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April 30 Wednesday's News

 

How your phone is revealing your location, regardless of privacy settings

How your phone is revealing your location, regardless of privacy settings

Data gathered by smartphone sensors can be used to identify you, pinpoint your location and monitor your phone, irrespective of your privacy settings, new research has found.

Accelerometers, sensors used to track movement of smartphones, are used in countless apps, including pedometers, playing games and monitoring sleep. Research from the University of Illinois' Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering found that minuscule imperfections during the manufacturing process create a unique 'fingerprint' on the generated data.

The gathered data can be used to identify you as it is sent to the cloud for processing, bypassing privacy settings concerning the withholding of location data and with no need to discern your phone number or SIM card number, leaving you potentially vulnerable to cyber attack.

Graduate student Sanorita Dey said you can best protect yourself and your device by not sharing your accelerometer data without thinking about how legitimate or how secure that application is.

'Even if it's using only the sensor data, still it can attack you in some way," she said. "The consumer should be aware.'

Microsoft Office for iPad updated with support for Apple's AirPrint

Microsoft Office for iPad updated with support for Apple's AirPrint

Microsoft's Office for iPad now ties even more tightly into Apple's ecosystem, as the touch-friendly productivity suite has been updated with support for the wireless AirPrint standard, along with a few other new features and assorted bug fixes for Word, Excel and PowerPoint. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks seed to developers with minor tweaks

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks seed to developers with minor tweaks

Apple on Tuesday seeded the latest version of its OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minor changes, asking testers concentrate on the usual built-in features including graphics and Mail. -- AppleInsider.

Readers react to my quest to learn the Dvorak keyboard layout

Readers react to my quest to learn the Dvorak keyboard layout

My Dvorak keyboard layout experiment has come to an end. I received hundreds of comments across the three-part series and many more e-mails and tweets from interested or concerned readers. As promised, I'm following up my experience with a collection of your stories and advice. -- Ars Technica.

Google Chrome protection for Heartbleed-hacked sites called 'completely broken'

Google Chrome protection for Heartbleed-hacked sites called 'completely broken'

A few hours after this article went live, Google engineer Adam Langley published a blog post taking issue with the GRC characterization that Chrome's CRLSet is "completely broken." In the post, Langley said he has always been clear that the measure isn't perfect, but in any event, it's more effective than the revocation checks on by default in other browsers. "And yet, GRC managed to write pages (including cartoons!) exposing the fact that it doesn't cover many revocations and attacking Chrome for it." In fairness to Google a test performed after this article was published showed Chrome blacklisted the TLS certificate Ars revoked three weeks ago. The text of the article as it originally ran follows. -- Ars Technica.

How to recover data from an old SCSI drive

How to recover data from an old SCSI drive

'Tis the season for spring cleaning, and maybe you've found an old Mac in a closet or off to the side somewhere in your garage. That Mac is a time capsule and it might be fun to see what's on the hard drive. The challenge: how to transfer data from your old Mac's SCSI hard drive to your current Mac. -- Macworld.

The right way to tag everything in iTunes

The right way to tag everything in iTunes

Imagine what your iTunes library would be like if all your songs just had random characters for their song, artist, and album names. You'd never find what you want to listen to. But even if your iTunes library's tags are mostly correct, any erroneous tags may prevent you from finding your music. If an artist's name is spelled wrong, for instance, or if there's a typo in a song name you won't find your favorite tunes when you search in iTunes. And if you've left some tags blank, some of your music won't display in certain views. -- Macworld.

The iPad discontinuity

The iPad discontinuity

iPad sales were unexpectedly slow in Q1.

There's quite a long set of explanations for was essentially was a flat quarter for the iPad. I can't add more to this, but I do want to focus on the bold part of one quote. 'But what it means to me is the trend over time -- over the arc of time, that things look very, very good."

How can we see the long arc of time? -- Asymco.

Commands for finding files in the OS X Terminal

Commands for finding files in the OS X Terminal

The Terminal in OS X is a relatively powerful environment, where you have access to a number of scriptable tools that can help you configure, gather information, and otherwise use your Mac in ways that you cannot otherwise do with a mouse and graphical elements. Granted some of these more advanced features of the terminal require extensive experience, but if you are just getting started, then you might wonder how you simply find files in the Terminal.

In the OS X GUI, you simply have to invoke a Finder search by pressing Command-F, or invoke Spotlight with Command-Space, and then use these services to search for files not only by name, but also by content.

In the Terminal, as with all tasks, finding files requires you know how to use a few basic commands. The three that will be most useful in OS X are the 'find' command, the 'mdfind' command, and the 'locate' command. When run, these commands will search for a specific query and then output the full path to all resulting files that fall within the scope of your search. -- MacIssues.

Where's the Next Heartbleed Bug Lurking?

Where's the Next Heartbleed Bug Lurking?

OpenSSL, which the Internet depends upon, has a single full-time employee dedicated to keeping the software secure. Other projects are similarly understaffed.

After causing widespread panic and changing of passwords, the Heartbleed bug has largely disappeared from the news. Yet the implications of the discovery are still being debated across the computer industry. The biggest concern for security experts is how to preempt other flaws lurking in the Internet's foundations. -- MIT Technology Review.

Firefox Rolls Out Biggest Design Overhaul in 3 Years

Firefox Rolls Out Biggest Design Overhaul in 3 Years

Mozilla got personal with the biggest update to its Firefox browser since 2011 to users on Tuesday, ushering in a much-welcomed modernized look with a collection of new customization features. -- Mashable.

Listen to Public Radio on Your Terms with the WNYC Discover App

Listen to Public Radio on Your Terms with the WNYC Discover App

On-demand Internet radio is nothing new, but New York Public Radio hopes to take the concept to the next level by providing theme customized and time-based offline playlists that cater to public radio listeners' specific preferences. NYPR's new Discover feature, a part of the organization's WNCY mobile app, lets listeners choose the topics they're interested in and how long they'd like to listen, and then creates and downloads a custom playlist of public radio show segments that meet those criteria. -- TekRevue.

Apples To Oranges: Why Hardware Is Compared Instead Of Software

Apples To Oranges: Why Hardware Is Compared Instead Of Software

Humans are interesting creatures. We'll work hard to make a living, but not devote the same effort when thinking about a matter of importance.

In that regard we're sometimes lazy creatures. Why do network and local TV stations devote so much time to the goings on in government? They're lazy. It's easier to cover government than it is to seek out and report real news.

Why do tech pundits compare device hardware specifications when it's the software that we use? -- Mac 360.

Fish In A Barrel: Bashing The Apple Bashers

Fish In A Barrel: Bashing The Apple Bashers

There's a new cult sweeping the tech world. No, this cult is not made up of owners of Apple or Android smartphones and tablets. It's the Cult of Apple Critics, a loosely organized but highly insidious group of tech writers and pundits, and market analysts. Their claim to fame is biased reporting of the Fox News caliber; inflammatory headlines and arguments with little, if any, factual evidence to support a flimsy premise. -- PixoBebo.

Heartbleed used to uncover data from cyber-criminals

Heartbleed used to uncover data from cyber-criminals

The Heartbleed bug has turned cyber criminals from attackers into victims as researchers use it to grab material from chatrooms where they trade data. -- BBC.

April 29 Tuesday's News Happy Birthday

 

New Flash flaw could let attackers control Macs, Adobe urges users to update

New Flash flaw could let attackers control Macs, Adobe urges users to update

Adobe on Monday disclosed a new vulnerability in its Flash platform that may allow attackers to remotely take over and control Macs, PCs, and Linux machines and advised users to update their system as quickly as possible. -- AppleInsider.

Apple quietly releases more affordable MacBook Airs starting at $899

Apple quietly releases more affordable MacBook Airs starting at $899

As expected, Apple on Monday released faster versions of its MacBook Air lineup, with the 11-inch and 13-inch thin-and-lights getting 100MHz speed boosts compared to outgoing models, as well as a price reduction of $100. -- AppleInsider.


Zero-day Flash bug under active attack in Windows threatens OS X, Linux too

Zero-day Flash bug under active attack in Windows threatens OS X, Linux too

A day after reports that attackers are exploiting a zero-day vulnerability in Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser, researchers warned of a separate active campaign that was targeting a critical vulnerability in fully patched versions of Adobe's ubiquitous Flash media player. -- Ars Technica.

Monthly Apple Users

Monthly Apple Users

In the postmodern computing world that we live in, the measure of success isn't revenue or profit or units sold but the number of users that an ecosystem can attract. Therefore the monthly active user (MAU) unit of performance seems to be in vogue right now. E.g.:

  • Facebook claims Messenger has more than 200 million MAUs
  • WhatsApp has 500 million MAUs, 48 million of whom are in India
  • Line last month announced that it had 400 million users (active or not)
  • WeChat claimed 355 MAUs
  • Viber claims 105 million MAUs

Startups are aggregating these millions of MAUs in order to obtain valuations for raising capital[1] and the faster the growth in MAUs the more 'successful' the company is considered. -- Asymco.

Review roundup: Best MacBook docks

Review roundup: Best MacBook docks

This week we look at docking stations for the MacBook. Docks let you stow your laptop out of the way. With its lid closed, and yet still use its brain to power a monitor and hook up to a mouse and keyboard.

Some docks are simple dumb stands, others offer hookups that the modern MacBook lacks, like HDMI and Ethernet ports.

Let's take a look at three of the best. -- Cult of Mac.

Why you shouldn't buy a new iPhone for a stranger in exchange for cash

Why you shouldn't buy a new iPhone for a stranger in exchange for cash

In the underground world of iPhone trafficking, someone has to take the fall. Unfortunately, it appears to be the homeless and others in desperate need of some quick cash. -- Cult of Mac.

Unlike Android, iPhone users are totally safe from mobile malware

Unlike Android, iPhone users are totally safe from mobile malware

For years Macs have had the reputation of being less susceptible to malware than PCs. According to a new report, that also holds true when it comes to iPhones.

Research by Finnish security firm F-Secure looked at reports of mobile malware detected in the first quarter of 2014. Of the 277 new threats detected, they found that 275 were aimed at the disease-ridden Android platform -- while only one targeted iPhones. (The other was for Nokia's defunct Symbian software.) -- Cult of Mac.

Avram Miller says Steve Jobs has one more Apple intro

Avram Miller says Steve Jobs has one more Apple intro

We all have friends (people we know) and friends (people we not only know but hang out with). Maybe the better contrast might be between friends and buddies. Well Avram Miller is one of my buddies. He lives down the road from me and my kids prefer his pool to ours because his is solar heated. The retired Intel VP of business development is quite a character, knows a lot of people who know people, and understands the business of technology at a level few people do. So when he wrote a post this morning predicting that Apple will clean Google's clock in search, I sat up in my chair. -- I, Cringely.

Microsoft Internet Explorer Zero Day Exploit Threatens 26% of Web Users

Microsoft Internet Explorer Zero Day Exploit Threatens 26% of Web Users

A new zero day exploit targeting Microsoft's Internet Explorer Web browser has been discovered that has the potential to be particularly nasty because it affects every IE user. The security flaw impacts IE 6 and newer -- which accounts for about 26 percent of all Web browser use -- and can let hackers run arbitrary code on victim's computers. -- The Mac Observer.

How to block popup windows in Mac Web browsers

How to block popup windows in Mac Web browsers

Popup windows in Web browsers can be one of the more irritating aspects of browsing the Web. While most Web sites to not make use of popups, at times you might be directed to some that do.

In a few cases, these are necessary for the services the site is supplying; however, often these sites are spam sites where you might find yourself flooded with popups when you click a link or two, or even when you initially visit or leave the site.

There are several ways to manage or prevent popups from displaying on your Mac. -- MacIssues.

Didn't Read Those Terms of Service? Here's What You Agreed to Give Up

Didn't Read Those Terms of Service? Here's What You Agreed to Give Up

People who share status updates, photos and other information online may not realize the reuse rights they are granting, according to a new study from Georgia Tech.

On Twitter, Facebook and other sites that promote sharing of content, users can typically choose whether they want to post their updates publicly to everyone or carefully select their audience.

But even careful users may not be aware that sites where they post their status updates, photos, videos, fiction or digital art may be able to repurpose that content, using it for marketing or remixing it with other people's submissions and republishing it. -- New York Times.

US Patent Office Published 82 Apple Patent Applications Last Week

US Patent Office Published 82 Apple Patent Applications Last Week

Last Thursday the US Patent & Trademark Office published a series of 82 patent applications from Apple. While we only highlighted three of the patent applications (one, two and three) that were most interesting to the general Apple community, the fact remains that there were many other inventions that could appeal to many niche communities that have specialty skills. In this report we've compiled a list of 50 of the remaining 82 patent applications and their respective hyperlinks so that the curious explorer could find some of Apple's little hidden treasures that didn't get much attention last week. Enjoy the hunt. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Surprising Patent for an iWatch-Like Device

Apple Granted a Surprising Patent for an iWatch-Like Device

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 45 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a single granted patent that surprisingly relates to an iWatch-like device form factor. -- Patently Apple.

The Care and Feeding of External Hard Drives

The Care and Feeding of External Hard Drives

With the rise of fast solid-state storage that doesn't offer much room for data and Macs that don't let you swap out their hard drives, external drives have become essential in the Mac world. But are you treating yours well? Josh Centers offers some advice on keeping your hard drive and its data healthy. -- TidBITS.

Skype brings free group video calling back to the Mac (and PC)

Skype brings free group video calling back to the Mac (and PC)

You may recall Skype debuted a very useful (and social) feature for Mac way back in 2010: group video calling. Specifically, the feature was in a public beta stage with widespread testing thus carried a price tag of $0 with idea being it would eventually be a paid feature when the service was stable enough. Fast forward a few months to 2011 and Skype rolled the feature out to its official version of the app for Mac and put a price tag on it. As you can imagine, as the price of entry went above nothing, free alternative services including Google's Hangouts video calling emerged. Three years later, the Microsoft-owned company is back in the business of bringing multiple faces together over video for free (hooray!) as today it announced group video calling for everyone at no cost... again. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple patches another major security hole in its website that allowed access to all developer personal information

Apple patches another major security hole in its website that allowed access to all developer personal information

Imagine our surprise when an email from a complete stranger showed up in our tips box containing the personal contact information--including cell phone numbers--of several 9to5Mac staffers, as well as a few high ranking Apple executives.

Last night Apple pulled the Developer Center offline for maintenance, but as is usually the case, no noticeable changes were visible when it came back up. As it turns out, the company was patching a very serious security breach that was discovered over the weekend, allowing anyone to access the personal contact information for every registered iOS, Mac, or Safari developer; every Apple Retail and corporate employee; and some key partners. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS: Home screen icons are magnified or large

iOS: Home screen icons are magnified or large

If the icons on your Home screen appear too large, the zoom feature may be enabled on your device. Follow the instructions in this article to disable this feature. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple is Granted 45 Patents Today Covering a MEMS based Autofocus Actuator for iDevices and Much More

Apple is Granted 45 Patents Today Covering a MEMS based Autofocus Actuator for iDevices and Much More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 45 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent for a MEMS based autofocus actuator for iDevices which will provide faster response times, better photo stability and more. The inventor of this patent worked at Cambridge Mechatronics who specialized in auto focus actuators. Will this cause Apple any problems in the future or did Apple license part of the technology? Only time will tell. In addition, we cover Apple's newly awarded design patents and we wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Recording Presentations In Keynote

Recording Presentations In Keynote

In Keynote you can record your voice and the timing of slides. This recording can then be used to play back the presentation automatically. You can also use this timing to export the presentation as a video. -- MacMost.

How to Create a Table of Contents in Microsoft Word

How to Create a Table of Contents in Microsoft Word

When you're creating or editing a long document, you'll probably have to create a table of contents. That might sound like a chore, but fortunately, you can do it in just a few clicks. Then, if you change the document, Word can update the table of content instantly. Best of all, Word includes hyperlinks to the various sections in your table of contents, so it isn't just a visual aid for printed documents, but also is perfect to make easy-to-browse online documents and PDFs.

Creating the table of contents itself is simple, but the tricky part is getting it to work the way you want. In this tutorial, I'll show you everything you need to make a simple, auto-generated table of contents, and then get it to look the way you want in every version of Microsoft Word. -- Tuts+.

iWork:Pages Create a Table of Contents

iWork:Pages Create a Table of Contents

A table of contents is a great way to organize the content of your document. Watch as Pages generates a table that automatically updates with each edit. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How To Find And Delete iCloud Files

How To Find And Delete iCloud Files

Since the dawn of computing with a GUI, we Mac users have been in charge of managing our own files. That means files, folders, and thoughtful organization.

Personal organization of files and folders may not be the best way to manage files, but what's the alternative? Either no organization at all. Or, Apple's way. The iCloud way. That brings up a frequently asked question. 'Where are iCloud's files?' -- Mac 360.

Why I Stick with Apple Mail

Why I Stick with Apple Mail

I've been an email junkie since the late 1980s, when I first began to use AOL. When the Internet spread across the planet, I tried different email clients on my Macs to see which suited me. Eudora, for example, was embraced early as a sort of power users choice, but I never took to it. -- The Tech Night Owl.

April 28 Monday's News

 

Man uses Raspberry Pi to build actual working cell phone for $158

Man uses Raspberry Pi to build actual working cell phone for $158

Raspberry Pi-using tinkerer David Hunt--who previously built a bark-activated door opener for dogs--is at it again with a real, working cell phone powered by the tiny computer and a few other items.

"PiPhone" cost Hunt $158 to build with these components, all held together with cable ties. -- Ars Technica.

Stanford's password policy shuns one-size-fits-all security

Stanford's password policy shuns one-size-fits-all security

Stanford University network engineers have unveiled a refreshingly enlightened password policy. By allowing extremely long passcodes and relaxing character complexity requirements as length increases, the new standards may make it easier to choose passwords that resist the most common types of cracking attacks. -- Ars Technica.

Apple launches replacement program for defective iPhone 5 power buttons

Apple launches replacement program for defective iPhone 5 power buttons

If you have an iPhone 5 with a flaky power button, good news: Apple has just initiated an "iPhone 5 Sleep/Wake Button Replacement Program" that will replace your button, even if your phone's warranty has expired. The program begins today in the US and Canada, and it will launch on May 2 in other countries.

Enter your serial number on Apple's page to see if you're eligible for the program--if your phone has other damage (say, a cracked screen), that damage will first have to be fixed at your expense. If you're one of those holdouts running iOS 6, your phone will also be upgraded to iOS 7 as part of the repair.

If your phone is eligible, you can send it in by mail or bring it to an Apple store or to a service provider yourself. Repairs will take between four and six days, but 16GB loaner iPhones will be available for you to use while yours is being repaired, if you need one. My experience has been that most Apple stores will simply swap broken, in-warranty devices for working new or refurbished devices rather than repairing your specific unit, but the iPhone 5 has been out of production for several months at this point--Apple may not have enough left in circulation to replace all of the affected phones outright.

How to selectively delete browser history

How to selectively delete browser history

Rather than delete your entire browsing history after visiting a website you want to keep secret, there's an easy way to remove individual sites. -- PC World.

16 things you should know how to do with Siri

16 things you should know how to do with Siri

Siri is, of course, a marvel of modern technology. But it's also one of those things that a lot of us don't use as much as we could or should. So a couple of Macworld editors, particularly Senior Editor Dan Frakes, put together the following list of 16 things we think everybody should know how to do using Siri. -- Macworld.

How to get beta seeds of OS X for your iMac and MacBooks

How to get beta seeds of OSX for your iMac and Macbooks

With Apple recently making OSX Beta Seed downloads available to the general public, Cult of Mac's Ste Smith shows you how to prep your Mac to install the latest software. Get the latest OSX updates before general release by following the simple steps shown.

Take a look at the video to see what you need to do. -- Cult of Mac.


Verizon Plans to Use Desktop Tracking for Mobile Ads, How to Opt-Out

Verizon Plans to Use Desktop Tracking for Mobile Ads, How to Opt-Out

Verizon's new approach to mobile advertising is to include your desktop/laptop computer as a data source to help focus ads on your phone and tablet. Kelly Guimont explains how it works and how to opt-out. -- .

Enable MIDI playback in Web browsers for Mavericks and Mountain Lion

Enable MIDI playback in Web browsers for Mavericks and Mountain Lion

MIDI files are similar to digital sheet music, where notes on individual tracks are played with a selected instrument from a central sound library. This allows the relatively small MIDI file of only a few kilobytes to play anything from simple piano music, to full symphonic arrangements.

When Apple introduced QuickTime X in Mountain Lion, it unfortunately removed support for MIDI file playback. This limitation prevents these files from playing in the QuickTime Player; however, this also broke the ability to play or preview these files in the Finder and in Web browsers that use the QuickTime plugin. -- MacIssues.

Four reasons you should use OS X's System Information utility

Four reasons you should use OS X's System Information utility

When troubleshooting your Mac, you often need to get information about your system and what's going on inside of it, either to help you identify and fix the problem yourself or so you can convey that information to others who might help.

One tool that can help with this is a utility that used to be called System Profiler but as of OS X 10.7 (Lion) was renamed System Information. By either name, it's a handy app that lets you look up all kinds of details about your system's hardware and software, from the serial number and firmware version of your particular Mac to information about peripheral devices attached to it. -- Macworld.

How to easily clone your Mac using SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner

How to easily clone your Mac using SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner

Even if you're backing up your Mac using Time Machine or another method, you may eventually need to clone your hard drive as well. Cloning produces an exact duplicate of your hard drive, bootable from your Mac. If your main drive fails, it can be a life-saver.

There are a number of good reasons to clone: Upgrading your hard drive, for example, or working off an external drive for some reason, such as if you're Mac is in the shop getting something else fixed, and you're relegated to a backup machine. Maybe you just want to have an extra version of your hard drive on hand in case of emergencies.

Of the many ways to clone your Mac's hard drive, I'm focusing on two: Shirt Pocket Software's SuperDuper! and Bombich Software's Carbon Copy Cloner. They're both popular, well-supported software apps. Here are instructions for using them. -- iMore.

How to fix Apple Mail by rebuilding and reindexing the Mailbox

How to fix Apple Mail by rebuilding and reindexing the Mailbox

If your Apple Mail doesn't seem to be searchable and/or has become so slow it seems to hang your Mac -- or even displays incorrect email content, then it's time you attacked the problem: it's time to rebuild and reindex your Mailbox. -- Computerworld.

Full Circle: A Brief History of NeXT

Full Circle: A Brief History of NeXT

Steve Jobs' career at Apple was unique. His unconventional leadership helped create Apple's two most important products of the 70s and 80s: the Apple II and the Macintosh. Unfortunately for Jobs, the CEO he had recruited, John Sculley, was not happy with the risks Jobs was willing to take. After a short power struggle that left Sculley in control of Apple, Jobs left the company in 1985. -- Low End Mac.

Can't delete songs in the Music app on your iPhone and iPad? Here's the fix

Can't delete songs in the Music app on your iPhone and iPad? Here's the fix

The Music app in iOS 7 didn't just come with an all new design, it came with an all new bug that's giving some of us trouble with deleting songs. What's supposed to happen is that you swipe a song, it brings up the delete button, and with a tap the song is gone. Unfortunately, for iTunes in the Cloud, that's sometimes not the case. The good news is all iTunes in the Cloud (and iTunes Match music) is safely backed up to Apple's servers. And that means you can fix the Music app bug with the nuclear option! -- iMore.

My thoughts on iOS 7, six months later

My thoughts on iOS 7, six months later

Since we are roughly six months into the general release of iOS 7, and about two months from learning about iOS 8, I thought I'd share my thoughts on iOS 7 as well as my iOS 8 wish list. Overall, I've been pretty happy with iOS 7 and haven't wanted to go back to iOS 6. However, I still think there is room for improvement. -- Gigaom.

Best car rental and taxi apps for iPhone: Uber, Zipcar, Taxi Magic, and more

Best car rental and taxi apps for iPhone: Uber, Zipcar, Taxi Magic, and more

What are the best iPhone apps for renting cars and catching taxis? If you don't own a car but need one on occasion, be it for a trip across town and a weekend out of town, there are a lot of great apps in the App Store that'll help you get a ride in just a few taps. But that doesn't mean all car rental and taxi apps are created equal -- nor are the services themselves. So what are the absolute best apps for getting you the car you need to get where you need to go? -- iMore.

How to recover lost contacts on iOS and prevent it from happening again

How to recover lost contacts on iOS and prevent it from happening again

It can happen to anyone at anytime, noticing that your contact list is either missing or incomplete. All may not be lost, as there may be a way to get back some or all of your contacts.

The trouble with being connected all of the time is that when something bad happens to the data stored on one device, like losing your contact list, it can quickly spread like wildfire across all of your devices. If you do end up losing your contacts, there are some steps you can take to hopefully get most if not all of your contacts restored. -- Gigaom.

April 25 Friday's News

 

Apple's iOS 7.1.1 tweaks shown to extend iPhone battery life

Apple's iOS 7.1.1 tweaks shown to extend iPhone battery life

The latest version of Apple's mobile operating system seems to have brought with it enhancements designed to ease strain on the iPhone's battery, as some users are reporting noticeable increases in uptime with iOS 7.1.1. -- AppleInsider.

Before Silicon Valley got nasty, the Pirates of Analog Alley fought it out

Before Silicon Valley got nasty, the Pirates of Analog Alley fought it out

The history of information technology has a way of repeating itself. Every era's corporate competitors elbow each other for success, try to better the other's ideas, and sometimes just plain steal from one another. In that light, it's no surprise that the battles of today's technology giants may have been foretold by another wave of innovators--those at the turn of the 20th century, when electricity was new and computing was done with real machines. Think the kind with gears, cams, and shafts.

The startup culture created by the electrification and communications booms of the late 19th and early 20th centuries produced a generation of engineers looking for the next big thing. But their similarities with today's tech leaders go beyond the fact that "a generation of engineers looking for the next big thing" could just as easily describe anyone at Google, Facebook, or maybe even SnapChat. While researching the recent Ars report on Naval analog computers, parallels immediately revealed themselves. The behavior of the men who pioneered this analog computing eerily mimics actions we're more familiar with from Steve Jobs, Bill Gates, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, and the rest of today's tech pantheon. These early engineers were, if you'll pardon the phrase, the Pirates of Analog Alley. -- Ars Technica.

Mobile Safari creator talks about crafting Apple's first iPhone apps

Mobile Safari creator talks about crafting Apple's first iPhone apps

Apple's infamous secrecy means that despite years of interviews, biographies, and testimonies, we still don't know everything about the development of the original iPhone hardware and the first version of the iPhone OS. Today, the New York Times Bits Blog ran an extensive interview with Francisco Tolmasky, the developer responsible for the first version of mobile Safari, and he shared some additional details about the creation of the very first iPhone apps.

Apple surprised with sales performance

Apple surprised with sales performance

After n quarters of predictability, Apple surprised with sales performance that was 3.74% above the top of their guidance. This may not seem significant but since instituting a new range-bound guidance method in Q1 of last year the company reported revenue within about 1% of the top of the range. -- Asymco.

How to save all your embarrassing tweets in 1 fell swoop

How to save all your embarrassing tweets in 1 fell swoop

You know, it sure would be nice if you could retain ownership of all that pithy writing you've done over the years on Twitter, right?

I mean, chances are you've crafted some fairly amazing 140-character diatribes along the way, and it might be fun to go back and see just how awesome you are.

Of course, the truth may be that you need to delete that Twitter account and just archive all of them for some embarrassing reason, but we're not judging. Whatever the reason, it's super-simple to download all your Twitter writing to your Mac. Here's how. -- Cult of Mac.

iOS 6 Users on Devices Able to Run iOS 7 Must Upgrade to Fix FaceTime

iOS 6 Users on Devices Able to Run iOS 7 Must Upgrade to Fix FaceTime

Apple today released a new support document, detailing the issue behind the recent problems some iOS 6 users have been experiencing with FaceTime. According to Apple, a bug resulting from an expired device certificate has rendered FaceTime unusable on older versions of iOS and the only solution to the problem is to update to the latest version of the operating system.

Apple's FaceTime issues first began on April 16, with many iOS 6 users reporting an inability to use the service. At that time, it was unclear whether Apple would implement a fix, but customer service representatives have been presenting iOS 7 updates as a solution since the problem was first uncovered, and it appears that Apple does not plan to offer another solution. The company did, however, release a FaceTime update for OS X users to fix the issue earlier this week.

Tip: Hide or unhide applications to remove clutter

Tip: Hide or unhide applications to remove clutter

If you regularly use your Mac for multiple tasks, you might have a number of applications, application windows, and documents open at the same time. These may include browser windows, preference windows for open applications, and perhaps iTunes, iPhoto, and multiple Terminal sessions, among many others. In all, with multiple documents open in multiple programs, you can easily have 20 to 50 windows packed into your Mac's screen. -- MacIssues.

U.S. Plan for Internet Fast Lanes Contrasts With European Rules

U.S. Plan for Internet Fast Lanes Contrasts With European Rules

The battle over whether Internet content should be treated equally is heating up.

A proposal in the United States that would allow Internet providers to charge companies for more powerful transmission of web traffic stands in contrast with new rules in Europe. -- New York Times.

Apple tops J.D. Power's 2014 survey in smartphone satisfaction across all U.S. carriers

Apple tops J.D. Power's 2014 survey in smartphone satisfaction across all U.S. carriers

J.D. Power, which previously awarded the iPhone highest in consumer satisfaction for smartphones eight years in a row, today released a report that puts Apple on top for customer satisfaction by carrier. While measure four key metrics-- performance, physical design, features, and ease of operation-- across the four major carriers, J.D. Power found Apple and the iPhone's overall score ranked #1 for Sprint, Verizon, AT&T and T-Mobile. However, in most cases, it's only beating Samsung by a small margin. -- 9to5Mac.

Mac computers: Don't change SD cards while computer sleeps

Mac computers: Don't change SD cards while computer sleeps

Don't swap an SD card with another one of the same manufacture and capacity while your computer is sleeping. This could potentially lead to data loss.

Always wake your computer and eject the SD card before removing it from your Mac. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Fix for a Mac Disconnecting from Wi-Fi After Sleep Wake

Fix for a Mac Disconnecting from Wi-Fi After Sleep Wake

A fair amount of Mac users have encountered an issue where their Mac will immediately disconnect from wi-fi networks after waking from sleep, forcing users to rejoin a wireless network constantly. This is obviously pretty frustrating, but it's usually easily remedied with a few adjustments to the Network Preferences in OS X. -- OS X Daily.

How To: Microsoft Word Text Effects 101

How To: Microsoft Word Text Effects 101

Most of your Word documents are likely set in standard, drab Times New Roman or Calibre typography, perhaps with the occasional cheesy Word Art thrown in for variety. Yet Word actually includes a number of text effect tools that give you everything you need to make beautiful art from your words.

In this tutorial, I'll show you everything about you need to create the text effects you want in every modern version of Microsoft Word, using its advanced type and formatting features. Once you're done, you'll know the tricks that I used to make Word templates that were featured in Microsoft's Art of Office site. -- Tuts+.

Using iMovie Markers

Using iMovie Markers

Markers are a simple tool in iMovie that allow you to create points in your video where the playback head and other elements will snap. You can use them to mark places to add things later, or to let you easily line up overlays, titles or other elements. You can add markers while the video is playing in the preview pane. They are similar to beat markers in previous versions of iMovie. -- MacMost.

Mac 101: Use this tip to easily map a contact's address in OS X Mavericks

Mac 101: Use this tip to easily map a contact's address in OS X Mavericks

Traveling to a friend's new house and not exactly sure how to get there? if their new address is in your Contacts, then you can quickly and easily pull up a map to see where they live. Once you have Maps open, driving directions are just few clicks away. -- TUAW.

Cooler Than Cool: Create Vector-based Raster Patterns From Bitmap Images Right On Your Mac

Cooler Than Cool: Create Vector-based Raster Patterns From Bitmap Images Right On Your Mac

Way, way back in the day, when vector-based graphics were just getting started on the Mac (can you say, 'MacDraw?') I would trace bitmapped images with vector tools to create a unique, distinct, yet highly flexible image for advertising clients. Those days of intense and highly manual labor are gone, thankfully, but vector-based tools still command a presence. -- McSolo.

On the Past, Present and Future of Apple's Aqua User Interface

On the Past, Present and Future of Apple's Aqua User Interface

Building a new operating system is a monumental challenge, and in January 2000 when Aqua was introduced, Apple was in the thick of the transition to OS X.

Beyond the staggering amount of development work taking place to smash Mac OS and NeXTSTEP together, Apple was hard at work on the user interface of OS X. But to understand what OS X would become (and how it would look), it's important to remember where the company had been before. -- 512 Pixels.

Set AirDrop in iOS to be Discoverable by Contacts Only for Added Privacy

Set AirDrop in iOS to be Discoverable by Contacts Only for Added Privacy

Those of us who regularly use AirDrop on the iPhone or iPad and leave the function frequently turned on for share requests may want to take a moment to adjust a simple privacy setting for the feature, allowing your iOS device to be only discoverable by Contacts. This prevents AirDrop requests coming in from random or unknown users, which if you've ever been in a busy office or place crowded with many iPhone and iPads, you may have encountered yourself. -- OS X Daily.

Watch Dogs Analyzes Your Digital Shadow: Facebook Data Miner Will Shock You

Watch Dogs Analyzes Your Digital Shadow: Facebook Data Miner Will Shock You

A new website sponsored by Ubisoft as part of its advertising campaign for the upcoming hacking-themed game Watch Dogs isn't just a plug for the title -- it's a chilling example of exactly how easy it is for companies to mine your data. While I'm normally averse to giving any application or service access to my Facebook account, I also take some effort to lock down my settings and posts. I decided to make an exception to this policy and give the application access to my account data. What it came back with is interesting, scary, and informative by turns. -- Hot Hardware.

Who decides how consumers should shop?

Who decides how consumers should shop?

Consumers once shopped predominantly at their local stores; but first mail order catalogs and today the Internet have created new ways to shop for and purchase a wide range of goods and services. Similarly, consumers once arranged for taxis by hailing one from a street corner or by calling a dispatcher; yet today, smartphones and new software applications are shaking up the transportation industry, creating new business opportunities and new services for consumers. -- Federal Trade Commission .

April 24 Thursday's News

 

Apple beats estimates with $10.2B in profit on sales of 43.7M iPhones, 16.3M iPads

Apple beats estimates with $10.2B in profit on sales of 43.7M iPhones, 16.3M iPads

Apple on Wednesday exceeded market expectations for its second quarter of fiscal 2014, posting $45.6 billion in revenue and quarterly net profit of $10.2 billion, or $11.62 per diluted share. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's display tech lets users interact with 3D objects in mid-air

Apple's display tech lets users interact with 3D objects in mid-air

A document discovered on Thursday describes an interactive three-dimensional display system that allows users to "touch" objects in mid-air, presenting the illusion of an advanced hologram. -- AppleInsider.

Future Apple devices may boast environmental sensor suite with built-in thermometer

Future Apple devices may boast environmental sensor suite with built-in thermometer

A pair of documents unearthed on Thursday detail Apple's ambitions to make the iPhone -- or rumored iWatch -- a one-stop-shop for gathering all kinds of data, including information about a user's surrounding environment. -- AppleInsider.

Apple users left exposed to serious threats for weeks, former employee says

Apple users left exposed to serious threats for weeks, former employee says

A noted whitehat hacker who spent more than a year on Apple's security team has dealt her former employer some blistering criticism for fixing critical vulnerabilities in iOS three weeks after they became widely known to blackhats. -- Ars Technica.

This is Tim: Apple's CEO on the iPad, Apple TV, future products, and China

This is Tim: Apple's CEO on the iPad, Apple TV, future products, and China

As usual, Apple CEO Tim Cook was the focus of attention during the company's quarterly earnings call with analysts on Wednesday. And, as usual, we've got a transcript of his remarks while on the call. -- Macworld.

MacRx

MacRx

The workplace can be stressful enough, without adding computer snafus to the mix. As an IT consultant, I hear about a lot of them, usually after disaster has struck.

Here's how to deal with some of the more common workplace issues -- email problems, contacts not syncing, WiFi headaches, deleted files -- and keep rolling with your Mac. -- Macworld.

Digital Me: Will the next Cringely be from Gmail?

Digital Me: Will the next Cringely be from Gmail?

My last column discussed the intersection between Big Data and Artificial Intelligence and where things might be heading. The question for this column is can I (Bob Cringely) be replaced by a machine? -- I, Cringely.

Numbers: Fitting Your Content to a Printed Page

Numbers: Fitting Your Content to a Printed Page

With both the old and the new versions of Numbers, you can easily configure your spreadsheet so that the columns fit to a single page-without having to jump through a ton of hoops (or change your headers!) to do so. In this Quick Tip, we're going to go over how to do that in both versions of Apple's spreadsheet software, so no matter which one you use, this article's for you. -- The Mac Observer.

The Golden Age of Mac Upgrades is (Once Again) Upon Us

The Golden Age of Mac Upgrades is (Once Again) Upon Us

Years ago we Mac users enjoyed the ability to spend a little bit of money to upgrade our admittedly-expensive computers. It may seem like those days are behind us, but the reality is that we're truly in the thick of a new golden age of upgrades. -- The Mac Observer.

Create a Fusion Drive with a Recovery Partition

Create a Fusion Drive with a Recovery Partition

There are many step-by-step guides on the internet that explain how to add an SSD to an existing Mac, and create a 'Fusion Drive' that has the speed of an SSD, but also the capacity of a Hard Drive. All these guides fall short in one way that was important to me.

Creating the Fusion Drive the way these walkthroughs say (including OWC's exceptional guides), destroys the Recovery Partition that exists on the drive. Without a Recovery Partition, you cannot enable FileVault2, and will need some other external boot drive if you ever need to perform maintenance on your internal drives. For a laptop computer that might be far from home, not having a Recovery Partition was unacceptable to me. Also note that if you buy a Mac from Apple today with Fusion Drive, it DOES come with a Recovery Partition, so it is indeed possible to do. -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to detect and remove Genieo for Mac

How to detect and remove Genieo for Mac

In recent months there have been a growing number of concerns regarding a software package called Genieo, which in some cases seems to have mysteriously appeared on people's Macs.

When installed, the software results in a number of headaches, stemming from the inability to change browser search engines, to advertisements and warnings popping up when people use their systems. [I have checked, and it is not one mine.] -- MacIssues.

Lab tested: The Mac Pro Daisy Chain Challenge

Lab tested: The Mac Pro Daisy Chain Challenge

A Thunderbolt daisy chain can support six connected peripherals per port. And the Mac Pro has six Thunderbolt ports, four more than any other Mac. The Mac Pro also has four USB 3.0 ports, one HDMI port, and two gigabit ethernet ports, so you can connect a lot of devices to one Mac Pro.

Macworld Lab came up with the Mac Pro Daisy Chain Challenge: How many devices can we round up, connect, and use on a single Mac Pro. -- Macworld.

Apple Reveals Additional Embedded Authentication Systems

Apple Reveals Additional Embedded Authentication Systems

On April 24, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a series of three patent applications from Apple that revisits the many authentication systems that Apple is working on beyond just a fingerprint scanner. Apple touches on retinal scanning, eye tracking, voice prints and other systems for the iPhone and MacBook Pro alike. For the MacBook Pro, the biometric sensor could be built right into a familiar keyboard key or in the palm rest. Lastly, Apple adds retina scans to one of their patents patent claims to ensure that it's a protected future feature option. -- Patently Apple.

Future iDevices may provide new Environmental Sensors

Future iDevices may provide new Environmental Sensors

On April 24, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals new environmental sensors may be considered for future iDevices relating to measuring temperature and humidity. -- Patently Apple.

Troubleshooting Yahoo/AT&T password issues

Troubleshooting Yahoo/AT&T password issues

Henry Ingram has a new problem with an old email account. He writes:

What with all the security breaches going on I've been changing passwords. The problem is that I have an old email account that was taken over by AT&T a few years ago but is now run by Yahoo. I've had a heck of a time changing the password plus my iPad won't accept the new one. Is there a way out of this misery? -- Macworld.

Outline Much? Try The Think Different 'Thinking Man's' Outliner For The Mac

Outline Much? Try The Think Different 'Thinking Man's' Outliner For The Mac

Anyone who has used an outliner app, Mac or Windows, iPhone or iPad, knows the value of a collapsible outliner tree. It's a great way to organize information, brainstorm ideas, sketch out plans and procedures, and do it all in an easy to use, drag and drop to rearrange method.

A few Mac outliner apps are free or next to free, while others are feature laden and have a price tag and learning curve to match the weight of the built-in options.

Then there's Tree, my favorite Mac outliner. -- NoodleMac.

A Cheap And Easy Way To Monitor Wi-Fi Networks (and a cheaper way)

A Cheap And Easy Way To Monitor Wi-Fi Networks (and a cheaper way)

Have Mac, will travel. That's my motto. It's also my day job. With my Mac sidekick in hand I troubleshoot computer problems in the State of Georgia.

That means I'm always on the lookout for handy utilities which let me monitor and troubleshoot Wi-Fi networks. Here's one that's almost dirt cheap, crazy easy to use, and if you prefer ease of use to confusing details, it's not bad for the price. -- BohemianBoomer.

'The Only Thing I Know About Apple TV Is There Are Some Amazing Engineers Working On Apple TV'

'The Only Thing I Know About Apple TV Is There Are Some Amazing Engineers Working On Apple TV'

Mark Gurman, senior editor at 9to5Mac, was on John Gruber's podcast and among other things they mentioned the Apple TV. [As we all know this is the next big product opportunity for Apple.]

Gurman said, "I know an Apple TV was planned for the first half of 2014," but it hasn't happened. Perhaps it was delayed, or pushed back. But with Tim Cook saying that Apple had new products planned across 2014, Gurman said, "something had to go wrong."

Gruber responded saying, "I wonder... maybe something slipped," or maybe Apple has something planned for WWDC, Apple's developer conference. They both thought that maybe Apple would introduce a new Apple TV at WWDC, but they were merely guessing, not reporting that they knew about an Apple TV coming.

Then, Gruber said, "The only thing I know about Apple TV is I know there are some amazing engineers working on Apple TV. Like, the type of engineers who there's no way that they're working on the Apple TV as we know it, the simple little up, down, right select thing. That there are some really good people on it." -- Business Insider.

April 23 Wednesday's News

 

Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with improvements to Touch ID, keyboard

Apple releases iOS 7.1.1 with improvements to Touch ID, keyboard

Apple on Tuesday released iOS 7.1.1, a minor update for its mobile operating system that's intended to address a few bugs, including an issue that could affect keyboard responsiveness, while also further improving the performance of the iPhone 5s Touch ID fingerprint sensor. -- AppleInsider.

Apple opens OS X betas to consumers with Beta Seed Program

Apple opens OS X betas to consumers with Beta Seed Program

In a substantial change to its operating policies, Apple has opened its OS X beta testing process to all Mac users with a newly minted Beta Seed Program.

The Beta Seed Program allows consumers to join Mac developers in test-driving pre-release versions of the Mac operating system in exchange for "quality and usability feedback.

After signing up, users can install the latest beta version of Apple's upcoming OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks maintenance update on their Macs. The most recent beta -- build 13D45a -- was released on Monday.

It appears Apple has been quietly working to implement the new open beta policy for at least a couple of months via a "Feedback Assistant" that turned up in build 13D38 OS X 10.9.3 earlier this month. At the time, the standalone app's purpose was unknown, though it is now believed to be part of the Beta Seed Program.

From Apple's Beta Seed Program webpage:

Join the OS X Beta Seed Program and accept the Beta Seed and Confidentiality Agreement. Apple will provide a Beta Access Utility for your Mac, which gives you access to pre-release versions of OS X in the Mac App Store Updates panel.

As with any beta or pre-release software, the latest OS X Mavericks is not yet finished and may have unknown bugs or decreased functionality. Users should take this into consideration before installing the beta on a vital machine.

Apple updates iWork apps for iOS with stability improvements and bug fixes

Apple updates iWork apps for iOS with stability improvements and bug fixes

Coming on the heels of Tuesday's iOS 7.1.1 release, Apple has issued updates to all iWork for iOS apps with unnamed stability and bug fixes.

With the background changes applied to all three apps, Pages, Numbers and Keynote, the software reached version 2.2.1.

It is unknown what "stability improvements and bug fixes" the updates bring, though it can be speculated that the relatively quick turnaround since Apple's last iWork refresh suggests the fixes may patch complications with the Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability. The company revamped iOS, Mac and iCloud versions of iWork in early April.

For new devices, the latest iWork versions can be downloaded for free from the iOS App Store. Apple's Pages is a 276MB download, Numbers weighs in at 239MB and Keynote comes to 456MB.

Apple patches Heartbleed vulnerability in latest AirPort Extreme, Time Capsule update

Apple patches Heartbleed vulnerability in latest AirPort Extreme, Time Capsule update

In response to the Heartbleed kerfuffle, Apple on Tuesday rolled out a firmware update for all 2013 AirPort Extreme and AirPort Time Capsule models that protects affected units from the OpenSSL vulnerability.

Apple on Tuesday patched a bug in its most recent AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule models related to the Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability discovered earlier this month.

The update, AirPort Base Station Firmware Update 7.7.3, is only for the AirPort Extreme and Time Capsule base stations with 802.11ac, introduced in June 2013, and fixes a vulnerability that existed only when the Back to My Mac feature was turned on. -- Macworld.

iPhones and Macs get fix for extremely critical 'triple handshake' crypto bug

iPhones and Macs get fix for extremely critical 'triple handshake' crypto bug

Apple has patched versions of its iOS and OS X operating systems to fix yet another extremely critical cryptography vulnerability that leaves some users open to surreptitious eavesdropping. Readers are urged to install the updates immediately. -- Ars Technica.

How To Add To, Hide And Reorder Those Pesky Sidebar Items

How To Add To, Hide And Reorder Those Pesky Sidebar Items

The OS X sidebar, introduced in Mac OS X Panther (10.3), has gotten an increased set of features over the years, including the most recent changes in Mountain Lion, which let you Hide and change the order of your Sidebar items. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Disable Noise Cancellation On iPhone

How To Disable Noise Cancellation On iPhone

Some folks find that the iPhone's noise-cancellation feature causes a weird, uncomfortable sensation. If this is bothering you, here's how to turn off the noise-cancellation feature, which Apple added to iOS 7. (Originally exclusive to the iPhone 5s, noise cancellation is now available to older devices in iOS 7.1.) -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Releases Security Update 2014-002 for Mavericks, Lion, Mountain Lion

Apple Releases Security Update 2014-002 for Mavericks, Lion, Mountain Lion

Apple released Security Update 2014-002 on Tuesday, an update for OS X Lion, Mountain Lion, and Mavericks, as well as the server versions of those OSes. The sparse patch notes don't offer any details, and Apple has not yet released the separate list of security issues addressed in this release. -- The Mac Observer.

First Generation Apple TVs Once Again Able to Connect to iTunes

First Generation Apple TVs Once Again Able to Connect to iTunes

Over the weekend, Apple's first-generation Apple TVs were unable to access iTunes, an issue that affected Apple TV owners worldwide.

It appears that Apple has resolved the problem as of Tuesday, with many first-generation Apple TV owners reporting on Apple's Support Communities that their Apple TVs are once again able to access iTunes. -- Mac Rumors.

ElevationLab Debuts Aluminum Elevation Stand for iMac and Apple Displays

ElevationLab Debuts Aluminum Elevation Stand for iMac and Apple Displays

ElevationLab today launched a new Kickstarter project for the Elevation Stand, an aluminum stand designed for the iMac and Apple displays. Aimed at improving posture, the Elevation Stand is milled from a single piece of aluminum to match the seamless look of the iMac and Apple's displays. [The video was fascinating. I enver knew there were so many display stands out there.] -- Mac Rumors.

Apple Fixes FaceTime on Older Versions of OS X, iOS 6 Still Not Working

Apple Fixes FaceTime on Older Versions of OS X, iOS 6 Still Not Working

Apple tonight released an update for FaceTime on OS X, which resolves connections issues and is recommended for all FaceTime users currently running OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. The connection issues are presumably related to the problems reported last week which affected both older versions of OS X and iOS 6 versions of FaceTime. -- Mac Rumors.

Apple reveals new Password Gestures to Strengthen the Authentication Process of Future iDevices and Macs

Apple reveals new Password Gestures to Strengthen the Authentication Process of Future iDevices and Macs

Earlier today we posted a report titled "Two new Biometric Patents from Apple Surface Covering Anti-Spoofing Measures and More" that covered a new "doodle" authentication process. In another patent application filing published by the US Patent & Trademark Office today, Apple reveals the next level of passcode authentication process for iDevices and Macs that involve a color coded combination feature covering "password gestures." The new method is to both strengthen the current authentication process using Touch ID and to provide an alternative method of authentication for those Apple fans that have decided to opt out of using Touch ID due to their distrust of the US government's NSA spying processes that have been in the news of late. The race is on to secure these next-gen authentication processes, as others like Samsung have patents on record for this, though Apple's filings are dated a year or more ahead of theirs. And with Apple suing Samsung over "Slide to Unlock," securing patents for this advanced process is important. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Liquid-Metal Patent for Hollow Structures that Support a Possible Future iPhone Design

Apple Granted a Liquid-Metal Patent for Hollow Structures that Support a Possible Future iPhone Design

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 56 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a liquid-metal related patent that supports hollow structures. This supports a possible future flexible display based iPhone patent filing that was revealed last December. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted Patents for a Cellular Data Connected Smart Pen, the Next Generation of MagSafe with Fiber Optics & More

Apple Granted Patents for a Cellular Data Connected Smart Pen, the Next Generation of MagSafe with Fiber Optics & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 56 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's possible Livescribe competing smart pen and the next generation of MagSafe with a fiber optic line incorporated. One of the questions that arise from the smart pen patent is whether Sir Jony Ive secretly works for UK's MI6. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted 56 Patents Today Covering Magic Mouse and a Method of Locking-Out Drivers from using an iDevice for Texting

Apple Granted 56 Patents Today Covering Magic Mouse and a Method of Locking-Out Drivers from using an iDevice for Texting

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 56 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's granted patents for their magic mouse and one relating to a method of turning off an iDevice while a driver is in the driver seat and in motion. This invention was way ahead of its time and yet it's possible that it'll make its way into a future version of Apple's new CarPlay. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

How Apple's billion dollar sapphire bet will pay off

How Apple's billion dollar sapphire bet will pay off

Apple is making a billion dollar bet on sapphire as a strategic material for mobile devices such as the iPhone, iPad and perhaps an iWatch. Though exactly what the company plans to do with the scratch-resistant crystal -- and when -- is still the subject of debate. -- Network World.

Perspective on 10 Breakthrough Technologies

Perspective on 10 Breakthrough Technologies

In this issue of the magazine, Brian Bergstein, MIT Technology Review's deputy editor, interviewed Sarah Lewis, a curator, about the 'accomplishments that come from seemingly improbable circumstances and the connections between art and science' (see 'Q&A: Sarah Lewis'). Asked about Samuel Morse, who invented the telegraph after years of struggling as a painter, Lewis says:

'Few people recognize that when they're moved by a work of art, they're moved by an artist's ability to solve a problem that is often a long-standing, timeless one. For Cézanne, it was how to realize nature in paint. He didn't sign 90 percent of his paintings, because he didn't feel he had yet solved the problem … All these different works are solutions to problems. For some people, there's no differentiation between finding something new in paint and finding something technologically.' -- MIT Technology Review.

Self-Defense

Self-Defense

It is difficult to protect your privacy even if you know how.

I am a privacy researcher with a confession to make. I'm not any better at protecting my privacy than you are. For 17 years I've been interviewing people about their privacy concerns, studying how companies collect and use personal information, and researching the latest surveillance techniques. I attend privacy conferences, read privacy books, and have written a couple myself. But when friends ask me how to protect their privacy, I don't have much to tell them. Like most people, I want more privacy but find it difficult to get: few products allow us such control. -- MIT Technology Review.

Ultraprivate Smartphones

Ultraprivate Smartphones

New models built with security and privacy in mind reflect the Zeitgeist of the Snowden era.

On January 21 a text message flashed on phones held by the protesters thronging Kiev's Independence Square. Ukraine's president, Viktor Yanukovych, was then still clinging to power and brutalizing opponents. The message--from the number 111--read: 'Dear subscriber, you are registered as a participant in a mass disturbance.' Widely presumed to have been sent from Yanukovych's security apparatus to all phones in the protest zone, the message was a stark reminder of how mobile phones can be used for surveillance. -- MIT Technology Review.

Switch From iOS to Android (Or Vice Versa) in 4 Easy Steps

Switch From iOS to Android (Or Vice Versa) in 4 Easy Steps

You find iOS/Android annoying, and all your friends say Android/iOS is, like, way better. So you've finally decided it's time to switch phones. Let's do it. -- Wired.

April 22 Tuesday's News

 

Apple launches 'Better' environmental campaign with Tim Cook-narrated video

Apple launches 'Better' environmental campaign with Tim Cook-narrated video

Apple on Tuesday unveiled a campaign that more clearly outlines the impact of the company's environmental initiatives, backing it up with a revamped environmental responsibility website and an introductory video narrated by CEO Tim Cook.

Apple now offering free recycling of all old Apple products in environmental push

Apple now offering free recycling of all old Apple products in environmental push

Continuing its environment-minded announcements on Monday, Apple revealed a new plan to accept all used Apple products for free in an effort to cut down on pollution caused by manufacture and use of the company's devices. -- Yahoo.

Intel's next-gen Thunderbolt rumored to hit 40Gbps transfer speeds with new connector

Intel's next-gen Thunderbolt rumored to hit 40Gbps transfer speeds with new connector

In a purported presentation slide leaked to the Web on Monday, Intel outlines its next-generation Thunderbolt specification -- "Alpine Ridge" -- that will boast double the throughput of current Thunderbolt 2 interface, while bringing massive gains in power efficiency. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 beta to developers with minor tweaks

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 beta to developers with minor tweaks

Apple on Monday seeded the latest OS X Mavericks 10.9.3 beta to developers with iterative changes and enhancements, while asking developers concentrate on the usual focus areas including graphics, Mail and iTunes syncing. -- AppleInsider.

Apple tech takes on distracted driving, blocks users from texting while behind the wheel

Apple tech takes on distracted driving, blocks users from texting while behind the wheel

A new piece of technology unearthed on Tuesday shows Apple has developed iPhone technology that automatically shuts off texting capabilities when it is determined that a user is driving, helping to mitigate potential accidents resulting from in-car distractions. -- AppleInsider.

Apple reportedly hopes to replace your credit card with your iPhone

Apple reportedly hopes to replace your credit card with your iPhone

Apple is "very, very serious" about hiring new executives to head up a new mobile payments system, according to a report from Re/code earlier today. The company is looking to fill two new positions to lead the charge--one for a head of product and one for a head of business development. CEO Tim Cook has previously indicated Apple's interest in mobile payments, lending some weight to the rumors. -- Ars Technica.

Active malware campaign steals Apple passwords from jailbroken iPhones

Active malware campaign steals Apple passwords from jailbroken iPhones

Security researchers have uncovered an active malware campaign in the wild that steals the Apple ID credentials from jailbroken iPhones and iPads. -- Ars Technica.

Older Macs Must Upgrade To Keep Using iChat Logins For AIM

Older Macs Must Upgrade To Keep Using iChat Logins For AIM

Come July 1, Mac users running various older versions of OS X won't have the ability to use their mac.com and me.com addresses to log into the AOL Instant Messaging service via iChat.

Apple says that users who want to take advantage of the service must upgrade to at least OS X Lion 10.7.2. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Enable And Customize Video Subtitles

How To Enable And Customize Video Subtitles

Many videos that you purchase these days via iTunes or other sources have subtitles, those little words beneath the screen that were created to help caption videos.

These can be useful for someone with a hearing impairment, or who reads a different language than the one being spoken in the video, to watch these during a movie.

In OS X Mavericks, you can easily get subtitles going in any supported video, and you can customize the way they look, as well. Here's how to find out if your video supports subtitles, how to turn them on and how to change their look and feel. -- Cult of Mac.

1st Gen Apple TV Owners Lose iTunes Store Access

1st Gen Apple TV Owners Lose iTunes Store Access

First generation Apple TV owners can't connect to the iTunes Store any more, and it isn't clear if the issue is temporary, or if Apple is leaving those users behind. The problem started late last week, and so far there hasn't been any resolution. -- The Mac Observer.

Word font corruption may cause OS X to hang

Word font corruption may cause OS X to hang

There may be some instances where opening a rogue Microsoft Word document on your Mac might result in a progressive hang of OS X applications and services, to the point where the system is no longer responsive to any input. -- MacIssues.

Fix iMessages only showing up on one device

Fix iMessages only showing up on one device

Apple's iMessage service is its proprietary messaging technology, which works through iCloud to allow the synchronization of conversations between all supported iOS and Mac OS devices. This is convenient, because you can chat and text on any of your Macs, iPhones, or iPads, and then continue the conversation on another device, with full access to the conversation history. -- MacIssues.

Can a Normal User Justify a Mac Pro?

Can a Normal User Justify a Mac Pro?

Julio Ojeda-Zapata falls madly in love with the new Mac Pro, and gives serious consideration to buying an entry-level version of the professional desktop Mac. But is it really the Mac for him? He has to set emotion aside and ask hard questions. -- TidBITS.

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.1

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.1

Microsoft has updated Office 2011 to version 14.4.1 with several improvements, most notably a fix for a security flaw that could allow remote code execution. Office 2011 14.4.1 also improves how Outlook handles synchronization of blocked senders and folder hierarchies, recovering from server errors, managing responses for meetings, creating Microsoft Lync meetings, and sending encrypted email messages. Additionally, the update fixes an issue that caused the mouse pointer to disappear in Word and increases Excel's data validation control capabilities from 1,024 to 2,048 entries. (Free update via the Office for Mac Web site or through Microsoft AutoUpdate, 113 MB, release notes.)

More on Mavericks InDesign corruption and SMB nsmb.conf

More on Mavericks InDesign corruption and SMB nsmb.conf

Anthony Godwin provided some new information about the previously reported Mavericks problem saving InDesign files on file servers, although his files aren't corrupting as others have reported. He has also reports success with the previously reported workaround for Mavericks SMB file sharing problems. -- MacWindows.

Mavericks, Outlook, Mail and Exchange Tips and Reports

Mavericks, Outlook, Mail and Exchange Tips and Reports

Readers are reporting that since updating to OS X 10.9 Mavericks, their iOS devices no longer sync calendars or contacts with Microsoft Outlook via iTunes. Workarounds are few because the problem is the result of Apple removing Sync Services from Mavericks. Sync Services was the core OS X software that enabled syncing of devices and Mac apps through iTunes. -- MacWindows.

Mac 101: A handy list of startup options for Macs running OS X

Mac 101: A handy list of startup options for Macs running OS X

Need to reboot you Mac to access a new startup disc or launch with safe mode enabled so you can troubleshoot problems with OS X? Then read on for this handy list of startup options for Mac OS X machines. -- TUAW.

An Easier Way To Delete Photo Duplicates From iPhoto On Your Mac

An Easier Way To Delete Photo Duplicates From iPhoto On Your Mac

Got photos? If you have a digital camera, a smartphone and a Mac, yes, you've got photos; and probably thousands and thousands stuffed into iPhoto.

The only real negative with digital photography is the number of useless duplicates that we keep shoving into iPhoto with every new sync. If you're at all like most Mac users, then you know the problem. Duplicate photos. Blurry photos that should be deleted but are left alone because, well, you know-- deleting photos is work. -- BohemianBoomer.

Apple has bigger plans than just song ID with Shazam deal

Apple has bigger plans than just song ID with Shazam deal

Apple will integrate music identification technology created by Shazam into the next version of iOS, according to a report by Bloomberg.

But while most observers, including Bloomberg, focused on the obvious plays for Apple, others see much more in the deal and believe that Apple's intent goes far beyond simple song naming. -- Computerworld.

How to enable the 'Kill Switch' on your iPhone or iPad, right now

How to enable the 'Kill Switch' on your iPhone or iPad, right now

The big smartphone manufacturers--Apple, Google, Samsung and Microsoft--have all committed to introducing a smartphone 'Kill Switch' for their devices by 2015.

But what is a 'Kill Switch,' why would you want one, and--perhaps most relevantly to readers of this blog--how can you turn on your very own iPhone/iPad Kill Switch today? -- Intego.

How to avoid paying Apple for extra iCloud storage

How to avoid paying Apple for extra iCloud storage

Apple offers just 5GB of free storage to iCloud users. Need more space? You've got to pay for it. If you don't want to do this, then you should take a look at these tips to keep your iCloud usage under control. -- Computerworld.

Reinventing the Wheel

Reinventing the Wheel

Chopping wood is hard, but it's something modern society has largely freed us from as a daily activity. That's nice, but consequently, if you ever do have to chop wood, you're more than likely going to suck at it. Splitting a log requires a surprising amount of force, but Finnish inventor Heikki Kärnä has invented a new kind of axe that makes it much easier and safer. -- Geek.

April 21 Monday's News

 

Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 8, OS X 10.10 remains steady ahead of WWDC 2014

Traffic from Apple's unannounced iOS 8, OS X 10.10 remains steady ahead of WWDC 2014

Testing of Apple's anticipated next-generation operating systems -- iOS 8 and OS X 10.10 -- continues along at a steady clip, new traffic data shows, ahead of the upcoming Worldwide Developers Conference, where both products are expected to be unveiled. -- AppleInsider.

How Apple dodged the Heartbleed bullet

How Apple dodged the Heartbleed bullet

In 2011, Apple told its developers that it would be deprecating OS X's Common Data Security Architecture including OpenSSL, describing it as an outdated relic of the late 1990s. Nearly three years later, OpenSSL was hit by a severe flaw that affected a wide swath of vendors and their users, but not Apple. -- AppleInsider.

Replacing Messages Theater: more screen-sharing alternatives

Replacing Messages Theater: more screen-sharing alternatives

Apple's iChat had a wonderful feature called iChat Theater--also present in the Mountain Lion version of Messages, just without the "iChat" in its name--that let you share photos, PDFs, or Keynote presentations during a video chat. I used it countless times to give virtual presentations: An audience watching on a projection screen in a remote location could see video of me alongside my Keynote presentation, and I could see video of the audience plus a miniature view of my presentation (and anything else on my screen, such as my email or a Web browser).

But then Theater disappeared in the Mavericks version of Messages.

In a recent Mac 911 column, Chris Breen suggested a couple of workarounds. I'd like to share a few more, and add my own take on one of Chris's suggestions. -- Macworld.

Better Security On That Macbook: Turn Off File Sharing, Enable AirDrop

Better Security On That Macbook: Turn Off File Sharing, Enable AirDrop

When you travel with a Mac laptop, whether a Macbook Pro or Air, you may be leaving it open to malicious users to get into your machine.

One of the things you can do to keep them out of your precious files is to turn off File Sharing completely. Then, if you still want to share files with other Mac users, you can use AirDrop, which is more of a temporary opening of the security gates than File Sharing is.

Note that you can indeed improve security while using File Sharing on and setting up your Firewall with specific ports, but that's the subject of a different tip. -- Cult of Mac.

Heartbleed Update: OpenVPN isn't Safe, Either

Heartbleed Update: OpenVPN isn't Safe, Either

As if the fact that the heartbleed bug wasn't already causing enough trouble for OPenSSL, it's a problem for OpenVPN, too. Just as hackers can exploit a code flaw in outdated versions of OpenSSL to potentially gain the secret keys to decrypt Internet traffic, they can do the same with OpenVPN, and one VPN operator has figured out exactly how it's done. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Streamline System Preferences on Your Mac

How to Streamline System Preferences on Your Mac

Many of us have to go to System Preferences on our Mac from time to time. Be it cleaning up old wifi networks, sorting out misbehaving Bluetooth devices, or choosing a new desktop image, there are some tasks that you might do more frequently than others. Fortunately, there are ways to streamline System Preferences that can make your periodic trip faster and easier. Here's how... -- The Mac Observer.

Yet Another 25 Tips for Mastering iPhone Photography

Yet Another 25 Tips for Mastering iPhone Photography

Sandro Cuccia continues his series on iPhone Photography mastery with yet another twenty-five awesome tips that are guaranteed to help you improve your own iPhone photography and go beyond simple silly selfies. -- The Mac Observer.

3 Free iOS Apps To Unleash the Music In You

3 Free iOS Apps To Unleash the Music In You

Music is an integral part of my life even though I can't play a lick on any instrument and my singing has been likened to what a drowning moose might sound like.

Ah well, I'm content with limiting my audience to whatever happens to be flying, crawling, slithering, or walking pass my bathroom window while I'm showering. I know I'll never be a star, but I do enjoy belting out a tune every once in a while. Apparently so do many others. -- The Mac Observer.

Using Time Machine on unsupported volumes

Using Time Machine on unsupported volumes

I wanted to use Time Machine on my exFAT hard drive, but turns out that these volumes aren't supported from Time Machine! There is a very simple way to use Time Machines on unsupported hard drives, as long as you follow these instructions carefully you shouldn't have any issues at all. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Troubleshooting iMac Target Display mode

Troubleshooting iMac Target Display mode

When Apple introduced its late-2009 iMac systems, it was clear the large built-in display on these systems could not only be used for the accompanying computer, but similar to the functions of Target Disk mode for hard drives, the display could be used for another Mac.

While Target Disk Mode requires you to restart the system into a special mode, the use of Target Display simply switches the monitor to accept input from an external source, rather than the running system, just as if you had unplugged it for alternative uses. -- MacIssues.

Wake up your Mac with your iPhone

Wake up your Mac with your iPhone

Waking a Mac up from sleep generally requires you tap a key on the keyboard, or click your mouse or trackpad; however, there are times when you might need to wake your Mac up remotely, either because it is locked away such as a server in a closet, or perhaps it is among a number on a large local network that you are trying to access and need it woken up. -- MacIssues.

Use the Terminal to quickly get a Unix path to a file

Use the Terminal to quickly get a Unix path to a file

While you can often access the files you need by browsing the filesystem in the Finder, sometimes you might need to specify the Unix path for a file or folder in question, either to run a Terminal command on it, or to communicate this path to others in an e-mail, online discussion, or otherwise. -- MacIssues.

Use OS X services to reveal or open file paths

Use OS X services to reveal or open file paths

There are several ways to refer someone to a specific file or folder in OS X, especially if this resource is part of OS X and therefore should be in the same location on all systems. One way is to simply describe the location of the file and have the person find their way to it, or optionally instruct them to use Spotlight to find the file, though this does not search for system files by default. -- MacIssues.

Facebook's New Twist on Location Sharing Puts Users in Control

Facebook's New Twist on Location Sharing Puts Users in Control

On Thursday, Facebook is taking the wraps off a new feature, under development for four years outside and inside the company, that allows mobile users to share their location with their friends on the service.

Called Nearby Friends, the service is completely optional. When users turn it on, they pick whom they want to share their location with -- all of their friends, a smaller group, or just a few people. The service then broadcasts their general location -- say, TriBeCa in New York, or the Financial District in San Francisco -- to those people -- New York Times.

Google Uses Algorithms to Create SLR-Like Photos

Google Uses Algorithms to Create SLR-Like Photos

Google is lifting up the hood of its new Lens Blur feature for its camera app, showing how the company can make a photo taken on a smartphone look like it has varying depths of field. -- New York Times.

Heartbleed Highlights a Contradiction in the Web

Heartbleed Highlights a Contradiction in the Web

The Heartbleed bug that made news last week drew attention to one of the least understood elements of the Internet: Much of the invisible backbone of websites from Google to Amazon to the Federal Bureau of Investigation was built by volunteer programmers in what is known as the open-source community. -- New York Times.

How Urban Anonymity Disappears When All Data Is Tracked

How Urban Anonymity Disappears When All Data Is Tracked

At some point very soon, a large amount of public information, like a car license plate, will be part of a mosaic portraying personal lives. At that point, believers in technology say, we'll build a better society by eliminating deceit. Some say, however, that deferral to data comes at the expense of people making real choices about how to behave. -- New York Times.

How An iPad Can Improve Your Photography

How An iPad Can Improve Your Photography

Jeff Carlson is the author of The iPad for Photographers, Second Edition" (Peachpit Press) and "Adobe Lightroom mobile: Your Lightroom on the Go" (Peachpit Press). You can check out his personal website and iPad for Photographers to learn more about Jeff's photography, and the newest tool in your camera bag -- the iPad. Here is his tutorial on how to get the best out of your iPad. -- Jeff Carlson.

Apple to End Support for AIM iChat Logins on Older Versions of OS X Starting June 30

Apple to End Support for AIM iChat Logins on Older Versions of OS X Starting June 30

Apple has announced in a recent support note that it will end AIM iChat login support for users running versions of OS X below 10.7.2 Lion on June 30, 2014.

The change will affect those who use their mac.com and me.com addresses as AIM IDs to log into iChat on older systems, as users running compatible versions of OS X Snow Leopard and OS X Lion can upgrade to OS X Mavericks for free. -- Mac Rumors.

'Enhanced' dictation in Mavericks is true

'Enhanced' dictation in Mavericks is true

Elliott Wicks's discovery of "enhanced" dictation in Mavericks is true. (You must first go to System Prefs and download the software via the Dictation pane.)

'Enhanced' dictation in Mavericks is true

I've tried the OS X dictation feature in the past, but I found that the 30 second maximum was too limiting. I had no idea that this upgrade was in Mavericks. -- MacInTouch.

Is there a way to install Mavericks without using an Apple ID?

Is there a way to install Mavericks without using an Apple ID?

If you have Lion, for example, then Mavericks is a free upgrade. Most people would get that via the Mac App Store, but that requires an Apple ID. You could get a copy of the installer app from a friend and, since you own a Mac and Mavericks is a free upgrade, it would appear that you have a right to install it (mandatory disclaimer: I am not a lawyer and this is not legal advice). You still have to agree to the EULA when you install it, but that doesn't require an Apple ID.

You have a valid point. However, in contrast, it's worthwhile to think about the overall cost/benefit. It's not so much an issue of registering your OS as one of registering your Apple ID as a valid user. In the past this was done with a name-and-address panel but now it's simpler with an Apple ID for the Mac App Store. And the App Store is the real point here - not the OS. So, for example, if you purchased a Mac recently, you're entitled to Pages/Numbers/Keynote for free rather than having to pay for them. The way Apple handles that is through your Apple ID and knowing what you purchased and when.

Bear in mind that you can have a separate Apple ID just for the App Store - unrelated to anything else. It can (and, I would suggest, should be) separate from any Apple ID that you might use for email etc. And separate from the ID you use for iTunes (long story - more detail than appropriate here). -- MacIntouch.

How to share a Pages, Keynote, or Numbers file with iCloud

How to share a Pages, Keynote, or Numbers file with iCloud

If you're using Pages, Keynote, or Numbers on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac you can easily share anything you create via Apple's online service, iCloud. The best part about sharing iWork documents via iCloud is that the person you share with doesn't need an iOS device or Mac to open or even collaborate on the documents with you. All they need is a web browser. -- iMore.

How To Download Adobe Photoshop CS2 For Free Legally

How To Download Adobe Photoshop CS2 For Free Legally

Photoshop is seen by the overwhelming majority as the de facto pinnacle of image editing and manipulation. Whilst revered for its vast tool set, seemingly unlimited plugins and general, all-round power, it is out of the price range of many average users looking to learn / dabble in a little Photoshopping. Each year, Adobe beefs up its umbrella of Creative Suite products (encompassing Photoshop), with prices remaining higher than most other paid software out there, but in something of a turn up for the books, Photoshop is now free.

Before you smash open your "saving for Photoshop" piggy bank to splash on expensive champagne in joyous celebration, it's important to note that we're not talking about the latest version, rather the ten year old Photoshop (and Creative Suite) CS2. It would appear Adobe has grown tired of maintaining a bunch of activation servers to keep users on the right side of legal, and has simply caved, instead releasing it free of charge. -- Redmond Pie.

OS X Mavericks: 4 speed secrets

OS X Mavericks: 4 speed secrets

If you've followed my earlier tips to help you squeeze more performance from your OS X Mavericks Mac, but crave a little more zest, these suggestions may help you get slightly more performance from your Mac.

These tips tend to boost single application performance more than overall system performance, but if you run multiple apps at once you should feel a little benefit. -- Computerworld.

How to fix choppy video playback in Safari on OS X

How to fix choppy video playback in Safari on OS X

Recently I ran into a problem that I found to be quite annoying. Flash video playback in Safari began suffering from major stuttering and choppiness. It was so bad that videos essentially became unwatchable while using Safari.

For someone who's constantly watching and editing video like me, this proved to be a big problem. I even pondered switching to Chrome for a bit, but quickly dismissed that thought and set out to find a solution to the problem.

Fortunately, the solution to fixing choppy video playback in Safari is an easy one. Have a look inside and we'll show you how. -- iDownload Blog.

iTunes: Glitchy tracks, numbers game, and too-large libraries

iTunes: Glitchy tracks, numbers game, and too-large libraries

You know the one where you get a track from iTunes Match and it's not perfect? How about the one where you've just got too much stuff in your iTunes library and it slows iTunes down to a crawl? Or that thing where there are numbers at the beginnings of track names and you'd really like to get rid of them? Well, read on to find out how to fix these problems. -- Macworld.

iTunes Radio: Create a Station from a Song or Artist

iTunes Radio: Create a Station from a Song or Artist

If you haven't played around with iTunes Radio, you should really check it out. It's a free way to listen to streaming music right from within iTunes, and you can choose to either play the built-in featured stations or make your own based on a type of music or artist that you like. -- The Mac Observer.

Beamer Is The One-Click Way To Stream Movies From Mac To Apple TV

Beamer Is The One-Click Way To Stream Movies From Mac To Apple TV

Considering that Apple has sold millions of Apple TVs in recent years, it's still a convoluted mess to get a Mac to stream a movie to your television.

Unless you use Beamer. -- BohemianBoomer.

iCloud Is Bloated

iCloud Is Bloated

I've written recently about iCloud; about how it's a black hole that swallows up your data and documents, and how Apple is stingy with storage. But when you think about it, iCloud is many different services, all wrapped into one. Perhaps there are too many. You often hear people complain that certain apps are bloated; perhaps iCloud is bloated too, and this bloat makes it hard to manage and use. -- Kirkville.

How To Install New Fonts On iPhone And iPad Without Jailbreaking

How To Install New Fonts On iPhone And iPad Without Jailbreaking

Apple's iOS is commonly referred to as a "walled garden," a label used to described the subtle limitations attached to a closed source piece of software. But every now and then, we're reminded that Apple's mobile operating system isn't a completely fusty old stick-in-the-mud, and that actually, there are means of customizing the experience without having to resort to a jailbreak. AnyFont, an app that lets you install custom TrueType and OpenType fonts, is a prime example, and for $1.99 over at the App Store, is well worth checking out. -- Redmond Pie.

How to reduce the number of ads in Gmail

How to reduce the number of ads in Gmail

You can't stop Google from scanning your inbox or serving you ads, but you can opt out of receiving personalized ads in Gmail. And you can eliminate one prominent ad banner altogether. -- CNET.

April 17 Thursday's News

 

TI brings Apple's iBeacon to Bluetooth products for industrial, automotive & embedded applications

TI brings Apple's iBeacon to Bluetooth products for industrial, automotive & embedded applications

Silicon firm Texas Instruments on Wednesday announced plans to support Apple's iBeacon micro-location technology across a large swath of TI's Bluetooth product line, including chips for embedded and automotive applications. -- AppleInsider.

LaCie reveals year-long security breach at online store

LaCie reveals year-long security breach at online store

Storage vendor LaCie , maker of a number of accessories compatible with Apple's Thunderbolt, announced on Wednesday that data from transactions made through the company's first-party online store may have been compromised as a result of a security breach that went undiscovered for nearly a year. -- AppleInsider.

33 great tips and tricks for iOS 7

33 great tips and tricks for iOS 7

Whether it's the first time you've picked up an iPad or the seventeenth time you've pulled out your iPhone today, there are probably still some iOS 7 features and functionality that you're not familiar with. Don't sweat it: We're here to help. We've collected some of our favorite and most useful tips and compiled them here, just for you. -- Macworld.

Which iPad Manual Rules The Roost?

Which iPad Manual Rules The Roost?

In Apple's drive toward simplicity, one of the things which fell into the category of "things we can do without" were physical paper manuals.

While the Cupertino company does offer a 140-page online User Guide -- which provides a passable intro to using your iPad (and currently has the advantage of being one of the few iOS 7.1 guides around) -- Apple's refusal to create manuals has fostered a cottage industry with rival products.

With the iPad recently celebrating its four-year birthday, Cult of Mac figured the time was right to dive into a few of the world of third-party "how to" guides to find out which -- if any -- deserve a place on your physical bookshelf (people still have those, right?) here in 2014. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Get Media Into iTunes Faster

How To Get Media Into iTunes Faster

I'm all for getting my stuff into iTunes more efficiently, aren't you? Jordan Merrick is, too, and he's come up with a brilliant way to do just that. He's also got a great site full of clever tips there as well. Really, go check it out.

Use Maps to See Traffic and Alerts

Use Maps to See Traffic and Alerts

With OS X 10.9 Mavericks, we can use the fancy new Maps program to plan our routes around construction slowdowns, accidents, and all sorts of other traffic problems. To see how this works, open Maps, and first, you'll make sure that "Show Traffic" is on by clicking the button with the little cars on the toolbar. -- The Mac Observer.

Change your contextual internet search

Change your contextual internet search

When you right-click a word in programs like Safari or in word processors, in addition to options for copying and pasting, or perhaps changing the style of the word, there might be a couple of options for looking the word up. The first of these is a quick-access link for the word's definition in the Dictionary, and the second is to search Google for the word, which will launch Safari and perform a standard Google search for it.

While Google is the default search option used here, you can use alternative search engines as well, including Bing and Yahoo. -- MacIssues.

Q&A: MacIssues Answers

Q&A: MacIssues Answers

MacIssues Answers is a periodic column where I respond to questions asked by MacIssues readers. In this session, readers asked about styling text in Calendar entries, how to best switch from Thunderbird to Mail, and how to remove unused and cluttering apps that were purchased and are now sitting in iCloud.

The Best Photo Organizing App? I'm Still Looking

The Best Photo Organizing App? I'm Still Looking

I have about 2,500 photos stored on my smartphone, and who knows how many more on previous phones and other devices I use. I need an organizing principle, stat.

Luckily, there are many apps that let you organize, categorize and view your photos on a mobile device with varying degrees of difficulty.

A new entrant from Dropbox, Carousel, looked promising, but fell short. A raft of others all have strengths, but nothing offers everything you want. -- New York Times.

Two new Biometric Patents from Apple Surface Covering Anti-Spoofing Measures and More

Two new Biometric Patents from Apple Surface Covering Anti-Spoofing Measures and More

On April 17, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published two new biometric related patent applications from Apple. While one invention delves into various methods that Apple's Touch ID may be using today or could be using in the future, the other introduces us to a new and unique anti-spoofing measure that they aptly call the "Doodle" mode that could be used with the iPhone and/or future Macs. -- Patently Apple.

How Apple Can Improve iOS for Educators

How Apple Can Improve iOS for Educators

Bradley Chambers, Director of IT for the Brainerd Baptist School in Chattanooga, TN, has a number of suggestions for ways Apple could improve the role of iOS in education, including a way to deploy in-app purchases in MDM or Apple Configurator, the option to redistribute iBookstore textbooks between classes, increasing the default storage space in future devices, and an iCloud email option for schools.

Mac Remote Desktop Software Roundup

Mac Remote Desktop Software Roundup

Never has there been a time in history when so many people have had such widespread access to so many computers. Most of us have computers at home and work, and one in every five people now also owns a smartphone. And the number of devices we have access to is increasing as technology becomes ever more pervasive. That's why it's important to understand the one category of software that gives us access to our Macs even when we're not physically near them: remote desktop. -- TidBITS.

An Introduction to Bluetooth, Mac and iPhone

An Introduction to Bluetooth, Mac and iPhone

Bluetooth has been around since before the days of feature phones, having been developed in the 1990s, and it has come a long way from just being used in oversized handsfree earpieces.

If you want to wirelessly connect your iPhone to your Mac, Bluetooth is one of the easiest ways to do it. As long as you leave Bluetooth enabled on both your devices, they'll automatically connect whenever they're in range of each other.

In this tutorial, I'll explain what Bluetooth is, how to use it and show you a few practical uses of Bluetooth to wirelessly connect a Mac and an iPhone. -- Tuts+.

Make your Mac safer online: Five tips for better password security

Make your Mac safer online: Five tips for better password security

Gotofail. Heartbleed. Target. Sony's PlayStation Network. The NSA. It seems like every few weeks, there's a new story circulating in the news about major security breach concerning systems that you rely on. What can you do to protect yourself?

The bottom line is that attacks do happen, so it's best to try to minimize the risk you face when these services inevitably are breached. Here are some tips to help you stay as safe as possible by changing your password habits. -- iMore.

Python, Chemistry and a Mac 1

Python, Chemistry and a Mac 1

Python is rapidly becoming the scripting language of choice for scientists, and whilst SciPy and NumPy are probably the best known scientific tools for Python there are actually a huge number of Scientific Python Resources available. One that is useful for data analysis is pandas, an open source, BSD-licensed library providing high-performance, easy-to-use data structures and data analysis tools for the Python programming language. -- Macs in Chemistry.

Skip the Back Button: A Secret Swipe for Navigating Safari in iOS 7

Skip the Back Button: A Secret Swipe for Navigating Safari in iOS 7

There's an annoying quirk about Safari, Apple's browser, in iOS 7. If you've scrolled down a page, the bar that houses the back button disappears. Granted, this makes the reading experience more pleasurable, but if you want to go back a page, you need to either swipe up or tap the page to summon the bar back into existence. Turns out, there's a smart, yet little known workaround for this.

In Safari, when you want to go back a page, just swipe from the left edge of the screen instead of hitting that back button. And if you change your mind and want to go forward a page, swipe inwards from the right side of the screen. This trick also works in Messages and in the Settings app, along with a handful of third party apps, like Instagram and Strava, and Apple-built apps.

If you really like tapping that back button, or you need to access your bookmarks or tabs, you can alternatively just tap near the bottom of the screen to pull up the nav bar again. Be careful though -- lots of websites position ads at the bottom of their pages, so look before you tap. -- Wired.

Apple Does Not Know What To Do About Its Own Frankenstein-like Monster

Apple Does Not Know What To Do About Its Own Frankenstein-like Monster

Every now and then an entity becomes so big, so powerful, and so unwieldy that the creator just does not know what to do about the creation.

Think Frankenstein monster and you'll understand the daunting situation that faces Apple. There were once calls to break up Microsoft, break up IBM, even break up the N.Y. Yankees. Apple has its own Frankenstein monster problem and it does not know what to do. -- Mac360.

College kids gave Siri new powers and now you can too

College kids gave Siri new powers and now you can too

We already know Apple is working on improving Siri, but gosh dangit, the folks in Cupertino just aren't moving as fast as some would like. That's why a quartet of freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania decided to try making Siri do more on their own... at a hackathon, no less. They wound up taking third prize for the hack -- called GoogolPlex -- and after some fine-tuning, Alex Sands, Ajay Patel, Ben Hsu and Gagan Gupta are ready to help you make your virtual assistant do more. The setup process is trivial: you just have to change your Wi-Fi connection's proxy settings (seriously, it'll take five seconds). Once that's done though, you can invoke Siri and ask GoogolPlex to play tunes in Spotify, crank up the heat on your Nest thermostat or even start your Tesla. -- Engadget.

Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

Switching From Sitting To Standing At Your Desk

Chris Bowlby reports at BBC that medical research has been building up for a while now, suggesting constant sitting is harming our health -- potentially causing cardiovascular problems or vulnerability to diabetes.

Advocates of sit-stand desks say more standing would benefit not only health, but also workers' energy and creativity.

Some big organizations and companies are beginning to look seriously at reducing 'prolonged sitting' among office workers. 'It's becoming more well known that long periods of sedentary behavior has an adverse effect on health,' says GE engineer Jonathan McGregor, 'so we're looking at bringing in standing desks.'

The whole concept of sitting as the norm in workplaces is a recent innovation, points out Jeremy Myerson, professor of design at the Royal College of Art. 'If you look at the late 19th Century,' he says, Victorian clerks could stand at their desks and 'moved around a lot more'. 'It's possible to look back at the industrial office of the past 100 years or so as some kind of weird aberration in a 1,000-year continuum of work where we've always moved around.'

What changed things in the 20th Century was 'Taylorism' -- time and motion studies applied to office work. 'It's much easier to supervise and control people when they're sitting down,' says Myerson.

What might finally change things is if the evidence becomes overwhelming, the health costs rise, and stopping employees from sitting too much becomes part of an employer's legal duty of care 'If what we are creating are environments where people are not going to be terribly healthy and are suffering from diseases like cardiovascular disease and diabetes,' says Prof Alexi Marmot, a specialist on workplace design, 'it's highly unlikely the organization benefits in any way.'

Siri: Why are you asking me?

April 16 Wednesday's News

 

Microsoft launches $70/year Office 365 Personal for Mac, iPad

Microsoft launches $70/year Office 365 Personal for Mac, iPad

Pricing on Microsoft's Office 365 service became a little more affordable for individual users on Tuesday, as the company launched a new "Personal" subscription plan priced at $69.99 per year.

Apple joins tech heavyweights, wireless carriers in smartphone anti-theft initiative

Apple joins tech heavyweights, wireless carriers in smartphone anti-theft initiative

A group of smartphone industry giants, including Apple, Samsung, Google and Microsoft, signed on to a voluntary program spearheaded by the U.S. wireless industry that looks to incorporate anti-theft technology into handsets by July 2015. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minor changes

Apple issues OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minor changes

The latest version of Apple's upcoming OS X maintenance update, dubbed build 13D43, comes six days after the previous seed was issued and once again asks developers to concentrate on the same focus areas as prior versions.

According to the accompanying seed notes, Apple is looking for feedback on Graphics Drivers, Audio, Mail, Safari and iTunes contacts and calendar synchronization. -- AppleInsider.

Linksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we've tested

Linksys WRT1900AC Wi-Fi router review: Faster than anything we've tested

It's expensive and its firmware is a few features short of the competition's, but the Linksys WRT1900AC is the fastest 802.11ac router you can buy today (today being April 16, 2014). -- PC World.

When iPhoto isn't enough: Four reasons to upgrade your software

When iPhoto isn't enough: Four reasons to upgrade your software

iPhoto is an excellent tool for basic photo management and editing, but if your library's getting too big to handle or you need advanced editing options, it might be time to look into alternatives. Adobe's Lightroom and Apple's Aperture provide better management and image tools, while Photoshop and Photoshop Elements can augment iPhoto's basic editing software with more powerful options. If you're starting to feel like your library is getting out of control, here are some of the best reasons to upgrade. -- Macworld.

How To Let Some Calls Get Past Do Not Disturb

How To Let Some Calls Get Past Do Not Disturb

We've been using the Do Not Disturb function on our iPhones since iOS 6, really, as the feature really helps us have some down time. You can schedule or enable the feature for easy access, keeping those pesky calls, messages, and notifications off your iPhone screen when you just don't have the brain space to deal.

But what about those calls and messages you really do need to get? What do you do there? Luckily, there are a couple of options to let certain calls come through. -- Cult of Mac.

Screens 3 For Mac Is The Best VNC App For Most People

Screens 3 For Mac Is The Best VNC App For Most People

Edovia makes the most polished VNC client for iOS, but its Mac app has been needing some attention for quite some time, especially in the design department. Screens 3 for Mac was released today, and it has been rebuilt from the group up for Mountain Lion. It also looks much cleaner and promises to be faster. -- Cult of Mac.

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence

Big Data is the new Artificial Intelligence

This is the first of a couple columns about a growing trend in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and how it is likely to be integrated in our culture. Computerworld ran an interesting overview article on the subject yesterday that got me thinking not only about where this technology is going but how it is likely to affect us not just as a people. but as individuals. How is AI likely to affect me? The answer is scary. -- I, Cringely.

Time Machine Bug In Mavericks with Secondary Monitor - How to Fix It

Time Machine Bug In Mavericks with Secondary Monitor - How to Fix It

There's a known issue in Mavericks where a secondary monitor causes Time Machine all manner of grief and heartache. If this is happening to you, we have some suggested workarounds to help you access your backups. -- The Mac Observer.

How to quickly look up words in OS X

How to quickly look up words in OS X

When browsing the Web, reading documents in programs TextEdit or Pages, you might come across a word or two that you do not know, or perhaps you are composing a document and need to look up synonyms. While there are online options such as Dictionary.com and its sister site Thesaurus.com which offer great word research tools, Apple includes a couple of quick ways to look up a word in OS X. -- MacIssues.

Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon?

Fast Home Wireless: A Content Weapon?

Consumers will ultimately choose the winners in the competition among cable companies, television networks, tech giants and others to supply our digital entertainment. We may do it, however, in a way we don't expect: by the speed of our home networks. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Two Major iDevice Technologies, Five Designs and More

Apple Granted 37 Patents Today Covering Two Major iDevice Technologies, Five Designs and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 37 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two major iDevice technologies and five design patents. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Laws and Ethics Can't Keep Pace with Technology

Laws and Ethics Can't Keep Pace with Technology

Employers can get into legal trouble if they ask interviewees about their religion, sexual preference, or political affiliation. Yet they can use social media to filter out job applicants based on their beliefs, looks, and habits. Laws forbid lenders from discriminating on the basis of race, gender, and sexuality. Yet they can refuse to give a loan to people whose Facebook friends have bad payment histories, if their work histories on LinkedIn don't match their bios on Facebook, or if a computer algorithm judges them to be socially undesirable. -- MIT Technology Review.

iMovie (2013): Tips For iMovie '11 Users

iMovie (2013): Tips For iMovie '11 Users

iMovie (2013) introduced an all-new, streamlined design. If you used a previous version of iMovie, you'll find that some features work differently or have moved to a different part of the app. Learn about these changes with the topics below. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to clean out old Mail downloads and reclaim disk space on your Mac

How to clean out old Mail downloads and reclaim disk space on your Mac

If you're running low on disk space on your Mac, especially SSD space, every extra bit can count. One of the places you can often scrape out a few extra megabytes or even gigabytes is Mail Downloads. Any attachments you open in Mail or Quick Look gets saved right to that folder. Chances are you don't need them, especially the old ones, and trashing them will free up some valuable space. -- iMore.

Using the Timeline Index in Final Cut Pro X

Using the Timeline Index in Final Cut Pro X

There are many Final Cut Pro X editors out there who have never even opened up the Timeline Index. Steve Martin And Mark Spencer take a look at what it is and what exactly it does. -- fcp.co.

How to display your Calendar events as list view in iOS 7.1 Notification Center

How to display your Calendar events as list view in iOS 7.1 Notification Center

If you switch your Calendar app to daily agenda, your Today section in the iOS Notification Center adapts its layout accordingly to display your daily agenda as a list. -- iDownload Blog.

3 Professional iPhone Camera Features that You Probably Don't Know About

3 Professional iPhone Camera Features that You Probably Don't Know About

The camera in the iPhone 5 as well as the updated version in the iPhone 5S both have some pretty great features that take the iPhone's camera from a simple smartphone camera into a device that rivals today's point-and-shoot models.

This doesn't mean your iPhone 5S is going to replace your DSLR any time soon, but by using these iPhone camera features, you can get the most out of the camera that's always in your pocket. -- Apple Gazette.

This is Your Brain On Mobile

This is Your Brain On Mobile

Jeremy Vandehey offers this "critique of destructive smartphone habits diagnosed by someone that makes a living off of them."

I made a promise to myself and my friends to live a more fulfilling life. I let a 2.3 x 4.5 inch piece of glass, metal, and plastic get in the way of that. I made a few small changes that compounded into a better prescription than any anxiety medication. I started rehabbing slowly by rethinking how, why, and when I used my phone. I became very meticulous about when I could and could not use my phone. I went as far as making it inconvenient to use apps I didn't actually NEED.

April 15 Tuesday's News

 

Microsoft reverse engineers Apple's Passbook, adds support in Windows Phone 8.1

Microsoft reverse engineers Apple's Passbook, adds support in Windows Phone 8.1

With Apple's Passbook quickly becoming the de facto way for developers to create digital tickets, store cards and passes, Microsoft has found a way to strip the data from .pkpass files and recompile them on handsets running Windows Phone 8.1. -- AppleInsider.

MacBook Pro vs. MacBook Air: how I made the choice

MacBook Pro vs. MacBook Air: how I made the choice

Lately, I've been struggling with what's clearly a first-world problem: I have too many computers.

There was my main iMac, which I love. Then there was my "power" laptop, a mid-2010 15-inch MacBook Pro (with the 1680-by-1050 display and a recently installed 750GB SSD), which I love. And there was my "light" laptop, a mid-2012 11-inch MacBook Air, which I love (and which replaced an older 11-inch Air). So what was the problem?

The problem was that I don't travel often enough to justify owning two laptops. And even if I did, I'd still be stuck answering the "Which one should I take on this trip?" question. Generally, I take the big heavy MacBook Pro beast when I need the extra screen-space and the more powerful (or so I thought) CPU; when I don't need those two things, I take the Air. And then I also have to deal with the issue of which machine has the files I need for each trip. In short, it was a horrid setup, and it needed fixing. -- Macworld.

Still Think You Can't Do Real Work On The iPad? A Lot Has Changed Since 2010

Still Think You Can't Do Real Work On The iPad? A Lot Has Changed Since 2010

Back when I worked exclusively on my iPad, writing posts for Cult of Mac and everything related to that, I had a hell of a time getting some things done. It seemed like every tiny step needed to be researched before I could get anything done. -- Cult of Mac.

3 More Tips for Protecting Yourself from Heartbleed

3 More Tips for Protecting Yourself from Heartbleed

When news of the heartbleed OpenSSL flaw hit the Web last week, it send the online security community into a tizzy, and rightly so. The Mac Observer shared some tips on what you can do to protect yourself, and now we have some more help keep your private stuff out of the hands of the bad guys. -- The Mac Observer.

How to restore files from Time Machine manually

How to restore files from Time Machine manually

Apple's included Time Machine backup technology in OS X is a convenient and rather thorough way to make full-system backups of your Mac. It works by using multi-linked files on the backup drive to mirror unchanged data from a prior backup instance to a new one so both instances share the same data on disk. It then only copies changed data since the last backup, to the new backup instance. This approach allows Time Machine to create many snapshots of the entire system without any data redundancy on disk.

Whether it uses a disk image on a Time Capsule, or an external drive, Time Machine uses the raw HFS+ (Mac OS Extended) filesystem as a storage medium, which means that in addition to the Time Machine interface, you can use other means to access the Time Machine backup data. -- MacIssues.

Microsoft Releases Office for Mac 2011 14.4.1 Update

Microsoft Releases Office for Mac 2011 14.4.1 Update

This week, Microsoft released an update for Office for Mac 2011, resolving vulnerabilities in Microsoft Office that could allow remote code execution if a specifically crafted file is opened in an affected version of Microsoft Office. The 113.5 MB update is available for Mac OS X version 10.5.8 or later versions on an Intel processor.

This update applies to the following Microsoft software: Office 2011, Office 2011 Home and Business Edition, Word 2011, Excel 2011, PowerPoint 2011, Outlook 2011, Office for Mac Standard 2011 Edition, Microsoft Office for Mac Home & Student 2011, and Microsoft Office for Mac Academic 2011. -- Microsoft.

How to search smarter in Mail

How to search smarter in Mail

OS X's Spotlight search feature automatically indexes all the messages in Apple Mail for super-fast searching, and you can search for those messages either within Mail or using the system-wide Spotlight menu.

But Mail isn't limited to simple text searches. With a flexible system of search tokens (which I explain in a moment), Boolean searches, and other options, you can find almost any message you can describe. You can even save a search by converting it into a smart mailbox, as I describe at the end of this article. -- Macworld.

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Let's face it: Despite all the technology at our fingertips, scheduling and planning meetings is still a pain in the neck. Nobody can agree on where to meet or when. When meetings do get scheduled, people forget or show up unprepared. You'd think we could do better.

Using your Mac, iPhone and the Web, of course, you can, but you have to use them right. Here are four tricks I've learned that use technology to plan meetings better. -- Macworld.

Using Autofill In Numbers

Using Autofill In Numbers

Numbers can automatically fill in cells for you if you want to repeat a value, or create a sequence. You can use Autofill to add a set of sequential numbers or dates to cells. You can also have the cells follow a pattern. If you are using tables properly, formulas included in cells will repeat as you add new rows to the table. -- MacMost.

iTunes High Resolution Conversion to WAV or AIFF Truncates Bit Depth

iTunes High Resolution Conversion to WAV or AIFF Truncates Bit Depth

I spotted something surprising today, and if you buy and listen to high-resolution files with iTunes, you'll want to know about this. Personally, I don't believe the high-resolution music file stuff, but it's up to you.

As you may know, you can play back high-resolution files in iTunes, if they are in Apple Lossless format. You can convert files to Apple Lossless from FLAC, AIFF or WAV with no loss in quality. You can do the WAV or AIFF conversion in iTunes, or, to convert FLAC files, you can use the free XLD.

But, if you use iTunes to later convert your Apple Lossless files to WAV or AIFF, you may be surprised: iTunes converts your 24-bit files to only 16 bits. Here's an example: I took a 24-bit, 96 kHz file and converted it to WAV using iTunes. -- Kirkville.

Why Is It So Hard to Think Different?

Why Is It So Hard to Think Different?

The Think Different formula: Look at the target market; figure out what customers want or will want; build a product that encompasses that; and bet the farm on the result. That may look easy, but it's scary risky, which is why there are so few CEOs like Jobs, Bezos or Musk. Most others are like the runners who just stare at the leader's butt and then wonder why they never win the race. -- TechNewsWorld.

April 14 Monday's News

 

Connecting two Macs using Thunderbolt

Connecting two Macs using Thunderbolt

I think all Mac users can agree: Thunderbolt is both fast and flexible. Not only is it capable of 10 Gbps of bi-directional throughput on each of the dual channels in its original form and 20 Gbps max on a combined channel in Thunderbolt 2, it can also transport PCIe, USB 3.0, FireWire, Mini DisplayPort and gigabit ethernet data. But that's not all: you can also daisy-chain up to six Thunderbolt devices per Thunderbolt port on your Mac. With six available Thunderbolt 2 ports on the new Mac Pro, that adds up to a plethora of possible peripherals. -- Macworld.

How to Easily Create a Travel Itinerary Map in OS X

How to Easily Create a Travel Itinerary Map in OS X

Have you ever wanted to create your own custom travel itinerary map? It turns out it's pretty easy, and it's built into every Mac.

iPhoto can automatically create beautiful maps showing all or part of a travel itinerary - precisely laying out your travel route from country to country and city to city. The trip destinations are accurately plotted, and a number of map styles can be selected. -- The Mac Observer.

How to remove application preferences on your Mac

How to remove application preferences on your Mac

Most programs and services you run in OS X will save preferences to disk as a property list (.plist) file in your account's hidden Library > Preferences folder. Since these files contain settings that are loaded and interacted with as the program is run, if a fault exists either in a specific setting or in the structure of the file itself, then a program may experience hangs, crashes, the inability to save and retrieve settings, or other odd behaviors. -- MacIssues.

How to fix home folder permissions in OS X

How to fix home folder permissions in OS X

If you run into odd slow-downs or problems with loading specific programs and services, then sometimes this can be caused by the inability of the program or service to access a necessary resource on disk, be it a preference file, or a core resource like a framework, font, or audio unit. In these cases you might see an error, but also might just see the problematic behavior. -- MacIssues.

Isolate issues using a new user account

Isolate issues using a new user account

When troubleshooting problems with your Mac, it is a good idea to try to isolate it as much as possible. Even if you cannot pinpoint the problem, finding out where and when it crops up can help if you need to seek guidance from others.

One of the steps in doing this is to see if the problem you are experiencing is an account-based issue, or one that is perhaps more global in nature. -- MacIssues.

When and how to reset your Mac's SMC

When and how to reset your Mac's SMC

The System Management Controller, or SMC, is a controller in your Mac that is responsible for handling a number of power- and controls-related features of your computer. In general, the lights, buttons, charging, fans, and optional display modes are all examples of items that rely on the SMC for proper behavior. -- MacIssues.

Test related settings when troubleshooting

Test related settings when troubleshooting

Sometimes we get fixated on specific settings and possibilities when troubleshooting problems with our Macs, and in doing so might overlook other seemingly unrelated settings that might end up being the root of the problem at hand. -- MacIssues.

Understanding and adjusting default permissions in OS X

Understanding and adjusting default permissions in OS X

Every file and folder in OS X has permissions associated with it, which allow the system to grant or deny access to specific users and groups. You can see these permissions by getting information on a selected file or folder in the Finder, and then expanding the "Sharing & Permissions" section at the bottom of the window. -- MacIssues.

Apple Patent Reveals Larger Apple TV Heat Sink Right for Gaming

Apple Patent Reveals Larger Apple TV Heat Sink Right for Gaming

Earlier today Patently Apple discovered a patent application filing that listed one of Apple's leading product design engineers. The patent application was published under its inventor's names as a means of avoiding being published under Apple's name at the US Patent Office. Legally speaking, Apple only has to appear as the assignee after the patent application has been granted. This is a somewhat common practice that Apple uses to keep specific intellectual property out of the lime light until the last possible moment. The discovery today covers a rather simple invention. It's about providing Apple TV with a much larger heat sink. Today's Apple TV supports a 32-bit single-core A5 processor. But if Apple should ever decide to adopt their faster A7 or future A8 64-bit single or multi-core processors to support gaming, it would need a larger heat sink. In context, last Wednesday iFixit uncovered a larger heat sink in Amazon's new Fire TV that's aiming at Android gaming. The trend is obvious. -- Patently Apple.

Apple updates standalone FaceTime app for Snow Leopard users with connection bug fix

Apple updates standalone FaceTime app for Snow Leopard users with connection bug fix

Remember the good ol' days when FaceTime wasn't included with each Mac? Back then, you had to download a bit of software from the Mac App Store in order to make video calls to iPhone owners (though iChat could still do Mac-to-Mac calls). Even today, that standalone app is still available on the Mac App Store for $.99--and for some reason it's still the #5 paid app on the entire store.

Given its apparent popularity three years after its launch, it makes at least a little sense that Apple updated the app today to fix a bug that could prevent users from connecting to FaceTime calls. Of course, if you're on anything newer than Snow Leopard, you don't need this update, but anyone still running OS X 10.6 who already purchased the app can get the free update to resolve the problem.

For Snow Leopard users who haven't already made the purchase, the app is $.99 on the Mac App Store.

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Scheduling success: Four tech tricks for planning meetings

Let's face it: Despite all the technology at our fingertips, scheduling and planning meetings is still a pain in the neck. Nobody can agree on where to meet or when. When meetings do get scheduled, people forget or show up unprepared. You'd think we could do better.

Using your Mac, iPhone and the Web, of course, you can, but you have to use them right. Here are four tricks I've learned that use technology to plan meetings better. -- Macworld.

How to replace the battery in your iPhone 5

How to replace the battery in your iPhone 5

The iPhone 5 has been selling for over a year-and-a-half now and that means battery life just won't be what it used to be for anyone who has owned one for any length of time. That's just how batteries and charge cycles work. If you're starting to experience greatly reduced battery life on your iPhone 5, are no longer under AppleCare, but aren't ready to upgrade yet, you can always try a DIY repair. Not only it it easy but it's a whole lot more affordable than a new iPhone. Follow along and we'll walk you through from start to finish! -- iMore.

April 11 Friday's News

 

Apple says iOS, OS X and certain Web services protected against 'Heartbleed'

Apple says iOS, OS X and certain Web services protected against 'Heartbleed'

Apple has confirmed that its systems and services remain largely untouched by the secure sockets layer (SSL) bug known as "Heartbleed," a bug found in open source software that could potentially compromise the passwords and personal information of millions.

"Apple takes security very seriously. iOS and OS X never incorporated the vulnerable software and key web-based services were not affected," the spokesperson said. -- re/code.

Apple releases Xcode 5.1.1 update with bug fixes, stability improvements

Apple releases Xcode 5.1.1 update with bug fixes, stability improvements

Apple on Thursday released the latest update to Xcode 5.1, bringing fixes for reported bugs and overall stability improvements to the software development, debugging and testing tool.

Coming one week after Apple released golden master seed to developers, Xcode version 5.1.1 is now available for public consumption on the Mac App Store.

From the release notes:

  • Includes SDKs for OS X 10.9 Mavericks, OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion, and iOS 7.1.
  • Fixes an issue that would reposition the Interface Builder canvas unexpectedly.
  • Improves the reliability of Quick Look within the debugger.
  • Fixes an issue where test cases would report as failed when in fact they had passed.
  • Fixes a rare code generation issue in the LLVM compiler.
  • Includes additional bug fixes and stability improvements.

The improvements come on top of existing features released in Xcode 5.1, including Xcode IDE, LLVM compiler, Instruments, iOS Simulator, and the latest OS X and iOS SDKs.

Xcode version 5.1.1 comes in at 2.18GB and is a free download from the Mac App Store.

Apple issues iMovie for Mac update with new features, bug fixes

Apple issues iMovie for Mac update with new features, bug fixes

Apple rolled out an update to iMovie for Mac, bringing new sorting and font options, enhanced titles, UI tweaks and bug fixes to desktop version of its consumer level video editing app. -- AppleInsider.

Tweet Any Highlighted Text From Your Mac

Tweet Any Highlighted Text From Your Mac

If you've ever come across a great snippet of text you want to Tweet right from your Mac, you know the drill: you have to copy it, open Twitter, create a new message, and then paste in the text there. Then hit the Send button.

Sure, it's not that difficult, but what if there was an even easier way?

Well, there is, and here it is.

All you need to do is highlight the text you want to Tweet with a click and drag. This applies to any text you can highlight, from an iBook to text on a Web page. Highlight it, and then right-click on the text.

You'll get a contextual menu that pops up. Hover your mouse over "Services" and then choose Tweet.

OS X will launch your Twitter app, and create a new Tweet message, filling in the body of that message with the text you highlighted.

Simply hit the Tweet button and you're good to go. -- Cult of Mac.

14 Mac Hacks That Will Change The Way You Use Your Computer

14 Mac Hacks That Will Change The Way You Use Your Computer

These life-changing shortcuts are right at your fingertips. Note that some of these tips and tricks will vary depending on which exact iteration of OS X you have. -- buzzfeed.

8 Good Reasons to Leave Apple's OS X Utility Apps Behind

8 Good Reasons to Leave Apple's OS X Utility Apps Behind

Apple provides a complete suite of core OS X apps for the newbie and the casual Mac user. Apps like Mail, iCal, Contacts, TextEdit, Time Machine and Safari have a specific, simplistic design philosophy. However, if you're a more experienced Mac user, it may be time to ask yourself why you're still using these beginner apps. -- The Mac Observer.

Create very unique signatures in Preview

Create very unique signatures in Preview

You can make signatures in Preview that are pen and ink style drawings.

I don't know if this has been posted yet, or if it is generally known, but I stumbled upon a neat feature of signatures in Preview.app. When you create a signature, if you you don't hold up a piece of paper with a signature on it, and simply smile for a mug shot, Preview will create a signature that is a neat pen and ink style image of yourself, or whatever is in front of the camera. I've created several, that for the right client, can be used as a humorous alternative to an actual signature. I also used a screen capture of the signature on a document and made the image into a Facebook Profile picture. -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to make a custom Fusion Drive in OS X

How to make a custom Fusion Drive in OS X

In OS X 10.7 Lion, Apple switched its FileVault encryption technology from relying on disk images, to using a volume management technology called CoreStorage. This provides a layer between the OS and the physical partitions on a local drive, allowing not only full-disk encryption options, but also spanning of a single logical volume across multiple physical partitions.

This technology is the backbone of Apple's Fusion Drive, and while it is offered as an OEM option for some of its Mac systems, if you have multiple drives on your Mac, then you can not only create your own spanned volume, but also create your own Fusion Drive.

When two drives are combined into one, CoreStorage will prioritize the faster one, so if an SSD and mechanical hard drive are paired in this manner, then the system creates a Fusion Drive, where commonly-accessed files will be stored on the faster SSD, but the entire drive will include the space available on the larger mechanical drive.

This technology offers great potential for those who know how to make use of it; however, Apple has not provided an easy way to create or managing CoreStorage volumes.

As such, for now if you would like to create a homemade Fusion Drive or otherwise set up a custom spanned volume in OS X, then you will have to use the following steps... -- MacIssues.

FileMaker Pro and FileMaker Pro Advanced 13.0.2

FileMaker Pro and FileMaker Pro Advanced 13.0.2

FileMaker Pro and FileMaker Pro Advanced have been updated to version 13.0.2, with a slew of tweaks and bug fixes to the powerful database products. The update adds a "Preserve external container storage" option to skip re-importing external container storage, extends the functionality of the FMP URL protocol, removes the 2048 character limit from the XML import text fields, and addresses an issue where characters from condensed and expanded fonts were not being placed in their correct locations, among a variety of other issues. ($299/$549 new, free update, 571.1 MB, release notes.)

OS X: How to change your account name or home directory name

OS X: How to change your account name or home directory name

Learn how to change your user account name and home directory name (which should match) by using the advanced procedure described below. -- Apple Care Knowledge Base.

The best Mac accounting apps

The best Mac accounting apps

If home is where your heart is, then there's a pretty good chance that home--or at least your Home Folder--is where you prefer to keep your business' financial information. While there are plenty of excellent Web-based apps you can use for tracking your business finances, if you're uncomfortable with the idea of working within a browser and keeping your business' financial information in the cloud, a traditional Mac application is your best option for you. -- Macworld.

OS X: How To Do What The Mac's Finder Cannot

How To Do What The Mac's Finder Cannot

Love it or hate it, the Mac's Finder is probably here to stay, and with a little engineering love from Apple over the years, has developed a few good habits.

Other than tabs, Quick Look preview is one of my favorite new additions to Finder. Select a file, press the space bar, file displays without opening the app connected to the file. Nice, right? It makes the Finder more usable. What if you want to print the file? -- Mac 360.

April 10 Thursday's News

 

NAB 2014 roundup: Thunderbolt 2 accessories, DJI Phantom 2 Vision+, 4K video

NAB 2014 roundup: Thunderbolt 2 accessories, DJI Phantom 2 Vision+, 4K video

This week is the annual National Association of Broadcasters show, where a number of Mac and iOS compatible products geared toward professionals have been unveiled, including new Thunderbolt 2 accessories, an upgraded DJI Phantom 2 Vision+ flying camera drone, and a plethora of 4K video recording and playing devices. -- AppleInsider.

Apple UI chief Greg Christie set to leave after clashes with Jony Ive

Apple UI chief Greg Christie set to leave after clashes with Jony Ive

Longtime Apple human interface director Greg Christie, who has been with the iPhone maker since 1996, is said to be planning an exit after his relationship with recently-elevated senior vice president of design Jony Ive allegedly turned sour. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues sixth OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks seed to developers with minor tweaks

Apple issues sixth OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks seed to developers with minor tweaks

Apple on Wednesday released to developers the latest version of its upcoming OS X maintenance update, asking beta testers to concentrate on graphics drivers, audio, Safari and iTunes contacts and calendar syncing over USB. -- AppleInsider.

Apple confirms retirement of Greg Christie as sources rebut claims of internal struggle

Apple confirms retirement of Greg Christie as sources rebut claims of internal struggle

In a statements furnished to multiple news outlets on Wednesday, Apple confirmed that Human Interface director Greg Christie will be leaving the company in a planned exit later this year. -- AppleInsider.

Handheld quantum key generators are on the way

Handheld quantum key generators are on the way

As recent disclosures have reminded us, security is not a simple matter. Most will tell you that the weak link in the chain is us: we simply don't use good security habits. But we're only one part of a number of issues. Although passwords are weaker than they should be, a strong password used on a weak system won't be much help. There is still a lot of necessary work being done to ensure that communication between parties is strongly encrypted. -- Ars Technica.

Perhaps it's not for you?

Perhaps it's not for you?

 

How to make exported iPhoto image titles 'sticky'

How to make exported iPhoto image titles 'sticky'

Reader Ed Dorroh, like many people, is perplexed by what goes on when moving images out of iPhoto. He writes:

When I add a title to a photo in iPhoto and then drag that photo to the desktop, the file name reverts back to its original name--"IMG_0697.jpg" for example. Is there any way to title a photo in iPhoto and make it "stick" when I export it? -- Macworld.

What the Heartbleed bug really means to Mac and iOS users

What the Heartbleed bug really means to Mac and iOS users

By now, it's likely you've heard about the Heartbleed Internet security vulnerability, which has made headlines around the Web, albeit often with a level of hyperbole and technical detail that makes it difficult to evaluate. Let's assume you're not a system administrator, or in charge of a bank or e-commerce Web site (if you are, go read Troy Hunt's writeup). What do you, as a normal user of the Internet, need to know, and more importantly, need to do? Thanks to our security editor, Rich Mogull of Securosis, for the bulk of this information. -- TidBITS.

How to print Office for iPad documents

How to print Office for iPad documents

Microsoft's recently released Office for iPad apps (Word, Excel, and PowerPoint) have some great features. Unfortunately, printing isn't yet one of them. Microsoft says that printing will be included in a future update, but it wasn't available at the suite's initial launch.

But never fear: You can in fact print Office documents from your iPad right now. (Assuming, of course, you've already set up your iPad and printer appropriately.) All it takes is a few extra steps plus an extra app or two. -- Macworld.

Why Heartbleed Shouldn't Make You Rush To Change Passwords ... Yet

Why Heartbleed Shouldn't Make You Rush To Change Passwords ... Yet

The discovery of the Heartbleed security bug sent the web into a panic with it's devastating OpenSSL vulnerability.

On a scale of 1 to 10 of Internet catastrophes this one goes all the way to 11, according to respected security analyst Bruce Schneier, who isn't prone to manic exaggeration.

A shriek of "CHANGE YOUR PASSWORDS" has erupted from the throats of sites issuing evasive maneuvers, but you might want to hold off on going password-reset-crazy for just a few days.

Here's why: -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Invents Cool Status Indicators for Future Macs & iDevices using Electrically Charged Liquid Crystal Droplets and More

Apple Invents Cool Status Indicators for Future Macs & iDevices using Electrically Charged Liquid Crystal Droplets and More

Late yesterday Patently Apple discovered a unique patent application from Apple that was published in Europe. The patent contains a feast of cool new ideas floating around Cupertino's R&D labs. Apple's many inventions are illustrated on both MacBooks and a possible future iPen. Apple discusses varying flex display designs and a new illumination process that is very cool. Some of the features described in this latest patent filing could easily be applied to future wearable devices from Apple. All-in-all Apple's European patent application was a lot of fun to explore and I think that you'll really enjoy our report covering its many highlights. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents System Related to Location-based SIM Cards

Apple Invents System Related to Location-based SIM Cards

Earlier this week we posted a report titled "Apple Secretly Moves Next-Gen iPhone Baseband Processor Development In-House to Possibly Enhance Security." Today, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that may reveal yet another aspect of Apple's future radio systems. Apple's new patent relates to the field of wireless communication, and more particularly to a system and method for performing location-based updating of subscriber identity information in an iDevice which utilizes an embedded subscriber identity module (eSIM). -- Patently Apple.

Mac Security: OS X Immune to OpenSSL Heartbleed Bug

Mac Security: OS X Immune to OpenSSL Heartbleed Bug

OMG, stop using the internet for shopping and banking because it's not secure! Meh. According to a knowledgeable source, the client and server versions of OS X aren't susceptible to the OpenSSL Heartbleed security issue.

Apple gets a lot of deserved grief for being slow in adopting industry standards. For example, while OpenGL 4.4 has been out for nearly a year, OS X Mavericks only supports OpenGL 4.1, which limits the availability and performance of games on the Mac.

It's a bad thing.

However, here is an example of Apple not supporting an industry standard that has resulted in a good thing. Because OS X doesn't use OpenSSL, Macs are immune to the problem. -- FairerPlatform.

Heartbleed Tools

Heartbleed Tools

Heartbleed.com mentions a web based tool and a couple of scripts for testing to see if you are vulnerable to this latest exploit:

  • A web based test
  • A Python script to test for the vulnerability from the command line. If you want to scan multiple sites, you can use a modified version with easily parseable output.

April 09 Wednesday's News

 

New 'mApp' platform helps museums leverage Apple's iBeacons for interactive exhibits

New 'mApp' platform helps museums leverage Apple's iBeacons for interactive exhibits

Museum visits may become far more immersive in the future thanks to Dutch micro-location startup LabWerk's new mApp platform, a deployment and management system that allows museums to quickly and easily roll out iBeacon-based interactive exhibits. -- AppleInsider.

My nine must-have plug-ins for Apple Mail

My nine must-have plug-ins for Apple Mail

In a recent story about simplifying your email system, I mentioned nine plug-ins for Apple Mail that I use to transform it from a fair email client into a much more powerful tool. A number of people have asked me what those plug-ins are, so here's my list. (For even more suggestions, see Maximizing Mail: Add-ons for Mac OS X's Mail.) -- Macworld.

Critical OpenSSL 'Heartbleed' bug puts encrypted communications at risk

Critical OpenSSL 'Heartbleed' bug puts encrypted communications at risk

Computer security experts are advising administrators to patch a severe flaw in a software library used by millions of websites to encrypt sensitive communications.

The flaw, nicknamed "Heartbleed," is contained in several versions of OpenSSL, a cryptographic library that enables SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) or TLS (Transport Security Layer) encryption. Most websites use either SSL or TLS, which is indicated in browsers with a padlock symbol. -- Macworld.

Security splainin'

Security splainin'

Isn't it nice that so many people who are ostensibly not Mac users are still very concerned about Mac security? It's sweet the way they look out for us.

(Stuck in) BetaNews's Derrick Wlodarz is one of them. -- Macworld.

Heartbleed Security Bug: What Apple Users Need to Know

Heartbleed Security Bug: What Apple Users Need to Know

The newly discovered Heartbleed bug is being called the Web's worst security bug ever.

It allows hackers to steal passwords and login details when users visit vulnerable sites -- undetected. That's the bad part: affected sites probably have no idea they're vulnerable. The bug is subject to an emergency security advisory. Some experts are estimating that up to 66% of the Internet's servers could be affected. Each server has to be fixed manually. So it could take a while.

In the meantime... -- Cult of Mac.

Custom margins in TextEdit

Custom margins in TextEdit

There is already an old hint about this topic, but it doesn't really explain it very clearly, only in the comments.

Here's how you can change the margins in TextEdit to your favorite size, so that you can use, for example, the whole space on a sheet of paper when printing. -- Mac OS X Hints.

How to determine if your Mac's hard drive is failing

How to determine if your Mac's hard drive is failing

Your hard drive failing can mean loss or corruption to important data, or perhaps to applications and system software that can destabilize the system. If your Mac is regularly showing hangs, is running exceptionally sluggishly, crashes, or you get odd permissions denied errors about the inability to access certain files for which you previously had access, then your drive may be about to fail. -- MacIssues.

Check what the OS X installer is doing

Check what the OS X installer is doing

When you install applications in OS X, you usually download an installer in a .dmg image from the developer, in which there is either the program itself ready to be dragged into your Applications folder, an installation program to run from the disk image itself, or an installation package.

The later of these options will look like an orange box, and when double-clicked will launch the OS X installer program. This program will run you through the steps for installing the package contents, which is usually just a bunch of sequential information before you finally install the package.

In these steps, you will eventually see a progress bar, and then quit the installer to launch your program.

While this process usually goes without problems, sometimes it may be useful to see exactly what the installer is doing, including where files are being copied, and any any errors or warnings encountered with the installation process. -- MacIssues.

How to look up the audio capabilities of your Mac

How to look up the audio capabilities of your Mac

While for the most part the only audio-related settings you interact with on your Mac are the volume controls, there might be times when you need to look up or configure more specific details.

There are three basic areas in OS X where you can look up audio information and configure it: The system preferences, the system information utility, and the Audio MIDI Setup utility. -- MacIssues.

The Data Mining Techniques That Reveal Our Planet's Cultural Links and Boundaries

The Data Mining Techniques That Reveal Our Planet's Cultural Links and Boundaries

Studying cultural variation around the world has always been expensive, time-consuming work. Which is why the newfound ability to mine the data from location-based social networks is revolutionizing this science. -- MIT Technology Review.

Volume Purchase Program: Requesting free iLife and iWork apps

Volume Purchase Program: Requesting free iLife and iWork apps

If your business or educational institution is part of the Apple Volume Purchase Program, you can make iLife for iOS (iPhoto and iMovie) and iWork for iOS (Pages, Keynote, and Numbers) available to your users for free. This is available on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch devices that are iOS 7 compatible. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Understanding Home Sharing

Understanding Home Sharing

Home Sharing in iTunes lets you share your iTunes media libraries between up to five computers in your household. You can also use Home Sharing to play your iTunes content on your iOS devices and Apple TV (2nd generation) if they are connected to your home Wi-Fi network. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

iOS Nap Time: Playing Music to Fall Asleep

iOS Nap Time: Playing Music to Fall Asleep

If you want to listen to music on your iPhone while you fall asleep, you don't need to remember to shut it off or download third-party apps to handle that for you. Turns out the iPhone can handle that task all on its own, and it's easy to set up. -- The Mac Observer.

AppleCare covers much more than you may have thought

AppleCare covers much more than you may have thought

Extended warranties get a bad reputation for a good reason, since lots of them are ripoffs. They cost too much money for coverage that's either limited or just not useful for the amount of time the warranty covers. Still they have their uses. You probably don't need one on your refrigerator, but unless you're made of money, it's a wise idea to get one for your major Apple products. -- TUAW.

Why the Web Still Matters for Writing

Why the Web Still Matters for Writing

This week Twitter was abuzz with the most recent report from Flurry that showed people spending most of their time on mobile using apps, not the browser.

Many were quick to once again declare "The Web is Dead," but I'm not sure that conclusion makes sense, at least for writing. -- Matt Mullenweg.

April 08 Tuesday's News

 

The ultimate guide to solving iOS battery drain

The ultimate guide to solving iOS battery drain

A former Genius Bar technician has dedicated his time to finding out what causes battery drain on iOS devices. The result: This comprehensive post on how to troubleshoot battery issues on your iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad. -- Overthought.

Intel: Thunderbolt Macs will be able to directly connect with Thunderbolt PCs

Intel: Thunderbolt Macs will be able to directly connect with Thunderbolt PCs

Thunderbolt is of special interest to the attendees of the National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) show, since it provides the throughput needed for video production. Intel likes to make Thunderbolt announcements at NAB, and this year, the company revealed that Thunderbolt Networking would be expanded so that Macs and PCs can be directly connected. -- Macworld.

Lightroom For The iPad Is Straight Up Amazing

Lightroom For The iPad Is Straight Up Amazing

Lightroom for the iPad is here. It's called Lightroom Mobile, and it runs smoothly on anything down to an iPad 2 (or first-gen mini). You can use the app to edit and organize any photos in your Lightroom collections, and it syncs automatically (and near instantly) with Lightroom on your desktop (you'll need to upgrade to v5.4).

And the price? It's free, but only if you already subscribe to Adobe's $10-per-month Photoshop Photography Program, which also gets you the desktop versions of Photoshop and Lightroom. There's also a 30-day free trial to check it out.

So how does it work? Lets take a nice long look. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple's Facial Recognition Technology Could Create A Virtual You

Apple's Facial Recognition Technology Could Create A Virtual You

Remember that recent story about Apple's lack of racially diverse emojis?

A patent, published Tuesday, may solve some of those problems by promising Automatic Avatar Creation for Apple users -- literally putting a virtual "you" inside your Apple device. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Granted 46 Patents Today Covering Push-to-Talk, Avatars, a more advanced version of Slide-to-Unlock and Much More

Apple Granted 46 Patents Today Covering Push-to-Talk, Avatars, a more advanced version of Slide-to-Unlock and Much More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 46 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent relating to a possible future Push-to-Talk iPhone and/or iDevice feature. We also cover a more advanced version of Apple's famed Slide-to-Unlock and two patents relating to avatar creation and editing for social networking, video conferencing and gaming. -- Patently Apple.

How to connect your iPad to an HD TV

How to connect your iPad to an HD TV

Whether you own an iPad or iPad mini, their screens can't compare to the much larger HD TV sitting in your lounge (or even bedroom).

Unlike most Android tablets, the iPad doesn't have an HDMI output as everything goes through Apple's dock connector. Fortunately, you can buy Apple's Digital AV adapter which gives you a full-size HDMI output and a pass-through dock port for charging your iPad at the same time. -- PC Advisor.

Here's How Google's Gmail iOS App Change Affects Apple Users' Privacy

Here's How Google's Gmail iOS App Change Affects Apple Users' Privacy

Google recently implemented a change in its Gmail iOS app that affects the privacy of Apple's iPhone users, reports Quartz. Google announced the change via its official Gmail blog last month. The blog post noted that "The app now fully supports background app refresh, which means your Gmail messages will be pre-fetched and synced so they're right there when you open the app -- no more annoying pauses while you wait for your inbox to refresh."

Although this change ostensibly improves the way that the Gmail app functions in iOS, it also has implications for users' privacy, since it alters the way that Google's other iOS apps operate.

April 07 Monday's News

 

iTunes: Organizing media files, mixed genre smart playlists, and too-long syncs

iTunes: Organizing media files, mixed genre smart playlists, and too-long syncs

You can do a lot with smart playlists in iTunes, and sometimes the questions I get from readers make me discover ideas that I had never thought of. In this week's column, I show you how to create a smart playlist with a certain percentage of songs from different genres. I also talk about organizing iTunes media files, slow syncing of iOS devices, and how to find a lost password for an Apple ID. -- Macworld.

Mac PROS and CON

Mac PROS and CON

 

One Man's Opinion: iPad Secrets

One Man's Opinion: iPad Secret

First a confession. I hate iOS 7. IMO the iOS 7 "design" is one of the worst decisions Apple has ever made. I am also NOT an iOS person. I am one of only two persons on earth who do not have a smart phone. Much less an iPhone. I live with the other one. I also think that Apple Support is not what it was or should be.

These thoughts percolate to the top of my keyboard today after what occurred with an iPad Air over the weekend.

All of a sudden the iPad Air would not "turn on."

I pressed the "Home Button", nothing but blackness.

I pressed and held the "Sleep/Wake Button", nothing but blackness.

I had been using it earlier in the day but all of a sudden nothing but darkness.

I went online but Apple's knowledge base was dumb on the subject.

A phone call to Apple Support also provided no help and not the best person on the other end.

So in desperation I reached out to my personal homegrown iOS expert. Who explained to me (in less than 144 charters or 10 seconds) that I needed to hold down the "Home Button" and "Sleep/Wake Button" at the same time for a 10 count (it may restart sooner.)

And lo, the iPad Air was once again alive. And he did it without even seeing the device or actually talking to me.

It seems that there are times when iOS has its own version of a kernel panic and the only way out is the above. It is something like a combination of "force quit" and "on/off button" on OS X.

My unhappiness is not that I had to do it. It is that I could not find it or get Apple Support to tell me. And one thing I know how to do is search. But I can not find what is not there.

So go ahead and tell me how silly I was and that everyone knows this.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Spec Shootout: Fire TV vs Apple TV, Roku, and Chromecast

Spec Shootout: Fire TV vs Apple TV, Roku, and Chromecast

Amazon announced the Fire TV this week, and on paper it's quite far ahead of it's competitors. The online retailer posted a comparison chart for the Fire TV, Apple TV, Roku 3, and Chromecast, but it's a chart that has been spun, and heavily. We thought it would be more useful to people if we broke it down in ways that make sense. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Do HDR Photography on Your iPhone, and Why You Should

How to Do HDR Photography on Your iPhone, and Why You Should

HDR (High Dynamic Range) is a big deal now with the release of iOS 7.1. But, what's it all mean? Sandro Cuccia demystifies HDR, how it's put to use on an iPhone, and why you should consider using it all the time. -- The Mac Observer.

How to wake your Mac over the network

How to wake your Mac over the network

While for the most part you usually wake your Mac by pressing a button on the keyboard or clicking the mouse, you can also do so over the network. This may be useful in instances where you are unable to get to the Mac, such as if you have a Mac Mini set up as a media or network server and have it tucked away in a closet. -- MacIssues.

How to fix deep formatting problems with OS X drives

How to fix deep formatting problems with OS X drives

Even though formatting advances like Journaling in Apple's filesystem formats help prevent data corruption, problems can still happen that result in a drive not only being unreadable, but also unable to be reformatted.

If this happens, the drive may show up in the Finder sidebar but not show data when clicked, or it may just not show up but be present in Disk Utility; however, if you try to mount it you get a "resource busy" error. Another possible symptom is if you get this error or one claiming the drive cannot be unmounted, when trying to format the drive or running a fix routine on it with Disk Utility. -- MacIssues.

Access old internet radio in iTunes 11

Access old internet radio in iTunes 11

In the latest version of iTunes, Apple's iTunes Radio service has been revamped, so instead of offering a number of stream URLs to various third-party radio stations, the new service gives you channels based on artist or genre, which play songs available through the iTunes store.

This radio feature has its benefits, including the ability to skip songs, purchase those you like, and create custom radio stations based on your tastes; however, you may still wish to access older streamed radio station options. -- MacIssues.

Apple's iPhone is King of Manhattan as Shown in Stunning Map

Apple's iPhone is King of Manhattan as Shown in Stunning Map

They say that a photo is worth a thousand words. This is a clear example proving that out. The map illustrated in our cover graphic was created by Mapbox. It clearly shows us just how hot the iPhone really is in the richest part of New York: Manhattan. The iPhone is king in Manhattan in stark contrast to Newark, New Jersey where incomes are substantially less. It's an established fact that Apple's iPhone is adopted by more in the higher-end of the market, but this classic map gives visual life to those stats.

This map showing the locations of 280 million individual posts on Twitter shows a depressing divide in America: Tweets coming from Manhattan tend to come from iPhones. Tweets coming from Newark, N.J., tend to come from Android phones.

If you live in the New York metro area, you don't need to be told that Manhattan is where the region's rich people live, and the poor live in Newark. Manhattan's median income is $67,000 a year. Newark's is $17,000, according to U.S. Census data.

The rich, it seems, use iPhones while the poor tweet from Androids. -- Patently Apple.

New Stunning Maps of the US, Canada & Other Countries Show Apple is winning against Android in Larger Cities

New Stunning Maps of the US, Canada & Other Countries Show Apple is winning against Android in Larger Cities

Earlier this morning we posted a report titled "Apple's iPhone is King of Manhattan as Shown in Stunning Map." In that report we covered Business Insider's viewpoint that the iPhone's success in Manhattan proved the great divide in America between the rich and poor. They chose a series of New York maps to prove their point. However, that was a subjective slant to support their position. While I appreciate their report bringing some of this to light, the fact is that if you work with the source mapping service, you'll find a somewhat different reality that expands on Business Insider's viewpoint. Our report will provide with a large selection of maps outside of New York that paints a slightly different picture of the iOS vs. Android War. -- Patently Apple.

How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

How the Internet Is Taking Away America's Religion

Using the Internet can destroy your faith. That's the conclusion of a study showing that the dramatic drop in religious affiliation in the U.S. since 1990 is closely mirrored by the increase in Internet use. -- MIT Technology Review.

Cool Products from Macworld/iWorld 2014: Part 2

Cool Products from Macworld/iWorld 2014: Part 2

We've mostly recovered from the endurance event that is a journalist's lot at Macworld/iWorld (for Adam and Tonya, getting only 3 hours of sleep on the red-eye home didn't help!), and we'd like to share more of the neat stuff we saw at the show with you. If we've overlooked something that you thought was great, please let us know in the comments! -- TidBITS.

Apple seeds GM version of Xcode 5.1.1 to developers with bug fixes

Apple seeds GM version of Xcode 5.1.1 to developers with bug fixes

Apple has seeded the golden master version of Xcode 5.1.1 to developers. This indicates that a public release should be imminent. This new seed follows the release of Xcode 5.1 in the middle of this past March. -- 9to5Mac.

You can no longer share presentations in Messages

You can no longer share presentations in Messages

In the past if you were giving a presentation to a remote group you could use Messages to do that. Now that Apple has released Mavericks it doesn't work.

Messages' iChat Theater feature is gone in the Mavericks version.

For the "Wait, what?" crowd, allow me to explain. -- Macworld.

Apple Employees Confess All The Worst Things About Working At Apple

Apple Employees Confess All The Worst Things About Working At Apple

If you want to work in tech, you want the words "Apple Inc." somewhere on your resume. That experience is widely regarded as a key that can unlock virtually any other type of employment opportunity.

But what is it really like to work at the most innovative tech company on the planet? -- Business Insider.

The Woman Behind Apple's First Icons

The Woman Behind Apple's First Icons

Thirty years ago, as tech titans battled for real estate in the personal computer market, an inconspicuous young artist gave the Macintosh a smile.

Susan Kare "was the type of kid who always loved art." As a child, she lost herself in drawings, paintings, and crafts; as a young woman, she dove into art history and dreamed of being a world-renowned fine artist. -- Priceconomics.

Apple files patent for advanced playlist creation on iTunes

Apple files patent for advanced playlist creation on iTunes

Apple has filed for a patent (number 20140095998) with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for "advanced playlist creation." It involves iTunes ability to compile "recommended" lists based on the media you've already viewed or listened to. -- Apple Daily Report.

Apple granted patent involving Time Machine on Mac OS X

Apple granted patent involving Time Machine on Mac OS X

Apple has been granted a patent (number 20140095973) by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for a "mechanism for partial document restore" on a Mac. It involves the Time Machine back-up/restore feature in OS X. -- Apple Daily Report.

A budget Mac: how to install a Hackintosh: Step-by-step guide to installing a Hackintosh system

A budget Mac: how to install a Hackingtosh/Step-by-step guide to installing a Hackingstosh system

Would you like to try Mac OS but do you think an actual Mac is too expensive? With a few easy tricks you can install Apples operating system on a normal PC. In this article we will show you how to install a so-called Hackintosh. -- Hardware.Info.

Time for iOS device spring cleaning: How to replace your old apps with new ones

Time for iOS device spring cleaning: How to replace your old apps with new ones

Nothing can compare to the fresh start that comes with erasing and restoring your iOS device back to its original configuration. But before you start reinstalling all of your old apps again, consider some alternatives first. -- Gigaom.

How To Lock / Power Down iPhone With A Broken Power Button

How To Lock / Power Down iPhone With A Broken Power Button

The iPhone and iPad are among the mobile industry's sturdiest exports, but it's not without its fair share of issues. The sleep/wake button, for example, which sits atop the device, is susceptible to breaking, sticking, or just generally ceasing to function. If you encounter this issue, then the only option is to go either try your hand at fixing it, or taking the sensible option of getting it repaired, by Apple. But if you don't have the time or immediate funds to take a whimsical trip to an Apple Store, then here's how you can still utilize the button's functions even when it's MIA. -- Redmond Pie.

What's a 'carrier update' for iPhone or iPad and why do we get them?

What's a 'carrier update' for iPhone or iPad and why do we get them?

If you've had an iPhone or iPad with cellular networking for any length of time you've probably been notified about a carrier update. Some are mandatory and don't give you an option to say refuse or to be reminded later. Others just bug you occasionally until you actually perform the update. But why? What are they, what do they contain, and what do they want from us? -- iMore.

April 04 Friday's News

 

Apple new touchscreen tech would use IR light to discern hard presses from soft

Apple new touchscreen tech would use IR light to discern hard presses from soft

Using a combination of capacitive touch and infrared light sensing, Apple's newly revealed touchscreen technology concept allows users to accurately convey force applied to a touch surface without bulky physical hardware, opening new dimensions in GUI navigation and interaction. -- AppleInsider.

Apple working on voice-recognizing headphones with built-in accelerometer, beamforming mics

Apple working on voice-recognizing headphones with built-in accelerometer, beamforming mics

Apple is looking to advance the design of its bundled iPhone EarPods by potentially implanting an accelerometer into the earbud portion that could recognize voice activity, which in turn would activate and tune beamforming microphone arrays. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues fifth OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minimal changes

Apple issues fifth OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers with minimal changes

Apple on Thursday issued the fifth OS X 10.9.3 Mavericks beta to developers, asking testers to focus on graphics, audio, Safari and the recently restored iTunes contacts and calendar syncing over USB. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates iPhoto for iOS with print order enhancements, bug fixes

Apple updates iPhoto for iOS with print order enhancements, bug fixes

Apple on Thursday rolled out a minor update to its iPhoto app for iOS, building on an in-app print ordering capability by adding the option to include white borders around selected pictures. -- AppleInsider.

Latest iWork update is another win for AppleScript

Latest iWork update is another win for AppleScript

Late last year, Apple generated a wave of negative press after releasing slimmed down Mac versions of the iWork apps--Keynote, Numbers, and Pages. Rewritten from the ground up to focus on ease of use, consistency, and iCloud support, the apps lacked lots of the useful productivity features that Mac users had come to use. One major setback was a significant reduction in AppleScript support, a problem for anyone attempting to automate an iWork-based office workflow. -- Macworld.

Map Street Addresses Right Inside Safari

Map Street Addresses Right Inside Safari

When you want to look up a street address in Safari, you may still be using an old workflow: copy the address from the web page, paste it into the search bar, and then use Google Maps.

With OS X Mavericks, you might even have gone a step further and pasted the address into Apple's Maps app, and then sending the directions to your iPhone.

There's another way, though, which offers more immediate gratification: opening the address in Safari. -- Cult of Mac.

Sonnet Announces New 4U Enclosure to Rack Mount Two Mac Pros

Sonnet Announces New 4U Enclosure to Rack Mount Two Mac Pros

Mounting and organizing options for heavy duty Mac Pro users continue to grow since the new machine's launch at the end of last year, with Sonnet now announcing a new rack mount enclosure capable of holding two Mac Pros. The new enclosure is an additional option to go along with the enclosure and expansion chassis the company announced last week.

Preserve file permissions when copying in the Finder

Preserve file permissions when copying in the Finder

When new files are created by programs in your account, they are inherently assigned your username as the owner, along with the default permissions for your account to access, which generally are full access for the owner, and then read-only access for the default group and everyone else. -- MacIssues.

Manage the Quick Look window in OS X

Manage the Quick Look window in OS X

The Quick Look service in OS X is useful for previewing images and other file contents, either directly in the Finder, or in programs like Mail where you might encounter images and documents as message attachments. While you might consider opening a file or attachment directly in the program you have assigned to handle it, you can use Quick Look to take a peek at a file, which can be handy if you only need to look up a word or two in it. -- MacIssues.

Rebuild mailboxes to fix message handling problems in OS X Mail

Rebuild mailboxes to fix message handling problems in OS X Mail

Apple's Mail program can connect to a number of different e-mail services, including popular ones like Gmail, Outlook.com, and Yahoo, but in addition be configured for custom IMAP and POP services, such as those at work or educational institutions.

While Mail can manage messages from many different accounts and account types, sometimes an error may occur that results in one or more of the following symptoms:

  • Incorrect unread Mail where the number of unread messages does not reflect the total count in the Mail Dock icon badge.
  • Incorrect number of messages Where the count of messages seen in Webmail clients do not reflect those seen in Mail.
  • Messages not displaying content when selected, and instead showing a blank viewer window.
  • Incorrect message content where another e-mail message appears to be showing instead of the selected one.
  • Messages you know should be available are simply missing and cannot be found.

These issues may happen because of the way the program handles messages in various inboxes you have created. -- MacIssues.

About Disk Image file format options

About Disk Image file format options

One useful feature in OS X is support for disk images. These are container files that commonly end in the .dmg suffix, which represent virtual disks to the operating system when opened. By double-clicking these files, the system will mount them just as if you attached an external drive, and then allow you to copy files to and from them.

While most disk images you encounter will be from a developer or other third-party distributer, you can also create your own using Apple's Disk Utility program. -- MacIssues.

Apple's Invents Sapphire Growth Systems

Apple's Invents Sapphire Growth Systems

Last week we posted a report titled "Apple Reveals an Oleophobic Coating on Sapphire Process for iDevices that may Incorporate Liquid-Metal." The week prior we reported that Apple revealed laser cutting techniques for processing sapphire. The wave of sapphire related patents continues for the third straight week with one titled "Continuous Sapphire Growth." Apple's patent application relates to sapphire growth and, more particularly, to systems and methods for continuous sapphire growth. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents Secure Touchscreen SIM Card Tray Ejection System

Apple Invents Secure Touchscreen SIM Card Tray Ejection System

On April 03, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a simple yet sophisticated next generation SIM card tray ejection system. The system is activated on a future iOS touchscreen UI virtual button. The new system adds a new level of security for SIM cards which will be important as future iDevices may support bank related SIM cards for credit and/or debit. -- Patently Apple.

How Your Location Data Is Being Used to Predict the Events You Will Want to Attend

How Your Location Data Is Being Used to Predict the Events You Will Want to Atten

The next generation of recommendation engines will use your location data to suggest music festivals, sporting events, and conferences you will want to attend.

Recommendation engines have flooded the Web. It's hard to buy an ebook, mp3 track or video without being bombarded with suggestions for other purchases. Indeed, the phrase "people who bought X also liked Y" has become a modern-day aphorism -- MIT Technology Review.

iWork Suite Gains View-Only Option and Other Enhancements

iWork Suite Gains View-Only Option and Other Enhancements

As it did in November 2013 and again in January 2014, Apple has released an update to its iWork suite of apps -- Pages, Numbers, and Keynote -- across all three platforms on which it runs: Mac OS X, iOS, and iCloud. For those keeping track, that's nine apps that got some Apple update love in this latest release. Let's take them on a platform-by-platform basis. -- TidBITS.

iPhoto for iOS update adds white border printing option alongside various bug fixes

iPhoto for iOS update adds white border printing option alongside various bug fixes

Following a slew of updates to iWork, Apple has released a minor update to iPhoto for iOS, part of its iLife suite. The update adds a new border printing option. When ordering prints, you can now frame your photos with a white border. As usual, the update also includes miscellaneous bug fixes and "other improvements". -- 9to5Mac.

iPhoto: Prevent the Program from Automatically Opening

iPhoto: Prevent the Program from Automatically Opening

In this Quick Tip, we're going to cover how to stop iPhoto from opening every time you plug in your iOS device. Hey, sometimes you want to import images and sometimes you don't, but dagnabbit, you should be able to control what your applications do. We think so, anyway. -- The Mac Observer.

The Death of QuickTime

The Death of QuickTime

Apple has long had a guideline stating that apps that use deprecated technologies will be rejected. QTKit classes such as QTMovieView were only deprecated in October 2013 with the release of Mac OS X 10.9. This is probably because the replacement, AVFoundation, did not initially support much of what was possible with QuickTime. For example, its QTMovieView equivalent, AVPlayerView was only added in 10.9. Prior to that, you had to build your own player using AVPlayerLayer. -- Egg Freckles.

iOS 7 bug allows anyone to disable Find My iPhone and bypass Activation Lock without a password

iOS 7 bug allows anyone to disable Find My iPhone and bypass Activation Lock without a password

Starting with iOS 7, deleting an iCloud account or restoring a device requires Find My iPhone to be disabled. Find My iPhone, in turn, requires the user to enter the password for the Apple ID attached to the iCloud account. This system ensures that phone thieves can't remove the account and avoid being tracked through the Find My iPhone website.

Unfortunately, there's a pretty easy way to bypass this requirement. -- 9to5Mac.

April 02 Wednesday's News

 

Apple's premium-priced Macs 'defy the laws of economics,' but iPhone does not, Needham says

Apple's premium-priced Macs 'defy the laws of economics,' but iPhone does not, Needham says

Mac sales have continued to grow in the face of a recession and declining overall PC market, but Apple's iPhone could not escape shifting trends in the smartphone space, analyst Charlie Wolf of Needham said on Tuesday. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates iWork for iOS, OS X and iCloud with enhanced usability, graphics tweaks

Apple updates iWork for iOS, OS X and iCloud with enhanced usability, graphics tweaks

Apple on Tuesday released a series of updates to the iCloud versions of Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, including new iOS and OS X app versions, as the company continues to refine its web-based productivity suite. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates Safari with enhanced push notification, new security features

Apple updates Safari with enhanced push notification, new security features

Apple on Tuesday rolled out an update to its Safari Web Browser for Mac, with new features like enhanced push notification settings coming to users of OS X 10.9 Mavericks. -- AppleInsider.

OWC launches Mac Pro CPU and memory upgrade service

OWC launches Mac Pro CPU and memory upgrade service

Other World Computing on Tuesday announced a new turnkey upgrade program for late-2013 Mac Pros that offers replacement Intel Xeon CPUs and cheaper memory options not available directly from Apple. -- AppleInsider.

Apple receives patent for interchangeable iPhone camera lenses

Apple receives patent for interchangeable iPhone camera lenses

If you want to take good pictures, one of the things you need is a good lens. As good as lenses have gotten, this is one of the areas where smartphone cameras continue to be constrained: you can fit a small, fixed focal length lens to the back of a phone, but doing anything more complicated would make the device considerably larger. One potential solution to this problem would be a system of detachable, interchangeable lenses like those used in DSLRs and other mid- to high-end cameras, but the attachment mechanism itself would normally take up quite a bit of space. -- Ars Technica.

Google tells Supreme Court it's legal to packet sniff open Wi-Fi networks

Google tells Supreme Court it's legal to packet sniff open Wi-Fi networks

Google wants the Supreme Court to reverse a decision concluding that the media giant could be held liable for hijacking data on unencrypted Wi-Fi routers via its Street View cars.

The legal flap should concern anybody who uses open Wi-Fi connections in public places like coffee houses and restaurants. That's because Google claims it is not illegal to intercept data from Wi-Fi signals that are not password protected. -- Ars Technica.

Is high-resolution audio really as good as it sounds?

Is high-resolution audio really as good as it sounds?

Many audiophiles will tell you that high-resolution audio delivers a superior sound. But is the quality worth the extra cost of stocking your music library with high-resolution recordings? -- Macworld.

Hide All The Icons On Your Desktop

Hide All The Icons On Your Desktop

There are times when you just need to clear off the icons on your Desktop, like when you're giving an important presentation at work. No one wants to see all the images you've saved from the internet, right?

I used to solve this problem with a Sort Me folder on the Desktop, just select all in a Finder window focused on the Desktop, and drag it all to the Sort Me folder.

There's an even faster and easier way to hide all the icons on your Desktop, though, using the Terminal. -- Cult of Mac.

2013 Mac Pro now to ship closer to May

2013 Mac Pro now to ship closer to May

For the past few months, shipments of Apple's new slick Mac Pro desktop system have been on hold, as Apple revamps its production of the systems to meet demand. Apple's built-to-order page for the Mac Pro has stated any purchased system will be available for shipment sometime in April; however, while this is still the case for some of its international stores, in its US store Apple has changed this status to read "5 to 6 weeks." -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted 51 Patents Today Covering a 3D Apple TV Remote, the MacBook Pro Unibody Design and More

Apple Granted 51 Patents Today Covering a 3D Apple TV Remote, the MacBook Pro Unibody Design and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 51 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we primarily cover integrated camera windows in Apple iDevices, the MacBook Pro's unibody design and a possible future 3D remote controller for Apple TV. While we may not be getting an Apple centric HDTV anytime soon, perhaps we could look forward to Apple's 3D remote on the horizon. Only time will tell if that's just wishful thinking or not. And as usual, we wrap up this week's granted patent report series with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Keynote for Mac: Optimizing your presentation for iOS compatibility

Keynote for Mac: Optimizing your presentation for iOS compatibility

Use these tips to optimize iOS compatibility for your presentations that you create on Keynote for Mac. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to get started in podcasting: capturing the audio

How to get started in podcasting: capturing the audio

Once you've decided on a format and focus for your podcast, it's time to get down to some nitty-gritty: Figuring out how you're going to capture the audio. That means choosing a microphone (and maybe other hardware) and recording software. It means figuring out a recording workflow. And, if you're going to include guests who can't be in the same room with you, you have to know how you're going to record them. -- .

Mac 101: How to move pages between PDF documents using Preview

Mac 101: How to move pages between PDF documents using Preview

Preview is often overlooked by users who have yet to delve into the many features of the OS X app. Its name, "Preview," suggests it is only a document viewer, but it has editing capabilities that allow you do much more than merely read a file.

One useful feature is the ability to move pages from one PDF document to another PDF document with a simple drag and drop. -- TUAW.

How Apple's AirPlay Streams Audio

How Apple's AirPlay Streams Audio

I got a question from a reader asking how Apple's AirPlay streams audio. The question specifically asked about how audio files are converted, and whether AirPlay reduces their quality. -- Kirkville.

Disable iCloud Saving by Default

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iCloud has proven to be a great service that is used by a lot of iOS and OS X users, but if you use another cloud service like Dropbox or Box, then you'll no doubt be frustrated when saving documents and having iCloud-supported apps asking you to save your document in your iCloud account. Fortunately, there's an easy Terminal-based approach that can disable this save feature for all iCloud-enabled apps that save to the service. Stick around and continue reading to learn how it's done. -- Mac|Life.

Tuning into the Curious Design Decisions of iTunes Radio

Tuning into the Curious Design Decisions of iTunes Radio

Apple also has the huge advantage of being the world's biggest music store and has the ability to attract the world's biggest stars to create their own 'stations' (they did, after all, get Beyoncé to launch a new album exclusively on iTunes). This advantage leads me to iTunes First Play: it initially debuted on the iTunes Store but is now a dedicated station in iTunes Radio, meaning it is easier to access and more prominent to users. I'm sure I'm not the only one that enjoys listening to new albums with the knowledge that it is so new that it isn't even available to purchase yet.

Unfortunately, that is where my praise and iTunes Radio's innovations stop because of iTunes Radio's bizarre limitations and frustrations. -- MacStories.

The Secret iOS Feature That Could Change the Internet

The Secret iOS Feature That Could Change the Internet

A few weeks ago, a messaging app called FireChat launched. It looks, at first, like just about any other messaging app in an already very crowded market, but FireChat is sneakily subversive and quite possibly the most important thing to happen to the Internet since international network hubs began to form in 1995. -- Fortune.

How to add additional dictionaries for iOS 7's define feature

How to add additional dictionaries for iOS 7's define feature

The Define option in the iPhone and iPad text selector popup gives you dictionary definitions for most common words. It's convenient because it can be accessed in only a couple of taps. But what if you're in England and the U.S. dictionary keeps coming up? What if you also speak Italian or Japanese or Chinese and want to access those definitions as well? What if you're traveling and want access to French? Luckily, iOS makes it easy to add and manage additional dictionaries so you can have the languages you want right where you want them! -- iMore.

April 01 Tuesday's News

 

Visionaries of the tech world who foresaw Apple's future

Visionaries of the tech world who foresaw Apple's future

April first is historically a day to honor brilliant minds who have shared their genius with the world. So many of these have contributed their opinions on Apple over the years that there's not even enough space on the Internet to acknowledge all of their meaty chunks of cerebral output, but here are a few nuggets of wisdom from the tech sector's most elite thinkers. -- AppleInsider.

Faster, cheaper, smaller: The state of the system-on-a-chip in 2014

Faster, cheaper, smaller: The state of the system-on-a-chip in 2014

If you're reading this, the odds are pretty good that you have a smartphone. There's also a better-than-average chance that you know a little something about the stuff inside that phone--who makes the chips inside and how those chips stack up to the ones in other phones.

About a year ago, we wrote a guide covering most of the major players making these chips, and now that this year's Mobile World Congress is over and done with, we thought it was time to revisit the subject. What's changed? What's stayed the same? And what's going to happen in the next year that you need to know about?

We'll begin by looking at emerging trends before moving on to a bird's-eye view of where all the major chipmakers stand. This won't give you an in-depth technical description of every detail, but it should help you understand where this tech is headed in 2014. -- Ars Technica.

Facebook drones won't work for aerial Internet

Facebook drones won't work for aerial Internet

Screen Shot 2014-03-31 at 12.50.56 PMFacebook, trying to be ever more like Google, announced last week that it was thinking of building a global ISP in the sky. Now this is something I've written about several times in the past and even predicted to some extent, so I'd like to look at what Facebook has said so far and predict what will and won't work. -- I, Cringely.

New phishing attempt mimics Apple support

New phishing attempt mimics Apple support

A new malicious effort by cyber criminals is making the rounds, which mimics Apple's user account management site in an attempt to steal Apple IDs.

With a stolen Apple ID, a criminal can potentially log into your iCloud account and gain access to email and contacts, as well as use remote services to lock or wipe your Mac or iDevices. In addition, if you use your iCloud account as the main registration for various online services, then this may be used to gain access to those services as well. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted an Attachable Camera Lens Patent in Record Time

Apple Granted an Attachable Camera Lens Patent in Record Time

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 51 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a patent that just came to light as a patent application two weeks ago. We covered it extensively in our report titled "Apple Reveals New Camera Lens Attachment System for iDevices." This has got to be one of the fastest patent approvals I've ever seen. Does this signal Apple fast tracking this feature to market any faster? Only time will tell. Also today, Apple has been granted a design patent for the iPhone's home page user interface layout and more. -- Patently Apple.

Install and Run OS X 10.9 Mavericks on the iPad Air

Install and Run OS X 10.9 Mavericks on the iPad Air

Pundits have long speculated that Apple is working on ARM-based builds of Mac OS X that would allow the company to use its proprietary A7 CPU (or successors) in Macs as well as iOS devices. This is nothing new for Apple, which secretly compiled Mac OS X for Intel-based hardware for years while Macs shipped with PowerPC CPUs.

But we hadn't realized how far this work had come until a source inside Apple tipped us off to the fact that Apple is testing OS X 10.9 Mavericks on current iPad hardware. Not only that, but the ARM code is embedded in the shipping version of Mavericks. After months of attempts, we've cracked how to install and run Mavericks on the iPad Ai -- TidBITS.

In praise of Apple's horrible mice

In praise of Apple's horrible mice

Over the last twenty years, Apple's hardware has steadily conquered every aspect of my computing life. As I type this, my laptop, keyboard, monitor, phone, and tablet all sport the company's iconic logo--a reminder of how successful the folks from Cupertino are at designing electronics that I, and many others, want to use.

The one notable exception to this rule is the humble mouse, a device that the company has almost pathologically attempted to reinvent time and time again since it first introduced one with the Lisa back 1983--in the process creating an almost perfect metaphor for why the tech giant is so successful at design. -- Macworld.

TV Done Right: Still A Dream

TV Done Right: Still A Dream

As the strong reactions to even the slightest Apple TV rumor demonstrate, there's a vigorous appetite for a simple, modern Internet TV experience. The technology is ready but carriers aren't. -- Monday Note.

Fix Time Machine When Stuck on 'Preparing Backup' in Mac OS X

Fix Time Machine When Stuck on 'Preparing Backup' in Mac OS X

Time Machine is by far the simplest way to keep regular and reliable backups of a Mac, and usually the automatic backups start and finish without any incident. On some rare occasions though, Time Machine may get stuck* on the "Preparing Backup" stage for an inordinately long amount of time, causing a backup to never start, let alone finish. It's these failed backup attempts that we're looking to remedy here. -- OS X Daily.

Mac 101: Use Quick Look to create an instant slideshow from your photos

Mac 101: Use Quick Look to create an instant slideshow from your photos

Did you know that OS X has a handy feature for easily previewing a bunch photos in a slideshow format? It's a basic slideshow with no option to add music, but it is perfect if you want to quickly show a handful of your photos to your friends or family. -- TUAW.

How To Save Notes And Record Audio From Meetings Or Classes On Your Mac

How To Save Notes And Record Audio From Meetings Or Classes On Your Mac

One of my favorite meeting apps is Notability, a note-taking app for iPad and iPhone. As you take notes during a meeting or class, Notability also records the audio. Notability isn't available for the Mac, but AudioNote is and it works much the same way. -- NoodleMac.

How To Save Your iPhone's Battery When You're Almost Out Of Power

How To Save Your iPhone's Battery When You're Almost Out Of Power

Let's face it--there are simply some days in which you're going to use your iPhone more actively than others.

Whether you're listening to music during your two hour commute or playing games with high-end graphics all day long, there's a chance your iPhone's battery could drop down to 10 percent sooner than you'd have hoped. Here are a few tips and tricks to help you get the most out of your iPhone when it's on its last legs.

Most of what we're going to recommend can be done in the iPhone's "Control Center," which you can access by swiping from the bottom of the screen. -- Business Insider.

Why I can live without Office for iPad

Why I can live without Office for iPad

I've owned an iPad for almost four years, and during that time have developed a workflow for handling Office documents when I'm on the move. Office for iPad comes several years too late for me. -- ZDNet.