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May 31 Friday's News

 

Change the Time Machine Backup Schedule

Change the Time Machine Backup Schedule

Every Mac owner should be using Time Machine, it's by far the easiest and most painless backup solution, running in the background and allowing for easy recovery of files or the entire operating system should something go wrong during an OS X update or otherwise. That said, Time Machine is a bit aggressive, and backs up all changes every hour that a drive is connected or within range, this is great for backup purposes but can be a nuisance when it hogs disk I/O and CPU cycles from other tasks. The easiest way to avoid this is to adjust the backup schedule, and we'll show you how to do this from the Terminal, or with a super easy to use Preference Pane called TimeMachineScheduler. -- OSXDaily.

Answers to your questions about iTunes and videos

Answers to your questions about iTunes and videos

Many of the iTunes Guy columns focus on music, since the majority of the questions I receive are about that kind of media. But I get a fair number of questions about videos, and in this week's column, I cover four questions dealing with videos: their formats and tags, and how to make smart playlists to group movies by title. -- Macworld.

In the weeds

In the weeds

Although discussions related to how Apple will "use its cash" center on acquisitions of companies, Apple's has been busy acquiring, just not companies. It has been buying capital equipment. Capital meaning (in the original sense of the word[1]) the means of production.

Since the launch of the iPhone Apple has spent $21.1 billion on the acquisition of property, plant and equipment. The company has already stated that they will spend another $10 billion or so for the current fiscal year. This has been mostly machinery and equipment used in manufacturing. -- Asymco.

5 Best Mac Tools/Software for Getting Your Finances in Order

5 Best Mac Tools/Software for Getting Your Finances in Order

Saving money has become a major priority for many people. There are lots of software tools to help you, but finding the right one can be hard. For all you Mac owners out there, here are the top five tools to streamline your personal economy. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Adds RAW Support for 13 New Cameras in Aperture, iPhoto

Apple Adds RAW Support for 13 New Cameras in Aperture, iPhoto

Apple released Digital Camera RAW Compatibility Update 4.06 on Thursday, an update that adds support for RAW image files from 13 new digital cameras. The update affects Aperture 3 and iPhoto '11 in Mountain Lion.

Fix dimmed iOS dictation button

Fix dimmed iOS dictation button

Dictation is a fantastic, Siri-like service on iPhone and iPad that, at the tap of a mic button, transforms what you say out loud into text on the screen. But sometimes that mic button ghosts over, grays out, and otherwise becomes un-tab-able. That kills the natural-language interface, makes apps less accessible, and can otherwise stop your productivity dead.

It rarely happens with built-in apps like Messages (though it does sometimes), but it's happening quite often with third party apps, especially Twitter clients. It, of course, should never, not ever happen. iOS should do everything it needs to to keep that button live. But it seems, based on my own tests and talking to a few developers, that when memory gets low, iOS turns off Dictation. Sigh.

However, since memory does seem to be the issue, there's an easy if annoying fix -- iMore.

How to quickly annotate and send a screenshot in OS X

How to quickly annotate and send a screenshot in OS X

A picture being worth a thousand words makes screenshots often the most convenient method for conveying instructions to people. While Apple has a number of screenshot options built into OS X, these often result in intermediary files that can clutter up your computer if you frequently use them.

If you want to avoid this inconvenience, you can take screenshots and mark them up for sending to others without creating a single intermediary file. -- MacFixIt.

Universities Team With Online Course Provider

Universities Team With Online Course Provider

Coursera, the California company that offers free college classes online, is forming partnerships with 10 large public university systems (Tennessee is on of them) and public flagship universities to create courses that students can take for credit, either fully online or with classroom sessions. -- New York Times.

Apple reveals new Flex Screen Feature with Force Detection

Apple reveals new Flex Screen Feature with Force Detection

On May 30, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a new flexible display invention. Apple has filed a number of flex display based patents over the last year including one for advanced concepts and features, another relating to the a next generation Smart Cover and yet another relating to unique functionality beyond the gimmickry of flex screen designs. Today's patent extends on the latter patent in that it ties a flex screen directly to an application such as Apple's GarageBand. In the future, playing the piano will be more realistic allowing the user to press the keys harder or softer to get the right sound that they're seeking. I'm sure that Apple is working on other applications for this new functionality but we'll just have to wait until they roll it out to see just how cool this could be. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents New Manufacturing Process for Precision Display Setting and a New 3D Cursor

Apple Invents New Manufacturing Process for Precision Display Setting and a New 3D Cursor

On May 30, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a new manufacturing process relating to precision display setting on devices like an iMac, iPhone, iPod or Television. For those of you who happen to love industrial design and its associated processes as much as Apple's Jony Ive does, you'll appreciate Apple's latest invention. The second invention that we briefly touch on in our report relates to Apple's work on a 3D cursor. Considering that Tim Cook stated that a new Mac Pro would be coming to market later this year, perhaps we'll see this new feature pop up. Then again, don't count on logic being a guide for the timing of any Apple invention. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents a Wild New Display that could conceal a Camera, Strobe Flash and/or Fingerprint Scanner until Needed

Apple Invents a Wild New Display that could conceal a Camera, Strobe Flash and/or Fingerprint Scanner until Needed

Every once and a while a very cool idea emerges in a patent that puts a smile on our faces just because we know that Jony Ive and his team (the Crazy Ones) have come up with yet another aesthetically minded industrial design. Today's little gem hits on a number of interesting things. Firstly, Apple has designed a display that could conceal or reveal hidden components behind a display such as a camera and strobe flash so that they could be eliminated as physical features on an iPhone, iPad or other computer. Apple states that "Placing components that would typically be found on the surface of an electronic device enclosure behind a transparent display may increase the surface real-estate of the enclosure for a larger display or additional components. Further, the aesthetics of the electronic device may be greatly enhanced by not cluttering the device enclosure with always-visible components, but instead creating a more seamless electronic device where the components are only visible when they are in use." Secondly, beyond the camera and strobe flash, there's an additional key component that Apple wants to conceal that's noteworthy, and that's a fingerprint scanner. -- Patently Apple.

The Dictatorship of Data

The Dictatorship of Data

Big data is poised to transform society, from how we diagnose illness to how we educate children, even making it possible for a car to drive itself. Information is emerging as a new economic input, a vital resource. Companies, governments, and even individuals will be measuring and optimizing everything possible.

But there is a dark side. Big data erodes privacy. And when it is used to make predictions about what we are likely to do but haven't yet done, it threatens freedom as well. Yet big data also exacerbates a very old problem: relying on the numbers when they are far more fallible than we think. Nothing underscores the consequences of data analysis gone awry more than the story of Robert McNamara. -- MIT Technology Review.

AirPrint Basics

AirPrint Basics

AirPrint enables instant printing from iPad, iPhone, iPod touch, and Mac without the need to install drivers or download software. Simply select an AirPrint printer and print. It's that simple. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Contacts: Clicking Field Headers for More Options

Contacts: Clicking Field Headers for More Options

Because she spends approximately 23 percent of her time clicking aimlessly around on her Mac, Melissa Holt finds some useful stuff, and this tip is no exception. Want to map an address or start a Skype call right from your Contacts program? Well, you can, and we're gonna tell you how--no aimless clicking required. -- The Mac Observer.

This is your local Apple Store

This is your local Apple Store

You know the scene: hundreds of customers packed together like sardines, each one checking out the latest iPad, iPhone or MacBook without any intention of making a purchase, yet hogging all of the employees.

One Man's Opionion: The Sky is Falling

One Man's Opionion: The Sky is Falling

You may have seen articles lately reporting something like "Apple is Bankrupt" or "Why Hasn't Apple Invent a Transporter?", etc. This kind of thing used to be reserved for television news but now it has become mainstream for Internet blogs. They are trying to fill the 24/7 information void and it seems they don't think much of your intelligence or acuity. They believe they have to have something new and original to say and if they don't, they make it up and label it opinion in the belief you can't tell fact from fiction. They work on the premise of "say it first." Not as many are worried about getting it right.

Unfortunately this is true for even some respected sites. As an example there is an article today that says the if someone, other than you, has your Apple ID and password they can access your iCloud data?!? DUH! This is out on at least two major sites today. Not to mention all the places where you can read that Apple is dead, going out of business and will never have another good product or is not producing product fast enough, etc.

MacVolPlace has always tried to include articles that are both helpful and accurate, avoiding the other kind. I may not always get it right but I am trying.

Anyway, that is one man's opinion.

May 30 Thursday's News

 

Apple renews interest in 'gaze detection,' possible response to Samsung's 'Smart Scroll'

Apple renews interest in 'gaze detection,' possible response to Samsung's 'Smart Scroll'

A patent application discovered on Thursday reveals Apple is once again looking into so-called "gaze detection" eye-tracking technology for its iOS device lineup, possibly in response to Samsung's latest Galaxy S4 smartphone, which boasts a similar feature dubbed "Smart Scroll." -- AppleInsider.

Apple discontinues fourth-generation iPod touch, replaces with iSight-free 4-inch model

Apple unveils new 16GB iPod touch model without iSight, priced at $229

Apple on Wednesday added a new iPod touch model to its lineup of iOS devices, with the $229 camera-less version being sold as a stripped-down iteration of the company's high-end media player. -- AppleInsider.

Learn about the world (immediately) around you with Wikipedia Nearby

Learn about the world (immediately) around you with Wikipedia Nearby

Wikipedia has launched a mobile version of its Nearby page. The feature helps users look up articles associated with their location, including historic sites, parks, museums, theaters, bridges, schools and religious buildings, as well as historic figures tied to the location. -- Ars Technica.

Tim Cook's answer to my first question

Tim Cook's answer to my first question

Tim Cook was asked my first question (Why is the iPhone not sold as a portfolio product?) His answer is paraphrased here:

We haven't so far. That doesn't shut off the future. Why? It takes a lot of really hard work to do a phone right when you manage the hardware and software and services in it. We've chosen to put our energy on doing that right. We haven't been focused on working multiple lines.

Think about the evolution of the iPod over time. The shuffle didn't have the same functionality as other products. It was a really good product, but it played a different role -- it was great for some customers it was strikingly different than other iPods. The mini played a different role than the classic did. If you remember when we brought out the mini people said we'd never sell any. It was too expensive and had too little storage. The mini proved that people want something lighter, thinner, smaller. My only point is that these products all served a different person, a different type, a different need. For the phone that is the question. Are we now at a point that we need to do that?

...

At a macro level, a large screen today comes with a lot of tradeoffs. When you look at the size, but they also look at things like do the photos show the proper color? The white balance, the reflectivity, battery life. The longevity of the display. There are a bunch of things that are very important. What our customers want is for us to weigh those and come out with a decision. At this point we think the Retina display is the best. In a hypothetical world where those tradeoffs didn't exist, you could see a bigger screen as a differentiator.

Here is how I interpret the answer... -- Asymco.

Customize The Way Stacks Look And Behave In The Dock

Customize The Way Stacks Look And Behave In The Dock

If you're using Stacks in the Dock, either the built-in ones for Documents and such, or your own, like the Recent Items Stack, you might want to customize the way the Stack looks and behaves. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Take Long Exposure Photographs On Your iPhone

How To Take Long Exposure Photographs On Your iPhone

The iPhone has quickly become the most popular camera in the world simply because it's the camera that's always on you. Even though the iPhone's camera doesn't have anywhere near the same features and tools as a DSLR, that doesn't mean you can't squeak out some extra performance out of your iPhone to get pictures that look like a pro shot them.

Long exposures are a basic staple of most DSLR photographers, but thanks to some awesome apps for iOS, iPhone users can join in the fun too without having to spend hundreds of dollars on gear. In this guide we're going to teach you about all of the gear and apps you need to take long exposure photos with your iPhone.  -- Cult of Mac.

Numbers: Using Filters on Your Data

Numbers: Using Filters on Your Data

Melissa Holt's a big fan of Apple's Numbers program, and in this tip, she'll cover one of her favorite tricks for interpreting data--the filtering feature. Use it to find only cells that match your specified criteria, so you can know what your largest expenses are. Or how many times you spent more than $50. Or how much you spent on your cat. Hey, you can never spend too much on your cat, but it's still good to know. -- .

An Apple Developer Explains How iCloud is Broken

An Apple Developer Explains How iCloud is Broken

Max Seelemann is an Apple developer and founder of The Soulmen, now famous for the Ulysses series of OS X apps for writers. In this interview, Mr. Seelemann explains how Apple's iCloud APIs, designed for simple use, often fail when developers have even modest file issues to deal with. -- The Mac Observer.

Graphics-related crashes resurface for mid-2010 MacBook Pro systems

Graphics-related crashes resurface for mid-2010 MacBook Pro systems

If your MacBook Pro is crashing after updating Mountain Lion, you may be experiencing a long-standing bug affecting a specific model of MacBook systems.-- MacFixIt.

Check your Mac's serial number after repair services

Check your Mac's serial number after repair services

If you have experienced problems with your Mac and have had to take it in for servicing, be sure to check your system's serial number when you get it back, especially if the service required a logic board replacement.

Incorrect serial numbers from a repair may prevent some programs and features from working. -- MacFixIt.

Gigapixel Holographic Microscope Made From A4 Paper Scanner

Gigapixel Holographic Microscope Made From A4 Paper Scanner

The A4 digital scanner gathering dust under your desk could find new life as a gigapixel holographic microscope, say Japanese engineers who have constructed one at minimal cost. -- MIT T.

How one Irish woman made $22bn for Apple in a year

How one Irish woman made $22bn for Apple in a year

Cathy Kearney, an accountant in the Irish city of Cork, appears to live a fairly modest home life. A graduate of the local university, her home for 15 years has been a dairy farm outside Youghal, a seaside town a short drive from the city.

The 49-year-old lives with her husband and children in a large, but far from grand, farmhouse. Outside work she is involved in the local church. She is also, at first sight, the brains behind much of Apple's exceptional global success in recent times. -- The Guardian.

Tennis player uses his iPhone to dispute a referee's call

Tennis player uses his iPhone to dispute a referee's call

Mobile phones are increasingly taking over more and more parts of our lives. Everyone knows where we are at any given point. They see what we're eating before we've even taken our first bite. And it's not unusual for a concert venue to look more like a sea of screens, as people focus more on recording the event than they do enjoying it. And now, it looks like the next stage is interrupting professional sports events … and we're not talking from the spectators' side of the field. -- Digital Trends.

Sell! Sell! Sell! The iPhone and iPad apps you need to win at real estate

Sell! Sell! Sell! The iPhone and iPad apps you need to win at real estate

If you're a realtor or a broker, your iPhone and iPad can be invaluable tools that can not only help keep you organized, but help you do your job better. Everything from apps that help you market yourself to productivity apps that make client management and communication easier than ever are available in the App Store.

Here are the ones we think are the best choices for active real estate agents and brokers. -- iMore.

Why The iPad Needs File Level User Directory Access And Real Multitasking -- The 'Book Mystique'

Why The iPad Needs File Level User Directory Access And Real Multitasking -- The 'Book Mystique'

Back in the heyday of the Classic Mac OS, converts to the Mac's revolutionary Graphical User Interface took plenty of stick from DOS holdouts over the allegedly "Fisher-Price" on-screen environment. "There's the ducky, and there's the horsey" went the taunts from the command line jocks.

The were wrong of course and their protestations now seem quaint, what with Windows and even Linux having long since adopted the GUI to a greater or lesser extent respectively. Sniping at the Mac as having an allegedly kid-stuff interface were pretty decisively silenced with the changeover to OS X in 2001, with its industrial strength UNIX underpinnings and the option to switch to a command line at any time via the Terminal. Few users did. The GUI is better for most of us most of the time. But with this, as with most other things, it's wonderful to have a choice.

Unfortunately, Apple apparently forgot that when they re-engineered the iPhone OS into the iOS for tablet computer duty with the iPad. -- MacPrices.

May 29 Wednesday's News

 

Intel's grip on Thunderbolt keeps accessories off the market

Intel's grip on Thunderbolt keeps accessories off the market

While Apple has integrated Intel's Thunderbolt connection standard in every model of Mac the company has introduced since 2011, the technology has yet to truly take off in the computer industry, and one report says it is languishing due to Intel's tight controls over the standard. -- AppleInsider.

Apple purchased 9 companies since October, intends to pick up pace in 2013

Apple purchased 9 companies since October, intends to pick up pace in 2013

It was revealed on Tuesday that Apple has quietly made nine acquisitions since the start of the year, a rate outstripping 2012's pace of one company every 70 days. -- AllThingsD.


The full 1h 21m video of Tim Cook's D11 interview.

Automator workflow of the month: Automatically copy Photo Stream images

Automator workflow of the month: Automatically copy Photo Stream images

I recently read Jeff Carlson's "Four things Apple could do to improve iPhoto right now," and one point he made struck me in particular--that I couldn't make Photo Stream images appear in a folder of my choosing. Thinking how convenient this could be--for copying images into my Dropbox folder, for example--I set about finding a way. -- Macworld.

Privately share a video that only a select few can watch

Privately share a video that only a select few can watch

Larry wants to make a video available, via streaming, to friends and family, and only to friends and family.

Perfectly understandable. Streaming video is the obvious and easy way to share home movies, but sometimes you need to control who can jump into that stream. You may want everyone in the world to enjoy your cat videos, but humans often object when their drunken dancing turns up all over the Internet.

I'll give you privacy control settings for three free and popular streaming services. -- Macworld UK.

Add Recent Or Favorite Items Stack To The Dock

Add Recent Or Favorite Items Stack To The Dock

The old rainbow Apple menu had a function that let you find recent documents, along with the ability to place folders in it for quick and easy access. This was replaced in Mac OS X with stacks, a visual way to do a similar thing, but from the Dock. You can drag a folder into the right hand side of the Dock and have it open as a Stack, of course, but did you know you could get a list of Recent Apps, Documents, or Servers, as well as Favorite Volumes or Items as a Stack, as well? -- Cult of Mac.

How to change an encrypted volume's password in OS X

How to change an encrypted volume's password in OS X

With data security being an all-too-common concern, the options for encrypting data in OS X are welcome additions that are quite easy to implement. While you can store files in an encrypted disk image, you can also use FileVault to encrypt your boot drive. Furthermore, you can encrypt or decrypt any secondary volume by right-clicking it and choosing the option to do so, or by using the Terminal.

These features are convenient, but if you wish to change the password for an encrypted drive, you will find that this feature is not available along with the options for encrypting. You can change a password by first decrypting the volume and then encrypting it again, but this will take a while for drives with large numbers of files on them. -- MacFixIt.

Eject multipartitioned drives your way in OS X

Eject multipartitioned drives your way in OS X

To eject a drive, you simply need to click the eject button next to the drive's name in the sidebar, or select the drive and press Command-E, choosing the option to do so from the contextual menu, or even drag it to the trash.

While this action is usually straightforward, it may be a little more cumbersome if you have one or more drives with multiple partitions on them. -- MacFixIt.

Feature list of forthcoming OS X 10.8.4 update revealed

Feature list of forthcoming OS X 10.8.4 update revealed

The currently-in-testing update to OS X, 10.8.4 -- thought to be on a fast track for release ahead of the upcoming Worldwide Developer's Conference in mid-June -- is expected to offer a wide range of issues fixes and general performance improvements, according to an unnamed developer. While some of the improvements were previously known, some are new -- including a Safari browser update. -- MacNN.

Apple Granted 36 Patents Today Covering a Wide Range of Key iDevice Features, Functions, UI Elements & Much More

Apple Granted 36 Patents Today Covering a Wide Range of Key iDevice Features, Functions, UI Elements & Much More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 36 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a wide range of granted patents that relate to key iDevice features, functions and UI elements. Some of the iPhone patents directly relate to the original iPhone that the late CEO Steve Jobs introduced back in 2007. Our report concludes by providing you a list of 29 other patents that were granted to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Is Apple in a Race with HTC for First Liquid metal Smartphone?

Is Apple in a Race with HTC for First Liquidmetal Smartphone?

In April Patently Apple broke the news that Apple had filed a new Liquid metal patent in Europe that clearly pointed to specific Apple designs under consideration for the new material. Apple pointed to the iPhone and iPad specifically and added that other distinct devices such as a TV monitor were being considered. Today the news has broken that Apple and HTC may in fact be in a race to deliver the first smartphone using Liquid metal later this year. -- Patently Apple.

How to clear your Apple Maps search history

How to clear your Apple Maps search history

It's funny how you can use an app for ages, but still learn new things about it.

Earlier this week I gave a presentation to the North Coast Mac Users Group, and during their question-and-answer session, someone asked how to clear the search history in Apple's Maps app. -- Macworld.

iPhone owners use their phones 50 percent more -- usage data

iPhone owners use their phones 50 percent more -- usage data

New data from Experian Marketing Services' Simmons® ConnectSM mobile and digital panel sheds light on the way smartphone users spend time using their phone, with the average adult clocking 58 minutes daily on their device. On average, smartphone owners devote 26% of the time they spend on their phone talking and another 20% texting. Social networking eats up 16% of smartphone time while browsing the mobile web accounts for 14% of time spent. Emailing and playing games account for roughly 9% and 8% of daily smartphone time, respectively, while use of the phone's camera and GPS each take up another 2% of our smartphone day. -- Experian.

How To Use Your Mac To Scan, Monitor, Map, And Troubleshoot Wi-Fi Networks

How To Use Your Mac To Scan, Monitor, Map, And Troubleshoot Wi-Fi Networks

For most PC users, Wi-Fi networks are a royal pain to setup and maintain. For Mac users and Airport owners, it's a bit easier thanks to Apple's famed user friendly interface. What if you want to scan, monitor, map, and troubleshoot a local Wi-Fi network? What's the best way?

All you need is the free Mac app NetSpot. This is a great app for MacBook users who want to troubleshoot Wi-Fi network dead spots or weak areas, but it's also good to scan a wireless network for devices, monitor the Wi-Fi network signal, and measure signal strength and speed. -- NoodleMac.

May 28 Tuesday's News

 

Apple patent automatically adjusts iPhone speaker volume based on proximity

Apple patent automatically adjusts iPhone speaker volume based on proximity

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday issued Apple a patent for a system that leverages the iPhone's various sensors to seamlessly increase and decrease volume, as well as switch between the device's multiple speakers, depending on how far away the handset is from a user. -- AppleInsider.

Seven apps Ars readers use to chase away the iOS default-app blues

Seven apps Ars readers use to chase away the iOS default-app blues

Last weekend the Ars staff got together and told you what apps we like to use on our iOS devices when Apple's tools let us down. As is usually the case, our recommendations didn't even scratch the surface, and all of you had even more recommendations to fix what the default apps leave broken.

We've sifted through your recommendations and compiled a list of the ones that cropped up the most frequently. If you have even more suggestions, don't be afraid to share them below. -- Ars Technica.

Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like 'qeadzcwrsfxv1331'

Anatomy of a hack: How crackers ransack passwords like 'qeadzcwrsfxv1331'

In March, readers followed along as Nate Anderson, Ars deputy editor and a self-admitted newbie to password cracking, downloaded a list of more than 16,000 cryptographically hashed passcodes. Within a few hours, he deciphered almost half of them. The moral of the story: if a reporter with zero training in the ancient art of password cracking can achieve such results, imagine what more seasoned attackers can do. -- Ars Technica.

How to get started with AirPlay

How to get started with AirPlay

AirPlay (formerly called AirTunes) is Apple's technology for streaming media over a local (usually in-home) network. It lets you stream audio from any Mac or iOS device to any AirPlay-enabled audio system, or video from a Mac (of recent vintage) or an iOS device to an Apple TV (also of recent vintage).

AirPlay works over any modern ethernet or Wi-Fi network (for video over Wi-Fi, that ideally means a fast network using 802.11n technology). The sending and receiving devices also need to be compatible with AirPlay.

How you set up and use AirPlay depends on the devices involved and on whether you're streaming audio or video. Here's how you can get up and running. -- Macworld.

Grading Apple's digital textbook technology

Grading Apple's digital textbook technology

Shortly after his world history students began a pilot program testing a digital textbook for the iPad, Ken Halla noticed something different: His students were actually reading their textbooks. -- Macworld.

Apple Seeds Yet Another Pre-Release OS X 10.8.4 Build To Devs

Apple Seeds Yet Another Pre-Release OS X 10.8.4 Build To Devs

Apple has just posted a new pre-release developer seed for upcoming OS X Mountain Lion 10.8.4, Build 12E55. In the notes accompanying the seed release, which includes Combo (comprehensive) and Delta (just changes) update installers, Apple notes the same focus areas as the last few seeds: Wi-Fi, Graphics Drivers, and Safari. This seed, though, also has Windows File Sharing, a new addition to the list since the last seed, build 12E47, which was released at the beginning of this month. -- Cult of Mac.

Five Useful Tips To Master iBooks On Your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

Five Useful Tips To Master iBooks On Your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

Apple's iBooks provides one of the best, most accessible e-reading experience on the iPad, in my opinion, and it's pretty darn simple to use. That said, there's always room to learn just a few more tricks to make the experience even better for you. Here, then, are five tips to master iBooks on your iOS device of choice. -- Cult of Mac.

NeoLucida, A Fantastic Old-School Drawing Aid For The Modern Day

NeoLucida, A Fantastic Old-School Drawing Aid For The Modern Day

The camera lucida is an old piece of technology. It's a drawing aid for artists which uses a prism to let you look at your paper and your subject simultaneously. To your eye, it appears as if the subject before you is projected onto your sheet of paper, and all you have to do is trace the image you see.

The device makes it easy to produce accurate drawing of anything, making you look awesome. You'll even be able to draw hands!

The thing is, nobody makes them anymore. Until now. The NeoLucida is a new Kickstarter project by university art professors Pablo Garcia and Golan Levin. They are confirmed fans of the gadget, and decided they wanted to make one cheap enough that their students could afford to use them. So instead of spending $300 on eBay for an antique example, you can grab a brand new one for just $30.

Or rather, you could. The first and second runs have already sold out. Which brings me to my idea... -- Cult of Mac.

iPhone Urinalysis App Draws U.S. Government Scrutiny

iPhone Urinalysis App Draws U.S. Government Scrutiny

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has sent a letter to BioSense Technologies over its iPhone uChek urinalysis system, asking why its medical app hasn't been cleared by the agency. The app is one of the first that turns the iPhone into a medical device, designed to read urinalysis test strips that are normally examined by users and compared to a color-coded chart. -- Mac Rumors.

How to encrypt one volume on a drive in OS X

How to encrypt one volume on a drive in OS X

Encrypting data is a convenient method for keeping your data secure, especially when using external hard drives and thumbdrives that may be stolen or lost. While it might be easiest to encrypt an entire drive, sometimes doing so may be a touch inconvenient, especially if the drive is used for more than one purpose. -- MacFixIt.

Apple is granted a Surprising Patent for Next Generation Lighting Adapters with Bendable Elastomers and Possible New iPad Dock

Apple is granted a Surprising Patent for Next Generation Lighting Adapters with Bendable Elastomers and Possible New iPad Dock

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 36 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover three design patents in addition to a surprising one that introduces us to the next generation of Lightning adapters designed to offer a certain degree of bendability using elastomers as illustrated in our cover graphic which depicts a new iPad dock. -- Patently Apple.

Why many Apple TVs are better than one

Why many Apple TVs are better than one

My first Apple TV quickly established itself as an essential addition to my home media setup. I used it primarily to send music from my Mac's iTunes library to the home theater audio system in our living room. In addition, it let me watch videos purchased or rented from the iTunes Store on the family HDTV. -- Macworld UK.

13 Secret Features Hidden In Your iPhone

13 Secret Features Hidden In Your iPhone

If you want to become an iPhone power user, it's best to know about some of the hidden features Apple put in its operating system. Here are a few of our favorites. -- Business Insider.

May 24 Friday's News

 

iOS Mail Syncing Problem Solved

iOS Mail Syncing Problem Solved

Chuck Melcher wrote:

I'm wondering if anyone can help me with a mail syncing problem.  Probably I'm just missing a simple setting somewhere, but so far it is eluding me. Here is what happens.

I read my UTK exchange mail on my iPhone 4 using the Mail app.  I have iOS 6.1.3.  I read a newly received message then delete it.  It then disappears from the Inbox on my phone and appears in the Exchange trash folder on my phone.  It also disappears from the Inbox in OWA and appears in the trash (aka "deleted items") folder in OWA.  Therefore, it really does seem to be moved from my Inbox to the Trash folder on the Exchange server.  Or at least that is my simplistic view of things.

Then I go to my Macbook Pro (10.8.3) where I use Mail to access the same UTK exchange account.  The previously mentioned message is still listed in my Inbox although I previously deleted it using my phone.  If I try to delete it from the Inbox on the Macbook, I receive an error message that I cannot move it to the trash.  I then look in the trash and sure enough it is already there.  I.e. it is listed in both my Inbox and my Trash folder.  The only way that I have found to fix things is to rebuild my Inbox (~500 messages).  In that case, the message will, in fact, disappear from my Inbox.

What am I missing here?  It seems that my Inbox on my Macbook is not syncing properly with the exchange server, but the problem is specifically limited to messages deleted via my phone.  I'm not aware of any other syncing issues.

I would greatly appreciate any help since at this point I have only two options.  One is to never delete messages via my phone; the second is rebuild the Inbox on my Macbook every time that I do delete messages via my phone.  Neither of these options is particularly attractive.

By the way, I have already deleted the exchange account from both my Macbook and my iPhone and recreated it on both devices, but the problem persists.  I'm using all of the standard settings as far as I know, i.e. I'm using Autodiscover to set up the account on both devices.

And Chuck found the solution:

I discovered a simple setting that fixes the problem below.  On my phone I went to Settings/Mail, Contacts, Calendars/UTK Exchange/Mail Folders to Push and put a checkmark beside "Deleted Messages".  Problem solved.

Apple granted patents on push-to-talk, double-sided touch panel

Apple granted patents on push-to-talk, double-sided touch panel

This week the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published 26 newly granted patents for Apple, and among them were the Cupertino company's take on a push-to-talk feature and a double-sided touch-sensitive panel, both of which could possibly appear in future iPhones. -- AppleInsider.

How to set up a Time Capsule

How to set up a Time Capsule

Backing up your Mac is vitally important, yet creating a backup is something that most people don't bother with that much.

This is a shame because Apple has gone out of its way to make creating a backup incredibly easy. And a good backup will save your bacon if (and more likely 'when') something goes wrong. Losing valuable files, not to mention your entire system isn't fun, so we're going to take a look at some of Apple's options. -- Macworld UK.

How do I restore my Mac with Time Machine

How do I restore my Mac with Time Machine

Our guide to restoring Mac OS X from a Time Machine backup will help you recover a Mac that doesn't boot, and help with a failed hard drive -- Macworld UK.

Horace Dediu's questions for Tim Cook

Horace Dediu's questions for Tim Cook

Next week at AllThingsD's D11 conference in LA, Apple CEO Tim Cook will be interviewed by Kara Swisher and Walt Mossberg.

Here are some questions Horace Dediu is hoping they will ask:

  1. Why is the iPhone not sold as a portfolio product? Meaning, why, after six years, is there no iPhone product range being updated on a regular basis. Having a portfolio strategy is not only followed by every phone vendor but also by Apple for all its other product lines, including the iPad, which came after the iPhone. In other words, please explain why the iPhone is anomalous from a product portfolio point of view.
  2. There are more than 800 operators world-wide so why are there only about 250 of them carrying your phone? Competitors large and small (from BlackBerry to Nokia to Samsung) have cited relationships with more than 500 operators so Apple is being uniquely selective. My question does not stem from a lack of patience: this total number of iPhone distributors has not increased markedly for over a year. Are you limiting distribution through conditions placed on operators (like the availability of sufficient quality data services) or are operators finding the distribution agreement too onerous (e.g. too high a minimum order quota)?
  3. In 2012 Apple's capital spending has reached the extraordinary level of $10 billion/yr, higher than all but the most capital-intensive semiconductor manufacturers. This is unusual for Apple as it was less than $1 billion in the year before the iPhone launched. It's also unusual for Apple's competitors in phones, PCs or tablets. It's on a level matched only by semiconductor heavyweights. What is the purpose of this spending and what should we read into it leveling off at $10 billion for 2013?
  4. Depending on one supplier is an operational faux pas, and yet Apple has found itself in that situation with Samsung for mobile microprocessors. It may be excusable in PCs with Intel having an architectural monopoly but it's not excusable for a chip that you designed yourself and purchase in massive quantities. Why did you give Samsung such a concession, especially knowing their potential as a competitor vis-à-vis alternative suppliers who had no such potential? Does the answer have something to do with the previous question?

John Stewart Unveils 'The Tax Code Nano' In Response To Apple Senate Hearing

John Stewart Unveils 'The Tax Code Nano' In Response To Apple Senate Hearing

Tim Cook survived his grilling during his appearance before the U.S. Senate Sub-Committee Hearing to Examine Offshore Profit Shifting and Tax Avoidance by Apple Inc. Even though some of the senators still aren't happy with Apple's international tax practices, a solution to the problem wasn't given.

Not one to pass up the opportunity to make fun of senators, John Stewart broke down the Senate hearing on his show last night and jokingly proposed the U.S. create the 'Tax Code Nano.'

8 functions for iPhone 5 in the palm of your hand

8 functions for iPhone 5 in the palm of your hand

XiStera 8: pocketable lens adapter, stand, tripod mount, headphone wrap, stylus, bottle opener & key chain with optional LED lighting.

Help protect yourself from signed malware in OS X

Help protect yourself from signed malware in OS X

With the discovery of malware signed with a valid Apple ID, here are some steps you can take to help prevent the remote chance of any such programs infecting your computer.

There is no question that regardless of the computing platform you use, malware happens. To help prevent these and other unwanted programs from running, Apple includes a data execution prevention routine called GateKeeper, which offers three layers of protection. The first allows everything to run, the second allows only applications signed with a valid Apple Developer ID to run, and the third allows only programs distributed through the Mac App Store to run. -- MacFixIt.

Corning Gorilla Glass 3 stronger, better, cheaper, more eco-friendly

Corning Gorilla Glass 3 stronger, better, cheaper, more eco-friendly

A new test video, along with explanation and question period, shows Corning firing back at rumors that Apple and other clients may switch to using a sapphire glass cover in future products. In addition to showing that Corning's Gorilla Glass 3 is stronger and more resistant to damage, the US-based glass company says that their product is more eco-friendly, cheaper to make, and more flexible for designing products. -- Electronista.

Apple's Intelligent Orientation-Based Audio Coming to iDevices

Apple's Intelligent Orientation-Based Audio Coming to iDevices

On May 23, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an all-new intelligent audio system that is coming to future iDevices that will be based on a device's orientation rather than depending on its fixed speakers. Depending on the way the user is holding their iDevice and which content they're enjoying, Apple's new audio processing router will ensure that the very best audio output configuration is chosen using its intelligent audio mapping system. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents New Touch Pad Electrode Design & Diamond-Like Carbon Coating to Help Keep Battery-Powered Devices Cooler

Apple Invents New Touch Pad Electrode Design & Diamond-Like Carbon Coating to Help Keep Battery-Powered Devices Cooler

Last week we learned about Apple inventing an all-new touch sensor panel that would support larger displays like those found on a MacBook Air or Pro. Today, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals yet another major touch related invention relating to an all-new touch pad electrode design which is to reduce the effects of noise and thermal drift and to provide users with more precision in their interaction with a touch display. Another invention covered in our report covers an amorphous diamond-like carbon coating for increasing the thermal conductivity of the structural frames of any Apple mobile device that is battery-powered. We close out our report by covering a new camera patent and providing you with a list of continuation, provisional and divisional patents that were published today that may interest some. -- Patently Apple.

Using "lsof" When Files Won't Delete

Using

Got a file that's preventing you from emptying your Trash? Got a disk image that won't eject? Then we've got a Terminal trick you'll like. This command will show you what programs are accessing a file or volume, so you can quickly figure out what to quit to get on with your life. -- The Mac Observer.

Monitoring Multiple iTunes Downloads

Monitoring Multiple iTunes Downloads

It used to be that the iTunes Store Download link was on the left side of the screen and you could click it to see or pause multiple files downloading at once, but with iTunes 11 it's gone now?

Apple's redesign of its iTunes jukebox software last fall moved a number of elements around to new locations within the program's interface. In iTunes 11, you can see a list of actively downloading files by clicking the small downward-pointing arrow in the top right corner of the program's window.

When you click this Downloads icon, a box pops open showing the name and progress of each file on the way to your computer. You can pause all file downloads or individual downloads here as well, which can come in handy if you need to free up some network bandwidth.

Although the Downloads link no longer appears there, if you miss the other items that were listed in the left pane of the iTunes window in previous versions of the program, you can restore it. Just go to the View Menu in iTunes 11 and select Show Sidebar. When the Sidebar is showing, your various libraries (Music, Movies and so on) appear in a readily visible list instead of being hidden away in the Library pop-up menu in the top left corner of the window. (If you find you prefer the Library pop-up menu, just return to the View menu and choose Hide Sidebar.) -- New York Times.

How to Set Up Your Mac to Allow AirPrinting From iOS

How to Set Up Your Mac to Allow AirPrinting From iOS

AirPrint is a great feature of iOS that provides a simple way of printing documents from your iPhone or iPad directly to an AirPrint-compatible printer with no setup or installation needed. That's all well and good but the number of AirPrint-compatible printers is pretty small, chances are many of us have a great printer at home that isn't compatible. In this tutorial, we'll explore a couple of ways to provide AirPrint to your iOS device using your Mac as well as how we can make AirPrint work even better! -- Mactuts+.

How to download iTunes U assignments and course material to iBooks for iPhone and iPad

How to download iTunes U assignments and course material to iBooks for iPhone and iPad

iTunes U makes it easy to download and subscribe to any courses you'd like. While not all courses come with assignments and material, some do. If you decide you'd like to complete assignments or want to download additional material, here's how to find out if any is available in iTunes U and download it directly to iBooks. -- iMore.

With an SSD, backups are more important than ever

With an SSD, backups are more important than ever

Welcome to the dawn of the SSD age. Solid-state drives now offer great performance at affordable prices, which is why more and more users are choosing them in new PCs and adding them to older ones.

I'm a big fan myself, but I want to share a cautionary tale. -- PCWorld.

Meet the 23-ton X-Wing, the world's largest Lego model

Meet the 23-ton X-Wing, the world's largest Lego model

There's big, then there's really big, and then there's colossal, which might be a good word to use when describing a near 46,000-pound Lego X-Wing that made a triumphant debut Thursday in New York's Times Square.

The full-size replica, about 42 times the size of the Lego "Star Wars" X-Wing (#9493) set available on store shelves, celebrates the debut of Cartoon Network's "The Yoda Chronicles," which premieres on May 29 at 8 p.m.

It took a small army of 32 Lego master builders, housed in a facility in the Czech Republic, to build the 45,980-pound, or 23-ton, Lego ship. It stands 11 feet high and 43 feet long, and contains more than 5 million Lego pieces. -- BusinessWeek.

May 23 Thursday's News

 

Apple invention adjusts audio based on a display's orientation, user positioning

Apple invention adjusts audio based on a display's orientation, user positioning

A patent application published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday reveals Apple is actively researching methods to ensure a video's multi-channel audio is always played back correctly, no matter how a user holds the device. -- AppleInsider.

iOS 8 Revealed

iOS 7 Revealed

Syncing calendars between Mountain Lion and Snow Leopard

Syncing calendars between Mountain Lion and Snow Leopard

This was a popular subject when Mac OS X Lion (10.7) first shipped, as Apple drew a firm line between the new and old ways in regard to data sharing. MobileMe was out and iCloud was in. At that time there were a couple of sneaky ways to make Snow Leopard's iCal work with iCloud. Allow me to report that I've wasted plenty of my time so that you needn't waste yours. These schemes are broken and it's very unlikely Apple is going to do anything to make iCloud compatible with Snow Leopard.

But that doesn't mean you can't use an alternative--Google Calendar. In order to have such a thing you must sign up for a Gmail account. For the six of you who don't have one, hightail it on over to Gmail.com and set it up. -- Macworld.

Doing more with Messages

Doing more with Messages

Last week we wandered about Mountain Lion's Messages application to get a feel for the territory. In today's lesson we'll dig into some of Messages' less obvious features, including screen sharing, initiating remote slideshows and presentations, and viewing past chats. -- Macworld.

All about About This Mac

All about About This Mac

In this week's tip, I'll discuss a cool feature that you may be wholly unaware of--even if you're a long-time Mac user.

In Lion and Mountain Lion, click the Apple menu and choose About This Mac. Yeah, yeah, you've seen this before. But now click More Info.

In the old days, you'd be taken to System Profiler, and you'd see a fairly drab list of specs about your Mac--which you can still see in Mountain Lion by choosing Show System Report from the File menu. But now More Info offers a slicker view that puts your Mac's most important information front and center. -- Macworld.

Categorize And Manage Your Larger iBooks Library With Ease

Categorize And Manage Your Larger iBooks Library With Ease

Is your iBooks library starting to outgrow those beautiful skeuomorphic wooden bookshelves that Apple provided for you? Have you purchased way too many Star Wars novels, only to find them crowding out your beloved Jane Eyre collection?

Well, there's a simple way to manage an epic, ever-growing iBook collection, of course (why else would I be writing this), and here's how. -- Cult of Mac.

iOS Mail: Archive or Delete Individual Emails

iOS Mail: Archive or Delete Individual Emails

If you're using an email service that supports it (such as an iCloud account or a Gmail one), you can choose to archive your messages instead of deleting them, which will save emails into a folder called "Archive" or, within Gmail, "All Mail." If this feature is turned on for a particular email account on your iOS device, you'll see a storage box in your toolbar when you've got a message open instead of the typical trash icon. -- The Mac Observer.

Use Flickr as a cloud drive

Use Flickr as a cloud drive

Flickr has announced that all users will now have 1 TB of storage for free. With that much space, surely it would be interesting to figure out how to use Flickr as a cloud drive.

Ricardo Tomasi has done just that with Filr, a command-line tool that turns Flickr into a storage repository. This solution isn't ideal, since it's only available for now from the command line, and has only been tested with certain types of files (images), and only on files of up to 15 MB. But it's worth highlighting, and I'm sure others will come up with better solutions very soon. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Voice Search Coming Soon to Chrome for iOS

Voice Search Coming Soon to Chrome for iOS

Google has announced plans to roll out an update to the iOS version of Chrome that will enable voice searching. The feature will function similarly to Siri on the iPhone, requiring a tap on the microphone to bring up the interactive search interface.

Apple launches Father's Day promotions, cleaner look

Apple launches Father's Day promotions, cleaner look

As is traditional for the time of year, Apple has updated its main US homepage to promote items from its store in tune with the upcoming Father's Day holiday. In addition to the iPad and iPad mini, such items as iPhone 5, the Nike+Fuel band, the iGrill meat thermometer, the HipKey proximity alarm, the Nest thermostat and other suggestions are highlighted. The page also features a subtly cleaner and more geometric design.

The update to the design of the page is not immediately noticeable, but offers more squared-off corners and a more-clearly tiled design. The layout has been made more elegant, and buttons are also noticeably more rectangular. The look has been extended to the other main pages of the online store.

A link to shipping deadlines is also featured on the Father's Day page so that buyers can be sure to receive their deliveries in time for the holiday, which falls on June 16. Apple is again offering free custom engraving on the iPad as part of the promotion.

Swindles and Spam, Lurking in Your Search Results

Swindles and Spam, Lurking in Your Search Results

Most of our ventures onto the Web still begin with a search -- a fact readily exploited by spammers and swindlers who rely on excessive use of keywords, link exchanging and other manipulation techniques to push their content higher in the list of search results, hoping you will click on them.

Though the major search engines discourage such deception, that hasn't stopped companies from engaging in such practices -- and fooling users in the process.

A little caution when using a search engine can help you steer clear of fraudulent merchandise and keep out of the clutches of spammers. -- New York Times.

Apple Reveals New Two-Way "Airplay" Interactivity & Hints of TV

Apple Reveals New Two-Way

On May 23, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals Apple's next generation of "Airplay" that will be able to operation in a two-way manner that is also interactive. Apple also hints that the separate devices of an Apple TV and a Television could be combined into a single device, an Internet-enabled television. -- Patently Apple.

Intel's Linux OpenGL Driver Faster Than Apple's OS X Driver

Intel's Linux OpenGL Driver Faster Than Apple's OS X Driver

The open-source Intel Linux graphics driver has hit a milestone of now being faster than Apple's own OpenGL stack on OS X. The Intel Linux driver on Ubuntu 13.04 is now clearly faster than Apple's internally-developed Intel OpenGL driver on OS X 10.8.3. when benchmarked from a 'Sandy Bridge' class Mac Mini. Only some months ago, Apple's GL driver was still trouncing the Intel Linux Mesa driver. -- Phoronix.

Should I upgrade to Mountain Lion?

Should I upgrade to Mountain Lion?

Is Mountain Lion worth upgrading to? It's a question worth considering, and it seems that many Mac OS X owners have yet to take the plunge. In this feature we take a look at some of the features in Apple's latest operating system, and see if the update is worth it. -- Macworld UK.

Switch to Mac: Translating Windows to OS X

Switch to Mac: Translating Windows to OS X

Congratulations! You've made the leap from a Windows PC to the Mac. Now that you're here, it's no surprise that you might be feeling a bit lost. We've assembled this chart to make it easy for you to find the feature you're looking for, whether it's your printer settings or audio controls. -- Macworld.

How and Why to Use Private Browsing in iOS

How and Why to Use Private Browsing in iOS

A reader recently asked for help with their iPad: Safari's navigation bars had turned black, and the reader didn't know why or how to fix it. The short answer is that the reader had inadvertently enabled Private Browsing in Safari, but it got us thinking that perhaps a more detailed look at this useful, but little-known, iOS feature was in order. -- TekRevue.

On Using Your iPhone Abroad Without Getting Totally Screwed

On Using Your iPhone Abroad Without Getting Totally Screwed

It's expensive to use a cell phone abroad. It's even more expensive to use a smartphone abroad. A few years ago, I took a work trip to Paris and did a dumb thing. Long story short, I get off the plane, forget that both my voice and data plans are standard and end up with a four-figure phone bill. AT&T was actually really great about getting the number down to around $50, but they told me very clearly that this was my one get out of jail free card. -- Gizmodo.

May 22 Wednesday's News

 

Excessive Data Usage/Charges on iOS

Excessive Data Usage/Charges on iOS

Thomas Moats has several iOS devices: 6.0.1 -- iPhone 4, 6.1.2 -- iPhone 4S, 6.1.3 -- iPad, and more; he reports a problem and provides a fix for Excessive Data Usage/Charges:

I thought I would pass along something that we found on some iOS devices that were having excessive data usage (20-40GB per month) and thus excessive data charges ($200 to 400 per month).  After loading a data monitoring app called Onavo Count we found that the Exchange email service was the problem because of an old email stuck in the Outbox.  In one case it had been there for several months.  Deleting the email appears to have fixed the issue, but we are still monitoring everyone's usage to be sure.  One thing about deleting the email, on a couple of the devices I could not delete the offending email until I turned off cellular data and Wi-Fi.  After doing this, we had no problem deleting it.

Just thought I would pass this along.  It is a lot better than resetting a phone.

Edit your photos like a boss, the Ars way

Edit your photos like a boss, the Ars way

What do you do when you have a decent photo that you want to turn into a great photo?

Making a great image often means you need to spend a long time editing, but that's not always the case. Sometimes all you need is the right tool or approach.

We asked a few of the Ars editors and writers about some of the tools they use. All of us do some degree of photo editing for the articles we write, but some of us also love photography in our spare time. Here are a few of the tools we rely on and a few pro tips on creating images with impact. -- Ars Technica.

Font free for all: Where to get free and low-cost fonts

Font free for all: Where to get free and low-cost fonts

Back in ancient times--throughout much of the 1980s and 1990s when just 1000 or so fonts were available for desktop computers--designers had a tongue-in-cheek saying among themselves: The one who dies with the most fonts wins! It made sense at the time because fonts were coveted by every designer as a creative resource of unparalleled importance, and prices were astronomical. While supply has risen and prices have dropped in more recent eras, one thing remains true today: Fonts remain incredibly important and valuable to anyone who puts words on paper or pixels. -- Macworld.

How to transfer music from an iPhone to a Mac

How to transfer music from an iPhone to a Mac

One of the most infuriating thing about Apple's music devices - its wonderful iPods and iPhones - is their rigid approach to syncing. You can sync music from a single PC or Mac very easily and intuitively using iTunes, but transferring music in the other direction seems to be impossible. Here's how to get it off and transfer your tunes to a Mac. -- Macworld UK.

Traveling With An iPad And A Camera: Batteries, Backups And Bags

Traveling With An iPad And A Camera: Batteries, Backups And Bags

I just got back from a week-long vacation. We were staying in Tel Aviv, Israel, which meant lots of walking and cycling (I took my Brompton), plus day trips. Which in turn meant traveling light.

The iPad is perfect traveling companion, and the iPad mini is even better. But if you want to take lots of photos with an actual camera, or -- worse still -- a camera that shoots huge RAW images, you need to plan ahead. And as I didn't want to take a Mac with me, I needed a few tricks to help out.

This post isn't about how I managed my photos on the trip (although I will mention that side of things a little in terms of the hardware I used). It's about the gadgets and apps that help you work around the limitations of the iPad when you're relying on it away from home. -- Cult of Mac.

Use iBooks 3.1 To Study Better -- Highlight, Search, And Make Notes In The Text

Use iBooks 3.1 To Study Better -- Highlight, Search, And Make Notes In The Text

iBooks is not only a fantastic e-reading app on your iPhone or iPad, but it's also a fantastic study tool. If you need to read books for class or your own learning objectives, you can use iBooks to highlight words or passages, search the text for specific words or phrases, and make notes that appear in the margins as little colored sticky notes. -- Cult of Mac.

Optical drives not working with Mountain Lion for some

Optical drives not working with Mountain Lion for some

An ongoing issue for some people who have installed Mountain Lion is the inability to access their systems' internal optical drives. Once installed, inserting a disc results in a couple of noises before the disc is ejected. While this can sometimes happen for burned discs that are no longer readable, it appears to happen for all discs, be they home-burned or commercial. -- MacFixIt.

How to migrate a user account to another OS X system

How to migrate a user account to another OS X system

There are several ways you can move a user account from one computer to another without having to set up the account again from scratch. -- MacFixIt.

Apple Granted 26 Patents Covering a Double-Sided Touch Panel for iPhone, Push-to-Talk and Magic Mouse's Touch Design

Apple Granted 26 Patents Covering a Double-Sided Touch Panel for iPhone, Push-to-Talk and Magic Mouse's Touch Design

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 26 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover three main granted patents. The first covers the possible implementation of a native Push-to-Talk feature for a future iPhone. The second covers a new flexible circuit supporting a double-sided touch panel that technically could be used for a wraparound display for a future iPhone. The third covers the touch technology that went into the design of Apple's Magic Mouse. Our report concludes with a full list of the remaining granted patents of the day. -- Patently Apple.

What is the advantage of getting an unlocked cellphone?

What is the advantage of getting an unlocked cellphone?

Wireless carriers typically subsidize the cost of a new mobile phone by requiring you to sign a two-year contract for service on their networks -- in effect, "locking" the phone to the network. This subsidy can lower the price of a new smartphone to about $200 from around $600, but it basically means you cannot legally use the phone with any other company's network without permission from your carrier.

Modifications earlier this year to the Digital Millennium Copyright Act actually made unlocking your phone without your carrier's permission illegal. A Congressional bill, the Unlocking Technology Act of 2013, was recently introduced to change the current law.

You can still buy an unlocked phone outright, though, and one big advantage to doing so is that you can use it freely on other carrier networks -- especially if you buy a handset that works on the G.S.M. networks used around the world. Traveling with an unlocked G.S.M. phone means you can buy local inexpensive service plans, and S.I.M. cards, in the countries you visit and not worry about exorbitant roaming charges from a company back home. -- New York Times.

An introduction to Kerberos in OS X

An introduction to Kerberos in OS X

Kerberos originally designed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is a Network Service Authentication Protocol. It was named after the three headed guard dog of Hades.  This is quite accurate as Kerberos creates a realm with 3 key components, These are the Kerberos Client, the kerberised service and the Key Distribution Center or KDC. Apple have been using Heimdal's  implementation of Kerberos Version 5 since OS X .7. -- Amsys.

Calculating the Angular View of an iPhone

Calculating the Angular View of an iPhone

I have a new iPhone. You know I am going to use this for both videos and images that can be analyzed. It's just what I do. So, before I need it I am going to measure the angular field of view for this phone. Oh sure, I could just look it up somewhere but I don't always trust these values. It's more fun to do it yourself. -- Wired Magazine.

May 21 Tuesday's News

 

Think your Skype messages get end-to-end encryption? Think again

Think your Skype messages get end-to-end encryption? Think again

If you think the private messages you send over Skype are protected by end-to-end encryption, think again. The Microsoft-owned service regularly scans message contents for signs of fraud, and company managers may log the results indefinitely, Ars has confirmed. And this can only happen if Microsoft can convert the messages into human-readable form at will. -- Ars Technica.

Advice from an Apple Tech: When your Mac takes a fall

Advice from an Apple Tech: When your Mac takes a fall

If you've never heard that noise before, you're bound to hear it someday: that amazing, dull crunch as your Mac slips out of your hands or off a desk and makes a date with the ground at 9.8 meters per second squared, gravity having played the role of a yenta-like matchmaker bringing together your computer and an admirably dense surface. The crunch registers in your brain, and you have a sudden mental image of the universe collapsing.

Here's how to make the best of a terrible situation, get as much of your data back as possible, and avoid a similar disaster if your Mac decides to smooch the ground again somewhere down the line. -- Macworld.

How to fix a water-damaged Apple iPhone

How to fix a water-damaged Apple iPhone

So you dropped your Apple iPhone in the bath, the sea or the toilet, and you want to fix it, dry it out, and recover the data inside. Here's how to rescue a waterlogged iPhone. -- Macworld UK.

Teen's invention could charge your phone in 20 seconds

Teen's invention could charge your phone in 20 seconds

Waiting hours for a cellphone to charge may become a thing of the past, thanks to an 18-year-old high-school student's invention. She won a $50,000 prize Friday at an international science fair for creating an energy storage device that can be fully juiced in 20 to 30 seconds. -- NBC News.

Was Apple's Logo Really Designed Using The Golden Ratio?

Was Apple's Logo Really Designed Using The Golden Ratio?

Apple is well-known for its love of the so-called golden ratio, an "extreme and mean" mathematical ratio that designers as far back as the third-century B.C. had identified as most likely to lead to harmonious design. The iCloud logo, for example, is designed with the golden ratio in mind... and it's widely believed that the iconic Apple logo is also designed using the golden ratio. -- Cult of Mac.

Fix The Multiple Purchased Books Bug In iBooks On Your iPad

Fix The Multiple Purchased Books Bug In iBooks On Your iPad

When I opened iBooks on my iPad mini the other day, I tapped the Collections button, and selected "Purchased Books" as my filter option, to see what I had in my account that I wanted to read. Oddly, I saw a ton of the same book, over and over, sitting on the shelves. -- Cult of Mac.

Where have you gone, Engine Charlie?

Where have you gone, Engine Charlie?

Charles Erwin Wilson, known as "Engine Charlie," was president of General Motors and later Secretary of Defense under President Dwight Eisenhower. He is broadly -- and incorrectly -- quoted as having said during his Senate confirmation hearing "what's good for General Motors is good for America." His actual quote is more nuanced: "For years I thought what was good for our country was good for General Motors and vice versa."

This is a fascinating bit of history because we aren't talking about today's General Motors or even today's United States of America but the GM and the USA of 1953 -- a time when both were leading the world. Yet look at the equivocation in Charlie's statement -- I thought, not I think.

Look, too, at our biggest companies today like Apple, Exxon-Mobil, Google, Microsoft, General Electric, and even, yes, General Motors. Can we still maintain, as Engine Charlie kinda/sorta did, that what's good for those companies is good for America and vice versa?"

No, we can't. -- I, Cringely.

Control iTunes AirPlay streaming with AppleScript

Control iTunes AirPlay streaming with AppleScript

iTunes 11.0.3 provides AppleScript support for controlling AirPlay devices. Below is a basic script that illustrates how AirPlay devices can be selected and applied using some of the new iTunes AppleScript classes and properties. -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to create custom PDF compression filters in OS X

How to create custom PDF compression filters in OS X

Apple's Preview program is the default PDF viewer in OS X, and has a number of options for annotating and otherwise managing PDF files. One of its features is support for Quartz filters, which can be applied to PDFs and image files to convert them, for example into sepia, black-and-white, or gray scale. A Quartz filter can be used to reduce the PDF's file size, but while it's effective at doing so, you may find images in the resulting PDF too grainy to use.

You can make your own filters for reducing or otherwise adjusting images when exporting in OS X's Preview application. -- MacFixIt.

Kodak unveils new Mac-oriented scanner model

Kodak unveils new Mac-oriented scanner model

Kodak, continuing its journey back from bankruptcy, has introduced a ScanMate i940 scanner specifically aimed at Apple users for the North American and European market. In addition to featuring increase image accuracy and precision capture, the unit now comes bundled with NewSoft software for Macs, including Presto Pagemanager 9 for scanning images and doing OCR on the scanner as well as Presto BizCard Xpress business card-scanning software. -- MacNN.

Getting Passes for Passbook

Getting Passes for Passbook

You do not need a special iOS app to get coupons, tickets and other digital documents that work with Apple's Passbook electronic wallet. -- New York Times.

One-Time Pad Reinvented To Make Electronic Copying Impossible

One-Time Pad Reinvented To Make Electronic Copying Impossible

The ability to copy electronic code makes one-time pads vulnerable to hackers. Now engineers have found a way round this to create a system of cryptography that is invulnerable to electronic attack. -- MIT Technology Review.

iTunes: About the 'A secure network connection could not be established' alert

iTunes: About the 'A secure network connection could not be established' alert

If you are unable to sign in or purchase content from the iTunes Store, you may see the following alert:

"iTunes could not connect to the iTunes Store. A secure network connection could not be established. Make sure SSL 3.0 or TLS 1.0 is enabled in the Internet Options control panel, then try again."

In an effort to protect your privacy, iTunes uses the Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) protocol when you sign in to the iTunes Store. The SSL protocol uses port 443, the date and time, and other information from your computer to function as expected. The troubleshooting steps below will address the most commonly incorrect information that SSL and the iTunes Store require; this should resolve the issue and the alert should no longer appear.-- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Protecting Your Mail Account

Protecting Your Mail Account

E-mail security is an ongoing issue, but there are basic precautions you can take to help keep your account safer from intruders, viruses and other malicious scenarios. To start, make sure your computer's operating system, security software and e-mail/Web browser program have all the latest updates and security patches installed. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted a Patent for a New Magic Mouse Force Sensor that Could Debut Later this Year

Apple Granted a Patent for a New Magic Mouse Force Sensor that Could Debut Later this Year

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 26 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's future Magic Mouse that will utilize a new force sensor. Our report also covers and 4 new design patents covering Apple's Smart Cover and more. -- Patently Apple.

How To Wrangle Outlook 2011 To Work With Gmail

How To Wrangle Outlook 2011 To Work With Gmail

In 2010, Outlook poorly supported Gmail accounts, but today it's a lot better. Most of the setup that was previously required is now automated. In this revised guide, you'll now find two major sections. The first shows you where to plug in your account information, and I'll also walk you through some extra steps to remove a couple unnecessary folders. The second details how you can make Outlook feel more like Mail, and includes some of what was previously covered in the 2010 tutorial. I've also removed the previous introduction -- I'll get straight to the point. I hope you find this guide more more relevant and useful than it was before. -- MacStories.

Derrick Story Talks About 'iPad for Digital Photographers'

Derrick Story Talks About 'iPad for Digital Photographers'

Digital photography expert Derrick Story has a new book with a very specific focus. "iPad for Digital Photographers" is your guide to getting the most out of Apple's tablet if you are into photography. Derrick talks about why the iPad is such a compelling and useful device for photographers of all experience levels. With tips on using the iPad as a camera, and editing device, and a business device (for the pros), this book has something for everyone. We talk through some of Derrick's workflows for both transferring and editing photos to and from the iPad, why the iPad can encourage even the most traditional photographer to try something new, and why he recommends getting this book on paper rather than as an eBook. -- MacVoices.

Dropbox vs. Google Drive vs. Amazon vs. Skydrive: Which One Is Fastest?

Dropbox vs. Google Drive vs. Amazon vs. Skydrive: Which One Is Fastest?

As cloud computing services become ever more popular, you might begin to wonder how much you can really trust them to perform when you need them? I decided to find out - by testing the top file-transfer/file-storage/file-backup services. -- ReadWrite.

How to subscribe to an iTunes U course on your iPhone and iPad

How to subscribe to an iTunes U course on your iPhone and iPad

iTunes U offers a wealth of knowledge and for the most part, a lot of it is free. This means you can download courses and lectures on a vast array of topics and subjects without ever having to actually step foot in a classroom. Whether you want to brush up on a topic you've already studied or would like to learn something new, there's something for everyone.

Follow along and we'll walk you through how to subscribe to an iTunes U course directly from your iPhone or iPad. -- iMore.

6 Tips to Extend iPhone Battery Life That Actually Work

6 Tips to Extend iPhone Battery Life That Actually Work

These tips will extend battery life for all iPhone users, but you probably don't need to bother with any of this unless your iPhone battery life is actually suffering. It's usually pretty obvious when so, because those of us impacted by the battery drain will have a battery at 30%-60% by mid day despite very light to moderate usage. If you're not certain, you should run the battery down to about 5% and then see how long the battery has actually lasted by checking usage statistics, if what you see is only a couple hours of actual device usage, then you may have an excess drain issue that can be resolved by the tricks outlined below. -- OS X Daily.

The Texas Brick Railroad

The Texas Brick Railroad

Game designer Steve Jackson and a bunch of friends build Lego trains and tracks and scenery, including buildings and other props. The group calls itself the Texas Brick Railroad. They often display their train sets at public events where -- yes -- their trains attract children like crazy. This FLASH video shows off both current Lego trains and some of the classic, no-longer-sold Lego trains that members have collected over the years, including the highly-prized monorails.

May 20 Monday's News

 

US Air Force expects to save $50M with use of 18K Apple iPads

US Air Force expects to save $50M with use of 18K Apple iPads

The purchase of 18,000 iPads for use as electronic flight bags has set the stage for the U.S. Air Force to save more than $50 million over the next 10 years. -- AppleInsider.

Pentagon officially grants security clearance to Apple's iPhone and iPad

Pentagon officially grants security clearance to Apple's iPhone and iPad

The U.S. Department of Defense announced on Friday that it has officially approved Apple devices running iOS 6 or later to access its secure government networks. -- AppleInsider.

Where Ars staff turns for better app experiences

Where Ars staff turns for better app experiences

Thirty-party apps didn't exist when the iPhone first launched in 2007. At that time Apple offered its own set of built-in iOS apps and users were relegated to Web apps if they wanted tools made by someone else. Luckily things have changed since; we now have hundreds of thousands of apps to choose from for our iPhones, iPads, and iPod touches. Many of them even offer similar or better functionality than the default apps from Apple.

Users still can't delete Apple's default apps from iOS devices (grumble grumble…) but there are plenty of useful alternatives out there for people hoping to use something other than the default. Readers are always asking about which apps the Ars staff uses when they choose to ditch the Apple's camera, mapping, music, or other apps. I put out a call to our editors and writers to find out just what does the Ars staff use for the major app categories (and why)? Here's what we came up with. -- Ars Technica.

How to sync an Android phone to your Mac

How to sync an Android phone to your Mac

Thanks to iCloud, syncing an iPhone with a Mac is a piece of cake. But Mac users who don't buy into the whole "one vendor to rule them all" thing will find that syncing an Android phone with OS X isn't quite as easy. That said, it isn't terribly difficult, either, thanks to Google's own cloud services. -- Macworld.

Apple patents way to use other device's flashes for mobile photography

Apple patents way to use other device's flashes for mobile photography

Apple has filed a new patent in which a primary iOS device controls many other secondary devices as assistant flashes in order to light the scene.

When taking photos in low light the outcome may not always be as desired, that's why we use flashes to light the scene up. But, one flash might not be enough or it might ruin a face shot, and presumably that is why Apple have come up with this new system.  -- Macworld UK.

Apple retail revenues per visitor reach new record

Apple retail revenues per visitor reach new record

In the US, on a sales per square foot basis, Apple retail continues to perform twice as well as Tiffany & Co., the second best retailer, and three times as well as lululemon athletica, the third best retailer.

The latest quarter showed a 7% growth in visitors and a new record of $57.6 revenue per visitor. -- Asymco.

Five More Ways To Master Siri On Your iPhone And iPad

Five More Ways To Master Siri On Your iPhone And iPad

When Siri was updated along with iOS 6, we showed you a bunch of ways to use Apple's personal digital assistant the right way, like using punctuation and finding out the weather.

Yet time marches ever onward, and we've compiled yet another five tips and tricks to help you master Siri, whether you're looking to create a secure password or just pass the time with a few laughs. Enjoy! -- Cult of Mac.

Five Tricky, Advanced Ways To Save Space On Your Mac Hard Drive

Five Tricky, Advanced Ways To Save Space On Your Mac Hard Drive

Saving space on your Mac's hard drive is more important than ever, especially if you use one with a faster but smaller solid state drive in it, like my Macbook Air. Being able to manage your space wisely is the key here, and once you've done the obvious things, like pare down your Applications folder and delete all those iMovie source files, it's time to get trick, and a bit advanced.

Here's five things that you can do to get rid of hard drive bloat, if you dare. -- Cult of Mac.

iTunes 11.0.3: New MiniPlayer Features

iTunes 11.0.3: New MiniPlayer Features

In this tip, we're going to dive into the new options available for the MiniPlayer under the just-released version of iTunes, including the lovely new album art view. Melissa Holt informs us that she listened to a lot of Pink Floyd while writing this tip, so it may turn out to be her grooviest yet, man. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple TV: Hiding Unused Icons from the Main Screen

Apple TV: Hiding Unused Icons from the Main Screen

Love your Apple TV, but don't love all of the applications that come pre-installed? Then hide the ones you don't want, and enjoy a cleaner user interface! All you need is your Apple remote and a couple minutes of your time. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Assign Custom Icons to Desktop Files & Folders in OS X

How to Assign Custom Icons to Desktop Files & Folders in OS X

OS X looks great, but sometimes you need to give your Mac a little personality, or maybe you just need some quick visual cues for your folders files. Sandro Cuccia shows you how to engage in a fun, but Apple-sanctioned method for customizing your Mac desktop icons. -- The Mac Observer.

Save disk space by deleting copies of Mail attachments

Save disk space by deleting copies of Mail attachments

By default, Mail will keep file attachments that you've opened or viewed in your ~/Library/Mail Downloads folder, until you delete the associated email. You can save disk space by making the following switch.

In Mail's preferences, go to General, then set Remove unedited downloads to When Mail Quits. This does not remove the attachment from your email, just from your local cache of Mail Downloads.

On one machine I've got, I reclaimed nearly half a gigabyte after using the system for only a few months! I can't wait to see how much I get back on a system I've been using for 5 years! -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to handle OS X firmware updates that won't install

How to handle OS X firmware updates that won't install

If you've got an OS X firmware update that just refuses to install properly, there are a few things you can try to remedy the situation. -- MacFixIt.

Chinese Hackers Resume Attacks on U.S. Targets

Chinese Hackers Resume Attacks on U.S. Targets

Three months after hackers working for a cyberunit of China's People's Liberation Army went silent amid evidence that they had stolen data from scores of American companies and government agencies, they appear to have resumed their attacks  using different techniques, according to computer industry security experts and American officials. -- New York Times.

Intel Fuels a Rebellion Around Your Data

Intel Fuels a Rebellion Around Your Data

Intel is a $53-billion-a-year company that enjoys a near monopoly on the computer chips that go into PCs. But when it comes to the data underlying big companies like Facebook and Google, it says it wants to "return power to the people." -- MIT Technology Review.

Inside AT&T's 83GB/hour mobile cell tower …or why your iPhone no longer drops out at huge events

Inside AT&T's 83GB/hour mobile cell tower …or why your iPhone no longer drops out at huge events

AT&T shared a little bit of what goes into a portable network cells they put up at special events where bandwidth needs will be extraordinary. Remember, AT&T's network is about 80% iPhones so this is important stuff. The setup above was what they used to cover a recent Los Angeles festival (read: Coachella).

This isn't a test network; AT&T's been honing their skills since they got caught with their pants down at SXSW in 2010 (back when AT&T was the only US iPhone carrier). Since then, with their mobile response team, they've been able to keep their network up and running at huge events with the addition of these 'kits'. -- 9to5Mac.

Clearing up Mac App Store confusion

Clearing up Mac App Store confusion

Jack Sanford is being lied to by the Mac App Store and would like to do something about it. He writes:

When I checked for Mac App Store updates on my MacBook Air, it said there were no updates available. But when I clicked the Purchases tab, the button next to iMovie showed Update. I clicked that and got a dialog telling me "You have updates available for other accounts." But I have only one Apple ID that I use for purchases. How do I fix it? -- Macworld.

'SpecialisRevelio!' Macs use Harry Potter spell to unlock secret 'backdoor'

'SpecialisRevelio!' Macs use Harry Potter spell to unlock secret 'backdoor'

The Mac on your desk or on the cafe table next to you has a chip with secret functions that can be unlocked only by inputting a spell from the Harry Potter series. The SMC, or system management controller, is a chip used to regulate a Mac's current and voltage, manage its light sensor, and temporarily store FileVault keys. Turns out that the SMC contains undocumented code that is invoked by entering the word "SpecialisRevelio," the same magic words used to reveal hidden charms, hexes, or properties used by wizards in the Harry Potter series written by author J. K. Rowling. -- Ars Technica.

10 Photo Editing Programs (that aren't Photoshop)

10 Photo Editing Programs (that aren't Photoshop)

Adobe Photoshop is one of those weird products that has an cultural significance far beyond its actual purpose. As we've said before, it has become a verb - we commonly speak about 'Photoshopping' images regardless of the software that we actually used to do it.

Adobe's recent announcement that everything beyond Photoshop CS6 will need to be rented as part of its Creative Cloud lineup has caused a fair amount of disquiet (some of which has been pretty loud), but Photoshop isn't the only game in town, and never has been. In this article we'll be taking a quick look at ten other pieces of image manipulation software that you might not know about, but which are well worth exploring.

None of these applications is a true one-to-one 'replacement' for Photoshop CS6, particularly if you're a graphic designer or video professional. But for the rest of us - people that just want to retouch images, manipulate composition, adjust colors and saturation, apply canned filters and effects, and remove that kid who wandered into the foreground of an otherwise-perfect photo - they may prove to be very useful. -- Digital Photography Review.

Having Every Photo I've Ever Edited With Me At All Times Thanks to Lightroom 5

Having Every Photo I've Ever Edited With Me At All Times Thanks to Lightroom 5

When Lightroom 5 Public Beta was introduced I recorded a video showing my Top 5 Favorite Features (see below). One of the features that I knew would be a game changer for me was the new Smart Preview feature. When you build "Smart Previews" for your images they are available even if the original RAW files, TIFFS, JPGs, PSDs, etc. aren't with you. You can perform edits on them in the Develop Module and also output them for web/email as well as use them in slideshows. -- Terry White's Tech Blog.

Apple files patent for client-server version control system for software apps

Apple files patent for client-server version control system for software apps

Apple has filed a patent (number 20130125242) with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for client-server version control system for software applications. It's for a software version control system that manages versioned applications in a client-server computing system environment. -- AppleDailyReport.

Tool Hacks: Sometimes, You Gotta Improvise

Tool Hacks: Sometimes, You Gotta Improvise

Lately, we've been combing through data from our community survey and collecting stories for the Amazing Break series. All those stories have taught us a thing or two about the way people go about fixing things.

We firmly believe that it's always best to use the right tool for the job. But, sometimes, time is really of the essence. When you've just dropped your iPhone in a glass of Sprite or your motherboard is on fire, you probably don't have time to wait for a box of shiny new tools to arrive in the mail.

In these cases, you may need to resort to some improvisation. Here are a few tricks we've collected from our own experiences and those of our users. -- iFixit.

The Golden Ratio

The Golden Ratio

The golden ratio (symbol is the Greek letter "phi") is a special number approximately equal to 1.618. It appears many times in geometry, art, architecture, Aesthetics, Painting, Book design, Industrial design, Music, Nature, Optimization, Perceptual studies, and other areas.

If you divide a line into two parts so that the longer part divided by the smaller part is also equal to the whole length divided by the longer part then you will have the golden ratio. -- Math Is Fun.

May 17 Friday's News

 

MacBook Air Flash Storage Firmware Update 1.0

MacBook Air Flash Storage Firmware Update 1.0

MacBook Air Flash Storage Firmware Update 1.0 is recommended for MacBook Air (mid 2012) models. This update addresses a storage firmware issue that, in rare cases, may cause a system to fail to recover from a crash.

Apple's iPhone e-wallet concept suggests payment options based on context

Apple's iPhone e-wallet concept suggests payment options based on context

An iPhone-driven e-wallet service from Apple could simplify checking out at the store by presenting users with options based on data such as their location, current balance, or applicable rewards cards. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases iTunes 11.0.3 with new MiniPlayer, improved Songs View

Apple releases iTunes 11.0.3 with new MiniPlayer, improved Songs View

Apple on Thursday released a new version of its iTunes media suite, with a new MiniPlayer featuring artwork and a progress bar, along with an improved Songs View.

iTunes 11.0.3 is now available to download direct from Apple or through an OS X software update. The application is a 196.6-megabyte download for Mac. An update is also available for Windows users.

Release notes for the software state that users can now see their album artwork while in Songs View with iTunes 11.0.3. The updated software also adds support for multi-disc albums, which are now shown as a single album.

According to Apple, the update also provides performance improvements when searching and sorting large iTunes libraries.

The latest relatively minor update to iTunes arrived in February in the form of version 11.0.2,adding a new "Composers" view for music along with providing speed and reliability upgrades.

The last major update to the software was released as iTunes 11 last November. It featured a complete overhaul of the application's design, along with a new storefront and tighter integration with Apple's iCloud suite of services.

Now you see it: How Apple's Retina display is a boon to accessibility

Now you see it: How Apple's Retina display is a boon to accessibility

iOS's accessibility features are great, particularly on the iPad--as I've written elsewhere--but for disabled users, accessibility is more than just a niche set of options in the Settings app.

But perhaps the greatest accessibility feature is the most obvious part of a smartphone: the screen. As a visually impaired user, my effective use of these devices depends on the quality and brightness of the screen. In order for me to achieve optimal use--especially on the iPhone, the device I use the most--I've found that I really need a Retina display set to maximum brightness. -- Macworld.

Apple and the file system: Skating to where the puck might go

Apple and the file system: Skating to where the puck might go

Since the introduction of the Mac, Apple has waged a steadily escalating war against the file system. While the ability to organize files hierarchically has been a mainstay of operating systems for as long as there have been operating systems, the fine folks from Cupertino have constantly pushed away from that approach with each iteration of Apple's products, starting with the introduction of Packages and culminating, arguably, with iOS's complete lack of a user-facing interface for manipulating the file system. -- Macworld UK.

The real reason Adobe ditched Creative Suite for Creative Cloud

The real reason Adobe ditched Creative Suite for Creative Cloud

Why Adobe's move to a subscription service provoked such strong reactions, what the underlying reasons for the move are -- and how to decide if you should move to Creative Cloud. -- Macworld UK.

Fix for missing 'Assign to...' Mission Control bug in 10.8.x

Fix for missing 'Assign to...' Mission Control bug in 10.8.x

Having originally upgraded to 10.8 from 10.7, all of my applications' desktop assignments in (now) Mission Control were already set. I recently decided to wipe and install a fresh copy of OS X 10.8.3, and discovered that, for many of my apps, the option to "Assign to..." particular desktops or to all desktops was missing. After roaming through forum after forum I finally found a workaround for this bug. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Ways to hide applications in OS X

Ways to hide applications in OS X

Though OS X offers great multitasking features, having multiple windows open in multiple applications can sometimes hinder concentration. If you don't want to put the application you're mainly working with in full-screen mode, there are other options.

For example, you can minimize windows to the OS X Dock, but this has its limitations, including filling the Dock so it expands across your screen. Additionally, it requires you to click and expand the window from the Dock to preview its contents, which results in the documents being reordered in the Dock when you minimize it again.

If you're looking for other ways to keep multiple applications open, while reducing confusion, here are a few to try. -- MacFixIt.

Apple Reveals a Future Illumination System for iDevice Cameras While Hinting of a Stand Alone Camera & Beyond

Apple Reveals a Future Illumination System for iDevice Cameras While Hinting of a Stand Alone Camera & Beyond

On May 16, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a next generation lighting system for iDevices. The new system is designed to provide superior lighting to your photos day or night in a unique manner. Apple's patent also describes a new remote light source accessory while strongly hinting that a standalone camera is still a future option of theirs. With Samsung's Galaxy Zoom or the like on the horizon, a standalone or new kind of hybrid iDevice camera or advanced camera accessory isn't out of the question for the future. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents All-New Touch Sensor Panel for Larger Displays

Apple Invents All-New Touch Sensor Panel for Larger Displays

On May 16, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an all-new touch sensor panel design for larger displays. Today's touch sensor panels are designed like a checkerboard taking on a matrix of drive and sense lines arranged in rows and columns in horizontal and vertical directions. That may be fine for smaller touch displays but as the touch displays become larger such as those for a future MacBook or even an iMac, the current design becomes a drag on the speed of touch command execution. Apple's next generation touch sensor panel is likely to take on either a web-like design or one that incorporates thick diamond-like shapes so that the user's finger is more likely to hit the sensors faster and easier. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Advances their Future Shopping App Again & More

Apple Advances their Future Shopping App Again & More

On May 16, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals their ongoing work with their future "Shopping App." Apple first revealed an extensive patent filing for NFC as it related to "Shopping" back in 2010 as a companion app to their future iWallet. Just like Apple's Passbook keeps gift cards, coupons, tickets and passes into an organized app, Apple's iWallet is likely to contain another round of things that relate to their financial app and the "Shopping" feature is just one. Last week's update to the Shopping app focused on methods of setting payment option preferences and more. Today's patent application adds at least five major aspects to the "Shopping" apps patent claims. The base of the patent doesn't change much if any. It's all about securing key aspects of the invention that Apple wants to protect, just in case they have to go court over it in the future. -- Patently Apple.

Smartphone Tracker Gives Doctors Remote Viewing Powers

Smartphone Tracker Gives Doctors Remote Viewing Powers

At the Forsyth Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, nurses can see into the lives of some diabetes patients even when they're not at the clinic. If a specific patient starts acting lethargic, or making lengthy calls to his mom, a green box representing him on an online dashboard turns yellow, then red. Soon, a nurse will call to see if he is still taking his medication. -- MIT Technology Review.

A Few Words On Batching Photos On OS X

A Few Words On Batching Photos On OS X

Any Mac user who takes a lot of photographs runs into the same problems. Renaming, converting, color adjustments, watermarks, and photo file management are just a few of the issues we face. iPhoto might be good to store a large number of photos but it's not much for batching-- making adjustments to many photos at one time.

When it comes to batching changes to many photos at once Mac users have a few choices, starting with individual apps that do one thing. One app adds a watermark, while another converts to different file formats, while another changes color or file size. -- McSolo.

Ted Landau on Apple TV, Apple Televisions and a Possible Turning Point in Apple's Operating Systems

Ted Landau on Apple TV, Apple Televisions and a Possible Turning Point in Apple's Operating Systems

Ted Landau talks about the benefits of multiple Apple TVs (and why he now has one on every screen in his home), whether an Apple television makes sense, and how we all consume our video entertainment. Ted then takes aim at the next version of iOS and discusses what effect the absence of Scott Forstall will have on the direction of the iOS interface, why this could be a turning point in the iOS, and why he thinks this version will signal Apple's intentions on the merging (or not) of the two operating systems. -- MacVoices.

Creating or Importing your own Ringtones into iTunes

Creating or Importing your own Ringtones into iTunes

While Apple still allows you to purchase alert tones directly from the iTunes Store, many users may already have their own sound effects or songs that they already own that they'd like to use as ringtones or alert tones. Unfortunately, while iTunes doesn't provide any way to do this directly, if you already have a short sound file in the AAC format you can actually import it straight into the "Tones" section in iTunes simply by renaming the file, changing the extension from M4A to M4R before importing it.

If your file is longer than about 30 seconds and/or in a format other than AAC, however, you'll need to take some additional steps. See this week's Ask iLounge article "Setting up a ringtone in iTunes" for more information. -- iLounge.

May 16 Thursday's News

 

Apple seeds OS X 10.8.4 beta build 12E52 to developers

Apple seeds OS X 10.8.4 beta build 12E52 to developers

Exactly one week after the last OS X 10.8.4 beta was released to developers, Apple on Wednesday seeded build 12E52 of the upcoming maintenance update with no known issues. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's 'social camera flash' connects multiple iPhones, iPads to light a scene

Apple's 'social camera flash' connects multiple iPhones, iPads to light a scene

An Apple patent filing discovered on Thursday describes a system in which a primary iOS device, such as an iPhone, remotely controls multiple secondary devices, which can also be iPhones, as slave flashes for the first handset's on-board camera. -- AppleInsider.

She's Just Phishing

Just Phishing

How to install Linux on a vintage 68K Mac

How to install Linux on a vintage 68K Mac

If you're like me and happen to have a bunch of vintage Macs powered by Motorola 680x0 CPUs lying around, then you probably like to tinker with them. And what better way to tinker with obsolete hardware than by installing an obsolete version of Linux on it? It's a difficult and time-consuming procedure with no practical purpose, of course, but when has that ever stopped us? [This would be funny if it wasn't true.] -- Macworld.

Getting started with Messages

Getting started with Messages

If you thought the only way you could use your Mac to communicate with other people was to send email messages, I'm about to brighten your day. For years the Mac OS has supported instant messaging, a form of texting similar to sending and receiving messages with a mobile phone. -- Macworld.

Five Dictionary tricks I can't live without

Five Dictionary tricks I can't live without

Whether you need to know what a word means or just how to spell it, the days of leafing through hefty paper dictionaries are gone. But few Mac users really know how to make the most of OS X's built-in Dictionary app. Today I'll show you five tricks for doing just that. -- Macworld.

Pages: Using Paragraph Styles

Pages: Using Paragraph Styles

If you've used InDesign, you may be familiar with styles, those handy-dandy formatting tools that can help you change the look of your documents pretty much instantly. In this tip, Melissa Holt will cover how to use paragraph styles in Apple's Pages program, and if you've never used them before, you may find them to be the official Best Thing Ever™ for formatting text. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X: How to Kill Stubborn Apps & Hidden Processes

OS X: How to Kill Stubborn Apps & Hidden Processes

Mac Geek Gab listener Stephen is trying to update an app on his Mac, but the app's installer won't work because the app, or its processes, are still running. We show him how to quit those pesky apps and kill their hidden processes so that he can safely update or remove the app from his system. -- The Mac Observer.

Set up Facebook chat in OS X Messages

Set up Facebook chat in OS X Messages

You can set up Facebook chat in Messages. Since Facebook uses Jabber, all you need to know is your user name, and you can create an account.

Open Messages' preferences, and click on Accounts. Click on the + icon to create a new account. For Account Type, choose Jabber. For your account hem, you'll need to find your Facebook user name; this is the text after http://www.facebook.com/. The account name for the Jabber account should therefore be your_facebook_user_name@chat.facebook.com. Enter your Facebook password in the Password field, and click on Done. -- Mactuts+.

How to create an OS X installer from Apple's Internet Recovery

How to create an OS X installer from Apple's Internet Recovery

You can create a standalone OS X installation drive without having purchased OS X from the App Store.

The copy of OS X that is included with your Mac is not considered a retail purchase, so unfortunately you will be able to access it only through Apple's installer. However, there is a small workaround that you can use to capture this copy and put it on a USB drive for use offline.

Apple Discussion Communities member "keg55" outlines the method for doing this, which involves installing OS X to an external drive, then removing the drive before the installer can complete, thereby preserving the installation image. -- MacFixIt.

How to revert a language change in OS X

How to revert a language change in OS X

If the OS X system language changes to one you don't understand, you may have to navigate to the system preferences and revert the changes by using visual landmarks. -- MacFixIt.

Recovering a forgotten iTunes Store account name

Recovering a forgotten iTunes Store account name

If you have forgotten your iTunes Store account name, you can recover it if you have made iTunes Store purchases by following these instructions:

Note: In most cases, your iTunes Store account name will be your email address. You may want to try signing in using your email address as your iTunes Store account name.

  1. Open iTunes
  2. Highlight one of the items you have purchased (You can find your purchases in your Purchases playlist).
  3. Choose File > Get Info.
  4. Click the Summary tab.

The Account Name area will list the account used to purchase the item. Unless you have changed accounts, this is your iTunes Store account name. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Alternatives to Photoshop on the Mac

Alternatives to Photoshop on the Mac

Photoshop is the best image editor on the market. It is being used in a vast number of professions, from medical imaging to 3D graphics. Will that change with Adobe's Creative Cloud, which has change the way users purchase Photoshop? Under Creative Cloud, users no longer purchase the software, but rent it for $240 a year. For many users, this price is just too expensive. -- Three Guys And A Podcast.

Adobe unleashes critical patches for ColdFusion, Reader and Flash

Adobe unleases critical patches for ColdFusion, Reader and Flash

Adobe has released fixes for dozens of critical security flaws affecting ColdFusion, Reader, Acrobat and Flash Player.

Adobe's Patch Tuesday-synced scheduled security updates for Flash Player this month include fixes for 13 critical flaws with updates available for Windows, Mac, Linux and Android as well as updates for Adobe Air. -- ZDNet.

How To Use Your iPhone To Scare Store Employees When You Shop

How To Use Your iPhone To Scare Store Employees When You Shop

You know what they say. Knowledge is power. Years ago, retail giant Sears did away with sales in favor of everyday low prices. That didn't work out and Sears struggles for relevancy.

Likewise, JCPenny tried Apple Store honcho Ron Johnson who did away with sales in favor of everyday low prices, but the buying public wasn't buying it. Literally. Customers have a power now that didn't exist just a generation ago.

Take your iPhone, add the free RedLaser app, walk into any retail store and scan the barcode to compare that store's prices with prices elsewhere.

Whoa. Think about it. Using your iPhone while you shop probably sends shivers down the spine of store managers and retailers. All it takes is your iPhone's camera and a free app to compare one store's prices with another. -- TeraTalks.

May 15 Wednesday's News

 

iMovie 9.0.9

iMovie 9.0.9

iMovie 9.0.9 addresses issues where iMovie does not recognize video cameras connected to your Mac, improves compatibility with projects imported from iMovie for iOS and includes stability improvements.

Server-side update makes Siri a stickler for succinctness

Server-side update makes Siri a stickler for succinctness

Siri is already well known for her wit and willingness to joke, but a recent server-side update has given Apple's digital assistant the ability to tell users they should be more into the whole brevity thing. -- AppleInsider.

Apple and the file system: Skating to where the puck might go

Apple and the file system: Skating to where the puck might go

Since the introduction of the Mac, Apple has waged a steadily escalating war against the file system. While the ability to organize files hierarchically has been a mainstay of operating systems for as long as there have been operating systems, the fine folks from Cupertino have constantly pushed away from that approach with each iteration of Apple's products, starting with the introduction of Packages and culminating, arguably, with iOS's complete lack of a user-facing interface for manipulating the file system.

That's not to say that the file system itself has disappeared from your iPhone or iPad: Underneath iOS's glossy user interface and cloud-based document storage, files and directories continue to provide the basic structure in which data is organized.

Apple's decision to move from a file-centric user experience to one that revolves strictly around the concept of a document shifts the responsibility for organizing files from the users to their apps. And a key side effect of Apple's new approach is that it confines each app to working within a restricted sandbox where it has complete control over its files. -- Macworld.

Tips and tricks for iPhoto for iOS

Tips and tricks for iPhoto for iOS

Although iPhoto for iOS isn't quite as robust as its OS X counterpart, it's a very capable image editor--and it can do a few cool tricks you simply can't do on your Mac. -- Macworld.

Save Space On Your Hard Drive -- Delete Unwanted Speech Voices From Your Mac

Save Space On Your Hard Drive -- Delete Unwanted Speech Voices From Your Mac

Hard drive space is at a premium these days, with files getting larger and solid state drives (SSD) becoming more affordable and ubiquitous. I'm typing on a Macbook Air right now, and making sure I don't clutter up the drive with unnecessary files is important to me.

One way to do this is to get rid of the voices that Mac OS X uses for text-to-speech. These files can take up a decent amount of space, which may well be why iOS only allows the one onboard, now that I think about it. -- Cult of Mac.

Tell Siri Which Audio Input To Listen To

Tell Siri Which Audio Input To Listen To

Talking to Siri can be either an exercise in frustration, or a miracle of modern technology, depending on your mood and how successful the Apple digital assistant is at interpreting what it is you're asking. Typically, when you activate Siri with a long press and hold on the Home button, the input is collected via the microphone built into your iPHone or iPad.

If you have a Bluetooth accessory, though, you might not know that Siri can listen through that device as well. Here's how to get Siri to do just that. -- Cult of Mac.

Quickly add items to the OS X Finder sidebar and Dock

Quickly add items to the OS X Finder sidebar and Dock

The OS X Finder sidebar and Dock are convenient locations for favorite folders, documents, applications, and locations, and in addition the Dock offers a convenient place for minimized windows, as well as the Trash. For new user accounts Apple puts a default set of items in the Dock and Finder sidebar, but these can be customized.

The standard and perhaps intuitive method of adding items to these locations is to drag them there; however, it's not foolproof. If you inadvertently release your mouse before the cursor has reached the Dock or sidebar, then you chance copying or moving the item out of its current folder to the Desktop or to another window. Sometimes you can even embed items in open documents that were under where you released the mouse. -- MacFixIt.

Covering Up Your Amazon Tracks

Covering Up Your Amazon Tracks

Amazon.com displays on its home page products you browsed on recent visits to the site, but you can delete some or all of your shopping history.

You can remove certain products from your Amazon shopping trail, or turn off your browsing history on the site altogether. To remove specific items from the Recently Viewed section when you are logged into your Amazon page, click the "View or edit your browsing history" link under a row of products. On the resulting "Your Browsing History" page, find the product you want to remove and click the "Delete this item" link.

In the "Manage Your Browsing History" box on the left side of the page, you also have options to delete all the items on list at once or turn off your browsing history completely. You can also get to your browsing history settings by clicking the Your Account button at the top of the Amazon page and scrolling down to the Personalization section.

Apple Granted 35 Patents Covering Future iDevices that will respond to Acoustic Commands like Taps, Scratches & More

Apple Granted 35 Patents Covering Future iDevices that will respond to Acoustic Commands like Taps, Scratches & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 35 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we first cover Apple's granted patent which discusses how acoustic transducers could one day be configured to accept acoustic commands that consist of tapping, scratching and other interactions with a surface of an iPad, iPhone or MacBook Pro. Our report concludes with a list of the remaining patents that were granted to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted Patents for Movie Storyboarding, Final Cut Timecoding and iMovie Template Creation

Apple Granted Patents for Movie Storyboarding, Final Cut Timecoding and iMovie Template Creation

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 35 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover three granted patents covering technologies found in iMovie and/or Final Cut Pro. -- Patently Apple.

Apple is Granted New Patents for Multitouch & Trackpads

Apple is Granted New Patents for Multitouch & Trackpads

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 35 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two multitouch related patents. The second patent covers a movable trackpad like those associated with the iPod Classic and the Apple TV remote. The first granted patent that we cover today is for yet another major multitouch patent covering contact tracking and an identification module for touch sensing. -- Patently Apple.

Borked your iDevice? Pay EVEN MORE to have it fixed by Applecare

Borked your iDevice? Pay EVEN MORE to have it fixed by Applecare

Cupertino is reportedly planning changes to Applecare with a move towards shop-based iDevice repairs and a potentially lucrative subscription service scheme.

The AppleCare and AppleCare+ schemes look likely to be overhauled in America this autumn, with the altered services rolled out across the world afterwards. -- The Register.

Upgrade to SSD

Upgrade to SSD

If you are looking for a way to get more out of your MacBook or MacBook Pro, consider a solid-state drive (SSD). SSDs offer faster data read and write speeds, fast file transfers, speedier boot times and will save you some battery life. In the past, SSDs were considered somewhat pricey upgrades and out of reach for many users. Today, prices are dropping and quality drives can be had for a song through retailers like Amazon and OWC.

Today I will show you how to install an SSD, specifically the Samsung 840 series into a June 2012 MacBook Pro. The procedure in this tutorial video will work for any SATA-based Mac notebook with a few minor adjustments to the physical installation of the disc. -- TUAW.

Generate Random Passwords on the iPhone with Siri

Generate Random Passwords on the iPhone with Siri

The next time you need a new randomly generated strong password, pull out an iPhone and ask Siri. Yes, the voice assistant that lives in iOS. You won't find this trick in Siri's own listing of commands list, but it's a piece of cake to use and quite powerful. -- OS X Daily.

Type 40 Mark III: Interactive Sound Sculpture

Type 40 Mark III: Interactive Sound Sculpture

Is it a time machine? A MIDI controller? An art sculpture? Yes! We just call it awesome. The Type 40 Mark III console is an interactive sound sculpture. The console surface is covered interactive controls that trigger samples, loops, and other sounds. You can also modify tempo, tone, pitch, and apply different sound filters. We invite you to explore and play - create your own dynamic soundscape! -- Vimeo.

May 14 Tuesday's News

 

Apple wins utility patent for MacBook's trackpad design

Apple wins utility patent for MacBook's trackpad design

Apple on Tuesday was granted a utility patent from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office covering the glass-on-metal trackpad seen across the company's laptop lineup, with the award coming almost four months after the design rights were garnered for the same invention. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent lets users control a device with taps, thumps and scratches

Apple patent lets users control a device with taps, thumps and scratches

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday issued Apple a patent for an audio-based input system in which various noises made on a laptop's chassis are translated into actions, basically turning the computer into one large input device. -- AppleInsider.

Password strength meters aren't security theater

Password strength meters aren't security theater

If you've ever been nagged about the weakness of your password while changing account credentials on Google, Facebook, or any number of other sites, you may have wondered: do these things actually make people choose stronger passcodes? A team of scientists has concluded that the meters do work--or at least they have the potential to do so, assuming they're set up correctly. -- Ars Tecnica.

What to do when things go wrong with your Mac

What to do when things go wrong with your Mac

We recently encountered a problem with our MacBook Air that refused to charge. Here we look at the steps you need to take if you have a Mac that needs fixing. -- Macworld.

Save Space On Your Hard Drive -- Delete User Cache Files

Save Space On Your Hard Drive -- Delete User Cache Files

Saving space on your Mac hard drive is a key strategy, especially when you're using a Macbook Air, with it's strictly solid state drive (SSD). Even if you're using a desktop Mac with a hard drive that seemed like "plenty of space" when you bought it, there will come a time when you'll be looking to save some of it for more data. Why not get rid of the non-essential stuff on your Mac's hard drive? -- Cult of Mac.

Easily Correct Siri Input Errors Without Getting Frustrated

Easily Correct Siri Input Errors Without Getting Frustrated

Have you ever had one of those Siri moments, where you ask her to search for something, and she interprets your speech incorrectly? I'm guessing all of us have, at one time or another.

One thing Siri doesn't do very well is provide for "no I meant…" error correction, at least using speech. Next time you use Siri and the result is something you didn't expect, don't just press the home button in frustration, but correct Siri using your iPhone or iPad keyboard instead. -- Cult of Mac.

The iPhone's Hidden Image Editor

The iPhone's Hidden Image Editor

Your iPhone or iPod touch makes for a handy camera, and both can take nice images. That doesn't, however, mean you won't need to make some quick adjustments on the go. You can turn to a long list of apps designed to help with that, including Apple's own iPhoto, but if you only need to make some minor adjustments, the Photos app has a nearly-hidden editor just waiting to help out. -- The Mac Observer.

Disk Utility may combine custom drive setups on some Macs

Disk Utility may combine custom drive setups on some Macs

Apple's Disk Utility program is the built-in drive and volume management tool for OS X that is included not just in the working OS X installation but also in the OS X installation and recovery volumes for an OS X system. While useful for checking system file permissions and fixing formatting errors, there are some instances where it may not properly manage some custom drive setups on iMac and Mac Mini systems.

The use of automatic repair routines on newer Mac Minis and iMacs may combine two separate drives into a Fusion drive. Fortunately, there's a way to get around that. -- MacFixIt.

Tackle OS X Thunderbolt firmware update woes

Tackle OS X Thunderbolt firmware update woes

Last week Apple issued a firmware update for its entire Thunderbolt-supporting Mac lineup, which was intended to address some stability problems when using Macs in Target Disk mode. While the update works as intended for the majority of systems, a few have encountered problems, either applying the update or not being able to recognize Thunderbolt drives after updating.

If you are unable to successfully install the update or are experiencing problems after doing so, here are a couple of steps you can try. -- MacFixIt.

New Wi-Fi Standard in the Works with Ten Times Speed Boost

New Wi-Fi Standard in the Works with Ten Times Speed Boost

Late yesterday, the Nikkei reported that some 20 global companies including Electronics, NTT, Qualcomm, Ericson, China Mobile and Samsung have agreed to jointly develop a new Wi-Fi technology that is ten times faster than the current standard.

The aimed speed of the next generation Wi-Fi is 10GB which will enable Full HD real-time streaming services. In just one second, the new Wi-Fi standard you allow consumers to send data amounting to the volume of newspapers for 1,200 days.

The full list of the contributors to this standard wasn't made public. Whether Apple will be a contributor is unknown at this time. Apple has always been one of the early adopters of new wireless standards and they should be one of the first to adopt the newest standard now being developed.

Apple Granted Two Patents for waterproofing iDevices

Apple Granted Two Patents for waterproofing iDevices

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 35 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two of Apple's patents relating to waterproofing iDevices. A waterproofing test was recently conducted by Square Trade showing how waterproofing has been upgraded in Apple's iPhone 5 and our report includes that video. Our report also covers Apple's sole granted design patent of the day covering the iPad with an email interface which includes a credit to Apple's late CEO Steve Jobs. -- Patently Apple.

Which Data Recovery Software Should I Use on my Mac?

Which Data Recovery Software Should I Use on my Mac?

Reader John has a hard disk gone bad and needs to recover some files off it before he moves on to a newer, more reliable disk. With that, though, he's having trouble deciding which data recovery software to use, in part because there are no good reviews of any options out there. -- The Mac Observer.

How To Create a Bootable Mountain Lion USB Thumb Drive

How To Create a Bootable Mountain Lion USB Thumb Drive

Long gone are the days where Apple sells Mac OS X on discs. To get Mountain Lion (Mac OS X 10.8) you buy it online from Mac App Store, download and install it. That's great as long as your Mac is working properly and online. As we all know there are times when you may need to reinstall Mac OS X, install it on a fresh system or external hard drive. When you install it on a Mac you need to be able to boot from an external disc especially if you want to reformat the hard drive or do repairs with Disk Utility. Apple used to make it kinda easy to create a bootable disc, but for some reason with Mountain Lion Apple no longer provides to utility to automate this process. Nevertheless it can still be done. -- MacNews Blog.

Tool reveals Apple user locations

Tool reveals Apple user locations

An Australian researcher has created a tool that uses Apple's location services to potentially reveal where users live.

The tool works by accessing Apple's database of wireless access points, which is collected by iPhones and iPads that have GPS and WiFi location services enabled. Most iPhones and iPads regularly submit information about access points within range to Apple, regardless of whether users connect to them. -- SC Magazine UK.

The Complete Guide to Buying an External Display for Your Mac

The Complete Guide to Buying an External Display for Your Mac

Apple sells more portable Macs than desktops -- but that's a lot of Macs with a display of 15" or less. You can use an external display on any portable Mac and iMac but so many different display types, connectors, sizes, how do you know what type of display to go for? In this guide we'll explore how you can find your perfect second (or third) display. -- Mactuts+.

May 13 Monday's News

 

iOS 6.1.3 Affects Mail App, Gmail Accounts -- Apple Support

iOS 6.1.3 Affects Mail App, Gmail Accounts -- Apple Support

A considerable amount of complaints has been hitting Apple's forums (and MacGuru) as of late. A lot of customers are reporting various problems with their iDevices after installing iOS 6.1.3, the latest software update for Apple's mobile operating system. [I don't know if iOS 6.1.4 fixes this or not. Please let me know.] -- Softpedia.

Police asking Apple to decrypt seized iPhones must wait their turn

Police asking Apple to decrypt seized iPhones must wait their turn

Apple is inundated with so many requests from law enforcement agencies to decrypt seized iPhones that officials must endure a waiting list before their case is handled. -- AppleInsider.

Apple begins worldwide rollout of two-step verification system

Apple begins worldwide rollout of two-step verification system

Apple recently introduced its two-step identification verification system to at least 13 new countries as part of a worldwide rollout, with Apple ID account holders in those nations now granted access to the heightened security feature first deployed in March. -- AppleInsider.

DRM in HTML5 is a victory for the open Web, not a defeat

DRM in HTML5 is a victory for the open Web, not a defeat

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the group that orchestrates the development of Web standards, has today published a Working Draft for Encrypted Media Extensions (EME), a framework that will allow the delivery of DRM-protected media through the browser without the use of plugins such as Flash or Silverlight. -- Ars Technica.

An antibiotic that also helps prevent stupidity

An antibiotic that also helps prevent stupidity

Alternately, one of the most useful side effects of a drug that I've ever heard of. There's an antibiotic called minocycline, which is a close chemical relative of the more commonly prescribed tetracycline. But recently, some researchers discovered it has an intriguing off-label effect: the drug can "improve symptoms of psychiatric disorders and ... facilitate sober decision-making in healthy human subjects." To get a better grip on this effect, some researchers turned to a classic example of human stupidity, the "honey trap." In this case, rather than honey, the trap was baited with an attractive female, because "Males tend to cooperate with physically attractive females without careful evaluation of their trustworthiness." -- Ars Technica.

Live map of recent changes to Wikipedia articles is mesmerizing

Live map of recent changes to Wikipedia articles is mesmerizing

A website built by two programmers, Stephen LaPorte and Mahmoud Hashemi, displays recent changes to Wikipedia in real-time on a map of the world. When a new change is saved to the crowd-sourced encyclopedia, the title of the edited article shows up on the map with the editor's location according to his or her IP address. -- Ars Technica.

Professor Receives Department of Energy's Early Career Award

Professor Receives Department of Energy's Early Career Award

A UT professor whose research on neutron imaging could improve medical imaging and high-mileage electric vehicles has received the U.S. Department of Energy's Early Career Research Award. -- Tennessee Today.

Five overlooked OS X system tweaks

Five overlooked OS X system tweaks

If you like to find new ways to tweak OS X, you sometimes need to look in unexpected places. For example, the Accessibility pane of System Preferences, which houses a number of features to help users who have limited seeing, hearing, and mobility, contains some nifty features that all users should know about. Here are five system tweaks that you might want to try on your Mac. -- Macworld.

When cars talk, this is what they'll tell each other

When cars talk, this is what they'll tell each other

Researchers are developing machine-to-machine (M2M) communication technology that allows cars to exchange data with each other, meaning vehicles will soon know what the cars all around you are doing on the highway. -- Macworld UK.

Apple to fix iPhones in store, revamp Apple Care

Apple to fix iPhones in store, revamp Apple Care

Apple has plans to repair more iPhones in store rather than exchange a broken iPhone for a refurbished one. This could see customers paying for a part rather than a flat-fee for a complete replacement. The change should save Apple $1b a year. -- Macworld UK.

3 OS X Tips To Save You Time & Lower Your Blood Pressure

3 Mac Tips To Save You Time & Lower Your Blood Pressure

Nancy Carroll Gravley has three great Mac tips to make our computing experiences more fun and less stressful, including some tips on using the built-in dictionary, some scrolling shortcuts, and information on how to use the 'proxy icon.' -- The Mac Observer.

China Digs Deep to Show Apple Can Do No Right

China Digs Deep to Show Apple Can Do No Right

China is digging deep in its efforts to use Apple as a political and economic pawn, demonstrating that merely apologizing for mistakes and then correcting them won't keep the company out of the Chinese government's crosshairs. Bryan Chaffin discusses the issues. -- The Mac Observer.

What does the 'Reset Print System' routine in OS X do?

What does the 'Reset Print System' routine in OS X do?

The Reset Print System routine in OS X performs a number of adjustments to the print service's files and configurations to restore factory default settings, but these steps can be manually performed or can even be undone, if needed. -- MacFixIt.

How to Mine Cell Phone Data Without Invading Your Privacy

How to Mine Cell Phone Data Without Invading Your Privacy

Researchers at AT&T, Rutgers University, Princeton, and Loyola University have devised a way to mine cell-phone data without revealing your identity, potentially showing a route to avoiding privacy pitfalls that have so far confined global cell-phone data-mining work to research labs. -- MIT Technology Review.

The Deceptively Simple Games of Matt Neuburg

The Deceptively Simple Games of Matt Neuburg

When I first came to TidBITS and started getting to know the staff, I was surprised to learn that our own Matt Neuburg, in addition to being a TidBITS Contributing Editor and the guy John Gruber of Daring Fireball has called "the best technical writer in the business," is also an iOS developer. (This wouldn't have been as surprising had I known that Matt's main project of the last few years is his "Programming iOS" books for O'Reilly, the most recent of which is "Programming iOS 6.") Matt has created three simple, yet challenging games for the iPhone and iPad: Zotz!, Diabelli's Theme, and LinkSame. If you're looking for a mental challenge to kill a few minutes, give them a try! -- TidBITS.

Giving The People What They Want

Giving The People What They Want

How To Back Up, Speed Up, And Clean Up Your iPhone Or Android Device

How To Back Up, Speed Up, And Clean Up Your iPhone Or Android Device

It's good to clean up at least once a year and get rid of the clutter in your house, but there's no reason you shouldn't apply the same rule to your digital life. Cleaning up your smartphone isn't just about scraping the gunk out of your case and regaining that sparkly new look (though you should do that); it's also about sweeping away the junk onboard and potentially enjoying a performance boost.

Whether you're rocking an Android, an iPhone, or something else, these tips should help you reclaim your smartphone and put a fresh spring (pun intended) in its step. Here is our guide to backing up, speeding up, and cleaning up your iPhone or Android device. -- Digital Trends.

iOS 7 and my continued, unrequited desire for a Files.app!

iOS 7 and my continued, unrequited desire for a Files.app!

Every year, for the last three years, I've asked Apple to consider what amounts to a Files.app and FilePicker control in iOS. It would be analogous to the Photos.app and ImagePicker control, but allow us to easily find, and easily open, all the documents we use on all our iPhones and iPads, every day. Now, on the eve of iOS 7, the need for better file handling -- not filesystem! -- remains, and if anything has become even more urgent. In a post-iCloud, post Steve Jobs and Scott Forstall world, how can Apple address it? -- iMore.

Dr. iPhone?

Dr. iPhone?

It's as if an iPhone went to medical school. A Smartphone Physical debuted at TEDMED uses devices paired with an iPhone to measure vital medical functions. -- mLive.

Make your own invisibility cloak with a 3D printer

Make your own invisibility cloak with a 3D printer

Invisibility cloaks have been around in various forms since 2006, when the first cloak based on optical metamaterials was demonstrated. The design of cloaking devices has come a long way in the past seven years, as illustrated by a simple, yet highly effective, radar cloak developed by Duke University Professor Yaroslav Urzhumov, that can be made using a hobby-level 3D printer. -- GizMag.

May 10 Firday's News

 

Thunderbolt Firmware Update v1.2

Thunderbolt Firmware Update v1.2

Thunderbolt Firmware Update v1.2 provides stability fixes for Thunderbolt and Target Disk Mode.

How Internet Explorer 10 was inspired by iPad users

How Internet Explorer 10 was inspired by iPad users

Microsoft has been heavily promoting its touch-centric browser since the launch of Windows 8. Internet Explorer 10 features a "chrome-less" interface intended to remove browser distractions and keep the user focused on the content. It's also gesture enabled, enabling users to pan, zoom, and swipe between pages. To get the browser to this point, Microsoft had to discover what exactly consumers were looking for from a tablet browser. The answer lay with iPad users. -- Ars Technica.

PayPal exec aims to 'obliterate passwords from the face of the planet'

PayPal exec aims to 'obliterate passwords from the face of the planet'

PayPal's top security official is on a quest to kill passwords.

"Our intention is to really obliterate, within a certain number of years, both passwords and PINs and see the whole Internet--including internally in enterprises--obliterate user IDs and passwords and PINs from the face of the planet." -- Ars Technica.

The ramifications (ha! ha!) of additional memory on a Mac

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It happens to every Mac (and every other kind of PC): The system slows down when it's doing lot of things at once. If this happens to your Mac more than you'd like, though, your system might need more RAM.

Adding more RAM to your Mac--if you can add more RAM--is one of the easiest ways to improve your Mac's performance. The crucial question is, How much more RAM do you actually need? Macworld Lab ran benchmarks on a couple of Macs at different RAM configurations and analyzed the results. Our conclusion: The impact of more RAM depends on the types of tasks your Mac performs. In some situations your Mac may benefit from having as much RAM as you can afford; in others, you'll be fine with the stock configuration. -- Macworld.

Here's How Much The iPhone Camera Has Improved And The Images To Prove It

Here's How Much The iPhone Camera Has Improved And The Images To Prove It

One enterprising soul over on the Apple boards at Reddit has taken a bunch of comparison photos from the Camera+ app website and put them together to show just how far the iPhone camera has come, with the same image taken with the original iPhone, the iPhone 3G and 3GS, the iPhone 4 and 4s, and then the iPhone 5. -- Cult of Mac.

Hey, Grandpa! Don't Fall Asleep With Your iPad On Your Chest… It Could Kill You!

Hey, Grandpa! Don't Fall Asleep With Your iPad On Your Chest… It Could Kill You!

A 14-year-old girl has discovered that a regular old iPad Smart Cover can "accidentally turn off" a person's implantable defibrillator... a device that might be the only thing keeping them alive.

Her name is Gianna Chien, and having done a report on the issue for her class science fair, she's now presenting her findings in front of 8,000 doctors at the Heart Rhythm Society. -- Cult of Mac.

Quickly Enable AirPlay Audio Streaming On Your Mac

Quickly Enable AirPlay Audio Streaming On Your Mac

If you use a device which can receive audio via AirPlay, or even just switch your Mac's audio output device, you can do that without any extra software. It's easy, and most anyone that's keeping OS X up to date can do it. -- The Mac Observer.

Pixelmator 2.2 Adds Extensive Shapes Support, New Video Tutorials Website

Pixelmator 2.2 Adds Extensive Shapes Support, New Video Tutorials Website

The hugely popular Pixelmator continues to add features to its image editing app, this time adding an extensive collection of shapes and related tools, a new paint selection tool, and more. There is also a new tutorials website with videos showing how to use Pixelmator to its fullest.

Banish stubborn menu extras in OS X

Banish stubborn menu extras in OS X

If you are experiencing problems with a menu extra and can't seem to remove it by standard means, it may have a nonstandard implementation, which will take a couple of steps to root out and uninstall. -- MacFixIt.

Sonnet upgrades xMac Mini Server with daughter card support, BNC

Sonnet upgrades xMac Mini Server with daughter card support, BNC

Sonnet today introduced a significant upgrade of its popular xMac mini Server, a Thunderbolt-to-PCI Express expansion system and 1U rack mount enclosure for a Thunderbolt-equipped Mac mini with a Thunderbolt port. The updated xMac mini Server now supports a double-width PCIe card's daughter card and includes BNC connector mounting holes on the enclosure's rear panel. In addition, the length of the xMac mini Server is now just 15.8 inches, optimizing it for a wider range of popular mobile racks, carts, and rack bags. -- Electronista.

Apple Patent Points to Future iPhone Dock with Lightning

http://www.patentlyapple.com/patently-apple/2013/05/apple-patent-points-to-future-iphone-dock-with-lightning.html

In April of this year we posted a report titled "Apple Electro-Optical Connector Patents Surface that may Point to "Lightning's" Road Map," which was Apple's most up to date patent on their new lightning connector technology. Today, two older 2011 Lightning related patents surfaced as continuation patents which basically means that in all likelihood Apple simply updated their 2011 patent claims and no more. However, if you've never viewed these patents, they do provide those interested in the technology behind Lightning with some real meat to sink their teeth into. One surprise that we noted is that Apple clearly indicates that a Lightning centric dock could be on tap in the future. -- Patently Apple.

Tool Reveals iPad and iPhone User Locations

Tool Reveals iPad and iPhone User Locations

A researcher has found that Apple user locations can be potentially determined by tapping into Apple Maps and he has created a Python tool to make the process easier. iSniff GPS accesses Apple's database of wireless access points, which is collected by iPhones and iPads that have GPS and Wi-Fi location services enabled. Apple uses this crowd-sourced data to run its location services; however, the location database is not meant to be public. -- .

Glimpses of a World Revealed by Cell-Phone Data

Glimpses of a World Revealed by Cell-Phone Data

An examination of simple cell-phone records reveals maps of poverty levels, ethnic divides, and the movements of sports fans.

Around the world, some mobile carriers have been releasing anonymized records of cell-phone data to researchers.

The data releases are not all the same, but can include records of which phones connected to which cell phone towers, providing a trace of caller movements; with whom the connection was made, providing a map of social networks; and what purchases were made, even through simple phones, providing a glimpse of economic activity. In many cases, such data is unavailable from any other source.

The results--even from limited data sets--can be dramatic. -- MIT Technology Review.

How to Print from an iPhone

How to Print from an iPhone

The printer is the Keith Richards of machines -- slowly on the decline, but seemingly immortal. They are no longer our go-to source of information like they were in the '90s and early '00s, but they still hold a special place in the hearts of those of us who prefer the physical print medium to the eye-straining digital format we've grown accustomed to on our laptops, tablets, and smartphones. However, you don't necessarily need a fully-fledged computer to serve all your basic printing needs. Your nifty, spiffy iPhone will do just fine. -- Digital Trends.

Verifying Find My iPhone

Verifying Find My iPhone

If you've never opted into Find My iPhone -- or you're not sure if you have it -- don't worry. You can verify it in just a couple of minutes. On your phone, tap Settings, then tap iCloud, and make sure that Find My iPhone is enabled. To verify that all is working as expected, visit Apple's iCloud site and find your phone by clicking the Find My iPhone icon.

President Announces Open Data Policy With Executive Order

Obama Announces Open Data Policy With Executive Order

In an overdue but welcome move, President Obama has issued an executive order mandating "open and machine-readable data" for government-published information.

May 09 Thursday's News

 

Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 7 spikes ahead of WWDC

Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 7 spikes ahead of WWDC

Website visits from devices running the unannounced iOS 7 have seen a significant increase in recent weeks, as Apple gears up for the mobile operating system's official unveiling at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference in June. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's Lightning connector finally detailed in patent filing

Apple's Lightning connector finally detailed in patent filing

A trio of Apple patent applications filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday reveals the intricacies of the company's latest input/output protocol for iOS devices: the Lightning connector. -- AppleInsider.

FBI claims right to read your e-mail, just like other federal agencies

FBI claims right to read your e-mail, just like other federal agencies

If we've told you once, we've told you a thousand times--the feds can (and do) easily access your e-mail. In fact, sending materials through the United States Postal Service is legally more secure than e-mail. -- Ars Technica.

Discussing the Mac mini media server

Discussing the Mac mini media server

At one time, the computer was the computer and the TV was the TV and never the twain should meet. Yet increasingly computers are being used for entertainment purposes and televisions are packed with more smarts than ever before. Our own Chris Breen decided to bring the two together by incorporating a Mac mini into his home media center. He joins me to talk about the experience. -- Macworld.

How To Get Your Mac Back When The TSA Steals It From You

How To Get Your Mac Back When The TSA Steals It From You

On a vacation with his wife and kids recently, Paul Deas opened his suitcase and found a rude surprise: his MacBook had been stolen. Not only that, but the thief had helpfully left him a note inside, telling him exactly who had robbed him: TSA Agent 5414. -- Cult of Mac.

Manually Refresh Items And Passes In Passbook

Manually Refresh Items And Passes In Passbook

Passbook is cool, and one of the neat features of the service is the automatic refresh of information on your passes, letting you keep track of stuff like your Starbuck's balance, or airline miles, or other kinds of cool stuff.

Unfortunately, it doesn't always work automatically. This can be an issue if they include balances or loyalty points, right? Luckily you can refresh each of the passes in Passbook manually.

Here's how to do that. -- Cult of Mac.

Should Apple Disable iPhone Notifications During A Call In iOS 7?

Should Apple Disable iPhone Notifications During A Call In iOS 7?

Over at The New York Times, Bits columnist Nick Bilton has a gripe to pick with Apple. He doesn't like the fact that push notifications keep pouring in during a voice call on the iPhone. "Even when the device is placed on mute, it vibrates when a notification comes in, rattling your skull for a never-ending second," says Bilton.

Apple Seeds Mac OS X 10.8.4, Build 12E47 To Developers

Apple Seeds Mac OS X 10.8.4, Build 12E47 To Developers

It looks like another month, another 10.8.4 seed, as a new download on Apple's developer download site, build 12E47, contains the same focus areas as last month's seed, Wi-Fi, Graphics Drivers, and Safari.

The seed is the fifth for this particular dot release of OS X. The previous release was April 23, 2013, while the seeds before that came out on the 1st, 4th, and 17th of that month.

Mac OS X 10.8.3 went through 13 revisions over a five month period, so this could just be particularly busy focus area changes. -- Cult of Mac.

Top Tips for Smartphone Photography

Top Tips for Smartphone Photography

When it comes to your Etsy shop photography, what's the advantage of shooting with your smartphone? In short, it's a time-saver: You can shoot, edit, and list your photos in one go. And you won't get caught up in cords to transfer photos from your phone to a computer. Secondly, if you don't have a DSLR or a point-and-shoot, phoneography will save you money.

Although your phone's resolution might not be as high as top-of-the-line DSLRs, as long as you're not planning to print your product photos, your smartphone's resolution is plenty of pixels for the web. Ready to give phoneography a whirl? Check out our tips. But, first things first: If you're using an iPhone, download this free app from the Apple Store; if you're using an Android, we've got tips for using other tools. -- etsy.

Use Strong Passwords, Save Your Starship

Use Strong Passwords, Save Your Starship

The importance of strong passwords to protect your online accounts and personal information is a given, especially considering how many nefarious people are out there just waiting for the chance to hack into your data and bank accounts. You'd think a starship captain would take that to heart and use strong passwords to avoid problems like unauthorized initiation of self destruct sequences -- but apparently that's not the case. The crew at AgileBits used Star Trek as an example of why strong passwords are so important through the surprisingly weak passwords used to protect destruct sequences and warp core ejections -- something most of don't have to deal with on a daily basis, but still an important reminder as to why we need something better than "password" to protect our Twitter, Facebook, and bank accounts. -- Agile Blog.

How Apple Screwed the Xserve Pooch

How Apple Screwed the Xserve Pooch

Many Apple customers throughout the years profitably utilized the rack mounted Xserve product in their businesses. It was a quality product that cost less than the competition's by a significant amount. Yet, it was doomed to failure.  John Martellaro tells how it happened. -- The Mac Observer.

Provide limited, secure, ad hoc access to iOS 6 device

Provide limited, secure, ad hoc access to iOS 6 device

If you have an iPad or iPhone, and a friend wants to check out a web site, or your child wants to play a game, you may not feel comfortable lending them the device, since they can access your email, bookmarks, contacts and other personal data.

There's a way to lend a device to someone, however, so they can only access the current app. Go to Settings > Accessibility, and scroll down to the Learning section and tap Guided Access. Turn this on, and enter a PIN. Go back to the Accessibility settings, and scroll all the way down: you'll see, in the Triple-click section, that Triple-click Home is set to Guided Access. (Unless you've already set something else for the Triple-click Home setting.)

Now, to lend your device to someone, open the app they're going to use, triple click the Home button, then tap on Start. (You can also set some options before allowing access; tap the Options button at the bottom of the screen.) When the user is finished, triple click the Home button again to exit Guided Access; you'll need to enter the PIN. -- Cult of Mac.

Outsmarting Smartphone Thieves

Outsmarting Smartphone Thieves

In the month since two men violently shoved him to the ground and stole his iPhone 5, Dalton Huckaby has almost completely stopped calling his mother. It usually takes him a full day to text his friends back. Nothing personal, but Mr. Huckaby is just too frightened to take his replacement iPhone out in public. -- New York Times.

Turning a Smartphone Into a Workout Buddy

Turning a Smartphone Into a Workout Buddy

Summer is coming at last. Like me, you may be thinking that a few improvements to your fitness and physique might be in order before you hit the beach. It's also possible that, like me, you find it hard to motivate yourself to exercise or to head to the gym, and you don't like the idea of a personal trainer. Time for an app, in other words, and there are many out there to help us get in shape. -- New York Times.

Getting Wireless Network Details

Getting Wireless Network Details

Both Windows and Mac OS X can quickly give you information about your computer's wireless network connection, along with built-in troubleshooting tools. -- New York Times.

Apple revisits their iDevice Camera Swipe Controls Invention

Apple revisits their iDevice Camera Swipe Controls Invention

On May 09, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals one of the next chapters for Apple's iPhone. Today's patent reveals an innovative concept that is designed to help users control their incoming calls and voicemail by simply swiping their finger over the external camera lens. It will control replay and fast forwarding of voicemail. In addition, the new methodology will also enhance one handed navigation of web pages, documents, a contact list or your iTunes library by simply swiping the camera lens in different swiping motion combinations. The majority of this patent was first reported on back in February 2010 under the title "Cool New Finger Swiping Camera Controls coming to iPhone & iPad." You can obtain more details and patent graphics from that report. Apple is adding one distinct addition to their original invention by adding general page scrolling. -- Patently Apple.

iOS: Add Calendar Events More Quickly

iOS: Add Calendar Events More Quickly

If you need to add an event to your calendar on your iOS device, you touch the plus button, right? Nope! The only time you've gotta use that button is in List View. Otherwise, you can just tap and hold briefly on the day or time when you'd like the event to occur. Neat, huh? -- The Mac Observer.

Steven Wozniak discusses early Apple years and BASIC

Steven Wozniak discusses early Apple years and BASIC

In the August 2012 issue of Game Developer Magazine was an article I wrote titled "A Basic History of BASIC", in which I spoke with the surviving creator of the language Dr Thomas Kurtz. I also spoke with pioneering figures David Ahl, author of the million selling 101 BASIC Computer Games, and Steven Wozniak, co-founder of Apple. Given the cross-pollination between Gamasutra and Game Developer, there's a good chance this BASIC article will feature on Gamasutra at some point. For anyone who has written even one line of BASIC code (that's all of us, right?), it should prove an interesting read, detailing how it came about and the surprising divergence it underwent. -- Gamasutra.

Setting a notification for individual email accounts on iOS 6

Setting a notification for individual email accounts on iOS 6

Having spent the last (many) months using a Galaxy Note 2 and Nexus 4 as my primary devices and not even touching an iPhone in all that time I've had to re-visit the many things needed to make an iPhone "mine" again. One of the things I absolutely loved about Android was the ability to set multiple notification sounds for my various email accounts. When I came back to iOS I needed to figure out how to separate my work notifications from my personal ones. Here's how you can do it too... -- iSource.

Parenting Tip: Using Find My iPhone to locate a misplaced iOS device

Parenting Tip: Using Find My iPhone to locate a misplaced iOS device

We've read countless stories about Find My iPhone and how it has helped police recover a stolen iOS device. The service is great for this type of field work, but did you know that Find My iPhone can help you find an iOS device that's been misplaced around your house? -- TUAW.

Test passwords with Apple's Password Assistant

Test passwords with Apple's Password Assistant

Reuse of passwords across multiple sites is a problem. In the digital world, many of us are much more vulnerable than we need to be. For example, it's very likely that your Amazon password is the same as your Gmail password and also the same one you use for online banking and your Facebook account.

In fact, 74% of Internet users use the same password across multiple websites1, so if a hacker gets your password, they now have access to all your accounts. Reusing passwords for email, banking, and social media accounts can lead to identity theft and financial loss.

And what's worse is that many people use simple, easy to guess passwords. A recent study found that the most common passwords people use are "password," "123456," and "12345678."2 No wonder cybercriminals are finding it so easy to get into our accounts.

The solution is as simple as changing your habits. Take a moment to protect yourself in a basic area of security, and you can save hours of trouble.

At a minimum use one for your bank accounts, another for email and social networking accounts, so if your email account gets hacked, your bank account isn't compromised.

If you have frustrating experiencing with generating secure passwords, the Password Assistant tool in OS X is a great option to try. -- MacFixIt.

Changed My Password Infographic

Here are some other tips to protect your password:

  • Avoid logging onto sites that require passwords on public computers, such as those at an Internet café or library--these computers may contain malware that could "record" what you are typing.
  • Avoid entering passwords when using unsecured Wi-Fi connections, such as at an airport or in a coffee shop--your passwords and other data can be intercepted by hackers over this unsecured connection.
  • Don't use the "remember me" function on your browser or within apps--if you walk away or lose your device, someone could easily login to your accounts.

How I use my iPhone and iPad as a college math teacher

How I use my iPhone and iPad as a college math teacher

As a college math instructor, I am a huge advocate for technology use in the classroom and regularly use my iPhone and iPad to enhance the learning experience for my students. Between using apps on the classroom projector, enabling Guided Access for student devices during exams, and preparing content at home, my iPhone and iPad are essential tools for me as a teacher. -- iMore.

I Changed Cellphone Carrier, and My iPhone is Bleeding Data

I Changed Cellphone Carrier, and My iPhone is Bleeding Data

If you're a regular reader, you'll know that I recently moved from France to England. About a year ago, I wrote an article for TidBITS about how a company called Free had shaken up the cellphone industry in France. I had an iPhone contract with unlimited calls, texts and data (truly unlimited; no "fair use"), for only €16.

Well, my arrival in the UK changed things. -- Kirkville.

Tim Cook's 6-point plan to re-ignite Apple profits

Tim Cook's 6-point plan to re-ignite Apple profits

Next time analysts are on an earnings call with Tim Cook, they might want to stick around till the end.

A transcript of the April 23rd call reveals that after most of the attendees hung up, Cook unveiled an audacious 6-point plan to stop Apple's slide into oblivion. -- Scoopertino.

May 08 Wednesday's News

 

Cryptographic certification could lead to wider iPhone use in government

Cryptographic certification could lead to wider iPhone use in government

Apple's iPhone might see wider adoption in government use, thanks to the recent validation of a cryptographic module for iOS.

Last week saw the National Institute of Standards and Technology's Computer Security Division granting FIPS 140-2 certification to Apple iOS CoreCrypto Kernel Module v3.0. The Division tested the cryptographic module on an iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPad running iOS 6.0. -- AppleInsider.

Microsoft brings Office 365 support to Office for Mac 2011 in software update

Microsoft brings Office 365 support to Office for Mac 2011 in software update

Microsoft on Tuesday updated Office for Mac 2011, the long-in-the-tooth productivity suite tailored to machines running Apple's OS X, with bug fixes, features and compatibility with the Office 365 subscription service.

In order to take advantage of the newest Office for Mac 2011 version, existing owners must have version 14.1.0 or higher installed on a machine running OS X 10.5.8 or later, while Office 365 requires an Intel Mac and OS X 10.6 or higher. -- AppleInsider.

Manage multiple social media accounts with your Mac

Manage multiple social media accounts with your Mac

Keeping up with just one social media account is tough enough. But if you personally hang out on even one or two more services, or are in charge of socializing with your business's customers online, juggling it all starts to feel a lot more like work, and not the fun kind. Here are a few tools and tricks--some for power users, others for business cases, and even a slightly nerdier option--that can help take the drudgery out of managing social media. -- Macworld.

Adobe's David Wadhwani discusses future plans for Creative Cloud

Adobe's David Wadhwani discusses future plans for Creative Cloud

Adobe has used its MAX conference to update its creative software suite and make it subscription-only, and show off some of its early ideas for hardware, which include Project Mighty and Project Napoleon - a digital pen and ruler for iOS devices. Following the announcements, we sat down with senior vice president and general manager of digital media at Adobe, David Wadhwani, to talk about the Creative Cloud, pricing models, security in the cloud, piracy, hardware ventures, future updates and more. -- Macworld UK.

Mastering Notification Center

Mastering Notification Center

In OS X Mountain Lion, you can set a Calendar notification for a repeating event on your iPhone, then get that notification on your Mac. Heck, you can even set a Calendar event on your Mac and get it when you're out and about with your iPhone or iPad. It's all a part of Apple's iCloud integration, and it works pretty well, most days. But what if you really don't want to be notified of a certain type of event when you're on your Mac? With OS X Mountain Lion, at least, you have a few more options for notifications that come from Calendar. -- Cult of Mac.

Zachary Quinto vs. Leonard Nimoy: 'The Challenge'

Send Windows 8 to Boot Camp

Send Windows 8 to Boot Camp

When installing Windows 8 in Apple's Boot Camp environment, you may run into a problem in which the installer claims it cannot create a new partition or locate an existing one. This problem appears to be specific to Windows 8, and may be more likely to happen if you are trying to install Windows from a thumbdrive.

If you are attempting to install Windows 8 from a thumbdrive and the error continues to happen, then consider burning the installer to a DVD or try transferring the installer to another external storage device and make sure only that device is connected during the installation process. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Granted 34 Patents Today Covering iTunes for iOS & More

Apple Granted 34 Patents Today Covering iTunes for iOS & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 34 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's granted patent relating to iTunes for iOS based devices and specifically the upgraded "Movie" section of iTunes. The second granted patent that we highlight is Apple's iDevice magnetometer that relates to their iOS "Maps" application. To top off our report we provide with a full listing of the remaining patents that were granted to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Patent for Invisible Backside Button and Slider Controls for Future iDevices & Beyond

Apple Granted a Patent for Invisible Backside Button and Slider Controls for Future iDevices & Beyond

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 34 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we single out a patent that generally relates to input devices and device display systems, and more particularly to invisible input systems and device display systems. The input devices and display systems may become visible when illuminated from behind through microperforated holes that are invisible to the naked eye. -- Patently Apple.

Stephen Wolfram on Personal Analytics

Stephen Wolfram on Personal Analytics

The creator of the Wolfram Alpha search engine explains why he thinks your life should be measured, analyzed, and improved.

Don't be surprised if Stephen Wolfram, the renowned complexity theorist, software company CEO, and night owl, wants to schedule a work call with you at 9 p.m. In fact, after a decade of logging every phone call he makes, Wolfram knows the exact probability he'll be on the phone with someone at that time: 39 percent. -- MIT T.

At 10, You Still Have Some Tricks, iTunes

At 10, You Still Have Some Tricks, iTunes

Apple just celebrated the 10th birthday of its famed iTunes, which is easily the most popular source for buying digital content. Still, I regularly field questions from my family and friends about how iTunes works. These range from basic questions about syncing to storing music in the cloud and sharing music with family. And iTunes also has a lot of features most people don't know exist. This week, I rounded up some ways to improve the way you use iTunes. -- AllThingsD.

Graphisoft announces ArchiCAD 17 -- BIM Lives in the Details

Graphisoft announces ArchiCAD 17 -- BIM Lives in the Details

Graphisoft today announced ArchiCAD 17, the latest version of its award-winning building information modeling (BIM) software for architects and related professionals worldwide. The new version features several "industry-first" innovations. -- Architosh.

10 alternatives to Apple's all-time most-popular apps

10 alternatives to Apple's all-time most-popular apps

Last week, Apple announced that its App Store is approaching 50 billion app downloads. In celebration of the milestone, Apple is giving away a $10,000 App Store gift card to the lucky person who initiates the 50 billionth download.

As part of the celebration, Apple listed the top 25 apps -- both free and paid -- for iPhone and iPad. None of the apps listed is particularly surprising (especially to someone who studies the most popular list every day), but one thing that did strike me is that a lot of the all-time best sellers still sit near the top of the current most-popular lists. In other words, once an app gains a certain degree of popularity, it seems to have a way of keeping its momentum and staying at the top. But with more than a million apps available, it seems to me that a lot of people are missing out on great apps that didn't get the publicity, perhaps didn't come from well-known developers, or simply slid under people's radar.

So instead of trotting out the apps we all know such as Instagram, Angry Birds, YouTube, and Skype, I thought I would make a list of apps that you should try if you are looking for something new and different. -- CNET Reviews.

Call for Kill Switch to Deactivate Stolen Phones

Call for Kill Switch to Deactivate Stolen Phones

The statistics are startling: Cell phone theft is on the rise across the country. In Los Angeles, cell phone thefts are up 27% year-over-year, and New York City's crime rate rose last year due entirely to a rise in stolen phones. But nowhere is the problem worse than in San Francisco. Nearly half of all robberies in the city involve cell phones, with daring thieves grabbing devices straight from owners' hands. -- Techilicious.

Will Apple replace my iPhone?

Will Apple replace my iPhone?

Did you drop your iPhone in the toilet? Did the screen smash when it slipped from your hand? It's happened to the best of us, of course the big question on your lips will be: "Will Apple replace my iPhone for free?" -- Macworld UK.

May 07 Tuesday's News

 

Apple's smart audio splitter lets multiple users view content on a single device

Apple's smart audio splitter lets multiple users view content on a single device

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday published an Apple patent describing an accessory akin to an advanced headphone splitter, which allows for independent volume changes, media controls and communication via an inline mic. -- AppleInsider.

Amid a barrage of password breaches, "honeywords" to the rescue

Amid a barrage of password breaches,

Security experts have proposed a simple way for websites to better secure highly sensitive databases used to store user passwords: the creation of false "honeyword" passcodes that when entered would trigger alarms that account hijacking attacks are underway. -- Ars Technica.

Photoshop moves to Creative Cloud, merges Photoshop Extended

Photoshop moves to Creative Cloud, merges Photoshop Extended

When it comes to image editing, Adobe Photoshop is in a class by itself. Despite its humble beginnings as a plug-in to a long-defunct commercial scanner, Photoshop now stands as Adobe's flagship and most famous app, and the default standard worldwide for professional print and online image editing and graphic design. A new version, announced at the Adobe Max 2013 creativity conference, serves up major enhancements to the program inside and out. -- Macworld.

Illustrator and InDesign get makeover, move to the cloud

Illustrator and InDesign get makeover, move to the cloud

With the announcement of fresh updates to its flagship publishing applications--InDesign and Illustrator--Adobe redirects its attention to its roots in the print and graphic design arena. Today, at its own Adobe Max Creativity Conference, the company is revealing more details about the new version of its desktop nonlinear editing and motion graphics programs. Here are some of the highlights. In a departure from the intense focus on the mobile market that marked last year's CS6 release, Adobe says that at least 75 percent of all program updates to the debut release of Creative Cloud desktop apps were devoted to its traditional image editing and publishing software. -- Macworld.

Dreamweaver and Flash join Edge Tools in the cloud

Dreamweaver and Flash join Edge Tools in the cloud

Dreamweaver, one of the first, and perhaps the most famous visual Web-design app, has evolved over time into a powerful development tool that can facilitate almost any kind of website or project. Today the app--alongside Flash Professional and the HTML5-oriented Edge Tools & Services suite--joins Adobe's new Creative Cloud Web-oriented lineup. The company's new cloud initiative, announced at the Adobe Max 2013 creative conference, offers enhancements to all the Web-design applications. -- Macworld.

The computer in the living room: setting up a Mac mini media center

The computer in the living room: setting up a Mac mini media center

Trot back to the 16th century and corner famed prognosticating monk Nostradamus, and it's quite likely that when posed the question: "Will those living in the year 2013 be able to call up any media programming they like from a single box?" he'd respond with an enthusiastic "Mais oui!"

Sadly, we know only too well where this one sits in the cleric's win/loss column. Progress has been made, via cable and satellite services that deliver a trillion channels plus on-demand programming, as well as set-top boxes that have access to online music and video services. But the ultimate goal--watching exactly what you want to watch when you want to watch it--remains elusive.

In search of a solution, some people have turned to the most powerful media device in their home--their computer. Not only can it play locally stored music, video, and slideshows, but it can also bring you any media found on the Internet, including streaming TV programming, movies, and music.

But sitting in front of a computer monitor--regardless of its resolution--can be limiting. It makes for a less-than-satisfying group-viewing experience, and it's hard to shake the feeling that you're, well, sitting in front of a computer. What many of us want is a device as intelligent as a computer but one that's at home in the living room, attached to a big-screen TV. Turns out that Apple produces a device fitting that exact bill: the Mac mini. -- Macworld.

Fitbit Flex Activity Tracking Wristband Available Now for $100

Fitbit Flex Activity Tracking Wristband Available Now for $100 [iOS Blog]

Fitbit today launched its newest wearable activity tracking device, the Fitbit Flex. The wristband, which originally debuted at CES 2013, counts calories burned, distance walked, and steps taken, along with offering tools to record food intake and sleep quality.

At $100, the Fitbit Flex is more affordable than competing products like the Jawbone UP and the Nike FuelBand, priced at $130 and $150, respectively.

The waterproof band needs to be charged approximately every five days and syncs via Bluetooth 4.0. It works in conjunction with the Fitbit app. Engadget has posted a comprehensive review of the Fitbit Flex, finding the design to be appealing but the sleep and food tracking features to be lacking.

Setting the iPad's Side Switch

Setting the iPad's Side Switch

The iPad and iPad Mini have a switch on the side that can be used to either mute the tablet or prevent the screen from rotating, but you need to pick the function you want to use in the system settings.

Like the larger iPad, the iPad Mini has a small switch on the right edge. It can be used as a rotation lock to keep the screen from automatically reorienting itself as you move around, but you need to have the tablet's settings configured properly. That same switch, right above the volume buttons, can also be set to function instead as a mute button to silence certain types of audio.

If the Mini's side switch is set to work as a mute button, you can change its purpose to "screen-rotation lock" by tapping the Settings icon on the home screen. On the Settings screen, tap General on the left side, and on the right side of the screen flick down to "Use Side Switch to." Tap to select Lock Rotation or Mute to set the button's function.

Even if you set the side switch for your preferred use, you can still mute the Mini or lock the screen. Just double-click the Home button, and when the panel of apps appears along the bottom edge of the screen, flick the row from left to right with your finger. Tap the icon on the far left side of the row to either lock the iPad's screen or mute the Mini's alerts, notifications and sound effects. Music, podcasts and video are not muted unless you turn the volume all the way down. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Granted 4 Design Patents Including the new iPad mini

Apple Granted 4 Design Patents Including the new iPad mini

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of four newly granted design patents for Apple Inc. today. Three out of the four designs cover the iPad. More specifically, two of the iPad designs cover Apple's new iPad mini which was only introduced on October 23, 2012. So it's great to see that USPTO is getting faster at granting designs as they're still relevant. The other designs cover Apple's virtual keyboard on an iPad and a particular iOS user interface. Two of the iPad related designs credited Apple's Co-Founder and late CEO Steve Jobs. -- Patently Apple.

How to connect game controllers to your Mac

How to connect game controllers to your Mac

While the Mac platform has not been noted for catering to hard-core gamers, there are still many popular gaming titles and gaming accessories available for the Mac OS. If you own a Mac and have a few games you would like to try, then you might also be interested in getting a gaming controller or two up and running with your system. While the Mac's keyboard and mouse ought to be enough for most purposes, having a dedicated gaming controller can give you the feel of playing with a gaming console.

Of the game controllers available for home computers, only a few are officially supported on the Mac, but you can often get others, like those for the PS3, Wii, or Xbox, working just fine. To use any of these controllers with your system, you will first need to connect it to your system physically, and then install a driver package to make use of the controller's inputs. -- MacFixIt.

iCloud: Lock and track your device

iCloud: Lock and track your device

You can prevent someone from using your lost iOS device or Mac by remotely locking the device with a passcode--a number that must be entered before the device can be used. If your lost iOS device has iOS 6 installed, you can also track its location as it moves using Lost Mode.

All of your settings and configuration information is stored in the same memory space as your media content, apps, and other personal data. When the iPhone is wiped--either by a Remote Wipe command or by somebody manually erasing it--this configuration information goes away entirely. After a wipe operation, the iPhone is returned to the same configuration that it was in when it was brand new; to put it another way, at that point it's no longer "your" iPhone as far as iOS is concerned. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

May 06 Monday's News

 

What's a known source of malware doing in an iOS app? Ars investigates

What's a known source of malware doing in an iOS app? Ars investigates

At first blush, it looked serious: a Web link to a known source of malware buried deep inside of a highly rated app that has been available for months in Apple's iOS App Store. For years, antivirus programs have recognized the China-based address--x.asom.cn--as a supplier of malicious code targeting Windows users. Were the people behind the operation expanding their campaign to snare iPhone and iPad users?

Although Macworld writer Lex Friedman said the link was likely harmless, I wasn't so sure. As he pointed out, an iOS app from antivirus provider Bitdefender warned that the Simply Find It app, last updated in October, contained malware classified as Trojan.JS.iframe.BKD. Even more suspicious, Google's safe browsing service was causing the Firefox and Chrome browsers to block attempts to visit the address on the grounds that it had been reported as an attack page. "Some attack pages intentionally distribute harmful software, but many are compromised without the knowledge or permission of their owners," Google's advisory warned as recently as Thursday.

So, what was the link, embedded in an HTML tag known as an iframe, doing in an MP3 file included with the game? Who put it there? And, most importantly, was it infecting people who installed Simply Find It on their iOS devices? -- Ars Technica.

Five overlooked abilities of the Finder's Path Bar

Five overlooked abilities of the Finder's Path Bar

When you're working in a deeply nested folder (a folder within a folder within…), the Finder provides several options for moving back up through the hierarchy. But only one provides both at-a-glance info and powerful shortcuts for working with files: the Path Bar. -- Macworld.

Skip The Domain Suffix And Prefix To Get To Websites Faster Via Mobile Safari

Skip The Domain Suffix And Prefix To Get To Websites Faster Via Mobile Safari Want to get to websites faster using mobile Safari? No, I'm not talking about upgrading your internet or data plan to LTE or something, though that will obviously help. No, I'm more interested in showing you how to get to most major websites with just a bit less typing involved. It's pretty simple and straightforward, to be honest. -- Cult of Mac.

Why the iPhone Is Falling Behind

Why the iPhone Is Falling Behind

Apple haters, Android geeks and misinformed Wall Street analysts will tell you that Apple's iPhone is falling behind because Apple can't innovate anymore.

I don't buy the Apple-doesn't-innovate BS. Apple is super innovative, and their innovation is focused, disciplined and ultimately results in industry-dominating revenue and profits.

But iPhones are still lacking some of the best innovations out there. This isn't because Apple can't innovate. It's because Apple can't share. Apple can't play nice with others. Apple wants to control the user experience, even at the expense of the user.

Apple isn't open. -- Cult of Mac.

Five Sweet Tips To Help You Master iTunes On Mac OS X

Five Sweet Tips To Help You Master iTunes On Mac OS X

iTunes has gone from a basic mp3 player based on SoundJam in 2000 to a full-fledged movie and music media player, digital media distribution center, and repository of all your iOS apps. That's quite a lot of functionality for a music player.

iTunes is still a pretty decent media player, even if it feels rather bloated at times when your music and movie collection grows out of control. However, like anything else complex, it can be a little tricky to figure out how to use iTunes most effectively.

Here, then, are five simple yet helpful tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your iTunes experience. -- Cult of Mac.

Save on mobile bandwidth by disabling remote images in iOS Mail

Save on mobile bandwidth by disabling remote images in iOS Mail

I've just moved from a country where I had unlimited (really) data on my iPhone contract to one where data plans are metered and expensive. So this recent article by David Chartier, on the Finer Things in Tech web site, comes at the right time. It points out the simple setting in iOS to turn off automatic loading of images in Mail. As with Mail on OS X, you can load images later, but you won't need to load them for every message, saving download time and bandwidth.

To change this setting, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts & Calendars, and toggle Load Remote Images to OFF. If you get an email with images, and want to see them, just tap on Load All Images in the message.

This setting would make more sense if it only affected image downloads when using cellular data. But it's an all-or-nothing choice, so even when you connect via Wi-Fi, you'll need to download images manually, if you use this setting. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Denon reveals new AV receiver lineup, supports Apple AirPlay

Denon reveals new AV receiver lineup, supports Apple AirPlay

Denon has revealed the latest additions to its networked AV receiver lineup, designed to suit users with a range of budgets. The new INCOMMAND models also all support Apple's lossless AirPlay wireless standard, which adds streaming support for the full range of Apple iOS devices and Macs. Three of the four new models also offer support for the new 4K Ultra HD standard. [I recently bought a Denon AVR for my home system and can't say enough nice things about it. -mam] -- Electronista.

Chasing Down a GPS Blip to a Stolen iPhone

Chasing Down a GPS Blip to a Stolen iPhone

The woman was talking on her iPhone, and never saw coming her induction into a large and growing subset of crime victims. But there it happened shortly after noon on April 15, on a busy corner of Main Street in Flushing, Queens. A teenager zipped past, snatching the phone out of her hand and kept running.

An iPhone being stolen on the street is fairly common; police officers racing through the streets and subways while tracking it on another iPhone is not. -- New York Times.

Where Do Old Cellphones Go to Die?

Where Do Old Cellphones Go to Die?

AMERICANS replace their cellphones every 22 months, junking some 150 million old phones in 2010 alone. Ever wondered what happens to all these old phones? The answer isn't pretty. -- New York Times.

Accessories No Longer Tethered to Apple

Accessories No Longer Tethered to Apple

For years, Apple's clout in the electronics world could be gauged by how easy it was to bump into devices tailor-made for a connection to an iPhone or iPod.

Manufacturers are gravitating toward wireless connections for Apple's products, which is helping the market for competitors' mobile devices. -- New York Times.

Government Lab Reveals Quantum Internet Operated Continuously For Over Two Years

Government Lab Reveals Quantum Internet Operated Continuously For Over Two Years

A quantum internet capable of sending perfectly secure messages has been running at Los Alamos National Labs for the last two and a half years, say researchers. -- MIT Technology Review.

Mastering Notification Center: Switch Out The Menu Bar Icon For Something Cooler

Mastering Notification Center: Switch Out The Menu Bar Icon For Something Cooler

With the abundance of icons in the upper right corner of the Mac OS X screen, it could be time for a change. If you're tired of the same old Notification Center icon--the one that looks like a bullet list--this tip's for you. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Remove Attachments from Apple Mail Messages

How to Remove Attachments from Apple Mail Messages

Mac Geek Gab listener Joe prefers to archive copies of his email messages for reference, but doesn't always want to keep the associated email attachments which are often unnecessary and take up valuable drive space. We show him how to use a little-know feature of Mail to remove attachments from email messages. -- The Mac Observer.

iPads as Cash Registers Are About to Go From Novelty to Norm

iPads as Cash Registers Are About to Go From Novelty to Norm

On a recent morning at my corner café, I ordered two Americanos (they were out of drip) and a flaky, buttery calorie bomb of a pastry to start my day.

Across the counter, a barista handed me the iPad she had just used to swipe my debit card. I tapped "$1″ for a tip and hit "no receipt." And we were done.

In that moment, I had just paid for coffee on the same kind of device I use at home to watch Mad Men, page through pictures of my kid, read The New York Times and video-chat with my dad. Can your cash register do that? Daily life really didn't used to be this way. -- Wired.

Suspension Railroad Simulator

Suspension Railroad Simulator

N3V Games' Suspension Railroad Simulator 2013 is now available for purchase from Mac Game Store. The simulation gives players the chance to experience the challenge of driving a train on the Wuppertal suspension railroad. -- Inside Mac Games.

Why cell phone locks and required data plans are unfair

Why cell phone locks and required data plans are unfair

In this edition of Ask Maggie, CNET's Marguerite Reardon answers questions about device unlock policies for consumers who travel abroad and why a smartphone used only for voice and text messaging needs a data plan." CNET News 7:59 AM

TED Teams Up With PBS On Ideas For Education

TED Teams Up With PBS On Ideas For Education

TED has teamed up with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the New York public broadcaster WNET to create an hour long special called, 'TED Talks Education.' -- New York Times.

May 03 Friday's News

 

WebKit releases new SunSpider 1.0 benchmark to chart the future of JavaScript performance

WebKit releases new SunSpider 1.0 benchmark to chart the future of JavaScript performance

Apple's WebKit team has released a revamped new SunSpider 1.0 benchmark suite for profiling the performance of web browser JavaScript execution, replacing the 0.9 version initially released at the end of 2007. -- AppleInsider.

Cellphone Thefts Grow, but the Industry Looks the Other Way

Cellphone Thefts Grow, but the Industry Looks the Other Way

Smartphone manufacturers and wireless carriers could be doing a lot more to counteract iPhone and other mobile device thefts, security experts and industry observers say in a New York Times report that singles out Apple.

Apple releases iOS 6.1.4 for iPhone 5 with updated audio profile for speakerphone

Apple releases iOS 6.1.4 for iPhone 5 with updated audio profile for speakerphone

Apple on Thursday issued a new software update for iPhone 5 owners, adding an updated audio profile for speakerphone. The minor update is now available for download and install. -- AppleInsider.

Apple launches countdown to 50B app downloads

Apple launches countdown to 50B app downloads

Apple on Thursday posted a countdown to 50 billion app download from the App Store, promising to give away a $10,000 App Store Gift Card to the person who downloads the landmark app. -- AppleInsider.

iMacs get new cheaper, smaller flash storage options

iMacs get new cheaper, smaller flash storage options

Apple's iMacs are getting some new flash storage options, per changes to Apple's online store. The 21.5-inch iMac, which was never before graced with the option of true solid state storage, can now get flash storage in two different sizes, while the 27-inch iMac has two new smaller sizes of SSD. -- Ars Technica.

Researchers build miniature flying robots, modeled on Drosophila

Researchers build miniature flying robots, modeled on Drosophila

It's relatively easy to get something big and heavy to fly. With enough equipment, it's possible to load the object with lots of energy to power the flight, specialized parts to control it, and the computers (or people) needed to direct the flight. But things get challenging as you make things smaller, and it gets harder to squeeze all the requisite parts into an ever-shrinking space. In that, nature has us beat, since something like a fruit fly crams all the energy, control systems, and specialized hardware into an extremely compact form. -- Ars Technica.

Introducing Contacts

Introducing Contacts

In weeks past we've talked about configuring the Mail and Calendar applications. Without the third leg of this personal information trio--Contacts--using the first two could be a lonely proposition. In this lesson we'll look at the cans and cant's of Contacts.

Contacts was called Address Book in previous versions of the Mac OS, and that's still its most descriptive name. What with its faux-leather border and stitched pages, it reminds you of something in which your parents might have added a new neighbor or business contact. But, old-school though it may look, it has more powerful features than its paper-and-glue counterpart. -- Macworld.

Creating complex smart playlists in iTunes

Creating complex smart playlists in iTunes

Creating playlists in iTunes can be as simple as dragging a few songs, or as complex as creating smart playlists that refer to other playlists and use nested conditions to pick songs that meet specific criteria. In this week's column, I answer three questions to show just how complex smart playlists can be. While perhaps not the same as the smart playlists you want to make, they are good examples of the complexity that is available with smart playlists in iTunes. -- Macworld.

Why you shouldn't listen to well-paid analysts

Why you shouldn't listen to well-paid analysts

An interesting discussion with Apple analyst Horace Dediu has appeared today in which he warns against giving too much credence to the opinions of well-paid analysts, especially those who are new to Apple. -- Macworld.

Access hidden function key options in OS X

Access hidden function key options in OS X

The standard F1 through F12 function keys in OS X by default are set to change a number of common system settings, including audio volume, backlight and brightness levels, and media player controls. Convenient as this is, sometimes their default behaviors can be intrusive or too crude for your needs.

For example, if your system is connected to an external amplifier that is set to a high volume, then the increments changed by the volume function keys may be too crude for your needs, and the corresponding audio indicator pop may be unpleasantly loud and intrusive, especially if you are listening to a soft piece of music.

If you find this to be the case, then there are some quick ways to effect a finer degree of change for these settings, silence audio indicators, and even get quick access to corresponding system preferences. -- MacFixIt.

Change the mouse cursor size in OS X

Change the mouse cursor size in OS X

The default size of the mouse pointers in OS X should allow them to be viewable in most situations, but there could be some instances in which the cursor can be difficult to locate. For example, if you need to dim your screen, it might be difficult to find the pointer; and sometimes, optional pointers -- such as those for text input or crosshairs -- can become lost among the textures of images on the screen. -- MacFixIt.

Apple Files New Patent for Establishing NFC Sessions

Apple Files New Patent for Establishing NFC Sessions

On May 2, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals that they're once again advancing their NFC project which began back in 2008. Apple has established a firm foundation for future NFC applications ranging from shopping, banking and everyday interconnectivity with other devices in the home, with a friend or retailer. Today's patent application relates to establishing an NFC session. Our report also provides a list of eight other patent filings for the techies in our community. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Advances their Future e-Commerce Shopping App

Apple Advances their Future e-Commerce Shopping App

On May 2, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals that they're once again advancing their NFC project which began back in 2008. Apple has established a firm foundation for future NFC applications ranging from shopping, banking and everyday interconnectivity with other devices in the home, with a friend or retailer. Today's patent application relates to methods for setting payment option preferences in Apple's future e-commerce app that they've temporarily dubbed as the "Shopping" app. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Patent May be Hinting of an iPhoto Upgrade for iDevices

Apple Patent May be Hinting of an iPhoto Upgrade for iDevices

On May 2, 2013, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that may be revealing an update to iPhoto for iDevices. Apple states that their invention relates to performing on-screen image adjustments, for example, to adjust colors of photos by using color control tools overlaid on the digital images to be adjusted. It's difficult to assess if today's patent revelations cover the current version of iPhoto for iDevices or a possible upgrade. The patent graphics don't reflect the current tools. If you're a camera buff who uses an iDevice for your snapshots, then you may want to check this patent filing out to see if Apple is going to add any new tools that you've been hoping for. -- Patently Apple.

Onavo Protect helps secure your data while on open and public Wi-Fi networks

Onavo Protect helps secure your data while on open and public Wi-Fi networks

Released today in the App Store, Onavo Protect promises to protect you while browsing the web on your iPhone. The app allows you to set up an always-on VPN connection, adding an extra layer of security to your browsing experience when you're on public Wi-Fi networks. Unsecured wireless networks open up the possibility of your personal data being intercepted, and Onavo Protect is intended to keep you safe from those with malicious intent. Additionally, the app warns users when the site they are using is attempting to send a password in an insecure manner, and automatically blocks known phishing sites. -- 9to5Mac.

R reaches version 3.0.0

R reaches version 3.0.0

R the language and environment for statistical computing and graphics has now reached version 3.0.0.

Whilst there is a list of new features and updates, those listed as most significant are shown below.

  • Packages need to be (re-)installed under this version (3.0.0) of R.
  • There is a subtle change in behavior for numeric index values 2^31 and larger. These never used to be legitimate and so were treated as NA, sometimes with a warning. They are now legal for long vectors so there is no longer a warning, and x[2^31] <- y will now extend the vector on a 64-bit platform and give an error on a 32-bit one.
  • It is now possible for 64-bit builds to allocate amounts of memory limited only by the OS. It may be wise to use OS facilities (e.g. ulimit in a bash shell, limit in csh), to set limits on overall memory consumption of an R process, particularly in a multi-user environment. A number of packages need a limit of at least 4GB of virtual memory to load. 64-bit Windows builds of R are by default limited in memory usage to the amount of RAM installed: this limit can be changed by command-line option --max-mem-size or setting environment variable RMAXMEM_SIZE.
  • Negative numbers for colors are consistently an error: previously they were sometimes taken as transparent, sometimes mapped into the current palette and sometimes an error.

For more on R you can check OIT's Bob Muenchen's website r4stats or check out his book, R for SAS and SPSS Users.

iOS app contains potential malware

iOS app contains potential malware

An app available for download from Apple's iOS App Store contains an embedded Trojan horse. And while the good news is that you're almost definitely safe from any malware danger, there's still reason for concern. The app itself is almost certainly harmless--and the malicious code is probably present unintentionally--but the fact that the code slipped through the App Store's review process isn't ideal. -- Macworld.

Bad WiFi Performance? How to Tune Your Airport Network

Bad WiFi Performance? How to Tune Your Airport Network

Your internet connection is fast, but you experience poor wifi -- what is up with that? Here are some easy steps you can take to improve bad wifi performance and make your AirPort router hum contentedly. -- FairerPlatform.

Blessed Are The Pessimists For They Have Made Backups

Blessed Are The Pessimists For They Have Made Backups

A Rutgers University graduate student is having a terrible week, and now the whole world seems to know about it.

When the student's laptop was stolen on campus last Friday, he filed a police report and apparently printed leaflets begging for help, even offering the thief up to $1,000 for the safe return of the five years' worth of data stored on the device he needs to defend his graduate thesis. [Do you know how cheap a thumb-drive is?] -- myCentralJersey.

May 02 Thursday's News

 

Apple's research into curved battery technology points to new iOS products designs

Apple's research into curved battery technology points to new iOS products designs

A pair of patent applications Apple filed with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office reveal the company is working on unorthodox battery designs with curved cells and irregular shapes, suggesting slimmer, more shapely iOS devices could be on the horizon. -- AppleInsider.

Finger-free phones, full body gesturing, and our 'touchscreen' future

Finger-free phones, full body gesturing, and our 'touchscreen' future

Understatement of the century: touchscreen technology evolved at a rapid pace in the past decade. In the days of Y2K, Palm Pilots were a big deal. Five years ago? The iPhone debuted and the corresponding touchscreen explosion hasn't slowed up since. Today we're at a point where we think we understand how all the innovations in touch technology can fit into our future. But based on these last few years, good luck. Did anyone see the tablet-craze coming? -- Ars Technica.

Apple's attempt to ditch skeuomorphism resulting in tight iOS 7 deadlines

Apple's attempt to ditch skeuomorphism resulting in tight iOS 7 deadlines

Famed Apple product designer Jony Ive has his hands deep into iOS 7 following the departure of former iOS software head Scott Forstall, leading to potential delays as he revamps the look and feel of the software. That's according to a new report at Bloomberg, which cites sources claiming that Ive is working to rid iOS of the skeuomorphism that came from Forstall's influence in order to impose a "flatter design that's more unified and less cluttered."

ORNL-issued iPad stolen, remotely wiped clean

ORNL-issued iPad stolen, remotely wiped clean

An iPad issued by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to an employee, stolen Tuesday while the worker was shopping, didn't contain any classified information but has nevertheless been wiped clean remotely, an ORNL spokesman said.

Bill Cabage, a computer security officer at the lab, said the missing iPad "is basically a doorstop now." He said such lab-issued portable devices are encrypted and password-protected as standard procedures. -- Knoxville News Sentinel.

Consumers' shift to older iPhones raises concerns on Wall Street

Consumers' shift to older iPhones raises concerns on Wall Street

How strange to think that Vicki Macchiavello's decision to buy an iPhone after years of using a BlackBerry could be bad news for Apple Inc.

And yet, because the Oakland, Calif., resident opted to buy a cheaper, older iPhone 4 rather than the latest, pricier iPhone 5, she represents a trend that has become a growing concern on Wall Street. -- Knoxville News Sentinel.

Advice from an Apple tech: When your Mac gets too toasty

Advice from an Apple tech: When your Mac gets too toasty

Ever hear a Mac's desktop fans go into overdrive under normal operating conditions? Or felt a Mac laptop go from a normal temperature to a more-than-toasty lap roaster in under a minute? Those are times when a Mac was running hotter than it should have been. -- Macworld.

Is Google Now Killing Your Battery Life? Here's How To Prevent It

Is Google Now Killing Your Battery Life? Here's How To Prevent It

Google updated its Google Search app earlier this week to introduce Google Now to iOS. The feature brings Android's awesome digital assistant to your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch, allowing you to get information like the weather, sports scores, and travel assistance all in one place.

But many users have found that it also has a significantly negative affect on battery life. Because many of Google Now's "cards" rely on location data, the service constantly gets updates on its whereabouts from nearby cell towers and Wi-Fi hotspots, and this means it's eating away at your battery all the time. -- Cult of Mac.

Kindle For iOS Will Now Turn Your Favorite Books Into Audiobooks

Kindle For iOS Will Now Turn Your Favorite Books Into Audiobooks

Amazon's Kindle app for iOS hasn't always been as accessible as Apple's own iBooks, but that changed today with a new update that adds VoiceOver support, among other new accessibility features. Kindle will now read aloud over 1.8 million books, allowing those who are visually impaired to kick back and listen to their favorite titles. -- Cult of Mac.

Microsoft's Worst Nightmare Has Come True

Want to know why Steve Ballmer wakes up in a sweat at night, screaming at the shadows and clutching his hogshead-sized heart? Look at this chart of year-over-year growth rates of Windows PCs since the iPad came out, put together by the ever nuanced Horace Dediu at Asymco. When the iPad debuted, it immediately killed the PC industry as we know it.

In fact, as Dediu makes clear later in his analysis, Microsoft's doing so poorly in the PC market right now that even though the Surface was a flop, it's still accounting for a third of all Windows revenues. Absolutely mind boggling.

Microsoft's Worst Nightmare Has Come True

Turn Off AutoFill On Your iPhone Or iPad For Better Privacy

Turn Off AutoFill On Your iPhone Or iPad For Better Privacy

One of the more useful features of modern browsing, the AutoFill function started on the desktop, then made its way to the iPhone and iPad a while ago. It lets your iOS device hold all the form data, populating the oft-repeated fields with your personal info like your name and address. That way, you don't have to type it all in all the time, which is brilliant on a mobile device with a small touch-keyboard.

When you share a device like an iPAd, like I do with my kids at home, you may not want to share this personal data. Until a proper multi-user experience comes to iOS, the best way to get around this is to clear out your personal info, and then turn off AutoFill. Here's how. -- Cult of Mac.

Pentagon Expects to Enlist Apple, Samsung Devices

Pentagon Expects to Enlist Apple, Samsung Devices

Samsung Electronics Co. and Apple Inc. are bringing the smartphone wars to the Pentagon.

The U.S. Department of Defense expects in coming weeks to grant two separate security approvals for Samsung's Galaxy smartphones, along with iPhones and iPads running Apple's latest operating system--moves that would boost the number of U.S. government agencies allowed to use those devices. -- Wall Street Journal.

Adobe's Tom Hogarty Demos Lightroom For The iPad

Adobe's Tom Hogarty Demos Lightroom For The iPad

You know those cool mini DNG previews that let you take edit your RAW photos even when your don't have the drive containing your photos connected to your MacBook Air? That tech could soon lead to Lightroom on your iPad. On Scott Kelby's show The Grid, Adobe's Lightroom boss showed off a prototype of the app. -- Cult of Mac.

Locking Down Location Services

Locking Down Location Services

It's no secret that apps on your iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch can track your location, but you may not realize Mac apps can do the same, too. You can, however, control which apps know where you are on both platforms, and it's easy to do. -- The Mac Observer.

New Apple ID Phishing Effort Compromises Over 100 Sites

New Apple ID Phishing Effort Compromises Over 100 Sites

As highlighted by The Next Web, security firm Trend Micro yesterday outlined a new phishing scam that has seen the perpetrators compromise over 100 sites in their attempts to gain access to users' Apple ID accounts. While Apple IDs are relatively popular targets for phishing scams, Trend Micro's analysis offers some interesting detail on the approaches used by the criminals. -- Trend Micro.

With Florida Project, the Smart Grid Has Arrived

With Florida Project, the Smart Grid Has Arrived

The first comprehensive and large scale smart grid is now operating. The $800 million project, built in Florida, has made power outages shorter and less frequent, and helped some customers save money, according to the utility that operates it. -- MIT Technology Review.

Back Up A Mac: How I Do It, How Others Do It, How You Should Do it

Back Up A Mac: How I Do It, How Others Do It, How You Should Do it

Perhaps the most important add on app you can use on a Mac is a backup. Today's backup apps are many and varied, not overly expensive, and rather simple to setup and use. -- TeraTalks.

How to backup your iPhone contacts (no iCloud required)

How to backup your iPhone contacts (no iCloud required)

Every once in a while, a friend will ask me what to do when some terrible thing has happened to their iPhone. Usually, it involves the device crashing or freezing. And usually, it involves someone who doesn't back up their data. -- iDownload Blog.

CSS Selectors as Superpowers

CSS Selectors as Superpowers

After years of complaints about Cascading Style Sheets, many stemming from their deliberately declarative nature, it's time to recognize their power. For developers coming from imperative programming styles, it might seem hard to lose the ability to specify more complex logical flow. That loss, though, is discipline leading toward the ability to create vastly more flexible systems, a first step toward the pattern matching model common to functional programming. -- O'Reilly Programming.

May 01 Wedensday's News

 

Ownership of imaging patents acquired from Kodak now being transferred to Apple

Ownership of imaging patents acquired from Kodak now being transferred to Apple

Filings with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office revealed on Tuesday that the transfer of a number of patents from Kodak to Apple has begun, with the iPhone maker taking ownership of several patents covering aspects of digital photography. -- AppleInsider.

Original iPhone to go the way of the dodo on June 11, 2013

Original iPhone to go the way of the dodo on June 11, 2013

Roughly six years after its public launch, the original iPhone is about to become obsolete--at least in Apple's eyes. Apple reportedly sent out internal documentation to its support partners, which was then passed on to 9to5Mac, detailing which of its products would no longer be considered current or recent devices as of June 11, 2013. The list doesn't just include the original iPhone, though: it also includes a number of older iMacs, MacBook Pros, Xserves, and PowerBooks.

Wireless dominance by AT&T and Verizon a 'very bad thing'

Wireless dominance by AT&T and Verizon a 'very bad thing'

Julius Genachowski, the outgoing chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) today touted his agency's record in promoting wireless competition over the last four years. And he warned that allowing AT&T and Verizon Wireless, the market leaders, to snap up all of the spectrum in an upcoming wireless auction would be a "very bad thing for our innovation economy." -- Ars Technica.

The sad state of Apple rumors

The sad state of Apple rumors

It's a weird time for those of us who've followed Apple rumors for years. (And I'm not the only one who has noticed.) At the risk of sounding like your prototypical hipster, today's rumors just aren't as good as they used to be. The devices that we hear whispers about now--a smartwatch, a television, a cheaper iPhone--seem lackluster compared to the rumored products of days past--products that, when they actually appeared, changed entire industries.

Yes, we do seem to be in a lull--but I'm here to tell you that that's OK. And, since Macworld has a minimum word limit, I'll even tell you why.

There were three canonical Apple devices that were foretold in prophecy: the phone, the tablet, and the set-top box. These three formed a trinity of promise that dates back to a bygone age--more than 15 years ago now. But though the tales of yore might seem meatier than the meager crumbs we get today, you have to remember that even those epic rumors weren't built in a day. -- Macworld.

Build A Better iTunes Smart Playlist

Build A Better iTunes Smart Playlist

Smart Playlists are fantastic, and they really do work to help you listen to the kind of music you're in the mood for, using a variety of user-controlled criteria. You can create a Smart Playlist for any given Artist in your iTunes library fairly easily.

But what if you want a playlist that includes more than one Artist? Well, that's pretty simple, too. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Seeds Build 12E40 of OS X Beta 10.8.4 Developers

Apple Seeds Build 12E40 of OS X Beta 10.8.4 Developers

Apple today issued build 12E40 of OS X Mountain Lion to developers, a week after build 12E36 was released. Build 12E40 marks the fifth beta iteration of OS X 10.8.4. -- Mac Rumors.

Colleges Adapt Online Courses to Ease Burden

Colleges Adapt Online Courses to Ease Burden

Educators are harnessing online materials to meet the toughest challenges in higher education: giving more students access to college, and helping them graduate on time. -- New York Times.

Apple Wins another Major Multitouch Patent and the First Acquired Kodak Patent Surfaces

Apple Wins another Major Multitouch Patent and the First Acquired Kodak Patent Surfaces

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 43 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover two granted patents. The first relates to a multitouch display while the second relates to automatically installing software for transferring and sharing photos. The later appears to be one the first patents that Apple acquired from Kodak. -- Patently Apple.

Apple was Granted 43 Patents today with a Surprising one that Covers Multiplayer Gaming with integrated Chat Capabilities

Apple was Granted 43 Patents today with a Surprising one that Covers Multiplayer Gaming with integrated Chat Capabilities

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 43 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we uncover a major surprise. Apple has been granted a major multiplayer gaming patent that emphasizes the integration of chat sessions over mesh and focus networks. Two of Apple's engineers that are listed on this patent have worked extensively on other FaceTime and/or iChat patents in the past which gives this aspect of the patent credibility. Last week we covered Apple's patent filing for new pivotal-styled buttons for a game controller and a secondary granted patent published today covers techniques for controlling gaming accessories on an iDevice. With Apple's CEO talking about new product and service categories being in the pipeline over the next two years, it would appear that advancing gaming to a whole new level may be one of the top ones coming our way. Without a doubt, today's gaming patent is by far the most detailed of them all to date. To top off our report we provide you with a full list of the other patents that were granted to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

How a Cheap Plastic Film Can Give Your Smartphone a 3-D Screen

How a Cheap Plastic Film Can Give Your Smartphone a 3-D Screen

Last week, a company in Singapore began shipping $35 plastic screen protectors for the iPhone 5. These are no ordinary screen protectors, though--each has half a million tiny lenses precisely patterned on its surface, which can turn an ordinary phone into a device capable of displaying 3-D images and video, no glasses required. -- MIT Technology Review.

What to Do When Your Web Browser Won't Display PDFs

What to Do When Your Web Browser Won't Display PDFs

These days, most Web browsers can display PDFs with aplomb. But if you see a black or white screen instead of a PDF in your browser, you may need to remove an elderly plug-in or two. -- TidBITS.

Apple sets another new record: the world's largest corporate debt sale

Apple sets another new record: the world's largest corporate debt sale

The first stage of Apple's plan to spend $100 billion in share buy-backs and increased dividends was completed yesterday as Apple sold $17 billion's worth of corporate bonds -- the world's largest corporate debt sale. -- 9to5Mac.

Tips for getting the most from Google Now on iOS

Five Google tips for getting the most from Google Now on iOS

Google Now is not its own app. It's actually a feature/service inside the Google Search app. If you already have the Google Search app installed on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad, just be sure to update it. New users will have to sign in with their Google account. -- PC Mag.

Phishing scam targets Apple ID users

Phishing scam targets Apple ID users

Apple users are being warned to stay vigilant following the discovery of a new series of phishing attacks targeting the Apple ID network.

Researchers at Trend Micro have uncovered a series of compromised sites that are being used to host fake login pages. Designed to resemble the Apple ID login screen, the pages ask users to enter both their usernames and passwords. -- V3.

OS X 10.9 Cabernet: What's a Power User?

OS X 10.9 Cabernet: What's a Power User?

And, then there's the question about functionality hardcore pro Mac users have wanted for years -- implementation of the latest version of OpenGL, broader/easier OpenCL support (compatible Macs and apps) and a modern file system, a la ZFS.

OpenGL 3.2 would be a boon for video and graphics pro users, as well as the growing number of Mac gamers -- yes, people, the Mac's got game. The same people would likely wet themselves with glee if Apple delivered improved OpenCL and finally moved the Mac to ZFS or some other advanced file system.

However, as laid out by 9 to 5 Mac, OS X 10.9 will deliver power user -- people that integrate and fully utilize OS features in their workflow (i.e. social sharing, Messages, etc.) -- functionality rather than features that video, image editing and gamers would find useful. -- Tapscape.

Troubleshooting AirPlay and AirPlay Mirroring

Troubleshooting AirPlay and AirPlay Mirroring

Use this document to help you in troubleshooting AirPlay and AirPlay Mirroring if:

  • The AirPlay icon doesn't appear on your iOS device, or iTunes on your computer, after following instructions about how to use AirPlay or AirPlay Mirroring.

    or
  • There are performance issues while using AirPlay streaming or AirPlay Mirroring.

Enable Siri 'Raise to Speak' to Hear Command Responses via Ear Speaker

Enable Siri 'Raise to Speak' to Hear Command Responses via Ear Speaker

Siri defaults to speaking responses back through the speakers of the iPhone and iPad, and often quite loudly at that. Though you can control Siri's volume level independently of general system audio levels, having the voice of Siri be set to a very quiet level isn't much of a solution if you actually want to hear responses. This is made worse in crowded situations or areas with a lot of background noise, because to hear a response you have to set volume quite high, which has the undesirable side effect of blasting responses to the world and also likely annoying those around you.

An excellent solution to this is to use Siri in what I like to call 'discrete mode', which sets Siri to speak responses through the ear speaker when the proximity sensor detects the iPhone has been held up and placed near your ear. The feature is called "Raise to Speak", and in practice it makes Siri smart enough to know when to only play responses through the ear speakers in the same way you hear phone calls. -- OS X Daily.

How to Block Porn on Your iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch

How to Block Porn on Your iPhone, iPad and iPod Touch

Thinking about letting your child or teen borrow your iPad or giving them your hand me down iPhone? Just like with a PC, your big concern is probably keeping them away from inappropriate content. But an Apple product is a great choice because of their solid parental controls and the company's strong stance against pornography--Steve Jobs once suggested that the company had a "moral responsibility to keep porn off the iPhone."

We'll walk you through where your youngster might be able to find inappropriate content on an Apple iOS device, as well as the tools Apple provides to keep them out of it. -- Techilicious.

Siri's Creator Challenges Texting-While-Driving Study

Siri's Creator Challenges Texting-While-Driving Study

A rash of media reports last week, reporting on a study released by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute, implied that using voice-to-text apps like Siri or Vlingo while driving is no safer than manual texting. But Adam Cheyer, the co-inventor of Siri, says journalists took the wrong message from the study, which didn't test Siri or Vlingo in the recommended hands-free, eyes-free mode. -- Xconomy.