magazines. While it would take days to comb through these applications to list all of the coming features, our report focuses on just a few of them including a new annotation toolbar. At the end of the day, it was quite the surprise to find these patent gems and for students and professionals who need to use annotation tools, this is going to be a huge leap forward for the iPad. It's the kind of tool that will help the iPad push further into the enterprise and beyond. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Working on Advanced Display for Future Video Glasses

Apple Working on Advanced Display for Future Video Glasses

Apple has been toying with a heads-up display or video glasses since 2006 and they've already been granted a patent for their invention. Then earlier this month Apple's video glasses project won a surprising second patent which we covered in our report titled "Apple's Special Project for a Video Telephonic Headset Wins a Second Patent." Today, the US Patent Office published a new patent application from Apple regarding a future heads-up display that focuses on delivering Retina Display like quality to a smaller display that's powered by a much smaller battery than an iPhone. While today's patent fills a need in Apple's video glasses project it has to be one of the driest reads of the year. For those interested in the finer details of this invention, check out Apple's latest patent application titled "Display Resolution Increase with Mechanical Actuation." -- Patently Apple.

New Mac malware eavesdrops on users, requires no password to install

New Mac malware eavesdrops on users, requires no password to install

Researchers have unearthed new malware that turns a Mac into a remote spying platform that is able to intercept e-mail and instant-message communications. The malware uses internal microphones and cameras to spy on people in the vicinity of the OS X machine. -- Ars Technica.

Podcasts for iOS remains hard to use after recent fixes

Podcasts for iOS remains hard to use after recent fixes

One month ago when we examined Apple's Podcasts application for iOS, we felt it wasn't fully baked. We did like the freedom from downloading that Podcasts' robust streaming feature provides. We also liked the simple access to podcasts downloaded through iTunes on the computer. But overall, the app just did not impress. And we're not the only ones who felt that way. Several other Apple iOS applications have ten times as many five-star compared to one-star ratings. But for Podcasts, this is very different: there are more than twice as many people awarding one star as there are giving out five stars. -- Ars Technica.

OS X Mountain Lion: Options for web sharing

OS X Mountain Lion: Options for web sharing

OS X Mountain Lion does not include Web Sharing as an option in the Sharing preference pane. Mountain Lion does include the Apache HTTP Server, an open-source web server.

Getting the AMP stack running is a little different on OS X Mountain Lion 10.8 (GM Build 12A269) than is its predecessor OS X 10.7 Lion, here is the lowdown on getting Apache, MySQL, PHP and phpMyAdmin running on the new Apple operating system. -- The Coolest Guy on The Planet.

Apple Gets Serious About Making iWallet A Reality, Acquires Fingerprint Sensor Maker AuthenTec For $356M

Apple Gets Serious About Making iWallet A Reality, Acquires Fingerprint Sensor Maker AuthenTec For $356M

Whenever Apple moves to purchase a company, you know they've got something up their sleeves, and it's not hard to imagine the possibilities of their latest acquisition: maker of fingerprint sensor chips, AuthenTec. -- Cult of Mac.

Discover The New And Hidden Features Of Mountain Lion On The CultCast

Discover The New And Hidden Features Of Mountain Lion On The CultCast

Our Mountain Lion Megasode is here, and on this minty-new CultCast, we'll tell you what we like, what we love, and which hidden features we've discovered in Apple's new big kitty. Plus, should you upgrade or do a clean install of Mountain Lion? We ponder that very question, then tell you when a clean install makes more sense and how to do it the right way on this all-new megasode. -- Cult of Mac.

Safari 6: New Ways to Share & Email Links

Safari 6: New Ways to Share & Email Links

In the new version of Safari, sharing links has been completely revamped. We've now got Twitter and Messages integration, and the old Mail Link to This Page/Mail Contents of This Page choices have been replaced by an integrated Email this Page command. There's even a new way to send Reader-formatted content! For the skinny on how best to handle these changes, come on in and read this tip from Melissa Holt.  -- The Mac Observer.

My Mountain Lion Install: a Travelogue

My Mountain Lion Install: a Travelogue

I installed Mountain Lion (ML) on my MacBook Air (MBA) as soon as the new OS was released. Here's the procedure I used, with notes and observations. -- The Mac Observer.

Mountain Lion Sharing: Setting Up Twitter & Other Social Networks

Mountain Lion Sharing: Setting Up Twitter & Other Social Networks

With the release of OS X Mountain Lion, Apple is bringing social networking services to the system level by letting users share content to Twitter, Vimeo, and Flickr via Mail, Safari, Messages and AirDrop. Setting up Sharing on your Mac is easy, too, and only takes a few steps. -- The Mac Observer.

Quickly rename bookmarks in Safari's Bookmarks Bar

Quickly rename bookmarks in Safari's Bookmarks Bar

You no longer need to right-click and display a dialog to be able to edit the name of a bookmark in Safari' 6's Bookmarks Bar. Just click and hold the bookmark; the name will become highlighted and you will be able to rename it in the Bookmarks Bar. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Apple also releases OS X Server 2.0 for Mountain Lion

Apple also releases OS X Server 2.0 for Mountain Lion

Apple also released OS X Server 2.0 for Mountain Lion, available in the Mac App Store for $19.99. OS X Server is added directly to Mountain Lion to provide services that include AFP, SMB, and WebDAV file services, a wiki server, a profile manager for configuration and management, mail services, CalDAV and CardDAV servers for calendars and contacts, a messaging server with encrypted IM and persistent chat rooms, VPN, Xsan, and more. OS X Server 2 is $19.99 for OS X 10.8.

OS X Mountain Lion application incompatibilities reported

OS X Mountain Lion application incompatibilities reported

With any new OS revision, the community's general tendency is often "upgrade first, ask questions about compatibility later." The excitement of obtaining the latest OS and its new features sometimes interferes with normal "best practices." While Microsoft has recently announced both Office 2008 and 2011 are compatible with Mountain Lion with patches, a handful of high-profile applications are not yet compatible with Cupertino's latest OS, which may lead to headaches with productivity, or just everyday computing tasks for hasty upgraders. -- MacNN.

Microsoft announces Office Mountain Lion update

Microsoft announces Office Mountain Lion update

In a post on the Office for Mac blog, Microsoft's Mac Office team announced that the 2011 version of their software now sports full compatibility with the latest version of Apple's operating system, OS X Mountain Lion. The post walks users through the update process necessary to ensure full compatibility between Office and the new OS. Microsoft's team also pointed out that Mountain Lion also supports Office for Mac 2008.

Users looking to update their software will first have to enable Office for Mac's AutoUpdate feature. Some updates will be necessary to the software in order to enable certain features.

Microsoft's team also notes that directly-downloaded updates will not install correctly if users keep the default security settings on Mountain Lions Gatekeeper feature. Instead, users are advised to only use Microsoft AutoUpdate for updating their software.

Apple Mountain Lion OS Offers Features for Small Businesses

Apple Mountain Lion OS Offers Features for Small Businesses

Although Microsoft's Windows operating system is still used in the vast majority of businesses, creative professionals and those working in design industries are partial to Apple computers and the operating system, and small and midsize businesses are increasingly adopting it for their own devices, particularly Apple's mobile operating system, iOS, as use of the iPad tablet has exploded among small businesses.

With the release of OS X Mountain Lion, Apple's latest version of their OS, there are a host of updated features that can serve midmarket companies well. -- eWeek.

OS X Mountain Lion: About the Display pane of System Preferences

OS X Mountain Lion: About the Display pane of System Preferences

You can use the Display pane of Display preferences to specify how your display works. Not all options appear for all display models. By default, the Display System preferences will automatically select the best resolution for your display.  -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Further Details iPhone-NFC Apps for TV, Games & More

Apple Further Details iPhone-NFC Apps for TV, Games & More

On July 26, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published yet another extraordinary patent application from Apple that reveals new details regarding Apple's future iPhone-NFC controls system. Our report mainly focuses on the new system as it relates to an iDevice controlling and interacting with a possible standalone television in addition to an expanded version of Apple's current Apple TV styled device. The updated Apple TV could one day control cable or satellite television programming and video game play via a video game controller. This would really be a boost for Apple if users were able to play high end RPG video styled games with a standard styled controller. Further, Apple's invention runs deep and they envision NFC ready iDevices being able to control standalone cameras, projectors, in-home security systems, lawn sprinkler systems, your thermostat, garage door and more. One of these fine days, future iDevices will finally support NFC; and when they do -- watch out, because Apple will open the floodgates and release a new generation of applications noted in this report and others like their forthcoming iWallet. Will Apple's next generation iPhone 5 finally be the one that will introduce NFC? Only time will tell. -- Patently Apple.

Clearing up Mountain Lion confusion

Clearing up Mountain Lion confusion

When Apple ships a new version of the Mac OS, it generally takes no more than 24 hours for the questions to come pouring in. Such is exactly the case with Mountain Lion. You have questions, Chris Breen has answers. -- Macworld.

Automator workflow of the month: Bring RSS back to Safari 6

Automator workflow of the month: Bring RSS back to Safari 6

Safari 6 spells the end for RSS support. However, with an Automator workflow, you can bring RSS content back to Safari. -- Macworld.

Resurrect Your Old Code With a DIY Punch Card Reader

Resurrect Your Old Code With a DIY Punch Card Reader

Need to read in some old punch cards? Have a hankering to return to yesteryear? I've combined an Arduino, the CHDK enhanced firmware for Canon cameras, and the Python Image Library to build a reader for standard IBM 80 column punch cards. You can see it in action in "Punch Card Reader — The Movie" or read more about it. -- Code included.

Ex-Sun Employees Are Taking Java To iOS

Ex-Sun Employees Are Taking Java To iOS

Ex-Sun employees did what Sun/Oracle failed to do since the iPhone launched. They brought Java to iOS and other mobile devices. They are getting major coverage from Forbes, DDJ, hacker news and others. They are taking a unique approach of combining a Swing-like API with a open source and SaaS based solution. -- Codename One.

July 26 Thursday's News

 

Firmware update enables 'Power Nap' feature for Mid-2011 MacBook Airs

Firmware update enables 'Power Nap' feature for Mid-2011 MacBook Airs

A firmware update pushed out by Apple on Wednesday enables the Power Nap in certain MacBook Air models that were promised the feature but found it missing when OS X Mountain Lion launched earlier in the day. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates iWork, Podcasts, iTunes U for iOS

Apple updates iWork, Podcasts, iTunes U for iOS

As part of the rollout of its next-generation OS X 10.8, Apple on Wednesday updated a number of first-party iOS apps to take advantage of the tight iCloud integration offered by Mountain Lion. -- AppleInsider.

Mountain Lion updates for OS X Server, Xcode, Remote Desktop hit Mac App Store

Mountain Lion updates for OS X Server, Xcode, Remote Desktop hit Mac App Store

Along with Wednesday's release of OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Apple released Mountain Lion Server as a $19.99 upgrade on the Mac App Store, while Xcode 4.4 was also provided to developers, and Apple Remote Desktop also received an update. -- AppleInsider.

iWork, iPhoto, iMovie & Aperture receive updates for Apple's Mountain Lion

iWork, iPhoto, iMovie & Aperture receive updates for Apple's Mountain Lion

Apple on Wednesday updated all three applications in its iWork productivity suite, as well as iPhoto, iMovie and Aperture, to take advantage of new features in Mountain Lion. -- AppleInsider.

How to bend Mountain Lion's Notification Center to your will

How to bend Mountain Lion's Notification Center to your will

Getting Mountain Lion's new system-wide notifications to work best for your own needs may take a little adjusting. Notification Center gives developers an (official) standardized way to send notifications to the user, but also a way to consolidate and control those notifications. We show you how to make the most of what this first desktop incarnation of Notification Center offers. -- Ars Technica.

OS X Mountain Lion: a screenshot tour

OS X Mountain Lion: a screenshot tour

Wednesday's Mountain launch has many Mac users squirming to get home from work so they can update their personal machines to the next major version of OS X. And many are already reading John Siracusa's massive, 26,000-word review of the operating system. But what if you have to actually get work done today and you don't have time yet to spend hours reading about the intricacies of Mountain Lion?

Sometimes it's nice to get a feel for which features to look out for ahead of time, and what better way to do that than through a screenshot tour? So sit back, relax, and grab a cup of coffee while you check out our screenshots highlighting the major features and functionality of Mountain Lion. -- Ars Technica.

Timeline: when will Mountain Lion see its first patches?

Timeline: when will Mountain Lion see its first patches?

In our massive OS X reviews, we sometimes recommend that people take a deep breath and wait for the operating system to be patched before upgrading. Chances are good that the initial installation will be OK, but things like user account deletion bugs and FileVault security holes have definitely made it into past final releases. But impatient upgraders want to know: how long will we have to wait for that first point update? -- Ars Technica.

How to create a bootable, backup Mountain Lion install disk

How to create a bootable, backup Mountain Lion install disk

Happy Mountain Lion Day! Now that you have downloaded the 4.34GB installer, you may want to install Mountain Lion on more than one of your personal machines. Do you really need to wait 45 minutes or more for each one? Absolutely not! Just make your own bootable install disk using our handy tutorial.

We have instructions for those of us who just want to get it done--using the donation-ware Lion Diskmaker app--as well as those that don't mind a little extra clicking to do it yourself. -- Ars Technica.

Apple brings Smart Search, Do Not Track, and more to Lion Safari users

Apple brings Smart Search, Do Not Track, and more to Lion Safari users

It's not just Mountain Lion that came out this morning--Apple has also released Safari 6 for OS X Lion users. The updated version of Apple's browser contains many of the same features included in Safari for Mountain Lion, including the "Smart Search" field, offline reading list, Do Not Track capabilities, and a new password pane. Baidu has also been added as a built-in search option for Chinese Safari users. -- Ars Technica.

15 Reasons Why Mountain Lions Are Awesome

15 Reasons Why Mountain Lions Are Awesome

Mountain Lions are magnificent beasts. Sure, they're not as huge as a real lion, or as exotic as tigers with their fancy stripes, but that doesn't mean they're not as cool. In fact, Mountain Lions are vicious killing machines and cuddly at the same time. Plus, they jump like really high. We love these big cute cats, so to celebrate the launch of OS X Mountain Lion, here are 15 reasons why mountain lions are awesome... -- Cult of Mac.

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion [Review]

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion [Review]

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion signifies a new approach on Apple's part towards OS X updates: instead of going years between major releases, Cupertino is trying to take the rapid release approach that has worked so well for them with iOS and apply it to the Mac.

Mountain Lion, then, feels in many ways less like OS X 10.8 than OS X 10.7.5: a smaller, more tightly focused update continuing what OS X Lion started, taking iOS's best ideas and bringing them to Mac.

Thanks to major breakthrough features like iCloud syncing, Notification Center, Sharing, AirPlay Mirroring and more, there's less of a distinction in Mountain Lion between the Mac and iOS than ever. But is that a good thing, and how will it change the way you use your Mac? -- Cult of Mac.

Just What Does Power Nap Do While Your Mac Is Sleeping?

Just What Does Power Nap Do While Your Mac Is Sleeping?

We showed you how to switch on Power Nap on your Mountain Lion-running, SSD-equipped Mac, but just what does this new feature do? -- Cult of Mac.

Deciphering OS X Mountain Lion's Save Document Features

Deciphering OS X Mountain Lion's Save Document Features

A paradox: Some of the most attention-grabbing new features in Mountain Lion are ones that you may use only rarely. Dictation, AirPlay -- to name two.

On the other hand, many of the "smaller" changes in the just-released 10.8 version of OS X are ones that will impact your work multiple times a day. One such example is how you save and open documents. Although you may view opening and saving as mundane tasks, Mountain Lion offers enough new wrinkles in how it all works to justify a closer look. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X Terminal: Jumping Around in Command Text

OS X Terminal: Jumping Around in Command Text

Something that even longtime users of the Terminal may not know is that you can hop around in a command you've typed, eliminating the need to use the arrow keys to move letter by letter. It's pretty simple, really--hold down the Option key, and your cursor will turn into a little crosshairs symbol. Then just click anywhere in the line, and you'll jump to that insertion point. -- The Mac Observer.

Remove icons from the Dock in Mountain Lion

Remove icons from the Dock in Mountain Lion

Before OS X Mountain Lion, you could drag an icon out of the dock and and it would disappear when you let go of it. This also used to work with the Finder's sidebar entries, but Apple has removed both of these in Mountain Lion.

With Mountain Lion's Finder sidebar, you have to right-click an entry and choose Remove from Sidebar from the contextual menu.

It might appear that this is now the only way of removing icons from Mountain Lion's dock, too. But I discovered that if you drag an icon out of the dock, then hold it anywhere for a second, the first frame of the "poof" animation appears next to the cursor. When you release the mouse button, the icon will disappear. -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to enable dictation on OS X Mountain Lion

How to enable dictation on OS X Mountain Lion

The latest edition of Mac OS X, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, is packed full of new features, over 200 in all. One of them is a built-in dictation service, similar to the dictation feature found on the iPhone 4S.

By default, dictation isn't enabled after installing Mountain Lion on your Mac. If you want to use it, you're going to have to enable it.  -- .

OS X Mountain Lion can run on unsupported Intel Mac Pros

OS X Mountain Lion can run on unsupported Intel Mac Pros

A new procedure has surfaced that may allow owners of the older and unsupported Mac Pro 1,1 and 2,1 machines to run Mountain Lion natively on their systems. -- MacFixIt.

Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) Review

Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) Review

MacInTouch's Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) review from Robert Mohns covers the purpose and features of Apple's latest Mac operating system, (available now from the Mac App Store) - its new applications, changed applications, the integration of Software Update and Mac App Store, user interface changes, iCloud, sandboxing, other security issues, links to additional resources and more.

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, the Little Details

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, the Little Details

You might look at the list of new features in OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion and think, "Ho hum, no big deal," but a lot goes into a major update to an operating system. Rather than write yet another comprehensive review (see the work of our friends Jason Snell, John Siracusa, and Matthew Panzarino for that), we want to touch on features and shortcuts that you might not easily encounter on your own -- or that we think are so cool they deserve mention. -- TidBITS.

Tatu Ylonen, father of SSH, says security is 'getting worse'

Tatu Ylonen, father of SSH, says security is 'getting worse'

Tatu Ylonen has garnered fame in technology circles as the inventor of Secure Shell (SSH), the widely used protocol to protect data communications. The CEO of SSH Communications Security -- whose crypto-based technology invented in 1995 continues to be used in hundreds of millions of computers, routers and servers -- recently spoke with Network World on a variety of security topics. -- Network World.

AirPlay mirroring hands-on: Free Hulu on your Apple TV

AirPlay mirroring hands-on: Free Hulu on your Apple TV

Apple's Mountain Lion operating system is packed with improvements, but home theater enthusiasts have been patiently waiting for one feature in particular: AirPlay mirroring. That's because AirPlay mirroring solves the question I'm most often asked: how do I stream any Web video from a laptop directly to your TV, wirelessly? With an Apple TV and a Mac running Mountain Lion that supports AirPlay mirroring, anything you can see on your computer's screen -- including Flash video and free Hulu content -- you can stream to your TV. -- c|net.

Apple's enterprise mojo: Education shines

Apple's enterprise mojo: Education shines

Apple's fiscal third quarter results will be dissected in a big way after the company disappointed Wall Street. However, Apple noted a bevy of key vertical industry developments with a strong quarter for education. In fact, there was a few minutes where Apple CFO Peter Oppenheimer was talking enterprise wins as if he ran Research in Motion in its heyday. -- ZDNet.

6 reasons you should be using jQuery

6 reasons you should be using jQuery

Bringing together HTML5 and CSS, the jQuery JavaScript library greatly eases the pains of Web application development. Based on the manipulation of the HTML DOM (Document Object Model) and designed to simplify the client-side scripting of HTML, jQuery incorporates parts of HTML and CSS. Thousands of companies are on the jQuery bandwagon, and your company should be, too. -- CIO.

Migrating to the cloud means more work than you think

Migrating to the cloud means more work than you think

Taking advantage of the cloud -- IaaS and PaaS, in particular -- requires a lot more work than most IT departments realize. And before you roll your eyes at yet another column about the cloud, it gets worse: I'm going to do something we geezers in training do a lot of. That is, I'm going to explain that the young whippersnappers who think they know it all need to learn from our experience. -- InfoWorld.

Should you do a "clean install" of Mountain Lion?

Should you do a

Some Mac users prefer to do a "clean install" of each major new version of OS X, erasing their drive and starting over. Here's a look at whether or not that's possible when installing Mountain Lion and, more important, whether it's advisable. -- Macworld.

How to install Mountain Lion over Leopard

How to install Mountain Lion over Leopard

According to the Mountain Lion license agreement, you must have Snow Leopard (Mac OS X 10.6) or Lion (OS X 10.7) installed before you can install Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8). But there are situations in which you may have a valid license for 10.6 or 10.7, but Leopard (OS X 10.5) installed. There are several ways to go directly from 10.5 to 10.8. -- Macworld.

Hands on with Mountain Lion's OS X Recovery and Internet Recovery

Hands on with Mountain Lion's OS X Recovery and Internet Recovery

Mountain Lion, like Lion before it, lets you boot your Mac into a special recovery mode called OS X Recovery. This mode includes a few essential utilities for fixing problems, restoring files, browsing the Web, and reinstalling the operating system. Here's our comprehensive look at this troubleshooting tool and the special Internet Recovery feature available on recent Macs. -- Macworld.

Algorithms that automatically reroute your car look like the next trend in mobile mapping

Algorithms that automatically reroute your car look like the next trend in mobile mapping

Traffic usually produces aggravation. But for Christian Brüggemann, it led to app inspiration. While sitting in a London café with a buddy, observing cars packed onto one street while another was empty, he thought, what if vehicles could be directed in such a way that optimized all the possible routes? -- MIT Technology Review.

July 25 Wednesday's News

 

Apple's profits rise 20% on sales of 26M iPhones, 17M iPads, and 4M Macs

Apple's profits rise 20% on sales of 26M iPhones, 17M iPads, and 4M Macs

Apple said Tuesday that third-quarter profits rose just over 20% percent to $8.8 billion, or $9.32 per diluted share, on sales of $35.0 billion for the three-month period ended June 30, 2012. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to release Mountain Lion Wednesday on Mac App Store

Apple to release Mountain Lion Wednesday on Mac App Store

As expected Apple announced on Tuesday that OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, its next-generation Mac operating system, will hit the Mac App Store on Wednesday, July 25 -- AppleInsider.

Apple's 25 Granted Patents Include Apple TV & Future ID App

Apple's 25 Granted Patents Include Apple TV & Future ID App

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of twenty-five newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In our first report of the day we covered a wild patent that detailed a wide variety of technologies ranging from a future TV system right through to a signature touch pad that could start a vehicle. In our second report of the day we cover the vast majority of Apple's utility patents that touch on everything from camera to smartphone technologies and in between we cover the user interface for Apple TV and a future ID App that will identify objects found in museums and guided tours. -- Patently Apple.

Apple's Wild New Patent Covers TV & Advanced 5D Technology

Apple's Wild New Patent Covers TV & Advanced 5D Technology

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of twenty-five newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. This particular report covers a single, wild and crazy patent that touches on advancing television, advanced 5D technology, interactive gaming, teleconferencing, advanced tactile feedback technology, virtual reality data gloves and even a unique touch signature for starting a future vehicle. Is that wild enough for you? -- Patently Apple.

Apple CEO Tim Cook: rumors are a "great thing about this country"

Apple CEO Tim Cook: rumors are a

Mountain Lion is coming out today, July 25. That seems to be some of the biggest news to come out of Apple's third quarter earnings release on Tuesday, because Apple otherwise had a pretty average (for Apple) quarter. Unit sales of iPads, iPhones, and Macs were all up year-over-year, though not quite at fall-out-of-the-chair levels. Meanwhile, CEO Tim Cook continued to tease listeners about future products in the pipeline, while simultaneously addressing the rumors and speculation about the as-yet-unannounced new iPhone expected for the fall. -- Ars Technica.

Apple Reports Third Quarter Results

Apple Reports Third Quarter Results

Apple® Tuesday announced financial results for its fiscal 2012 third quarter ended June 30, 2012. The Company posted quarterly revenue of $35.0 billion and quarterly net profit of $8.8 billion, or $9.32 per diluted share. These results compare to revenue of $28.6 billion and net profit of $7.3 billion, or $7.79 per diluted share, in the year-ago quarter. Gross margin was 42.8 percent compared to 41.7 percent in the year-ago quarter. International sales accounted for 62 percent of the quarter's revenue. -- Apple PR.

The New Mountain Lion Finder Is Fantastic For Photographers

The New Mountain Lion Finder Is Fantastic For Photographers

Back in the time of the OS X Leopards, the Finder became a whole lot more useful for anyone with photos and videos on their Macs (ie. everybody)/ We got Quick Look, which let us watch slideshows and movies right there on the desktop, and the Finder itself was good enough to use as a lightweight photo viewer.

Then Lion came along and broke one essential tool: the little slider in the bottom right of Finder windows had its functionality removed. It used to let you zoom file thumbnails defaults write Finder trackpad zoom, but in Lion the tool remained, but did nothing.

Thankfully in Mountain Lion the slider now works again. And happily for the photographers out there, the Finder has some other new tricks you're going to love. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple wins patent for Cover Flow media selection GUI

Apple wins patent for Cover Flow media selection GUI

Apple on Tuesday was granted a patent regarding browsing and selection of digital media on a connected device using the Cover Flow interface first seen in iTunes 7. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Granted "Dynamically Changing Cursor for User Interface" Patent, Originally Filed in 2003

Apple Granted

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday granted Apple a utility patent for the dynamically changing mouse cursor seen in previous Mac OS iterations as well as the current OS X Lion. -- AppleInsider.

Beyond The Numbers: What Tim Cook Really Said In Apple's Q3 2012 Financial Call

Beyond The Numbers: What Tim Cook Really Said In Apple's Q3 2012 Financial Call

Beyond the numbers, there were some tantalizing tidbits about Apple and the company's future plans during today's quarterly financial call. While nothing quite lived up to Tim Cook comparing Windows 8 to someone trying to converge a toaster and a refrigerator into a single device during the last call, there were several choice comments. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple to Present at Black Hat Security Conference

Apple to Present at Black Hat Security Conference

Apple is making its first official appearance at this week's Black Hat  conference with a presentation on iOS security by Dallas De Atley. Mr. De Atley is Apple's Platform Security team manager and will be speaking on Thursday, July 26. -- The Mac Observer.

Educational sales 'best ever' for Apple in Q3

Educational sales 'best ever' for Apple in Q3

During its latest financial conference call, Apple emphasized that the last quarter was its best ever for Mac sales in the education market, with K-12 and higher-education institutions accounting for a significant portion of overall shipments. Further boosting Apple's standing and sales numbers in education further, the company sold twice as many iPads to educational customers than Macs. -- MacNN.

Bought a Mac after June 10? Get a free upgrade to Mountain Lion

Bought a Mac after June 10? Get a free upgrade to Mountain Lion

Those of you who picked up a Mac on or after June 11 can soon pounce on a free upgrade to Mountain Lion. Courtesy of Apple's OS X Mountain Lion Up-to-Date Program, consumers who bought a Mac from Apple or from an Apple authorized reseller between June 11 and the date when Mountain Lion debuts will have 30 days to request their free upgrade. The program allows qualifying buyers to download Mountain Lion for free directly from the Mac App Store. -- c|net.

Turning Off Ads in Parallels

Turning Off Ads in Parallels

We use in-product notifications to share several types of information with our customers. First, and most importantly, we share information about product updates which are generally related to compatibility with OS X, new features and product enhancements. Second, we occasionally share special offers from Parallels or other third party companies who provide special deals for our customers. Many of our customers rely on the information about product updates and appreciate the special deals for products that are of interest to them.

Individual notifications can be turned off by clicking the "don't show this again" button. However, because customers need to receive important product information, there is not a mechanism for customers to completely disable notifications.

Try this in the terminal defaults write com.parallels.Parallels\ Desktop ProductPromo.ForcePromoOff -bool YES. -- Mjtsai.

College only has eyes for iPads: Regis takes step away from textbooks, buys tablets for all

College only has eyes for iPads: Regis takes step away from textbooks, buys tablets for all

All student and faculty at Regis College will get iPads when the fall semester begins, the latest in a growing number of educational institutions to take the digital leap to tablets.

What's more, all students at the small Weston campus will take Apple's popular tablet with them upon graduation. The school purchased 1,250 iPads for all full-time students and its faculty. The iPad 2 models have 16 GB and are Wi-Fi only, for a price of $380 each, and the college says it will replace each device every two years. -- Boston Herald.

Best Mac Pro GPUs versus 2012 Retina MacBook Pro running (wink) OpenGL Benchmarks

Best Mac Pro GPUs versus 2012 Retina MacBook Pro running (wink) OpenGL Benchmarks

The frustration of Mac Pro owners for the lack of new and better GPUs has given rise to a movement to buy "Windows only" GPUs and flash them with "OS X compatible" code. MacVidCards sent us some samples to try. We decided to show how these "alternative" GPUs compare to conventional OS X compatible GPUs when running OpenGL based games and benchmarks. -- Bare Feats.

Use This Mac App To Print From Your iPhone or iPad Without AirPrint

Use This Mac App To Print From Your iPhone or iPad Without AirPrint

When worlds collide -- this is ostensibly an iOS tip, but it involves a Mac App, which should technically be an OS X tip, but hey -- you probably know how to print from your Mac. It's more likely that, like me, you have a printer that you use with your Mac and it isn't one of them newfangled fancy AirPrint ones, neither. While AirPrint protocol has been around since iOS 4, I still haven't bought a printer with it built in. Hey, mine works just fine, still! -- Cult of Mac.

Going native on apps can get Apple user loyalty

Going native on apps can get Apple user loyalty

Apple's efforts to rein in its reliance on third-party apps with the next iteration of its iOS mobile operating system (OS) will help Cupertino gain a competitive edge over rivals and win customer loyalty. These native apps, though, should focus on communications rather than basic functions such as e-mail or calendaring. -- ZDNet.

Chemistry Circus is a chemical app for beginners

Chemistry Circus is a chemical app for beginners

Virtualnye Prostranstva LLC, developer of fun educational apps for kids, has announced the release and immediate availability of Chemistry Circus 1.0, a new amazing application developed exclusively for iPad. Instead of learning basic chemistry notions in a class, you can go on a fun journey to the chemistry circus. The program includes the show of the trained chemical elements, mobile alchemical laboratory, and fun animation all night on the arena! -- prMac.

OS X Mountain Lion: The Full Macworld Review

OS X Mountain Lion: The Full Macworld Review

In his comprehensive review of Apple's new Mac operating system update, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, Jason Snell reports on how Apple's goal isn't copying iOS, but integrating new features into both of its operating systems. -- Macworld.

Force iOS to use YouTube site instead of app

Force iOS to use YouTube site instead of app

The YouTube app that comes with iOS might be convenient, but it hasn't been updated in years. YouTube's own mobile site is better. Here's how to force iOS to use that site instead of the app for YouTube links. -- Macworld.

Better browsing with bookmarks

Better browsing with bookmarks

The biggest time-saving feature you'll find in any Web browser is the ability to bookmark sites, providing a quick route back to places you visit frequently. Here are Sharon Zardetto's favorite bookmarking tricks. -- Macworld.

16 Magical Pieces Of Tech That Need To Stop

16 Magical Pieces Of Tech That Need To Stop

They were supposed to make everything better. And maybe they did, a little. But it's time for them to go away now. Sorry, QR codes. It's been real. -- BuzzFeed.

How to transfer iPhone contacts to iPad without iTunes or the iCloud

How to transfer iPhone contacts to iPad without iTunes or the iCloud

I have an older iPhone which is kept away from iTunes and the iCloud as I only use it to make calls. I have recently purchased the new iPad which I am now setting as my new media and personal data center and was wondering how to transfer my iPhone contacts to my new iDevice. Since all my iPhone contacts are manually created on my phone and are stored locally there, I decided that the easiest way would be to export the iPhone contacts to my computer and then import the contact entries from the computer to my new iPad. -- O'Reilly Answers.

Small Pipes and High Bills: Keeping Bandwidth Use in Check

Small Pipes and High Bills: Keeping Bandwidth Use in Check

Our always-chatty computers and mobile devices have an all-you-can-eat mentality that can be wildly inappropriate when we're either in a low-bandwidth situation or when we're trying to keep bandwidth usage in budget or under a cap. We detail strategies for restricting your bandwidth diet. -- TidBITS.

July 24 Tuesday's News

 

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Mail 6.0 & Notes

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Mail 6.0 & Notes

In OS X Mountain Lion, Apple has split Notes off from Mail as its own app, mirroring iOS. Additionally, Mail gets new VIP contact, notification and search features, while the all new Notes app for OS X provides a new option for drafting ideas that are kept up to date across all your devices via iCloud. -- AppleInsider.

The trials and tribulations of running Windows 7 on a Retina MacBook Pro

The trials and tribulations of running Windows 7 on a Retina MacBook Pro

We already gave you our impressions of running OS X on Apple's Retina MacBook Pro, as well as how to maximize battery life by overriding the automatic GPU switching. Since we still had the hardware at our disposal, however, readers expressed interest in knowing how Windows runs at the Retina MacBook Pro's ultra-high resolution. -- Ars Technica.

How Apple's phantom taxes hide billions in profit

How Apple's phantom taxes hide billions in profit

On Tuesday, Apple is set to report financial results for the second quarter. Analysts are expecting net income of $9.8 billion. But whatever figure Apple reports won't reflect its true profit, because the company hides some of it with an unusual tax maneuver. -- Associated Press.

Google Wants Apple's Inventions To Be Shared With Everyone

Google Wants Apple's Inventions To Be Shared With Everyone

An interesting report comes from All Things D today, detailing a argument from Google against Apple. Unsurprisingly, the discussion revolves around patents, particularly standard essential patents (SEP). Basically, Google is suggesting that when technologies become popular enough, even if they are proprietary, they should become public standards, available to everyone.

Are Indian high schoolers manning your IBM help desk?

Are Indian high schoolers manning your IBM help desk?ibmin

The theory of outsourcing and offshoring IT as it is practiced in the second decade of the 21st century comes down to combining two fundamental ideas: 1) that specialist firms, whether here or overseas, can provide quality IT services at lower cost by leveraging economies of scale, and; 2) that offshore labor markets can multiply that price advantage through labor arbitrage using cheaper yet just as talented foreign labor to supplant more expensive domestic workers who are in extremely short supply. While this may be true in the odd case, for the most part I believe it is a lie.

This lie is hurting both American workers and the ability of American enterprise to compete in global markets. -- I, Cringely.

Apple's OS X Mountain Lion Up-to-Date Application Goes Live Ahead of Public Launch

Apple's OS X Mountain Lion Up-to-Date Application Goes Live Ahead of Public Launch

Alongside other OS X Mountain Lion announcements at its Worldwide Developers Conference last month, Apple announced an Up-to-Date program allowing any customer purchasing a Mac on or after June 11 to receive a free upgrade to OS X Mountain Lion once the operating system is released to the public. With OS X Mountain Lion being released only via the Mac App Store, the free upgrade is being delivered a redemption code for the store. -- Mac Rumors.

Find Out How Fast Your SSD Or Hard Drive Really Is

Find Out How Fast Your SSD Or Hard Drive Really Is

Sometimes, it's just fun to compare scores with your friends. Without the urge to compete, we wouldn't have sports, national videogame competitions, or reality television. Now there's a new way to measure up against those around you -- Solid State Drive (SSD) speed. --  Cult of Mac.

'Minority Report' software hits the real world

'Minority Report' software hits the real world

The software behind the film 'Minority Report' -- where Tom Cruise speeds through video on a large screen using only hand gestures: is making its way into the real world. -- AFP.

Siri: The ultimate guide

Siri: The ultimate guide

Everything you need to know about setting up Siri securely, and all the Siri commands for phone, email, messaging, alarms, timers, reminders, calendars, weather, music, maps, and more! -- iMore.

Cisco to unveil Apple Bonjour gateway for enterprise Wi-Fi networks

Cisco to unveil Apple Bonjour gateway for enterprise Wi-Fi networks

Cisco plans to add code to its wireless LAN controllers to make Apple's Bonjour-based technologies like AirPlay and AirPrint better behaved on enterprise networks. -- Macworld.

Bugs & Fixes: Two iTunes Match problems

Bugs & Fixes: Two iTunes Match problems

Ted Landau, like many of us, continues to run into iTunes Match glitches. In this installment of Bugs & Fixes he addresses two issues. -- Macworld.

How NSA's Surveillance Algorithms See Into Your Life

How NSA's Surveillance Algorithms See Into Your Life

A quite scary talk show with former NSA employees -- now whistle blowers -- Thomas Drake, Kirk Wiebe, and William Binney reveals that the NSA has algorithms that go through data gathered about us and they can basically 'see into our lives.' And this seems to be going on especially since the Patriot Act has removed the statutory requirement that the government prove a surveillance target under FISA is a non-U.S. citizen and agent of a foreign power. -- Technically Personal.

July 23 Monday's News

 

One Man's Opinion: OS X 10.8 'Mountain Lion'

One Man's Opinion: OS X 10.8 'Mountain Lion'

I have seen and run every OS that Apple has on platforms named Macintosh. Even some that did not see the light of day (and for good reason.) What I am about to relate is a personal view and is not that of OIT or UT. I have run every version of Mountain Lion on my iMac and am currently running the "Golden Master."

If you do not like Lion (OS X 10.7) you will hate Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8.) For me, I believe everyone should give it a pass until 10.8.1 if then. It is a huge change from the OS X we know.

Examples,

  1. web sharing is no longer available in the Sharing System Preference, however the web server is still there
  2. Safari will no longer serve as an RSS reader,
  3. the screen saver can no longer access your iPhoto library,
  4. saves happen without asking,
  5. all hardware that used a PowerPC driver will no longer function if the company has not updated their drivers and software,
  6. printers that you used to share wirelessly will not work unless they are AirPrint,
  7. invisible scrollbars,
  8. lack of access to the Library directory and the Unix under-pinnings.
  9. No more search box in Safari. It is combined into the url box.
  10. Full-screen.
  11. etc.

Xbench 1.3 benchmarking of my iMac10,1 Intel iMac (3.06 GHz Intel Core 2 Duo, 4GB 800 MHz DDR2 SDRAM) against OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. Your mileage may vary.

 
3.06 GHz Core 2 Duo Intel iMac
10.6.6 10.6.7 10.8
Over All 181.78 179.64 132.78
CPU Test 214.58 214.48 207.39
Memory Test 199.52 195.50 212.36
Quartz Graphics Test 217.46 225.58 292.65
OpenGL Graphics Test 185.73 178.15 111.04
User Interface Test 337.19 335.47 90.38
Disk Test 74.88 73.10 82.81

It seems obvious that Apple is trying to develop one code base for iOS and OS X. It is also obvious that it is trying to hide as much of the OS as possible. It wants to sell consumer machines and not enterprise class machines. in my opinion it wants to be an entertainment company.

It also seems that the Mac interface which we have all loved for so long and when Steve Jobs said OS X was so gorgeous "you want to lick it" is no longer the case.

If you are running 10.7 you have already seen some of these changes but believe me, you ain't seen noth'n yet. If you are currently running 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) you will think you are on the dark side of the moon because not only will the interface change like you can't believe, all of your PowerPC applications will not run which may mean your data is lost. You had better make sure you have all of your data in transportable formats BEFORE you move to 10.8. After that it is too late.

Rosetta Warning

To judge the impact on your 10.6.8 box, from the Apple menu select "About this Mac" and then click "More Info..." Next click on "System Report...", or you can just run "System Information" (previously know as System Profiler) in the Utilities folder. Under "Software" select "Applications." This will take a while to run. When it comes back click on the "Kind" column to sort by type. Look for all the PowerPC's. NONE of them will run under Mountain Lion.

Rosetta Warning

 

I can and am using it to get work done but I can not recommend it. If you upgrade you will have to spend some money and upgrade or buy new software and some hardware. For example my Canon LiDE scanner no longer works (there is no software upgrade from Canon) and no one wants to sell me just a scanner anymore or a printer. They want to sell me all-in-one's. I don't want an all-in-one thank you very much. And so on it goes.

If you are happy with the way your Mac is working and you have no need for new software or hardware then stay where you are. But with iCloud, the iPhone and the iPad that might not be possible because in order to up upgrade them to iOS 5 or 6 may require 10.8 on your Mac. Remember syncing? Catch 22.

Perhaps this is Apple's way of stimulating the economy?

Is there anything positive I can say? Well the Finder seems faster and applications seem to load faster.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Calendar & Reminders offer smart search, location-based alerts

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Calendar & Reminders offer smart search, location-based alerts

In OS X Mountain Lion, Apple has replaced iCal with two separate Calendar and Reminders apps, harmonizing with iOS and improving the overall interface while making Reminders not just calendar event with alarms, but also location-based notifications. -- AppleInsider.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Contacts to get new groups, sharing, linking and Facebook support

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Contacts to get new groups, sharing, linking and Facebook support

In OS X Mountain Lion, Apple has replaced Address Book with Contacts, bringing the simpler OS naming convention to OS X and adding a variety of new improvements, including easy sharing, card linking between different accounts and (later this year) Facebook integration. -- AppleInsider.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Go Full Screen on any display

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Go Full Screen on any display

In OS X Mountain Lion, Apple has taken an incremental step toward making OS X's new iPad-like Full Screen mode more useful: you can now pick which connected display you want to use. -- AppleInsider.

Epic fraud: How to succeed in science (without doing any)

Epic fraud: How to succeed in science (without doing any)

Running scientific experiments is, frankly, a pain in the ass. Sure, it's incredibly satisfying when days or weeks of hard work produce a clean-looking result that's easy to interpret. But often as not, experiments simply fail for no obvious reason. Even when they work, the results often leave you scratching your head, wondering "what in the world is that supposed to tell me?"

The simplest solution to these problems is obvious: don't do experiments. (Also, don't go out into the field to collect data, which adds the hazards of injury, sunburn, and exotic disease to the mix.) Unfortunately, data has somehow managed to become the foundation of modern science--so you're going to need to get some from somewhere if you want a career. A few brave souls have figured out a way to liberate data from the tyranny of experimentation: they simply make it up. -- Ars Technica.

The Future of Apple: A panel session at Fortune Brainstorm Tech

The Future of Apple: A panel session at Fortune Brainstorm Tech

My thanks to Adam Lashinsky of Fortune for inviting me to Fortune Brainstorm Tech in Aspen this week. I was asked to participate in a panel session with Gene Munster of Piper Jaffray to discuss "The Future of Apple". The session was moderated by Adam.

Where Microsoft Has 'More Taste' Than Apple

Where Microsoft Has 'More Taste' Than Apple

It must surely be a sign of the impending apocalypse that Microsoft's operating systems have "more taste" than Apple's. I'm referring, of course, to Apple's inexplicable use of skeuomorphic design in iOS and OS X apps, and contrasting that with Microsoft's stark avoidance of such cheesy gimmickry in the Windows 8 and Windows Phone user interfaces.

A skeuomorphic design in software is one that "decorates" the interface with fake reality -- say, analog knobs or torn paper. The problem is worse than it sounds. -- Cult of Mac.

How to prepare your Mac for OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion

How to prepare your Mac for OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion

Apple's next release of OS X "Mountain Lion" is slated for release by the end of this month, with some recent developments suggesting it may be out by as early as next week. If you are thinking about upgrading your Mac to the new operating system, then you might consider reserving some time this weekend to ensuring your system is capable of and prepared for the upgrade. While for the most part you should be able to download and install the upgrade without any problems, there are a few things you can do to help prevent running into odd problems. -- MacFixIt.

Smartphones, iPads become the new cash register

Smartphones, iPads become the new cash register

We've all seen the dreaded "cash only" sign on the windows of restaurants or mom-and-pop shops that don't accept credit cards. But the growth of smartphones has enabled retailers and consumers to explore alternatives that make paying with credit cards as simple as tapping on the screen of your cellphone. -- Santa Rosa Press Democrat.

Sacrifice another goat! iCloud is Apple's biggest failure before Google

Sacrifice another goat! iCloud is Apple's biggest failure before Google

For a company that prides itself on craftsmanship and a beautiful user experience, Apple's cloud services continue to be more than a blemish on the company's reputation. They are a serious black hole.

Google, meanwhile, was born in the cloud, and it shows: things like document and calendar synchronisation just work, and across a dizzying breadth of devices. Ditto for Amazon. Even desktop-bound Microsoft groks and executes the cloud better than Apple. Indeed, it is this fundamental flaw in Apple's end-to-end product strategy that ultimately paves the way for a host of competitors to set up shop on its wonderful hardware and steal the future of computing out from under its feet.

Again. -- The Register.

Opinion: It's a trap! Beware carriers' new unlimited talk and text plans

Opinion: It's a trap! Beware carriers' new unlimited talk and text plans

Analysts who have studied the plans agree: If you aren't already on an unlimited talk and texting plan, shared data plans will actually cost you more money -- often, a lot more money. Being for-profit businesses, carriers of course love pulling down more dough, but even more than that, they like the idea of getting you used to paying for unlimited talk and text. That's because talk and text deliver insane profit margins. It is a cash cow for carriers, and the cow's milk is running dry. -- Digital Trends.

Apple Granted Patent for Final Cut Pro Collaborative Editing

Apple Granted Patent for Final Cut Pro Collaborative Editing

In a review of Apple's Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3 in February, StudioDaily noted that "two nice things in the 10.0.1 update were the ability to apply a custom sequence starting timecode and XSAN support, which lets you support an XSAN volume for media and event storage." They concluded by stating that it didn't mean true collaborative editing was here yet but that it was a start. The interesting thing about this is that Apple was just granted a patent for Final Cut Pro this week and its total focus was on this very point: collaborative editing in real-time. Final Cut Pro fans tell me that this would be a major feature that many of them have dreamed of and hoped for. Well, let it be known, it's a feature on Apple's roadmap via this week's granted patent. -- Patently Apple.

Filings detail Apple's plans to improve support for hearing impaired users

Filings detail Apple's plans to improve support for hearing impaired users

With this fall's launch of iOS 6 set to add support for new "Made for iPhone" hearing aids, a pair of new patent applications offer a glimpse of how Apple could even further benefit users who are hearing impaired. -- AppleInsider.

HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards

HTML5 Splits Into Two Standards

Until now the two standards bodies working on HTML5 (WHATWG and W3C ) have cooperated. An announcement by WHATWG makes it clear that this is no longer true. WHATWG is going to work on a living standard for HTML which will continue to evolve as more technologies are added. W3C is going the traditional and much more time consuming route of creating a traditional standard which WHATWG refers to as a 'snapshot' of their living standard. Of course now being free of W3C's slower methods WHATWG can accelerate the pace of introducing new technologies to HTML5. Whatever happens, the future has just become more complicated -- now you have to ask yourself 'Which HTML5?' -- I Programmer.

July 20 Friday's News

 

Moving Time Machine to a New Hard Drive

Moving Time Machine to a New Hard Drive

It's a law of the universe. Sooner or later, Time Machine backups expand to fill all available space on a hard drive. It's actually a capability that we're glad Time Machine possesses. By using all available space, Time Machine can keep backups of our work going back as far as…well, as far as there's available space.

Eventually, though, you may decide you need more room for your Time Machine backups, and want to move them to a larger hard drive. You may need more room for two primary reasons. First, the amount of data you store on your Mac has grown over time, as you've added more applications and created and saved more documents. At some point, you may outgrow the amount of space available on your original Time Machine hard drive.

The other common reason for needing more room is a desire to store more data history. The more data history you can store, the farther back in time you can retrieve a file. Time Machine will obligingly save multiple generations of documents or other data, as long as you have enough room to accommodate them. But once the hard drive fills up, Time Machine will purge older backups to ensure you have room for the most current data.

Moving Time Machine to a New Hard Drive

Starting with Snow Leopard (OS X 10.6.x), Apple simplified what's required to successfully transfer a Time Machine backup. If you follow the steps below, you can move your current Time Machine backup to a new disk. Time Machine will then have enough room to save a larger number of backups, until it eventually fills up the available space on the new drive.

Preparing the New Hard Drive to Be Used for Time Machine

  1. Make sure your new hard drive is connected to your Mac, either internally or externally.
  2. Start up your Mac.
  3. Launch Disk Utility, located at /applications/utilities.
  4. Select the new hard drive from the list of disks and volumes in the left side of the Disk Utility window. Be sure to select the disk, not the volume. The disk will usually include its size and possibly its manufacturer as part of its name. The volume will usually have a simpler name; the volume is also what shows up on your Mac's desktop.
  5. Time Machine drives need to be formatted with the GUID Partition Table. You can verify a drive's format type by checking the Partition Map Scheme entry at the bottom of the Disk Utility window. It should say GUID Partition Table. If it doesn't, you will need to the format the new drive. WARNING: Formatting the hard drive will erase any data on the drive.

To format the new hard drive, follow the instructions in the guide below, and then return to this guide: Format Your Hard Drive Using Disk Utility

If you want the new hard drive to have multiple partitions, follow the instructions in the guide below, and then return to this guide: Partition Your Hard Drive With Disk Utility

  1. Once you finish formatting or partitioning the new hard drive, it will mount on your Mac's desktop.
  2. Right-click the new hard drive icon on the desktop, and select Get Info from the pop-up menu.
  3. Make sure that 'Ignore ownership on this volume' isn't checked. You'll find this check box at the bottom of the Get Info window.
  4. To change the 'Ignore ownership on this volume' you will first have to click the padlock icon located in the bottom right corner of the Get Info window.
  5. Moving Time Machine to a New Hard Drive
  6. When prompted, supply an administrators username and password. You can now make the changes.

Transferring Your Time Machine Backup to a New Hard Drive

  1. Launch System Preferences by clicking the System Preferences icon in the Dock, or selecting System Preferences from the Apple menu.
  2. Select the Time Machine preference pane.
  3. Slide the Time Machine switch to Off.
  4. Return to the Finder and browse to the location of your current Time Machine backup.
  5. Click and drag the Backups.backupdb folder to the new hard drive.
  6. If asked, supply an administrator name and password.
  7. The copying process will start. This can take a while, depending on the size of your current Time Machine backup.

Selecting the New Hard Drive for Time Machine's Use

  1. Once the copying is complete, return to the Time Machine preference pane and click the Select Disk button.
  2. Select the new hard disk from the list and click the Use for Backup button.
  3. Time Machine will turn back on.

That's all there is to it. You're ready to continue using Time Machine on your new, spacious hard drive, and you didn't lose any of the Time Machine data from the old drive.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: using iCloud as the smart, automated way to store documents

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: using iCloud as the smart, automated way to store documents

In OS X Mountain Lion, iCloud begins to take shape as the smart, automated way to store documents on a per-app, device independent basis, incrementally displacing the local file system that non-technical users have long struggled to comprehend and replacing it with a cloud-based service that connects and synchronizes desktop and mobile devices via the Internet. -- AppleInsider.

Managing iPhones And iPads? Don't Forget Mobile App Management

Managing iPhones And iPads? Don't Forget Mobile App Management

When Apple released iOS 4 two years ago, with a framework for device management built into the OS, the focus of IT departments and security specialists was to activate, configure, and lock down iPhones and iPad as well as other mobile devices. Mobile device management (MDM) was the big iOS-in-business buzz word for quite some time. Over the past several months, however, the discussion around mobile management has shifted significantly as a new concept has become the IT mantra for mobile devices.

That new concept is Mobile app management (MAM) and it has come to be seen as a critical part of supporting and securing mobile devices (including iPhones and iPads) in business. MAM has a different focus from mobile device management (MDM). -- Cult of Mac.

Verizon Q2 2012: Smartphone Adoption Up, Android Out Paces iPhone, And More

Verizon Q2 2012: Smartphone Adoption Up, Android Out Paces iPhone, And More

Verizon's Q2 earnings call took place today, and while the gist of the call went something like "we're making tons of money, money money," there were a few interested bullet point in regards to Android and smartphones in general. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple's iTunes U May Be Leading A Global Revolution In Higher Education

Apple's iTunes U May Be Leading A Global Revolution In Higher Education

Both the Atlantic and New York Times ran stories this week focusing on Coursera, an initiative involving several high-profile universities that are putting a range of classes online for anyone who wants to take them. The initiative is part of trend in higher education to make learning available to anyone who has the personal or professional interest in taking a college or university class regardless of financial or geographical challenges.

While Coursera is getting a lot of media attention and is racking up hundreds of thousands of students around the globe, the idea of free college learning is hardly new. Apple introduced the concept of watching or listening to college lectures when it first rolled out iTunes U in 2007. More recently, Apple revamped iTunes U to offer a much more immersive experience that includes assigned readings, activities and projects, and even note-taking in addition to recorded lectures. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Nabs AMD Trinity System Engineer

Apple Nabs AMD Trinity System Engineer

Apple has hired a former AMD systems engineer credited with developing that company's Trinity APU, a highly regarded system-on-a-chip (SOC). John Bruno was let go from AMD when the struggling chip maker laid off 10 percent of its work force in November of 2011, but now lists his occupation as "System Architect at Apple" on LinkedIn. -- The Mac Observer.

Script to delete huge sparsebundle images

Script to delete huge sparsebundle images

I needed to restart a backup for one of my Macs, which had an 800 GB disk image on my Time Capsule. It turned out to be impossible to delete the disk image - in Finder, it would just not move to the Trash, even after waiting for several hours. I was looking for advice and most of the suggestions involved reformatting the Time Capsule, but I couldn't do this, as I had other Macs being backed up there. -- Mac OS X Hints.

List Full Download History of Your Mac

List Full Download History of Your Mac

Mac OS X's quarantine feature not only sets a special quarantine bit on files you download - so it can alert you the first time you open them, and so its built-it anti-malware feature can scan for certain threats - but it also keeps a list of the files you have downloaded. OS X Daily pointed out the command you can run in Terminal to see the full list of these downloads. Note that this won't be "every" file you've downloaded, only those files you downloaded with applications that set the quarantine bit. -- Mac OS X Hints.

In The Name Of Progress: How Apple Is Killing The Mac (as we know it)

In The Name Of Progress: How Apple Is Killing The Mac (as we know it)

For a few decades Apple's fortunes rested upon the loyalty of tens of millions of Mac users who disdained the Windows way of computing life.

Then, along came the next great thing. iPod? iPhone? iPad? No. Apple figured out how to transfer the essence of a Mac into other products and create even more sales and profits. Today, the Mac represents the short leg of Apple's three-legged profit stool, taking a back seat to both iPhone and iPad. -- Mac 360.

Apple Patents Show Tweaks Coming to OS X Dock & Finder

Apple Patents Show Tweaks Coming to OS X Dock & Finder

On July 19, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published two patent applications from Apple that reveal coming tweaks to OS X and possibly iOS. The first patent covers changes coming to the OS X Finder while the other patent is a little more ambitious. We find Apple introducing us to "virtual boundaries" associated with an upgrade to the docking system that will accommodate multiple docks for apps, operating system components and more. It's also believed that the Finder tweaks found in today's patent may actually be associated with Apple's upcoming OS X Mountain Lion. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Patents Beef up iDevice Security against Malicious Code

Apple Patents Beef up iDevice Security against Malicious Code

Back in January Peter Oppenheimer stated that the iPad was continuing "its unprecedented adoption in business. And as more businesses adopt iPads, Apple needs to ensure corporate IT departments that their security meets higher standards. Last week four new security patents came to light and were captured in our report titled "Apple Advances Security System Technology for the Enterprise." Today, four additional security patents have been published by the US Patent and Trademark Office that cover systems and methods for tamper-resistant booting, fighting against malicious code aimed at portable devices and more. -- Patently Apple.

What Is Apple AirPlay?

What Is Apple AirPlay?

With Apple's AirPlay technology, you can wirelessly stream audio and video from the iTunes software or other enabled apps on your iOS device (such as an iPhone) or from a Mac or PC. The streams go to AirPlay-compatible devices such as an Apple TV, certain audio-video receivers, and some speakers. And soon you'll be able to stream anything playing on a Mac. -- LAPTOP Magazine.

Facebook's facial recognition policies draws Senate's attention

Facebook's facial recognition policies draws Senate's attention

Social network giant defends use of facial recognition technology and addresses concerns about user privacy as lawmakers seek answers on Facebook's tag suggestions. -- Macworld.

Apple Yanks Privacy App From the App Store

Apple Yanks Privacy App From the App Store

Back in May of this year, Internet security firm Bitdefender launched 'Clueful,' an iOS App that helps identify potentially intrusive applications and show users what they do behind their back, and giving users an inside look at all the information app developers can gather about a user. Seems legit, right? Apple doesn't think so. Or at least they have an issue with something behind the App that sparked them to pull it from the App Store. After initially reviewing and approving the App that was released on May 22, Apple has had a change of heart and has just removed the App from the AppStore. It's unclear [why it was yanked], and Bitdefender told SecurityWeek that the company is under NDA as far as explanations for the removal. Interestingly, Bitdefender did share some data that they gathered based on Clueful's analysis of more than 65,000 iOS apps so far, including the fact that 41.4 percent of apps were shown to track a user's location unbeknownst to them. -- SecurityWeek.

July 19 Thursday's News

 

MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Update 1.0

MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Update 1.0

MacBook Air and MacBook Pro Update 1.0 fixes an issue that can lead to increased CPU power consumption, and it improves compatibility with some USB devices. This update is recommended for all Mac notebooks introduced since June 2012.

Microsoft has no plans to release Office for Mac 2013

Microsoft has no plans to release Office for Mac 2013

When Microsoft recently announced an Office for Mac 2011 update was in the works it also confirmed that OS X users would not be able to take advantage of the newer Office 2013 as the software suite is reserved for Windows 7 and Windows 8 machines only. -- AppleInsider.

Apple leverages 'unique identifier' to thwart in-app purchasing hack

Apple leverages 'unique identifier' to thwart in-app purchasing hack

Developers reported on Wednesday that Apple is now attaching a unique identifier to in-app purchases in an attempt to stop a recently-discovered workaround which allowed the download of paid content for free. -- AppleInsider.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: new iOS-style Accessibility

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: new iOS-style Accessibility

In OS X Mountain Lion, Apple is radically improving the layout of Universal Access features for users who are sight, hearing or motor impaired, and changing the name of its portfolio of features to match iOS: "Accessibility." -- AppleInsider.

Recyclers disagree on impact of glued-in Retina MacBook Pro batteries

Recyclers disagree on impact of glued-in Retina MacBook Pro batteries

Apple's solution to shaving thickness from the Retina MacBook Pro--gluing its lithium polymer battery cells directly to the aluminum unibody shell--continues to spark debate among proponents of sustainable electronics. Apple submitted the device to the Green Electronics Council for an EPEAT Gold rating last week, prompting critics to argue that the glued-in battery should disqualify it from any rating at all. But it turns out that some recyclers disagree, saying it isn't dramatically more difficult to safely remove the battery than in other modern devices. -- Ars Technica.

Help! These data share plans are too confusing

Help! These data share plans are too confusing

If you're confused about AT&T's and Verizon's new mobile data share plans, you're not alone. CNET's Marguerite Reardon explains the ins and outs of the plans in this FAQ. -- c|net.

19% Of iOS Apps Access Your Address Book Without Your Permission... Until iOS 6

19% Of iOS Apps Access Your Address Book Without Your Permission... Until iOS 6

Antivirus software specialist Bitdefender has found that nearly 19% of iOS apps access your address book without your knowledge -- or your consent -- when you're using them, and 41% track your location. What's most concerning is over 40% of them don't encrypt your data once it has been collected. That's all going to change when iOS 6 makes its debut later this year, however. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Changes AppleCare Knowledge Base

Apple Changes AppleCare Knowledge Base

Apple has changed what was known as the AppleCare Knowledge Base. Previously it had a page which listed all the new, changed and updated documents. As of this morning that page no longer exists. Instead you are directed to the Apple Support tab page. This may have to do with the move to Mountain Lion as I have been seeing massive numbers of pages being updated in the last week. So after Mountain Lion comes out next week the page may return.

How to use SSH host names for tabs in the OS X Terminal

How to use SSH host names for tabs in the OS X Termina

While the OS X Terminal is not a familiar operating environment for most Mac users, those who have had experience with Unix-based systems will find it to be an invaluable tool for managing their systems. One of the most common uses of the Terminal is to establish a remote log-in session on a system using the secure shell (SSH) command, and sometimes invoke multiple connections to the same system and different systems at the same time.

As a result of this, you might find you have many windows open at once to manage these connections in, though starting with Snow Leopard Apple added the ability to group Terminal sessions in tabs, which allows for better management of multiple Terminal windows and the various tasks you are performing. -- MacFixIt.

Will OS X Mountain Lion be one of the last desktop operating systems Apple ships?

Will OS X Mountain Lion be one of the last desktop operating systems Apple ships?

A brief bubble of Apple speculation broke out this morning when the company's online retail store went offline for a few hours. "Will Mountain Lion ship?" was the big question. It didn't happen. Let's think about Mountain Lion and the company's readiness to disrupt its own business models and consider this: "Will Mountain Lion be one of the last desktop operating systems Apple ships?" In a sense, I think it will. That's because I believe operating systems are heading inexorably into the cloud and here's why... -- Computerworld.

10 new features in iOS 6 you probably don't know about

10 new features in iOS 6 you probably don't know about

Apple first debuted its next-generation mobile platform, iOS 6, back in June. The company has been seeding registered developers with betas of iOS 6, which also allows for the developers to search around and find minor new features that could actually end up being major improvements for users. We've rounded up ten new features in iOS 6 that you probably haven't heard of yet, but could prove to be useful in the future. -- It's All Tech.

Will Apple murder the iPhone?

Will Apple murder the iPhone?

Apple's primary concern right now should be coming up with a new device or innovation to kill the iPhone.

That's the opinion of analyst Horace Dediu, who spoke along with Piper Jaffray's Gene Munster on a panel on the future of Apple, at the Fortune Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colo.

"We're in uncharted territory," Dediu told the room, referring to Apple's remarkable pattern of growth over the past decade or more. "(Apple) has been able to constantly create new categories and self-cannibalize."

Dediu was talking about the way the introduction of the iPhone has slowly made the iPod obsolete, and how many -- including Munster -- believe Apple could be in the process of eventually phasing out its Mac line in favor of the iPad and perhaps something else that's yet to come. -- c|net.

The ins and outs of iPad photo management

The ins and outs of iPad photo management

Confused about how to manage photos on an iPad? Chris Breen offers some tips for using the Photos app as well as suggests a more capable alternative. -- Macworld.

Photo files 101: All about megapixels, megabytes, and DPI

Photo files 101: All about megapixels, megabytes, and DPI

We delve into the differences between megapixels, megabytes, and dots per inch, and explore the relationship between what's on your monitor and what you print. -- Macworld.

High-Performance Monolithic Graphene Transistors Created

High-Performance Monolithic Graphene Transistors Created

Hardly a day goes by without a top-level research group announcing some kind of graphene-related breakthrough, but this one's a biggy: Researchers at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany have created high-performance monolithic graphene transistors using a simple lithographic etching process.

This could be the missing step that finally paves the way to post-silicon electronics. In theory, according to early demos from the likes of IBM and UCLA, graphene transistors should be capable of switching at speeds between 100GHz and a few terahertz. The problem is, graphene doesn't have a bandgap -- it isn't a natural semiconductor, like silicon -- and so it is proving very hard to build transistors out of the stuff. Until now! The researchers say that current performance "corresponds well with textbook predictions for the cutoff frequency of a metal-semiconductor field-effect transistor," but they also point out that very simple changes could increase performance 'by a factor of ~30.' -- ExtremeTech.

July 18 Wednesday's News

 

Apple Wins Patents Relating to OpenCL & Unreleased Dock

Apple Wins Patents Relating to OpenCL & Unreleased Dock

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of twenty-five newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In our second granted patent report of the day we cover Apple's OpenCL patent and one that relates to a yet unreleased docking station that provides a moveable connector that is designed to better protect iDevices from damage. We conclude our report with a list of fourteen utility patents covering such things as a data synchronization protocol and a multisector parallel plate antenna for iDevices. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Wins another Major iPhone & iOS Interface Patent

Apple Wins another Major iPhone & iOS Interface Patent

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of twenty-five newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In today's first granted patent report we focus entirely on a single patent that represents another major iPhone and iOS interface victory for Apple. Some may be bored to hear about it, many will moan, groan and shout that the patent system is broken because of it. Yet to Apple's legal team, it's simply music to their ears. Apple reinvented the smartphone, and today they get another patent victory to celebrate that fact. Wherever you are Steve, Cheers! -- Patently Apple.

Apple Advances Security System Technology for the Enterprise

Apple Advances Security System Technology for the Enterprise

In the first of three security patents that our report covers titled "Securing Cryptographic Process Keys using Internal Structure," we begin with Apple's patent background which states that in the field of data security, there is a need for fast and secure encryption. This is why the AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) cipher has been designed and standardized. Cryptographic algorithms are widely used for encryption and decryption of messages, authentication, digital signatures and identification. AES is a well-known symmetric block cipher. Block ciphers operate on blocks of plaintext and ciphertext, usually of 64 or 128 bits length but sometimes longer. Stream ciphers are the other main type of cipher and operate on streams of plain text and cipher text 1 bit or byte (sometimes one word) at a time. With a block cipher, a particular plain text block will always be encrypted to the same cipher text block using the same key. However, to the contrary with a stream cipher, the same plain text bit or byte will be encrypted to a different bit or byte each time it is encrypted. Hence in the ECB (electronic code book) mode for block ciphers, each plain text block is encrypted independently. In other modes, encryption is a function of the previous blocks. -- Patently Apple.

Hands-on: Launch Center Pro is (almost) the Quicksilver of iOS

Hands-on: Launch Center Pro is (almost) the Quicksilver of iOS

There's no shortage of speed dial apps for the iPhone. Web apps like iSpeedDial and native apps like Contact allow phone calls and text messages to be sent quickly and easily. But Launch Center Pro ($2.99) is essentially speed dial for your iOS apps. While it functions just as well for calling and texting people, its differentiating feature is integration with almost all of your iOS apps and their features, allowing you to access them without digging down into the app itself. -- Ars Technica.

Doctors Rate Four-Year-Old iPhone 3G As A Better Ophthalmology Tool Than A PC

Doctors Rate Four-Year-Old iPhone 3G As A Better Ophthalmology Tool Than A PC

The uses for Apple's iPhone and iPad in healthcare seem to be growing by leaps and bounds. The latest field of medicine to take note of the power that iOS devices offer doctors and healthcare providers is ophthalmology. A new study shows that the iPhone may make a better tool when reviewing certain types of ophthalmology images that a standard desktop PC workstation. What's truly amazing is that the iPhone used in the study was a four-year-old iPhone 3G. -- Cult of Mac.

How to integrate Facebook Chat into Messages app on OS X Mountain Lion

How to integrate Facebook Chat into Messages app on OS X Mountain Lion

OS X Mountain Lion is set to be released later this month. One of the several new features of Apple's next desktop operating system is the Messages app, which replaces the old iChat app. Messages allows users to send iMessages to other Macs and iOS devices, as well as integrate other chat accounts to use (examples include Google Talk and Yahoo!). While not directly included, it's also possible to add Facebook Chat into Messages, and you can follow these steps to do so. -- It's All Tech.

6 Simple Ways To Protect Your Mac From Malware (all are free except one)

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There's just not much money to be made selling expensive Mac anti-virus apps because they're so few in number. The most danger to the Mac comes in the form of Trojan Horse malware, which relies on unsuspecting users to download and install malware (or, visit a web site which can infect a Mac). If it makes you feel better to spend money to secure your Mac, most of the publishers have commercial versions, too. -- Mac 360.

Bob 'Dr. Mac' LeVitus Looks Toward Mountain Lion

Bob 'Dr. Mac' LeVitus Looks Toward Mountain Lion

As we move closer to the release of Mountain Lion, Bob "Dr. Mac" LeVitus provides his thoughts on the known features and changes, and the apparent closing of the gap between the Mac OS and iOS. Name changes, functional changes, what is good and what doesn't quite work in this scenario are all part of Bob's analysis. Then, as he always does, Bob shows us a few new products that he has his eye on. -- MacVoicesTV.

Microsoft to Apple: You Will Lose In The Enterprise

Microsoft to Apple: You Will Lose In The Enterprise

Apple's Enterprise torch just dimmed a bit and Microsoft is to blame. That's not good news for Apple shareholders. Apple had the chance to define the future workplace, but have been largely silent on the issue. -- Forbes.

Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free

Top Universities Test the Online Appeal of Free

Online courses have been around for years, but now big-name colleges and competing software platforms have entered the field, which is evolving with astonishing speed. -- New York Times.

Universities Reshaping Education on the Web

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Major universities are joining Stanford, Princeton and others to expand Coursera, a venture that offers free massive open online courses, or MOCCs. -- New York Times.

That's No Phone. That's My Tracker

That's No Phone. That's My Tracker

The device in your purse or jeans that you think is a cellphone -- guess again. It is a tracking device that happens to make calls. Let's stop calling them phones. They are trackers. -- New York Times.

Seeking a Laptop? What You Need to Know

Seeking a Laptop? What You Need to Know

If you're looking to buy a laptop, there's no shortage of sites to help you choose one. Just type "laptop b" into Google, and the search engine will auto-complete with "laptop buying guide." (Apparently "laptop bacon" is not as popular as I thought). -- New York Times.

July 17 Tuesday's News

 

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Game Center and Chess 3.0

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Game Center and Chess 3.0

Apple is expanding Game Center from an iOS play into the Mac arena with OS X Mountain Lion, enabling developers to add friend requests, recommendations and challenges as well as unlockable achievements and top score listings. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases iOS 6 beta 3 with new settings for Maps

Apple releases iOS 6 beta 3 with new settings for Maps

Apple on Monday supplied developers with the third beta of iOS 6, arriving three weeks after the previous beta build, adding new features like expanded settings for the Maps application. -- AppleInsider.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: AirPlay Mirroring

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: AirPlay Mirroring

AirPlay, Apple's wireless audio and video distribution system, gets an update in OS X Mountain Lion, offering modern Macs with compatible hardware the ability to wirelessly mirror the screen to an Apple TV-attached HDTV display. -- AppleInsider.

Apple: leaving green product registry EPEAT was a "mistake"

Apple: leaving green product registry EPEAT was a 'mistake'

Only one week after Apple pulled 39 of its products off the eco-friendly product registry EPEAT, the company has decided to hop back on board. In an open letter posted to Apple's website, Apple's Senior VP of Product Engineering Bob Mansfield explained Apple's stance on the environmental friendliness of its products and acknowledged the EPEAT pull-out as a "mistake." -- Ars Technica.

Microsoft Office 2013: Everything you need to know

Microsoft Office 2013: Everything you need to know

Today, Microsoft unveiled its plans for Microsoft Office 2013. CNET's already had a chance to do an in-depth hands-on with the new Office. Have more questions? Check out our answers below. -- c|net.

Next iPhone 'will have thinner screen': WSJ

Next iPhone 'will have thinner screen': WSJ

According to a Wall Street Journal report, the next version of the iPhone could feature a thinner and lighter screen that incorporates in-cell technology.

Nano-SIM Cards Stockpiled In Advance of iPhone 5 Launch

Nano-SIM Cards Stockpiled In Advance of iPhone 5 Launch

Even though Apple hasn't confirmed the iPhone 5, nor whether it will use the mini SIM card it won the design proposal for, many European mobile carriers are placing orders for the tiny little smartphone cards in anticipation of the iPhone 5 launch, which is rumored to drop in September or October of this year. -- Cult of Mac.

Logic: About I/O buffer size and monitoring latency

Logic: About I/O buffer size and monitoring latency

Learn about latency on a digital audio system and determining the optimal buffer size setting for your computer. When you monitor audio in Logic and other audio software, it is necessary for the computer to buffer some of the incoming and outgoing data to protect against dropouts, clicks, or pops. The size needed for the buffer varies depending on factors including the speed of the processor, type of audio driver, sample rate, and more. In general, the more powerful the computer, the smaller the buffer can be without undesirable audio artifacts. The I/O buffer size affects the amount of "input monitoring latency" for the computer. Input monitoring latency is the slight delay you hear when you feed audio into your interface or when you playback software instruments. The smaller the I/O buffer size, the less delay you will hear. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

iCloud users to get @icloud.com e-mail addresses

iCloud users to get @icloud.com e-mail addresses

Apple's online services have undergone several transitions since their debut in 2000, from the original iTools, to the .mac service, and finally to the most recent me.com domain for MobileMe. Apple's latest transition to iCloud brings with it the use of the new iCloud.com domain; however, so far people have had to sign in with their old me.com accounts. Today Apple revealed it is starting to transition and allow users to use the icloud.com domain for their accounts. -- MacFixIt.

Apple Thunderbolt display and MacBook Air plagued by noise

Apple Thunderbolt display and MacBook Air plagued by noise

Some users of Apple's Thunderbolt display and the new 2012 MacBook Air line have discovered that after a few hours use, the display's speakers distort, crackle, and emit a static noise. There are no permanent solutions, and temporary fixes include disconnecting the Thunderbolt cable and replugging, or changing output methods away from and back to the display's speakers. Apple has no official response on the issue as of yet. -- MacNN.

How Can You Improve The Mac's Finder? Stop Using It And Try Something More Powerful

How Can You Improve The Mac's Finder? Stop Using It And Try Something More Powerful

The Mac's Finder is where we go to find files and folders, apps and tools. Unless you're using a specific app, the Finder is what we use to view stored documents, music, photos, and movie clips.

The Finder usually evokes one of a few emotional responses. Most Mac users are ambivalent towards the Finder. It is what it is. Get over the shortcomings and complication, and just use it.

Or, some Mac users may decide to avoid the Finder altogether (after all, there's no Finder equivalent in Mail, or iTunes, or iPhoto, or iMovie or iPhone or iPad).

Still other Mac users, long for a more powerful Finder, one that does multiple window panes or displays tabs in the interface. If you long for a more powerful Finder, there's only one solution. Ditch the Finder and use Path Finder instead. -- McSolo.

Quicksliver: Mac OS X at your fingertips

Quicksliver: Mac OS X at your fingertips

Quicksilver is a fast and free Mac OS X productivity application that gives you the power to control your Mac quickly and elegantly. Quicksilver learns your habits, making your everyday chores simple and efficient. Quicksilver is a launcher utility app for Mac OS X which gives you the ability to perform common, every-day tasks rapidly and without thought.

Controlling Apple TV with a third-party remote control

Controlling Apple TV with a third-party remote control

Apple TV can learn how to be controlled by third-party infrared remotes. This feature allows you to use a remote that came with your TV, cable box, or DVD player to also control Apple TV.

Note: This feature is different from what is offered by programmable remotes. The Learn remote feature of Apple TV allows Apple TV itself to learn how to be controlled by various remotes, as opposed to a programmable remote that has to learn how to control various devices. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Microsoft offers some details on future of Office for Mac and iOS

Microsoft offers some details on future of Office for Mac and iOS

A Microsoft spokesperson has provided Macworld with some details on what Mac and iOS users can expect from the company's newly announced Microsoft Office 2013 and Office 365. -- Macworld.

With Apple's Siri, a Romance Gone Sour

With Apple's Siri, a Romance Gone Sour

At first, many were enchanted by Apple's digital assistant, but more iPhone users have since reverted to the its voice dictation service, which is more reliable. -- New York Times.

Physical assault by McDonald's for wearing Digital Eye Glass

Physical assault by McDonald's for wearing Digital Eye Glass

Steve Mann, a long-time researcher of computer vision systems, (i.e. Augmented reality, Digital Eyeglass) had an incident at a McDonald's in Paris, France. He was assaulted by three men during his visit to get food with his family. They had a problem with his digital eye glasses and tried to take them off his head.

Your Laptop Can Now Analyze Big Data

Your Laptop Can Now Analyze Big Data

New software makes it possible to do in minutes on a small computer what used to be done by large clusters of computers. Computer scientists from Carnegie Mellon University have devised a framework for running large-scale computations for tasks such as social network or Web search analysis efficiently on a single personal computer. -- MIT Technology Review.

Are You Getting the Bandwidth You're Paying For?

Are You Getting the Bandwidth You're Paying For?

After being disappointed with the performance of his Internet connection, Adam Engst spent several weeks getting a new cable, upgrading to a higher service level, and swapping cable modems before Time Warner was able to provide the bandwidth he had been promised. It's worth checking your Internet connection and making sure you're getting what you're paying for -- read on for Adam's advice on the best way to proceed. -- TidBITS.

Hunting the Elusive MPAA Rating Field in iTunes

Hunting the Elusive MPAA Rating Field in iTunes

After implementing iOS Restrictions settings to display only age-appropriate movies and TV shows on the iPad his five-year-old son uses, Agen Schmitz discovered the movies he had encoded himself were not filtered out because they didn't include MPAA or TV Parental Guidelines ratings metadata. And there's no way to add those ratings to a video file via iTunes. Here's how he used the iDentify shareware app to protect his son from the evils of Louis C.K. -- TidBITS.

July 13 Friday's News

 

iPhoto 9.3.1

iPhoto 9.3.1

iPhoto 9.3.1 addresses a problem during the migration of albums from MobileMe Gallery that may cause photos to be moved from their original events into a new event called "From MobileMe" and fixes an issue that in rare cases could cause iPhoto to hang when upgrading libraries.

Included in Version 9.3

  • iPhoto can now open libraries from Aperture 3.3 or later 
  • AVCHD video is now supported
  • The Description field now automatically expands as needed when entering text
  • You can now flag a photo in Magnify (1-up) view by clicking a Flag icon displayed in the upper left corner of the photo
  • Keywords and titles are now preserved when exporting files with embedded GPS location data
  • A new Export option allows you to automatically organize exported photos into subfolders by event

FireCore Brings Trakt.tv Integration To aTV Flash (Black) For Apple TV

FireCore Brings Trakt.tv Integration To aTV Flash (Black) For Apple TV

One of the reasons most of us jailbreak our Apple TV is to install aTV Flash (black), a terrific piece of software from FireCore that adds a ton of incredible features to your set-top box. In its latest update, aTV Flash delivers a number of features, including trakt.tv integration for those who never know what to watch. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Invents New iDevice Power Clip & Docking Station System

Apple Invents New iDevice Power Clip & Docking Station System

Over the years, Apple has dreamt up a revolutionary styled docking station, some smart docks, docks based on straight forward inductive charging methods and some with loopy inductive charging methods and yet we still have Apple's plain old boring dock. But it seems that Apple isn't done just yet with designing new docks and today we see that their design team went over the edge with a dozen or more docking systems. And this time around, most of them involve mating a power-clip to a docking station that could also end up being your MacBook or iMac. One of these designs may end up making it to market one of these days or they'll all simply end up in Jony Ive's toy box to rust with all of the other rejected ideas. C'mon Jony – pick a new docking system and get on with it already. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invention Allows Smart Card to be used in iDevices

Apple Invention Allows Smart Card to be used in iDevices

On July 12, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals their intent to build an ejectable tray into future iDevices, including the iPod touch, which will accommodate specialty modules such as a smart card. Apple has updated this patent which was actually granted to them in March of this year. The activity involving this patent is a great sign that Apple may be putting the final touches on this feature before bringing it to market. The European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) recently approved Apple's Nano SIM which opens the door for Apple's future iWallet application to come to market. Apple's current patent goes beyond just smart cards and will allow future iDevices to store data on flash cards and beyond. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Files New iPhone Case Patent with Noise Windscreen

Apple Files New iPhone Case Patent with Noise Windscreen

On July 12, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a new iPhone case accessory that will come with a built-in noise windscreen. This may sound like a minor feature but it will be greatly appreciated by consumers of older iPhones. On a personal note, my wife phones me after work at a downtown location every day on her 3G iPhone. Almost every day I tell her that I hear the people talking around her louder than her own voice. It's one of the reasons that I've held back on buying an iPhone for myself. Yes, it's that annoying. So while this patent may be for an iPhone accessory case today, it may also indicate that this will become a standard iPhone feature in the future. One could only hope. -- Patently Apple.

AirPort: Troubleshooting Back to My Mac issues related to an AirPort base station or Time Capsule

AirPort: Troubleshooting Back to My Mac issues related to an AirPort base station or Time Capsule

If you encounter issues using Back to My Mac with an AirPort base station or Time Capsule, use the troubleshooting steps in this article before contacting iCloud Support. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

About the rescue email address

About the rescue email address

If you can't recall your Apple ID security questions and answers, the optional rescue email provides a way to reset them. Additionally, all future security-related emails for your Apple ID will be sent to the rescue email address. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mac OS X: Do not remove or modify the SyncServices folder

Mac OS X: Do not remove or modify the SyncServices folder

As if it were a swarm of bees, you should stay away from the SyncServices folder. Removing or modifying anything in the SyncServices folder--or in any subfolders within it--may cause unexpected issues. (This folder is located in your Application Support folder, in your Library folder, in your Home folder). -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Terminal fun: Deleting repetitive files in OS X

Terminal fun: Deleting repetitive files in OS X

To manage various settings, both OS X and Windows will often place small files within folders that help the system manage their contents. A common file of this type in OS X is the .DS_Store file, and a common type in Windows is the Thumbs.db file. While these files are usually hidden, in some cases (especially those where multiple operating systems share the same storage spaces), you may see these files show up and contribute to window clutter.

If you want to remove them and tidy up your filesystem, there are several utilities that can do this for you, but another option is to use the OS X Terminal's Find command, which with a simple setup can be used scour the entire system for a specific file name pattern, and then optionally delete the file. -- MacFixIt.

FileMaker, Inc. released FileMaker Pro 12.0v2 and FileMaker Pro Advanced 12.0v2

FileMaker, Inc. released FileMaker Pro 12.0v2 and FileMaker Pro Advanced 12.0v2

FileMaker, Inc. released FileMaker Pro 12.0v2 and FileMaker Pro Advanced 12.0v2 to update its popular database software. These maintenance releases include tweaks and bug fixes for layout design and rendering, value lists, printing, scripting, portals, accessibility, and more. See the release notes for details. FileMaker Pro is priced starting at $299 for Mac OS X 10.6 and 10.7 or Windows XP and up.

Fetch 5.7.2

Fetch 5.7.2

Fetch 5.7.2 is an FTP, SFTP, and FTPS client that includes Bonjour support, AppleScript support, auto-resume, droplets, Quick Look previews, and other features. This release adds compatibility with Mountain Lion's Gatekeeper, improved compatibility with Windows NT servers, a change so that the Edit command doesn't open editor windows in front when Fetch is in the background, a fix for a problem using Preview as an editor on Mountain Lion, and other changes. Fetch 5 is $29 for Mac OS X 10.5 through 10.8.

MacPractice Clipboard MD

MacPractice Clipboard MD

MacPractice Clipboard MD (Free; iPad) provides electronic check-in forms for medical offices using MacPractice MD, with patient registration and photo, health and social history, HIPAA release with electronic signature, and more.

Rash of data thefts emphasize need for strong user passwords

Rash of data thefts emphasize need for strong user passwords

Several significant data breaches have occurred over the last several days, and some criminal activity using previously stolen data has also occurred very recently -- a reminder to users security on e-commerce sites is not solely in the hands of the merchant. Yahoo Voices experienced a break-in with more than 400,000 email and plain-text password combinations were leaked onto the internet.

Microsoft maintains a page on best password practices, and given analysis of the Yahoo exposed passwords, few people seem to be following it. According to the password practices site, passwords with eight or more characters, with mixed punctuation, symbols, capitalization, and numbers are best. A password shouldn't be used for more than one service. Passwords with dictionary words, or with personal identifying information such as birth dates, social security number fragments, or other similar data should be avoided. Android, iOS, OS X and Windows all have password management tools that allow for truly random password selection and management. -- Electronista.

When Art, Apple and the Secret Service Collide: 'People Staring at Computers'

When Art, Apple and the Secret Service Collide: 'People Staring at Computers'

Maybe an email, or a phone call from Apple. Instead, my first indication that something was "wrong" was a real-life visit from the organization best known for protecting the President of the United States of America. -- Wired.

Backing Up an iPhone to Drive or Cloud

Backing Up an iPhone to Drive or Cloud

What gets backed up on the iPhone when it says it's "backing up" in iTunes? Is backing up to iCloud better? -- New York Times.

LCD makers to pay $571 million to settle price-fixing case

LCD makers to pay $571 million to settle price-fixing case

U.S. states have reached settlement agreements with LCD makers LG Display, AU Optronics and Toshiba, who will pay close to $571 million end the price-fixing case against them. -- Macworld.

MIT Develops Holographic, Glasses-Free 3D TV

MIT Develops Holographic, Glasses-Free 3D TV

Engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) are busy working on a type of 3D display capable of presenting a 3D image without eye gear.

What you've been presented with at your local cinema (with 3D glasses) or on your Nintendo 3DS console (with your naked eye) pales in comparison to what these guys and gals are trying to develop: a truly immersive 3D experience, not unlike a hologram, that changes perspective as you move around.

The project is called High Rank 3D (HR3D). To begin with, HR3D involved a sandwich of two LCD displays, and advanced algorithms for generating top and bottom images that change with varying perspectives. With literally hundreds of perspectives needed to accommodate a moving viewer, maintaining a realistic 3D illusion would require a display with a 1,000Hz refresh rate. To get around this issue, the MIT team introduced a third LCD screen to the mix. This third layer brings the refresh rate requirement down to a much more manageable 360Hz — almost within range of commercially produced LCD panels. -- MIT News.

July 12 Thursday's News

 

Apple corporate recruiting video

Apple corporate recruiting video

The video takes you through Apple's engineering labs, let's you see how the Apple website team examines web pages, discusses the backstory on Apple's work on new battery chemistry, tells the true, and interesting, backstory on the creation of the iPad 2′s Smart Cover, and more.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Safari 6 adds iPad-style iCloud-shared tabs

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Safari 6 adds iPad-style iCloud-shared tabs

Safari turns 6 in this summer's release of OS X Mountain Lion, offering a new view of open tabs similar to iPad and a new iCloud tab-sharing feature, along with an offline Reading List, new website passwords browser, new privacy settings, and a feature that allows websites to send alerts to the new Notification Center. -- AppleInsider.

New Java malware attacks Apple's OS X along with Windows, Linux

New Java malware attacks Apple's OS X along with Windows, Linux

A new form of browser-based cross-platform malware can give hackers remote access to computers running Apple's OS X, Microsoft's Windows, and even Linux. [It is a PowerPC binary, which means users running a modern, Intel-based Mac must also have Rosetta installed which means that Lion (10.7) and Mountain Lion (10.8) users are safe. Snow Leopard (10.6) users are not safe.] -- AppleInsider.

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Notification Center gets more social, configurable

Inside OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion GM: Notification Center gets more social, configurable

The new Notification Center service of OS X Mountain Lion, a feature borrowed from iOS, goes beyond its mobile sibling to offer a direct way to send tweets from the desktop. It does not however have iOS 5's live ticker updates for widgets such as Weather and Stocks, something OS X presents in Dashboard instead. -- AppleInsider.

Mountain Lion sends some 64-bit Macs gently into that good night

Mountain Lion sends some 64-bit Macs gently into that good night

Apple has now confirmed via its Mountain Lion upgrade page that previously published limitations on some 64-bit Macs will extend to the final release. This means that several otherwise 64-bit capable MacBook Pros, iMacs, and Mac Pros will indeed be restricted from upgrading to OS X 10.8 when it goes public later this month. And according to information found in the recently released golden master (GM), the limitation appears to be related to graphics, as we originally suspected. -- Ars Technica.

MacBook win, ultrabook fail

MacBook win, ultrabook fail

Apple continues to fend off the ultrabook challenge, with shipments of the thin and light Windows laptops way below what Intel had hoped for, an analyst tells c|net.

Parallels 7 Gets Support For New MacBook Pro's Retina Display In New Update

Parallels 7 Gets Support For New MacBook Pro's Retina Display In New Update

Parallels 7, arguably the best desktop virtualization tool for Mac, has been updated to take advantage of the new MacBook Pro's high-resolution Retina display. Its cousin, Parallels Mobile for iOS, has also received the same treatment, and now supports the Retina display in the new iPad.

Parallels Desktop for Mac 7.0.15104 updates the virtualization software with the following fixes and improvements:

  • Run Windows 8, Ubuntu, and Fedora on the latest models of Mac computers (MacBook Air (mid 2012), MacBook Pro (mid 2012) , MacBook Pro with Retina display).
  • Run Fedora 17 in virtual machines.
  • Install Parallels Desktop on Mac computers running OS X Mountain Lion.
  • Use IMG disc images for the virtual machine CD/DVD-ROM drive.
  • Use USB 3.0 devices in virtual machines.
  • Improved Parallels Mobile connectivity with Mac.
  • Improved Linux distributions detection during Express installation.
  • Enhanced Retina display support.

New Guide To Mountain Lion Server Confirms Apple Is Cutting Enterprise Tools And Features

New Guide To Mountain Lion Server Confirms Apple Is Cutting Enterprise Tools And Features

Mountain Lion Server is the final chapter in Apple's march from the enterprise data center – a march that started five years ago when Apple introduced a simplified management interface for small business as part of Leopard Server. The first sure sign that Apple had decided to tailor its server platform only for smaller organizations came with the cancellation of the Xserve.

To experienced OS X Server administrators, Lion Server looked like a patched together product that still had much of its former enterprise capabilities but with advanced administration tools that had been gutted like a fish. All of which pointed to Apple moving forward with its narrower focus and a simplified management app call simply Server. -- Cult of Mac.

Benchmark your SSD or hard disk speed

Benchmark your SSD or hard disk speed

You can benchmark the speed of your SSD or hard disk using a few simple Terminal commands. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Using Export... instead of Save As....

Using Export... instead of Save As....

Using Export... instead of Save As.... is not a problem. The real problem is that if I open a photo in Preview, rotate it to see it right and then quit Preview, the file will be saved automatically. The file size increases and the last-mod-date changes. I would like to be asked wether I want to change my valuable file or not. Now I have to remember to undo all changes before quitting. That's why I hate Lion. -- MacInTouch.

How to maximize battery-life when you travel

How to maximize battery-life when you travel

Admit it: Your carry-on bag is stuffed full of digital gear you can't bear to leave at home. Not only will your iPhone, iPad, or MacBook keep you entertained while en route, they'll make great navigation, research, and photo tools once you've reached your destination. But keeping these devices charged up when you're constantly on-the-go or stuck in the air can be a challenge. But there are a few things you can do to extend battery life and save power. -- Macworld.

Sanctions at the Genius Bar

Sanctions at the Genius Bar

Imagine if your ethnicity determined which products you were able to buy. Or if sales clerks required you to divulge your ancestry before swiping your credit card. Some of us don't have to imagine. -- New York Times.

Flying Would Improve if Apple Ran the Air Travel Industry

Flying Would Improve if Apple Ran the Air Travel Industry

While covering the consumer electronics industry in my day job for the past five and a half years, I've noticed just how ridiculously fast innovation has taken place, whether in TVs, phones, headphones or computers. The iPhone recently marked its fifth anniversary, and if you look at the current iPhone 4S compared with the original, the difference is astounding. The first iPhone--even though it was a breakthrough product at the time--had no apps, was much slower, and worked on a wireless network two generations behind those of today. -- The Philly Post.

Ten ways you know your tech journalists should be switched from covering Apple Inc. to say, Microsoft or RIM

Ten ways you know your tech journalists should be switched from covering Apple Inc. to say, Microsoft or RIM

Dear Editor. After many years of observing your publication in operation and as it attempts to make the transition to a digital news flow, may I offer the following reasons why some of your syndicated, featured, or freelance writers, be they journalists or bloggers or members of the kommentariat at large, may cause you to shift their fields of interest. Or: Ten ways you know your tech journalists should be switched from covering Apple Inc. to say, Microsoft or RIM. -- Les Posen's Presentation Magic.

Get your Mac ready for Mountain Lion

Get your Mac ready for Mountain Lion

Mountain Lion (OS X 10.8) is almost here, and while it's as easy to install as Lion was, there are still a few things you can do right now to ensure that your Mac is ready. -- Macworld.

July 11 Wednesday's News

 

Apple Wins a Major Patent for iTravel & More

Apple Wins a Major Patent for iTravel & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 23 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In our first granted patent report of the day we mainly focus on a major patent relating to iTravel, Apple's transportation check-in system. The timing couldn't be better for this patent as Apple recently announced that a new feature called "Passbook" was coming to iOS 6 this fall. Scott Forstall, Apple's Senior Vice President of iPhone Software, stated that Passbook would include travel services such as a boarding pass and express check-in which today's iTravel patent covers. The Near Field Communications (NFC) aspect of the patent will also be important for Apple's future iWallet application. To round off our report, we cover two of Apple's latest industrial designs wins and list an additional ten utility patents for the super geeks and legal professionals amongst us to review. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Wins their Sixth Solar Power Related Patent & More

Apple Wins their Sixth Solar Power Related Patent & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 23 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In our third and final granted patent report of the day we focus in on Apple's sixth granted patent for solar power related technology. Our report also covers a secondary granted patent for an anti-theft system for iDevices based on using an accelerometer. Whether this one even passes the laugh test is up to you to determine. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Wins a Major Integrated Multi-Touch Screen Patent & More

Apple Wins a Major Integrated Multi-Touch Screen Patent & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 23 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In our second granted patent report of the day we once again focus on a single major patent relating to Apple's all important Multi-Touch technology that allows iDevices to be thinner, brighter and require less power. We close out our report with a look at industrial design wins out of China and a list of seven additional utility patents covering such things as the assembly of an iPod and managing "to do" items or "notes" on iOS devices. -- .

San Francisco turns its back on Apple after green registry pull-out

San Francisco turns its back on Apple after green registry pull-out

The City of San Francisco will no longer be buying Macs following Apple's withdrawal of its products from the eco-friendly EPEAT registry. Officials from San Francisco's Department of Environment confirmed the move to the CIO Journal on Tuesday, saying that purchases of Apple's MacBooks, iMacs, Mac Pros, and other products would no longer be allowed among the city's 50 agencies because they "no longer qualify" for city funds. -- Ars Technica.

The poetry of Steve Ballmer

The poetry of Steve Ballmer

Steve Ballmer July 9th, 2012 on competing with Apple:

We are trying to make absolutely clear:
We are not going to leave any space uncovered to Apple
We are not.
No space uncovered that is Apple's
We have our advantages in productivity
We have our advantages in terms of enterprise management, manageability
We have our advantages in terms of when you plug into server infrastructure in the enterprise.
But we are not going to let any piece of this [go uncontested to Apple]
Not the consumer cloud
Not hardware software innovation
We are not leaving any of that to Apple by itself
Not going to happen
Not on our watch.
-- Asymco.

Apple explains why it yanked devices from enviro registry

Apple explains why it yanked devices from enviro registry

As concern swells around Apple opting out of the EPEAT registry, the tech giant says, "Apple products are superior in other important environmental areas not measured by EPEAT." -- c|net.

Please, Please Someone Turn This Email Concept Into A Real Mac App

Please, Please Someone Turn This Email Concept Into A Real Mac App

"When the first email was sent in the 1970s, there was no big difference to email we know today. And that's the problem." So begins this screed / manifesto written and posted by Tobias Van Schneider. Email, he says, has lived beyond its original purpose, and is being used by all of us in new and interesting ways. Web and social media technology continues to push beyond the original Berners-Lee concept of a world wide web of hyperlinked information, so why not do the same for email? -- Cult of Mac.

Built-in font-sampling method

Built-in font-sampling method

Mac OS X now has a very basic, built-in font sampler, at least as of 10.7.3. If you don't care about having customized sample text, Font Book can do it without any add-ons.

Select the desired fonts in Font Book, choose Print from the File menu, and choose "Font Book" in the pull-down menu for printing options near the bottom of the dialog (the one that also says Layout, Paper Handling, etc.). If you don't see this menu, click on Show Details to display it.

You'll have the ability to choose from among three reports: Catalog (upper case, lower case and numbers, optionally grouped by font family and in a size of your choosing), Repertoire (a chart of every character that each font can print, also in a size of your choosing), and Waterfall (font details and the same basic sample in increasing font sizes of your choosing; seemingly one font style per page). -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to prepare a used Mac for use

How to prepare a used Mac for use

When you purchase a new Mac, the system is set up to introduce you to OS X and accept new account information to start you off; however, if you purchase a used Mac then this may not be the case.

While owners selling a used Mac ought to format the system and include any restoration discs that came with it, sometimes this is not the case; they simply handed it over, with all their applications and settings still intact. Perhaps to make things easier they might create a new account for you, or change their passwords to their old account and given that to you. Either way, the system is someone else's setup, which can include applications and configurations you may not want.

The best option for any used system is to format it and start fresh, even if the previous owner claims this was done. While it may be enticing to keep application installations and other items on the system, running someone else's system setup can sometimes lead to problems down the road. Therefore, if possible, follow these instructions to format and set up OS X again. -- MacFixIt.

Microsoft issues security fix for Office 2011 for Mac

Microsoft issues security fix for Office 2011 for Mac

As part of a larger release of bug and security fixes for Windows issued on Tuesday, Microsoft also updated its flagship Mac product, Microsoft Office 2011. A security vulnerability that stems from the way that folder permissions are set "in certain Microsoft Office for Mac 14.2 installations" that could allow attackers privileged access has been resolved. Users are advised to update to version 14.2.3, which also features some general enhancements.

Let's Try to Think This iPad Mini Thing All the Way Through

Let's Try to Think This iPad Mini Thing All the Way Through

I've seen a fair bit of speculation that, if Apple produces a 7-inch iOS device, then maybe it would be a bigger iPod Touch, not a smaller iPad. One aspect of this line of thinking is that rather than making on-screen tap targets smaller (and, the worry goes, perhaps too small), a bigger iPod Touch would make tap targets bigger. -- Daring Fireball.

Before Mac OS X, There Was OS 1 Through 9: A History of Apple's Operating System

Before Mac OS X, There Was OS 1 Through 9: A History of Apple's Operating System

Apple has been building operating systems since 1984, when it launched the original Mac System 1.0 for its MacIntosh personal computer. Nearly 30 years of innovation has culminated in the Mac OS X Mountain Lion, which will launch this month, and iOS 6, which is coming this fall. -- Business Insider.

Fine-tune volume and brightness in OS X

Fine-tune volume and brightness in OS X

Normally, when you use the volume and brightness keys on your keyboard to adjust those output levels, your adjustments are made in whole steps on a scale of 1 to 10. But there's a keyboard shortcut that lets you adjust them more finely--and that keyboard shortcut has returned in OS X 10.7.4. -- Macworld.

Hackers Steal Keyless BMW In Under 3 Minutes

Hackers Steal Keyless BMW In Under 3 Minutes

It's cool to have a keyless BMW, until you no longer have a keyless BMW. Hackers have figured out how to break into such cars with ease. BMW has acknowledged there is a problem, but is not doing enough to protect its customers (video). -- ZDNet.

When Machines Do Your Job

When Machines Do Your Job

Researcher Andrew McAfee says advances in computing and artificial intelligence could create a more unequal society. Are American workers losing their jobs to machines? That was the question posed by Race Against the Machine, an influential e-book published last October by MIT business school researchers Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee. The pair looked at troubling U.S. employment numbers--which have declined since the recession of 2008-2009 even as economic output has risen--and concluded that computer technology was partly to blame. -- MIT Technology Review.

July 10 Tuesday's News

 

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion Golden Master seeded to developers

OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion Golden Master seeded to developers

Apple on Monday seeded what is intended to be the final test version of its OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion to developers with no known issues, meaning that the next-generation operating system is all but complete and set for imminent launch. -- AppleInsider.

Why the iPhone matters: 8 questions for Horace Dediu

Why the iPhone matters: 8 questions for Horace Dediu

Horace Dediu writes data-driven analyses on a wide range of mobile industry topics. He is the founder and author of Asymco, a blog for "curated market intelligence," and previously worked for eight years at Nokia, as an industry analyst and business development manager.

His background also includes software development, IT management, and computer science research. He has an MBA from Harvard Business School and an M.S. in engineering from Tufts University. He lives in Helsinki, Finland, with his family and a view of the Baltic Sea.

We asked him eight questions about the five-year impact of Apple's iPhone, and he replied from his iPad. -- Network World.

Replace a 'dumb phone' with an iPhone now or wait until later?

Replace a 'dumb phone' with an iPhone now or wait until later?

It's that time in the iPhone life-cycle when Apple is expected to launch a new version of the popular smartphone in a couple of months, leaving many potential first-time iPhone fans wondering what they should do about getting a new phone. In this edition of Ask Maggie, I lay out the options for a reader considering buying a used or refurbished iPhone now to replace her basic "dumb phone." -- c|net.

A Huge number of Updates and AppleCare Articles Posted

A Huge number of Updates and AppleCare Articles Posted

Yesterday Apple posted over 100 updates and AppleCare articles to its support website. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mountain Lion-compatible apps cleared for Mac App Store

Mountain Lion-compatible apps cleared for Mac App Store

Following the release of the Mountain Lion's Golden Master version earlier today, Apple has officially opened the Mac App Store for optimized OS X 10.8 apps to be submitted for review with an email to developers (seen below). The company says they can also submit iOS apps that take advantage of the now-cross-platform Game Center, one of several iOS features that is now making its way to the Mac. OS X Mountain Lion is set to launch later this month. -- MacNN/a>.

How the iPad helps scientists do their jobs

It wasn't so long ago that Chris Grant would regularly take a whole laboratory's worth of equipment with him into the wilderness. These days, he just takes an iPad. Tablet changes the way they design experiments, record results, and read journals. -- Macworld.

MIT debuts 'Mosh', the new approach to mobile Internet protocols

MIT debuts 'Mosh', the new approach to mobile Internet protocols

At the annual Usenix tech conference last month in Boston, two MIT researchers formally unveiled a new protocol, and a remote log-in program using it, that was specifically designed for mobile clients and the intermittent, low-bandwidth connections that typify today's wireless networks. The program, dubbed Mosh for "mobile shell," is intended as an alternative to the venerable Secure Shell (SSH), long used to create a secure connection between a client and server computer, for remote log-in, command execution and other services. -- Network World.

The power of two: Use your iPad or iPhone as a mobile file server

The power of two: Use your iPad or iPhone as a mobile file server

Getting access to the filesystem on an iOS device is just an app download away. For all the talk about a "post-PC" world, most people use smartphones or tablets as an addition to their existing technological arsenal, rather than a replacement for a standard laptop or desktop. In fact, there are a number of ways to combine the capabilities of your PC and mobile device that can make your tablet or smartphone an even more powerful tool. Last week, we took a look at an app that would let you use your iPad as a second monitor; this week, we'll talk about ways to use your iPad and iPhone as mobile file servers. -- Ars Technica.

Life's Too Short for So Much E-Mail

Life's Too Short for So Much E-Mail

About 107 trillion e-mails were sent in 2010, and 3.1 billion e-mail accounts were active worldwide as of last year. And if you aren't ignoring most of them, you are frantically trying to empty your mailbox. Nick Bilton has a better idea: Stop using e-mail. -- New York Times.

Cloud Security: What You Need To Know To Lock It Down

Cloud Security: What You Need To Know To Lock It Down

IT security writer Steve Ragan writes: 'The word "cloud" is sometimes overused in IT--and lately, it's been tossed around more than a football during a tailgating party. Be that as it may, organizations still want to implement cloud-based initiatives. But securing assets once they're in the cloud is often easier said than done.' He then walks through some of the core concepts of cloud security, along with the companies operating in the space. -- Slashdot.

July 09 Monday's News

 

Apple reportedly playing waiting game with mobile-payment initiative

Apple reportedly playing waiting game with mobile-payment initiative

As a growing number of handset makers incorporate mobile payment systems in their smartphones a new report details why Apple has been seemingly reticent to enter the market and says that company executives have chosen the "go-slow" approach instead of rushing headlong into the sector. -- AppleInsider.

IT class warfare -- It's not just IBM

IT class warfare -- It's not just IBM

Back in April I wrote a six-part series of columns on troubles at IBM that was read by more than three million people. Months later I'm still getting ripples of response to those columns, which I followed with a couple updates. There is a very high level of pain in these responses that tells me I should do a better job of explaining the dynamics of the underlying issues not only for IBM but for IT in general in the USA. It comes down to class warfare. -- I, Cringely.

OS X: Printer and scanner software available for download

OS X: Printer and scanner software available for download

Apple delivers third-party software for scanners and printers via Software Update. Simply connect the printer or scanner to the Mac. If software is needed and available, OS X will automatically download and install it. This article is a comprehensive list of currently supported printer and scanner models and associated software provided by third-party vendors as of 5 July 2012. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple's Special Project for a Video Telephonic Headset Wins a Second Patent

Apple's Special Project for a Video Telephonic Headset Wins a Second Patent

Earlier this week, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a very special granted patent of Apple's relating to a Head Mounted Display system. The Los Angeles Time mistakenly reported that "Apple may be taking a page out of Google's book." No, no, no. Apple's patent predates the iPhone while Google's patent is shown to have been filed be in 2011. So if anything, it's Google taking a page out of Apple's book, again. Admittedly, Google's vision for video glasses does in fact appear to be far more aggressive than Apple's humble aspirations, but it may be more realistic. Apple's main focus is connecting the headset to an iDevice in order to watch movies. Its secondary focus is shown to be working with telephony and the internet. Yet considering that the patent was actually filed prior to the iPhone debuting, the idea was way ahead of its time. Apple's patent presents us with a grand overview of the optical options that they're considering for this device and hints that it'll be mainly aimed at consumer entertainment and gaming. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Wins Patents for Advanced MacBook Keyboard, Creating Music Playlists & iOS Application Windowing

Apple Wins Patents for Advanced MacBook Keyboard, Creating Music Playlists & iOS Application Windowing

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 22 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. this week. This particular report covers three interesting iOS patents covering the creation of music playlists and application windowing. Additionally, we cover one of the key advancements in MacBook Pro's keyboard and several industrial designs including the iPhone face cover and the "Hi-Drive" icon. And lastly we cover twelve utility patents that relate to such things as the assembly of the iPad's display and an editor for program files. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Files Patents & Trademarks Covering a Camera Filter, iPhone Headset, Surround Panner, Flyover & Turn-by-Turn Logo

Apple Files Patents & Trademarks Covering a Camera Filter, iPhone Headset, Surround Panner, Flyover & Turn-by-Turn Logo

On July 5, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a series of patent applications from Apple covering a wide range of technologies. In particular, our report briefly touches on inventions relating to a digital signal filter for iOS device cameras, an iPhone wireless headset and Apple's Logic Pro's Surround Panner. For security fans, there's a specific one covering in-place encryption. In addition to patents, it was revealed by the US Patent and Trademark Office that Apple has filed for two iOS 6 related trademarks covering their 3D photo-realistic navigation feature called "Flyover" and their new Maps + Compass Logo reflecting its upcoming "Turn by Turn" feature. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Wins Patents for Advanced MacBook Keyboard, Creating Music Playlists & iOS Application Windowing

Apple Wins Patents for Advanced MacBook Keyboard, Creating Music Playlists & iOS Application Windowing

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 22 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. this week. This particular report covers three interesting iOS patents covering the creation of music playlists and application windowing. Additionally, we cover one of the key advancements in MacBook Pro's keyboard and several industrial designs including the iPhone face cover and the "Hi-Drive" icon. And lastly we cover twelve utility patents that relate to such things as the assembly of the iPad's display and an editor for program files. -- Patently Apple.

AT&T Unveiling New Blocking Service for Stolen Phones Next Week

AT&T Unveiling New Blocking Service for Stolen Phones Next Week

Originally announced this past April, AT&T will unveil a database of stolen phones to prevent lost devices from connecting to the carrier's network. -- Mac Rumors.

How to detect and fix a machine infected with DNSChanger

How to detect and fix a machine infected with DNSChanger

On July 9, the FBI will close down a network of DNS servers that many people have been depending on for proper Internet access. These servers were originally a part of a scam where a crime ring of Estonian nationals developed and distributed a malware package called DNSChanger, but which the FBI seized and converted to a legitimate DNS service. -- MacFixIt.

Using the OS X Terminal instead of the Finder to copy files

Using the OS X Terminal instead of the Finder to copy files

While in OS X people often copy individual files or small groups of files between locations using the Finder, there are times when you might copy hundreds if not thousands of files at a time, especially for the purposes of backing up or migrating data from one drive to another. For the most part, the Finder's copying process is perfectly adequate for moving these files; unfortunately it does have some drawbacks that can hinder the copying process. -- MacFixIt.

Four Super Cool Things You Can Do With GarageBand for OS X

Four Super Cool Things You Can Do With GarageBand for OS X

GarageBand for OS X changed the way us mere mortals create great music on their Macs. Included with all new Macs or available in the Mac App store for $15, it gives musicians from the brand new to the seasoned veteran a way to record all kinds of music, connecting real instruments, MIDI devices, and microphones to your Mac for easy music sessions. It also does some other cool things, which we'll tell you about right now. -- Cult of Mac.

How to tame Mac OS X Lion annoyances: Frustrated by Lion's little quirks? Read on for all the tips and tricks you need

How to tame Mac OS X Lion annoyances: Frustrated by Lion's little quirks? Read on for all the tips and tricks you need

Some changes introduced in OS X Lion haven't been to everyone's tastes. Luckily, many of those changes can be tweaked, while other annoyances can be tamed with third-party software, helping you avoid a trip into Terminal. If you've been plagued by a particular setting, read on to discover how to resolve the situation. -- TechRadar UK.

Discover the hidden features in iOS's built-in apps

Discover the hidden features in iOS's built-in apps

From Clock to Weather, you may have overlooked these capabilities. You've probably mastered your favorite built-in iOS apps such as Camera and Safari. But other apps that come preloaded on your iOS device include features you may not have discovered. -- Macworld UK.

Running Windows 8 on your Mac

Running Windows 8 on your Mac

Whether it's for work or just out of curiosity, here are four options for flirting with the latest rough beast to shuffle out of Redmond. -- Macworld.

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

A Phone that Knows Where You're Going

Beyond merely tracking where you've been and where you are, your smartphone might soon actually know where you are going--in part by recording what your friends do. Researchers in the U.K. have come up with an algorithm that follows your own mobility patterns and adjusts for anomalies by factoring in the patterns of people in your social group (defined as people who are mutual contacts on each other's smartphones). -- MIT Technology Review.

July 05 Thursday's News

 

U.S. drone 'hijackings' raise security concerns

U.S. drone 'hijackings' raise security concerns

University of Texas professor and grad students manipulate unmanned crafts' flight paths. One exercise is done with DHS. Thousands of civilian drones are destined for U.S. skies. -- c|net.

Apple's Sandboxing... One Month In

Apple's Sandboxing... One Month In

It's now been over a month since Apple began enforcing its sandboxing policies for the Mac App Store. With the dust beginning to settle, what can we conclude? Ted Landau offers a perspective. -- The Mac Observer.

Ratio of Mac to PC sales narrowing, reflects changing market

Ratio of Mac to PC sales narrowing, reflects changing market

A new chart by Asymco analyst Horace Dediu has revealed that while PCs have always sold significantly better than Mac computers, the ratio of sales has dropped precipitously since its peak in 2004 and now stands at the most competitive range Apple has achieved since 1985. The figures paint a picture of two simultaneous factors at work: the increasing popularity of Macs, along with the decline of the traditional desktop (and mostly Windows-running) PC.

Mac OS X's 9 lives: The InfoWorld tour

Mac OS X's 9 lives: The InfoWorld tour

In 21 years, Apple's reinvented Mac OS has pushed computing in vibrant new directions. Now a new version is imminent.

Apple will release OS X Mountain Lion later this month, the ninth version of OS X in its 21-year history. In 2001, OS X was a bet-the-farm move by an Apple that was on death's door, having squandered the magic of 1984's original Mac. Despite a rocky start, OS X proved that co-founder and returning CEO Steve Jobs could reinvent the Mac.

There's only one more digit in OS X's 10.x series -- 10.9 -- and many believe that will be the last OS X before it merges into iOS. We'll see whether this comes to pass. One thing's for certain: Even after OS X's nine lives, there's clearly more to come with Apple's computer innovations. -- InfoWorld.

What you can do when junk apps invade the App Store

What you can do when junk apps invade the App Store

Junk apps have been on the rise in the App Store, with some developers hoping to cash in on popular searches by offering "cheat" apps that ostensibly help you conquer the game you're really searching for. I noticed this myself recently when I went looking for Words With Friends. Developer Marco Arment dug a little bit deeper and believes these apps may be crossing into some legal gray areas. The good news, however, is that there's something that both developers and users can do about it. -- Ars Technica.

How Apple Could Fight The Bots, Scams And Other App Store Junk

How Apple Could Fight The Bots, Scams And Other App Store Junk

No platform is perfect. Not even Apple's. Over the last few weeks, there has been a flood of news about malfeasance in the app store from download bots to credit card scams to address-book sharing. Last month, I broke a few stories about app-related credit card fraud originating from Taobao, the eBay of China, and automated bots that download apps thousands of times to drive them up the charts. Then The New York Times and BusinessWeek came in with their own takes this week. -- TechCrunch.

For Apple, Pressure Builds Over App Store Fraud

For Apple, Pressure Builds Over App Store Fraud

In a little over an hour, Ryan Matthew Pierson racked up $437.71 in iTunes charges for virtual currency that he could use to buy guns, nightclubs and cars in iMobsters, a popular iPhone game. One problem: Mr. Pierson, a technology writer in Texas, has never played iMobsters. -- New York Times.

Former Apple Employee Gives A Tiny Look Into App Store Review Process

Former Apple Employee Gives A Tiny Look Into App Store Review Process

Think the App Store review team is a bunch of dicks? Think again. Instead, they are apparently too busy sifting through pictures of the male anatomy. Mike Lee, a former Apple senior engineer who worked on the Worldwide Developer Relations team, recently spoke out about the process to Business Insider. Lee offers a small explanation of why the various scam and rip-off apps have slipped through the cracks as the team is very busy sifting through the trash.

Big Brother Likes Your Taste in Music

Big Brother Likes Your Taste in Music

Every so often when you open iTunes, you might see it display a message about "sending Genius results to Apple. Every wonder what does it means? It means "we" know what you like. -- New York Times.

Speaking in Tech: Apple, Oracle and Google SUCK at cloud

Speaking in Tech: Apple, Oracle and Google SUCK at cloud

Our special guest this week at El Reg's enterprise tech-cast is George Reese, CTO and co-founder of enStratus, a cloud infrastructure management solution for deploying and managing enterprise-class applications in public, private and hybrid clouds. Your hosts Greg Knieriemen, Ed Saipetch and Sarah Vela spoke with the cloud biz man about the Amazon fiasco, cloud strategies and good "application hygiene" - and tore apart some of the moves of the biggest vendors. -- The Register.

Apple Files Patents & Trademarks Covering a Camera Filter, iPhone Headset, Surround Panner, Flyover & Turn-by-Turn Logo

Apple Files Patents & Trademarks Covering a Camera Filter, iPhone Headset, Surround Panner, Flyover & Turn-by-Turn Logo

On July 5, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a series of patent applications from Apple covering a wide range of technologies. In particular, our report briefly touches on inventions relating to a digital signal filter for iOS device cameras, an iPhone wireless headset and Apple's Logic Pro's Surround Panner. For security fans, there's a specific one covering in-place encryption. In addition to patents, it was revealed by the US Patent and Trademark Office that Apple has filed for two iOS 6 related trademarks covering their 3D photo-realistic navigation feature called "Flyover" and their new Maps + Compass Logo reflecting its upcoming "Turn by Turn" feature. -- Patently Apple.

Apple's Retina Display Patent Comes to Light

Apple's Retina Display Patent Comes to Light

On June 28, 2012, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a system and method to improve image edge discoloration. Yet at the heart of the patent, Apple states that "some embodiments of the LCD panel may be a model of the Retina display, available from Apple Inc." So if you want to know the lowdown on Apple's Resolutionary display, or at least certain aspects of this magical beast, it's now here for you to feast your eyes on. -- Patently Apple.

July 03 Tuesday's News

 

Walkthrough Of Apple's New Notes, Reminders And Find My iPhone Web Apps From The iCloud Beta

Walkthrough Of Apple's New Notes, Reminders And Find My iPhone Web Apps From The iCloud Beta

Apple unveiled its beta.icloud.com website today after the portal went live briefly a couple months ago. Developers can log into the beta iCloud website now and test out Apple's two brand new web companion apps for Notes and Reminders. The Find My iPhone web app has also been updated with a new look and slight improvements. We've got a quick walkthrough (including screenshots) of the changes revealed in the iCloud beta website today. -- Cult of Mac.

Steve Jobs -- The Lost Interview is on iTunes, but don't tell anyone

Steve Jobs -- The Lost Interview is on iTunes, but don't tell anyone

My little film about Steve Jobs has finally made it to iTunes as a $3.99 rental, but you wouldn't know it. Deeming the film "too controversial," Apple has it on the site but they aren't promoting it and won't. The topic is "too sensitive" you see. It isn't even listed in the iTunes new releases. You have to search for it. But it's there. -- I, Cringely.

iCloud: Troubleshooting the move from MobileMe to iCloud

iCloud: Troubleshooting the move from MobileMe to iCloud

During your move from MobileMe to iCloud, you may encounter issues moving your calendars, mail, or account. After successfully moving to iCloud, your contacts and bookmarks may not appear on some devices. This article covers possible alerts you may see moving to iCloud and how to respond, as well as explaining how to troubleshoot adding your contacts and calendars back to your devices after moving. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Maclocks makes first Retina MacBook locking mechanism

Maclocks makes first Retina MacBook locking mechanism

Lock system manufacturer Maclocks has developed and released the first locking mechanism for the new MacBook with Retina Display, which offers a unique approach to securing the new systems since Apple didn't include a standard Kensington lock port. -- MacFixIt.

Apple updates Configurator utility to version 1.1

Apple updates Configurator utility to version 1.1

Apple has updated its Apple Configurator, a tool used for mass imaging and control of iOS devices for businesses, institutions and other large-scale deployments. The new version 1.1 adds a new preference to disable auto-removal of app and profiles when a configuration is re-applied, a new preference to stop re-application of a configuration when a device is connected to the program, and miscellaneous fixes.

Apple IP More Important Than iOS

Apple IP More Important Than iOS

With most eyeballs and ears trained on speculation regarding Apple's next round of product introductions, it should be noted that none of these product innovations would exist without the appropriate intellectual property (IP) being filed and secured well in advance of any public product launch. -- Seeking Alpha.

How An Ex-Apple Employee Kept Sneaking Into Cupertino To Finish His Project

How An Ex-Apple Employee Kept Sneaking Into Cupertino To Finish His Project

While Steve Jobs famously liked to take credit for others' ideas, he also gave a lot of credit to the amazing people he employed at Apple who enabled the company to create all of the incredible products it has released over the years. In many interviews, Jobs praised their creativity, passion, and drive, and their determination to build the best product they could build. -- Cult of Mac.

Thomas Jefferson, Steve Jobs, and the Rule of 3

Thomas Jefferson, Steve Jobs, and the Rule of 3

This week America celebrates the three inalienable rights voiced in the U.S. Declaration of Independence: life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. Life, liberty, and happiness might very well be the three most important words in American history. The words are so eloquent, so impactful, they warrant their own Wikipedia entry. -- Forbes.

iPad digital art contest winners

iPad digital art contest winners

We sorted through more than 100 entries and picked our top three favorite pieces of art, and our Macworld Facebook friends voted for our five runner-ups. Here are the winners of our iPad digital art contest, sponsored by Scosche. -- Macworld.

Apple's International Obfuscation

Apple's International Obfuscation

All Steve McCabe wanted was an in-warranty fix for a struggling iPhone. But Apple's service advisors proved incapable of either helping with an international warranty repair or providing a straight answer to a seemingly simple technical question. -- TidBITS.

July 02 Monday's News

 

Street test measures Siri comprehension at 83%, accuracy at 62%

Street test measures Siri comprehension at 83%, accuracy at 62%

While the convenience of Apple's Siri comes with searching by voice, a new test has found that Apple's personal assistant is not yet a reliable enough search engine to entirely replace text input with Google. -- AppleInsider.

Apple: goodbye hardware engineering head Bob Mansfield, hello Dan Riccio

Apple SVP of Hardware Engineering Bob Mansfield to retire

Do you know who Dan Riccio is? You're about to. Apple is preparing to make Riccio its new senior VP of hardware engineering, replacing the current SVP Bob Mansfield. The company announced late Thursday that Mansfield is retiring from his post, and that Riccio will be transitioned into his position over a period of several months.

OWC Turns Your MacBook Air's Old Flash Storage Module Into The Perfect External SSD

OWC Turns Your MacBook Air's Old Flash Storage Module Into The Perfect External SSD

If you're planning to upgrade the flash storage in your 2010 or 2011 MacBook Air, don't just discard your old module or let it go for pennies on eBay. With the Aurora Envoy enclosure from Other World Computing, you can turn that old flash storage into an external drive that's designed to match your MacBook Air perfectly. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Hopes To Increase Genius Bar Capacity With New Table Layout

Apple Hopes To Increase Genius Bar Capacity With New Table Layout

As Apple's devices become increasingly popular, so do its retail stores. It's almost impossible to walk into one and see a Genius without an appointment, and even with an appointment you can almost guarantee they'll be a lengthy wait. But Apple hopes to improve this with a new Genius Bar layout that increases capacity from 7 to 12 customers, simply by turning a table 90° and adding a few extra stools. [So Apple thinks this will make the same number of people less busy? What about making it bigger and adding more people? -mam] -- Cult of Mac.

iCloud: Configuring Mail with Mac OS X v10.6 or iOS 4

iCloud: Configuring Mail with Mac OS X v10.6 or iOS 4

Follow the instructions below to configure your iCloud mail account on your old Mac or iOS device. Note: This article applies only to Mac OS X v10.6 and iOS 4. If you're running OS X Lion v10.7 or later, or iOS 5 or later, learn more about setting up iCloud on all of your devices. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Retina MacBook Pro Pushes the Limits of its Graphics Capabilities

Retina MacBook Pro Pushes the Limits of its Graphics Capabilities

Just after the launch of the Retina MacBook Pro earlier this month, AnandTech provided a first glimpse of the machine's display performance, noting the various resolution options available to users and examining how its color and contrast compares to other notebooks.

After having more time to analyze the new machine, AnandTech last week published its full review of the Retina MacBook Pro, bringing its thorough and technically-detailed perspective to the report. While the whole review is definitely worth a read, the section on graphics performance bears special attention.

New OS X Tibet malware variant surfaces

New OS X Tibet malware variant surfaces

Security company Kaspersky Labs has intercepted a new variant of the Tibet malware for OS X, which is being distributed to specific Uyghur activist groups as part of a seemingly politically motivated APT (advanced persistent threat) attack. -- MacFixIt.

App Store search algorithm altered three times in a week

App Store search algorithm altered three times in a week

Apple appears to have made three changes in a week to its App Store search algorithms which are used to fine-tune search results. A change made earlier this week scores apps higher by user ratings and app descriptions, rather than by application name (as was the case before the changes). A change made today places a larger emphasis on developer-inserted keywords with names than before, with other changes lowering the position of "junk" applications relying on in-app purchase names for higher placement. -- MacNN.

5 iOS 5 Tips and Tricks

5 iOS 5 Tips and Tricks

Tips and Tricks to help make using your iPhone faster and easier. -- MacNews Blog.

Project Glass

Project Glass

We think Glass helps you share your life as you're living it; from life's big moments to everyday experiences. Today we're kicking off what we're calling Glass Sessions, where you can experience what it's like to use Glass while we build it, through the eyes of a real person, in real life. The first Glass Session follows Laetitia Gayno, the wife of a Googler, as she shares her story of welcoming a new baby, capturing every smile, and showing her entire family back in France every "first" through Hangouts.  -- Google.

Averting Mac disaster with good backups, better luck

Averting Mac disaster with good backups, better luck

The hard drive in Lex Friedman's MacBook Pro failed after a water-related disaster at 30,000 feet. Good backups and some good luck prevented a true data disaster. -- Macworld.

A Rose-Colored View May Come Standard

A Rose-Colored View May Come Standard

Google on Wednesday offered a look at a previously secret project to develop Internet-connected glasses, staking out a lead position in a futuristic and fast-growing area known as wearable computing. -- New York Times.

How a Lone Grad Student Scooped the FTC On Privacy Issue

How a Lone Grad Student Scooped the FTC On Privacy Issue

Jonathan Mayer had a hunch. A gifted computer scientist, Mayer suspected that online advertisers might be getting around browser settings that are designed to block tracking devices known as cookies. If his instinct was right, advertisers were following people as they moved from one website to another even though their browsers were configured to prevent this sort of digital shadowing. Working long hours at his office, Mayer ran a series of clever tests in which he purchased ads that acted as sniffers for the sort of unauthorized cookies he was looking for. He hit the jackpot, unearthing one of the biggest privacy scandals of the past year: Google was secretly planting cookies on a vast number of iPhone browsers. Mayer thinks millions of iPhones were targeted by Google. -- Wired.