5



MacVolPlace
Since 1996 - Tennessee's Macintosh Resource
Macintosh Images
"No one will ever win the battle of the sexes; there's too much fraternizing with the enemy. - Henry Kissinger"

 

News Archive

News Archive
  then  
MacVolPlace RSS Archive feed

I will be off tomorrow and Monday is a holiday. See you back here on Tuesday. -mam

August 28 Thursday's News

 

LaCie unveils 48TB Thunderbolt 2 drive, Dropbox upgrades Pro plans to 1TB

LaCie unveils 48TB Thunderbolt 2 drive, Dropbox upgrades Pro plans to 1TB

Apple users gained two additional high-capacity storage options on Wednesday, as external drive maker LaCie showed off its new rack-mount Thunderbolt 2 drive in a 48 terabyte configuration and cloud storage firm Dropbox announced that its $9.99-per-month Pro plan will now include 1 terabyte of space. -- AppleInsider.

Feds warn first responders of dangerous hacking tool: Google Search

Feds warn first responders of dangerous hacking tool: Google Search

In a restricted intelligence document distributed to police, public safety, and security organizations in July, the Department of Homeland Security warned of a "malicious activity" that could expose secrets and security vulnerabilities in organizations' information systems. The name of that activity: "Google dorking." -- Ars Technica.

One apartment's Wi-Fi dead zones, mapped with a physics equation

One apartment's Wi-Fi dead zones, mapped with a physics equation

A home's Wi-Fi dead zones are, to most of us, a problem solved with guesswork. Your laptop streams just fine in this corner of the bedroom, but not the adjacent one; this arm of the couch is great for uploading photos, but not the other one. You avoid these places, and where the Wi-Fi works becomes a factor in the wear patterns of your home. In an effort to better understand, and possibly eradicate, his Wi-Fi dead zones, one man took the hard way: he solved the Helmholtz equation. -- Ars Technica.

Apparel is next

Apparel is next

If software can be injected into an industry's product it will bend to the will of the software writers.

This theory expands on Marc Andreessen's observation that "software is eating the world". The evidence is that software, coupled with microprocessors, sensors, batteries and networking becomes applicable to an increasingly larger set of problems to be solved[1]. Software has "eaten" large portions of entertainment (e.g. Pixar, iTunes, video games), telecommunications (iPhone, Android, Messaging), various professions including journalism, management and law, and is entering transportation, energy and health care and poised over banking, finance and government. -- Asymco.

iOS 7: Closing All Open Safari Windows on Your iPhone or iPad

iOS 7: Closing All Open Safari Windows on Your iPhone or iPad

iOS 7's Private Browsing is handy if you want to secretly shop for gifts or "ahem" view any other sites that you might not want people to see. In this Quick Tip, though, Melissa Holt's going to talk about using this feature as a way to close all of the Safari windows you've got open. -- The Mac Observer.

How Duke Turned an iPod Giveaway into a University-Wide Digital Initiative

How Duke Turned an iPod Giveaway into a University-Wide Digital Initiative

A decade ago, Duke University gave iPods to incoming freshmen. That idea evolved into the Duke Digital Initiative, a way to integrate emerging technology into courses. Kelly looks at how that initiative has grown and changed in the last ten years. -- The Mac Observer.

10.8: Open a specific browser based on the URL

10.8: Open a specific browser based on the URL

Usually I want to open Gmail in Chrome and URLs pointing to my development server in Firefox. For everything else I use Safari.

There is this nifty free app called LinCastor that enables you to register your own handler for an URL. Although it had beed designed to register your own non-standard URL schemes, it can intercept standard http and https as well. -- Mac OS X Hints.

Apple Seeds OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 Build 13F24 to Developers

Apple Seeds OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 Build 13F24 to Developers

Apple today seeded Mavericks 10.9.5 build 13F24 to developers, just over a week after seeding the fourth OS X 10.9.5 beta, build 13F18, and more than a month after releasing OS X 10.9.4 to the public.

It is unclear what improvements the 10.9.5 update will bring to Mavericks, but it is likely to include bug fixes and stability enhancements. Apple is asking developers to focus on USB, USB Smart Cards, Graphics, Safari, Thunderbolt, and Gatekeeper. -- Mac Rumors.

How to hide a hard drive partition on your Mac

How to hide a hard drive partition on your Mac

Generally when you either partition your Mac's boot drive, or attach a secondary drive to your Mac, then provided the partition's formatting is compatible with OS X, you should see it mount and be available in the Finder. However, there may be times when you might wish to keep a partition hidden, either because you do not use it, or because it is not intended to be shown in the first place. -- MacIssues.

Apple Invents an iPhone Dock with Lightning Connector that provides a newly Designed Breaking Strength Feature

Apple Invents an iPhone Dock with Lightning Connector that provides a newly Designed Breaking Strength Feature

On August 28, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an improved method of producing a lightning connector that has a newly defined breaking strength. This new feature will be able to protect the receptacle lightning connector and/or the electronic device from damage when a force is applied to the lightning connector. One of Apple's patent figures specifically presents a new docking station utilizing this new feature. -- Patently Apple.

Revolution in Progress: The Networked Economy

Revolution in Progress: The Networked Economy

No question about it: The Networked Economy is the next economic revolution. In the coming years, it will offer unprecedented opportunities for businesses and improve the lives of billions worldwide.

In fact, the revolution is already under way.

"Over the last few decades, we've grown beyond the industrial economy to the IT economy and the Internet economy, each of which led to significant inflection points in growth and prosperity," says Vivek Bapat, SAP's global vice president for portfolio and strategic marketing. "Now we're looking at the Networked Economy." This new economy, resulting from a convergence of the economies that came before it and catalyzed by a new era of hyper-connectivity, is creating spectacular new opportunities for innovation.

And, like any revolution, the Networked Economy is going to be big. Very big. -- MIT Technology Review.

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.4

Microsoft Office 2011 14.4.4

Microsoft has updated Office 2011 to version 14.4.4, a short but sweet maintenance release that should alleviate a few frustrations. The update improves keyboard language detection in Word to prevent incorrect updates, and adds descriptions for supported account types in Outlook to help you choose correctly when configuring an Office 365 account. It also fixes an issue in PowerPoint that caused slides to display random artifacts when displayed in Presenter View mode on a monitor with a large resolution (such as a 4k monitor). (Free update from the Microsoft Download Center or through Microsoft AutoUpdate, 113 MB, release notes, 10.5+)

Apple exploring double-duty NFC, inductive charging coil for smartwatches, mobile phones

Apple exploring double-duty NFC, inductive charging coil for smartwatches, mobile phones

On the heels of a report suggesting that Apple's long-anticipated "iWatch" could be unveiled within the next two weeks, a new patent application published Thursday by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows that the company has continued to contemplate wireless charging solutions for just such a device. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents an iPhone with Sidewall Displays, an Intelligent Scrolling Feature & Much More

Apple invents an iPhone with Sidewall Displays, an Intelligent Scrolling Feature & Much More

On August 28, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals an invention regarding flexible displays and more importantly, sidewall displays built into an iDevice like an iPhone. In this report we also link to several other patent applications of interest that includes one for intelligent scrolling on a device such as an iPad that will allow users to scroll through publications both vertically and horizontally. -- Patently Apple.

Replace a Dying iPhone 5 Battery: Take Two

Replace a Dying iPhone 5 Battery: Take Two

I can't remember exactly when my iPhone 5's battery began to fail, which is often the trouble with such things. I do know that, after installing iOS 7, it seemed to die occasionally when hitting the 20--30 percent mark. What I had assumed was a software quirk was not only not fixed in a patch, but grew worse this summer. The battery had gotten so bad that it would even die in the 40 percent range, and sometimes would sporadically drop several percentage points in a few seconds.

After Adam Engst's struggles with replacing his iPhone 5 battery on his own, Josh Centers takes the Apple-approved path, and found that it can be every bit as frustrating. -- TidBITS.

Why old iPhones become sluggish over time

Why old iPhones become sluggish over time

One of the unusual consequences of being in the computer business is that I tend to own more devices than the average person. Therefore, when a family friend recently broke her iPhone 4s, I didn't hesitate to visit the Tabini Museum of Antique Handsets and Tablets in my basement and dig out my old iPhone 4 to lend to her for a few weeks. After all, with a new model all but certain to be announced by mid-September, it would make little sense to purchase a new handset before then.

After restoring the phone and upgrading it to iOS 7, I couldn't help but notice that the user interface felt a little sluggish and that the battery didn't last quite as long as it used to. It wasn't unusable, mind you, but it certainly wasn't quite the lean, mean, mobile machine I remembered. Was Apple trying to tell me something by allowing me to upgrade to an operating system that was too big for my handset's britches? -- Macworld.

How to clean up your News Feed with Facebook for iPhone and iPad

How to clean up your News Feed with Facebook for iPhone and iPad

Have a friend that's particularly vocal on Facebook that you wish you could just hide? Or how about all those groups and pages you joined that now spam your timeline with nonsense that you really don't need to see every day? As luck would have it, there's an easier way to silence them than manually visiting each page, group, or profile. While doing some digging through the settings in the Facebook for iOS app, I found an interesting section that actually lets you clean up your entire News Feed in just a few taps. You just have to know where to look! -- iMore.

Google Maps tracks every single step you take -- here's how to stop it

Google Maps tracks every single step you take -- here's how to stop it

Google Maps has completely changed the way people navigate the world. Without having to pay a dime, users are able to find almost any location on the planet, learn about it, and even navigate to it. Of course, "free" always comes at a price with Google as we have discussed at length in the past, and sometimes Google collects far more data than most people are aware. Google's various services always detail data collection in their terms and conditions, but we all know just about no one actually reads those lengthy jargon-filled disclaimers.

When it comes to Google Maps in particular, you might be shocked at how much private data the app collects -- even while it's not open. -- BGR.

How to Block and Report Spam in Messages on the iPad and iPhone

How to Block and Report Spam in Messages on the iPad and iPhone

Have you received any spam messages on your iPad recently? There have been reports of a handful of spam attacks on iOS users' devices. Wired published an article earlier this month claiming that Apple's Messages app is "being taken over by spammers." It turns out it isn't the apocalypse that Wired made it out to be. However, Messages spam is real. I have not personally experienced the issue as of yet, but I do have friends who have noted the issue to me recently.

While there isn't much we can do on the user end to stop spammers from bombarding our Messages app, we can at least let Apple know it is happening and block the sender from ever being able to bug us (from that particular ID) ever again. -- PadGadget.

How Computer Security Is Like Birth Control (it doesn't always work as planned)

How Computer Security Is Like Birth Control (it doesn't always work as planned)

Hardly a week goes by without a headline on the news about yet another security breach. If it's not the U.S. government, it's a giant retailers. If it's not a bank, it's a company that stores credit card numbers and account information.

The answer to the question, "Is nothing online secure anymore?" reminds me of birth control. It doesn't always work as planned. -- PixoBebo.

Indiana University Researchers Get $1 Million Grant To Study Memes

Indiana University Researchers Get $1 Million Grant To Study Memes

Indiana University is receiving nearly $1 million in federal grant money to investigate the genesis, spread, and demise of Internet memes. The grant from the National Science Foundation awards four Indiana researchers $919,917 to for a project called Truthy that will, as the grant's abstract explains, "explore why some ideas cause viral explosions while others are quickly forgotten." (And yes, in case you're wondering, the name was inspired by Stephen Colbert's neologism "truthiness.") The government-funded research is aimed at identifying which memes are organic and which ones are mere astroturf. "While the vast majority of memes arise in a perfectly organic manner, driven by the complex mechanisms of life on the Web, some are engineered by the shady machinery of high-profile congressional campaigns," Truthy's About page explains. -- DailyDot.

Sorry to have missed you yesterday. Anyone who says there is better living through chemistry, is not telling the truth. -mam

August 27 Wednesday's News

 

Known iOS auto-call feature sparks concerns about unintended dialings

Known iOS auto-call feature sparks concerns about unintended dialings

Technical oversights on the part of some of the iOS ecosystem's most prominent developers -- including Facebook and Google --?could allow attackers to exploit a documented iOS feature that allows apps to initiate phone calls without a prompt, spurring reminders that iPhone owners should be careful what they tap on. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to restrict CloudKit services to latest iOS 8, OS X Yosemite betas ahead of launch

Apple to restrict CloudKit services to latest iOS 8, OS X Yosemite betas ahead of launch

In an email sent out on Monday, Apple informed developers that upcoming iCloud-based features like iCloud Drive, Mail Drop and more will require iOS 8 beta 5 or OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 5 or later to operate. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent embeds physical iPhone control, feedback components beneath flexible display

Apple patent embeds physical iPhone control, feedback components beneath flexible display

In a new patent discovered on Tuesday, Apple details a flexible mobile device screen that deforms to reveal buttons hidden beneath its surface, accepts sound and pressure input and provides haptic feedback. -- AppleInsider.

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

Ohio lawmakers want to limit the teaching of the scientific process

Science educators have recognized that teaching science as a large compendium of facts, without reference to the scientific process and theories that bind them together, simply leads to uninterested and uninformed students. So it's a bit mind-boggling to discover that an Ohio state legislator is attempting to block educators from teaching anything about the scientific process. And for good measure, the bill's sponsor threw politics and creationism into the mix. -- Ars Technica.

Why the kill switch law can make iPhone theft obsolete

Why the kill switch law can make iPhone theft obsolete

Governor Jerry Brown signed into law State Sen. Mark Leno's Smartphone Theft Prevention Act (Senate Bill 962). The law will affect any smartphone manufactured on or after July 1, 2015.

There's some reason to hope that the kill switch will do for smartphones what sophisticated alarm systems did for cars: make stealing them less appealing than a pair of leg warmers. Car thefts plummeted 96 percent in New York City when engine immobilizer systems came into play. -- Cult of Mac.

Can't Wait for OS X Yosemite? Disable Mavericks' Dashboard

Can't Wait for OS X Yosemite? Disable Mavericks' Dashboard

OS X Yosemite is coming soon, and it moves the widgets from the Dashboard, which will be no more, to the Notification Center. But if you can't wait to get rid of it in Mavericks, John Martellaro shows how. -- The Mac Observer.

How to share files between user accounts in OS X

How to share files between user accounts in OS X

OS X is designed to isolate users' files from each other, so while you can have multiple user accounts on your Mac, out of convenience you might end up using services like e-mail, Dropbox, sending files through iMessage, or using other online options as a means of transferring files to other user accounts.

Even though these options can be convenient, they do use third-party solutions that are entirely unnecessary, and furthermore are limited in bandwidth (and sometimes have file size limitations) that can hinder instances where you might need to copy large files or large amounts of files to another user on your system. If you need to copy files to another user account, then you can do so using three local services in OS X. -- MacIssues.

Fix iPhone not connecting to AirPort Wi-Fi networks

Fix iPhone not connecting to AirPort Wi-Fi networks

While there are many reasons why an iPhone will not connect to an AirPort base station or other Wi-Fi network, one may simply be an odd configuration of the AirPort's password in the iPhone's settings, but sometimes you might check or re-check your password and even though it is entered correctly, it may still give you errors and not connect. -- MacIssues.

Apple Wins a Patent for an e-Clapperboard for TV & Film Industry

Apple Wins a Patent for an e-Clapperboard for TV & Film Industry

On August 26, 2014, The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a granted patent that covers Apple's work on an e-clapperboard for the TV and Film industry. Jeff Roenning, a 13 year veteran engineer at Apple was once an assistant editor at Motion Picture Editors Guild. This granted patent was obviously inspired by his experience in that field. Although originally designed to work with an iPhone, the iPad is a much better fit for this type of work. -- Patently Apple.

Apple has been Granted Two New Liquid Metal Patents

Apple has been Granted Two New Liquid Metal Patents

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover two of Apple's latest patent wins related to liquid metal that could one day be used for future Apple devices or parts of devices relating to displays including a TV, the iWatch, iPad, Apple TV, iPod, keyboard, MacBook Pro and beyond. Although both patents are highly technical, I'm sure that there are those who will still want to investigate these patents in depth. -- Patently Apple.

Apple was Granted 57 Patents Today Covering a Future Shopping App, Multitouch, lots of Design Patents and More

Apple was Granted 57 Patents Today Covering a Future Shopping App, Multitouch, lots of Design Patents and More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 57 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we mainly cover Apple's possible future shopping app and briefly touch on a revised multitouch patent. We also cover several new design patents issued to Apple today. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10

BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10

Bare Bones Software has released BBEdit 10.5.12 and TextWrangler 4.5.10 with but a single change added to the two text editors -- implementation of new code signing procedures that will ensure compatibility with "future releases of OS X" (in particular, the upcoming OS X Yosemite). If you're running the public beta of Yosemite, you'll definitely want to update to these latest versions. ($49.99 for BBEdit, free update, 12.5 MB, release notes; free for TextWrangler, 9.4 MB, release notes)

Review: Parallels Desktop 10 brings even tighter OS X/Windows integration, overall performance improvements

Review: Parallels Desktop 10 brings even tighter OS X/Windows integration, overall performance improvements

Parallels Desktop has long been one of the go-to applications for using your Mac to virtualize a wide variety of operating systems, and many considered its previous version 9 as more than sufficient for getting this job done. While the software shining point has always been its ability to run Windows truly parallel to the standard Mac OS X desktop, this version of Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac takes multiple strides forward, making it even easier than before to incorporate Windows-only applications--or applications from other x86 operating systems including Android, Chrome, Linux, etc.--into your Mac-based workflow.

Perhaps most importantly, Parallels again ups the ante in speed both in launching and runtime, turning virtualization into a native-feeling experience. -- 9to5Mac.

Where's the best place to trade in an iPhone? $400+ offers compared at Apple, Amazon, NextWorth, Gazelle and more

Where's the best place to trade in an iPhone? $400+ offers compared at Apple, Amazon, NextWorth, Gazelle and more

We're 2 short weeks away from Apple's iPhone 6 announcement and that of course means it is almost time to trade in your current but now outdated tiny iPhone 3/4/5/s/c. Giving your non-sapphire 4-incher to a friend or relative? That's nice of you but for those in the US who prefer cold hard cash, there are lots of great options out there. -- 9to5Mac.

These are the best messaging apps on iOS

These are the best messaging apps on iOS

I recently watched The Lady try to convince a friend of ours to download WhatsApp. The friend is moving to the United Kingdom, and we want to stay in touch. Our friend tried to say that email would do the job, but we all know that will never work.

Our friend doesn't want WhatsApp (maybe because it's owned by Facebook), and she doesn't own an iPhone, so iMessage is out. Thankfully, there are plenty of free and good alternatives. Some are more secure, some have more features, and none of them is owned by Facebook.

Let's take a look at what's available and how these very different messaging apps compare on a number of key features. -- Cult of Mac.

How to fix disabled audio in OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta

How to fix disabled audio in OS X 10.10 Yosemite beta

Apple launched, almost a week ago, the second public beta build of OX 10.10 Yosemite, which, among other improvements, includes a healthy dose of bug fixes. But, for some reason, the company has not yet addressed a glaring sound problem, where the audio stops working until a restart is performed. It is likely this occurs in the developer-only builds too. -- BetaNews.

How to Make Your Mac Talk Using the Say Command in Terminal

How to Make Your Mac Talk Using the Say Command in Terminal

Ever since the introduction of the first Macintosh computer in 1984, text-to-speech has been a major feature of the platform. While the Mac's speech quality and capabilities have increased greatly since then, there's still an old school way to make your Mac talk: the Terminal.

To use speech in Terminal, open a new Terminal window and type say followed by a space and your desired word or phrase, and then press the Return key. -- TekRevue.

Why Don't We Use This Browser?

Why Don't We Use This Browser?

There is little question that we live in the 'golden age of browsers.' Every major browser renders webpages fast, with similar results, and has plenty of user-centric features.

Each of the major browsers has a distinct personality; fast, more secure, plenty of add-ons, or default. There is one browser that does not fall into the 'major browser' category that has been around for years yet is seldom used. Why? -- Mac 360.

iPhone Killswitch: How to Enable Activation Lock

iPhone Killswitch: How to Enable Activation Lock

On Monday, California mandated that all smartphones ship with a killswitch installed and turned on by default. That's very nice, but not as nice as Apple's iPhone killswitch.

For example every iPhone, iPad or iPod touch running iOS 7, which as released in October 2013, already has killswitch technology built in. Here is how to turn on Apple's iPhone killswitch feature, aka Activation Lock. -- FairerPlatform.

7 ingenious iPhone camera tricks you really need to try

7 ingenious iPhone camera tricks you really need to try

So you like using your iPhone to take pictures -- but are you really using your iPhone camera to its fullest potential? A new video featuring photographer Lorenz Holder shows you seven new ways to make your iPhone 5s camera more useful than ever before by giving you new tips and tricks for taking photos that will wow your friends. -- BGR.

The top iOS 8 features for business users

The top iOS 8 features for business users

When it shows up in the coming weeks, Apple's iOS 8 is set to bring several new features, including its HealthKit and HomeKit platforms, to the iPhone and iPad. Many of the advances are consumer-oriented and focused on creating a seamless experience across iOS devices and Macs running the forthcoming OS X Yosemite.

Even with that consumer focus, however, there are some incredible features for business users in iOS 8. -- Macworld.

Why Apple Builds In Usability Differences And Similarities To The Mac, iPhone, And iPad

Why Apple Builds In Usability Differences And Similarities To The Mac, iPhone, And iPad

There is little doubt that Apple would like customers to purchase a Mac, an iPhone, and an iPad, and each product's capabilities-- features and functions-- are cleverly positioned to optimize those multi-device sales. That explains why many, many Apple customers have all three devices. Each has functionality that is different enough from the other two to be beneficial as a standalone device, or in concert with the other two devices.

Each device provides great usability and value as a standalone device, but works in a blended harmony with the other two in such a way as to entice customers to purchase one of each. -- PixoBebo.

August 25 Monday's News

 

Apple activates iPhone 5 battery replacement program, to swap out affected parts for free

Apple activates iPhone 5 battery replacement program, to swap out affected parts for free

Apple on Friday announced a free replacement program for iPhone 5 batteries after discovering certain units sold during a five-month period after the product's launch in 2012 contain faulty components.

As noted by the program's dedicated webpage, Apple discovered a "very small percentage" of iPhone 5 handsets may suffer from unexpectedly short battery life due to an unannounced issue presumably related to manufacturing.

According to Apple, iPhone 5 units affected by the problem come from a batch sold between the product's launch in September 2012 through January 2013.

Owners who purchased their handset within that time period and are experiencing shortened battery life symptoms can check if their unit is eligible for replacement via Apple's website. A serial number is needed to process the request.

As with past replacement programs, users with affected iPhones will be required to take their handset in to an Apple Authorized Service Provider, Apple Store or send it off to Apple for examination prior to service in order to verify eligibility.

Aside from determining whether an iPhone contains one of the known-faulty batteries, the phone must be in working order to be eligible for a part swap. Any damage that would make replacement of the battery difficult, like a cracked screen, would first need to be fixed, meaning the swap-out could come at a cost.

For now, the initiative is limited to users in the U.S. and China, though coverage will be expanded to other countries on Aug. 29. Apple is extending the program to users with affected iPhone 5 batteries for two years after first retail sale or until Mar. 1, 2015, whichever provides longer coverage.

The program's start comes just weeks before Apple is expected to reveal a next-generation iPhone lineup on Sept. 9.

OS X Finder: Customize Your Desktop

OS X Finder: Customize Your Desktop

Did you know that you've got all kinds of options for how your Mac's Desktop looks and behaves? It's true. You can make the icons that appear there much larger or smaller, increase or decrease the space between them, and even force the items on your Desktop to sort themselves into rows. All of this magic is the subject of today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Week of Who, Day Five: Curse of Fatal Death

Week of Who, Day Five: Curse of Fatal Death

Week of Who concludes today with The Curse of Fatal Death, a special produced as part of a telethon for the Red Nose Day charity. This is a notable piece of Doctor Who history because it makes more than a few connections between the old series and the new, notable among them being that the "episode" was written by now current executive producer of Doctor Who, Steven Moffat. It was part of the Red Nose Day telethon in 1999, and has been affectionately adopted as part of the Whoniverse. Like a ridiculous, but lovable uncle, if your uncle was Rowan Atkinson. Enjoy the new series! -- The Mac Observer.

Change and manage Mail's New Mail sound

Change and manage Mail's New Mail sound

If you use OS X Mail, as with most e-mail clients you will hear a small new mail notification sound when you receive new messages. If you do not like the default sound that is configured for Mail, then you can change it. Not only can you change to use one of Apple's built-in sounds, but you can use any sound bite you want. -- MacIssues.

An Aperture User Tries Lightroom

An Aperture User Tries Lightroom

Given the unfortunate news about Apple not actively developing Aperture anymore, I decided to try Lightroom while shooting in Svalbard. I'm trying to figure out if I should keep using Aperture for the immediate future and wait for Photos to be more fleshed out or to switch to Lightroom now and not have to migrate even more photos later (I have terabytes of digital photos from 12+ years of shooting digital cameras and scans of slides about 20 years ago managed in Aperture). The short answer is that I'm still unsure, I'm leaning towards sticking with Aperture, but some small changes to Lightroom (or lack of improvements to Photos) could make me change my mind. -- Josh Anon.

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac Review

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac Review

Parallels announced the tenth version of Parallels Desktop for the Mac. The new version goes further where version 9 stopped. There is more integration with OS X, almost completely blurring the line between the two with a "Reveal in Windows" context menu option, the ability to share with Mac native sharing features and 'iMessage' from within Windows and have the Mac Dock show an "unread email" indicator for the Windows version of Microsoft Outlook. -- IT.Enquirer.

Mastering Video Recording & Editing With QuickTime

Mastering Video Recording & Editing With QuickTime

For every one of your needs, there is a tool out there that can help you fulfill it. The capability of these tools evolve over time and price tags. For such tools, the functions of time and cost are inversely proportional (with all technology really). Finding tools to capture, edit and render videos for free without an annoying watermark or resolution limit was a distant dream 5 years ago, now you can do that from your Quicktime player and not lose a modicum of quality. Following is a guide on how to put your Quicktime X to best use. -- AddictiveTips.

OS X Yosemite: How to Use the New, More Powerful Spotlight Search

OS X Yosemite: How to Use the New, More Powerful Spotlight Search

Apple's latest desktop operating system, OS X Yosemite, won't officially come out until sometime this fall. But now that its public beta is open, both developers and a large number of Mac owners are able to use a preview version of the landmark OS.

For those who've just started using the beta, or are just anticipating its launch later this year, we've got some tips on how to best take advantage of the redesigned OS and its many new features. In this edition, we take on Apple's systemwide search, Spotlight. -- Wired.

Encoding miracles and missing audiobook chapters

Encoding miracles and missing audiobook chapters

It's easy to forget that some of the technology we use is, to paraphrase a great author, nearly indistinguishable from voodoo. One reader wrote in asking for some clarification about lossless compression, and I explain the magic in this week's column. I also look at a question about iOS device backups, and one about missing audiobook chapters in iOS. -- Macworld.

Quicken Disses the Mac One More Time

Quicken Disses the Mac One More Time

It is well known that the Mac version of Quicken has long trailed behind the Windows version. Why this should be so is anyone's guess. The price of Quicken 2015 for Mac is $74.99, same as Quicken Deluxe for Windows, a mid-priced version. On the basis of price alone, customers have a right to expect comparable products.

But that's not quite how Quicken works.

Indeed, the latest version of the app actually dispenses with features that existed in previous Mac versions. -- The Tech Night Owl.

The Great Upgrade Freakout (and how to deal with it)

The Great Upgrade Freakout (and how to deal with it)

There's no stopping change.

And there's no stopping the reaction of a tech client who might be less than enthralled with whatever necessary changes you had to incorporate to save their data, upgrade their Mac and/or get their Mac working again. Yes, their computer is back, but something is either slightly or radically different and this is sticking in their craw. A user interface has changed in the new version of Microsoft Office, they liked the old version of iTunes better, or they didn't expect those new icons in that new version of Mac OS X that you had to install to make a print driver or application work. -- Macworld.

How To Tell If Apple Owes You A New iPhone 5 Battery

How To Tell If Apple Owes You A New iPhone 5 Battery

If you're currently using an Apple iPhone 5 and experiencing significantly shorter battery life, don't worry -- it's not just you. Fortunately, the company has noticed and is offering to replace certain iPhone 5 batteries for free. But the catch is not all iPhone 5 units are eligible. -- International Business Times .

How to view desktop versions of websites on an iPhone

How to view desktop versions of websites on an iPhone

Generally, websites will configure their look based on the kind of browser you're using--specifically, the browser agent. When you visit a site, your browser reports its identity. If it identifies itself as the desktop version of Safari, for example, you see one view. If it reveals that it's the version of Safari used by iOS devices, you may see a different layout that better suits small screens. Some sites will allow you to choose something other than the default view, but this isn't a feature implemented web-side. -- Macworld.

The 10 apps every college student needs to have

The 10 apps every college student needs to have

Going off to college for the first time is an exciting experience, but it can also be a stressful one. There are books to buy, exams to take, friends to make--the list goes on. The life of a high schooler living at home is quite a bit different than that of a college freshman living on his or her own for the first time. The good news is that you can make the transition a lot smoother with some useful digital tools. The apps below will help you with everything from saving money to finding food to getting to class on time. -- TechHive.

August 22 Friday's News

 

Apple's interest in reversible USB plugs detailed in new patent application

Apple's interest in reversible USB plugs detailed in new patent application

While a reversible "Type-A" USB connector may not meet the specifications of a certified USB cable, Apple has nevertheless shown interest in building one, a newly published patent application reveals. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Public Beta 2, new iTunes 12 beta for testing

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Public Beta 2, new iTunes 12 beta for testing

Apple on Thursday provided members of its public beta program the second test build of OS X Yosemite, while a new build of iTunes 12 for Yosemite is also available.

OS X Yosemite Beta 2 is now available to download from the Mac App Store for members of the OS X Beta Program. The public release comes a few days after OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6 was issued to registered members of Apple's development community. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates iMovie for Mac, iWork suite for OS X and iOS with minor bug fixes

Apple updates iMovie for Mac, iWork suite for OS X and iOS with minor bug fixes

In what appears to be a routine maintenance update, Apple on Thursday rolled out minor iWork app point releases for both Mac and iOS, bringing stability improvements and bug fixes to the company's multi-platform productivity suite. -- AppleInsider.

Buy an iPhone 5s for $79 or iPhone 5c for $0.79 at Walmart's iPhone fire sale

Buy an iPhone 5s for $79 or iPhone 5c for $0.79 at Walmart's iPhone fire sale

It's that time of year again! The weeks before a new iPhone launch are always marked by big box retailers trying to clear their stock of the soon-to-be-older models at steep discounts.

Right now, that big box retailer is Walmart, who is discounting the 16GB iPhone 5c to just $0.97, and the 16GB iPhone 5s to $79, with a two-year contract. -- Cult of Mac.

Soon you'll be able to stick iBeacons on anything

Soon you'll be able to stick iBeacons on anything

Estimote makes iBeacons in little polygon shapes with cool colors and custom designs. Designed to communicate over low-energy Bluetooth, Estimote Beacons can be used to alert nearby smartphones of a specific deal when they enter a shop, for example. -- Cult of Mac.

Week of Who, Day Four: Inspector Spacetime

Week of Who, Day Four: Inspector Spacetime

Day Four of my Week Of Who commences with a small Doctor tribute that has snowballed. On the TV show Community, a couple of characters are obsessed with the show Inspector Spacetime, a British show about a guy who travels through time and space in a phone booth. NBC decided not to make the show, so the actor cast as Inspector Spacetime started a web series. NBC would not let him continue, so he started a different show called Untitled Web Series About A Space Traveler Who Can Also Travel Through Time. It's fun to watch and clever references make it even more enjoyable. -- The Mac Observer.

What apps are killing your battery life?

What apps are killing your battery life?

While Apple touts 7-9 hour battery lives for its various portable products, MacBook owners will know that sometimes this simply is not the case. Even though you might not be doing any active work in power-hungry programs, you might see your battery life plummet and only last a couple of hours at most.

If this happens, then there are several things you can do, with one quick option being to check on what possible programs you have running that might be drawing excessive energy from your Mac. -- MacIssues.

Apple Invents an Intelligent Home Screen for iOS

Apple Invents an Intelligent Home Screen for iOS

On August 21, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals the addition of a new intelligent dimension to a future iOS Home Screen. Let's say that there's an app that you'll need to access quickly like an airline ticket that's currently buried in a folder on page 4 of your Home Screen. In the future, iOS will know to automatically bring that app or digital ticket up to your starting Home Page based on your proximity to the airport or concert hall so that there's no fumbling around at the gate. Although it's a simple idea, it represents the kind of convenience that we've just come to expect from Apple in making our everyday digital lives a little easier as time goes on. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Introduces Sensor-Assisted Location Technology that will combat the Problems associated with Urban Canyons

Apple Introduces Sensor-Assisted Location Technology that will combat the Problems associated with Urban Canyons

Earlier today we posted a report titled "Apple Advances Automatic Vehicle Location Services for Parking." It was one of three new location based patent filings revealed today by the US Patent Office. In a third filing today titled "Sensor-Assisted Location Fix," Apple describes location scenarios beyond parking and discusses location-centric problems and solutions associated with driving in urban canyons, which is a powerful image when you think of cities like New York, Hong Kong, Osaka, Beijing, Toronto, Vancouver, Chicago and others that have massive buildings in their downtown business cores. -- Patently Apple.

How Apple is Winning the PC Market

How Apple is Winning the PC Market

Ed Bott of ZDNet argues that Apple is winning the PC market, or at least the only segment of it that still makes money. Though less than 6 percent of last year's PC sales belonged to Apple, Bott estimates that Apple's MacBook Air owns 30 percent of the "premium ultramobile" market, which comprises high-end, lightweight machines, like ultrabooks and PC tablets, such as the Microsoft Surface. That market is highly profitable, and is expected to grow by 50 percent this year alone.

Apple patent filing hints at using Siri for searches on a Mac

Apple patent filing hints at using Siri for searches on a Mac

Apple has filed for a patent (number 20140236986) for "natural language document search." The goal, it seems, to have Siri, Apple's personal digital assistant, help you find documents and data you're searching for -- on a Mac as well as an iOS device. -- Apple Daily Report.

Learn these four oft-overlooked iOS 7 tips

Learn these four oft-overlooked iOS 7 tips

iOS 8 is going to be coming out in a few weeks and with it will come some cool new features. But before we get there it's worth your while to take a look at some existing iOS 7 features that you may not be using, but should. -- Macworld.

What Apple Can Do To Your iPhone And iPad That You May Not Want?

What Apple Can Do To Your iPhone And iPad That You May Not Want?

Apple builds in a number of safety controls that help iPhone and iPad users protect their data. Lose your iOS device and you can wipe it clean (mostly).

What you may not know is that Apple has a way to prevent you from using an application that you paid for and used. That means Apple can prevent a select app from running on your iPhone or iPad if the company so chooses. Here's the problem. -- Mac 360.

Future Hack: New Cyber Security Tool Predicts Breaches Before They Happen

Future Hack: New Cyber security Tool Predicts Breaches Before They Happen

A new research paper (PDF) outlines security software that scans and scrapes web sites (past and present) to identify patterns leading up to a security breach. It then accurately predicts what websites will be hacked in the future. The tool has an accuracy of up to 66%. Quoting: "The algorithm is designed to automatically detect whether a Web server is likely to become malicious in the future by analyzing a wide array of the site's characteristics: For example, what software does the server run? What keywords are present? How are the Web pages structured? If your website has a whole lot in common with another website that ended up hacked, the classifier will predict a gloomy future. The classifier itself always updates and evolves, the researchers wrote. It can 'quickly adapt to emerging threats.'" -- The Daily Dot.

August 21 Thursday's News

 

OS X 10.9.5 (13f18) Breaks Parallels Desktop 9 for Mac

OS X 10.5 (13f18) Breaks Parallels Desktop 9 for Mac

The latest update to OS X 10.9.5 keeps Parallels Desktop 9 for Mac from starting. It ran under the previous 10.9.5 update and of course it works on 10.9.4.

Word on the web is that Parallels Desktop 10 fixes this issue on OS X 10.9.5. A patch for Parallels Desktop 9 is expected but is not yet available. -- Parallels

Apple releases Safari 7.1 and 6.2, OS X Server 3.2 betas to developers

Apple releases Safari 7.1 and 6.2, OS X Server 3.2 betas to developers

Apple on Wednesday seeded the latest Safari 7.1 and 6.2 beta 3 builds and OS X Server 3.2 to developers, asking testers to focus on AutoFill, Smart Search and extensions, among other new features.

Coming nearly one month after the last betas were released, Apple's Safari 7.1 for OS X 10.9 Mavericks and Safari 6.2 for OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion again points developers toward password and credit card AutoFill features introduced in "Beta 2. -- AppleInsider.

Walmart discounts 16GB iPhone 5c to 97 cents, 16GB iPhone 5s to $79 for 90 days

Walmart discounts 16GB iPhone 5c to 97 cents, 16GB iPhone 5s to $79 for 90 days

Walmart on Wednesday announced an aggressive 90-day iPhone sale that shaves $20 off Apple's 16GB iPhone 5s and about $28 off the 16GB iPhone 5c, bringing the latter model's up-front cost down to less than a dollar. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invention helps iPhone users find their parked car despite poor cell, GPS reception

Apple invention helps iPhone users find their parked car despite poor cell, GPS reception

A pair of Apple patent applications discovered on Thursday describe a system that automatically determines when and where a user parks their car, and later directs them back to the vehicle without requiring a data connection or GPS signal. -- AppleInsider.

Models challenge temperature reconstruction of last 12,000 years

Models challenge temperature reconstruction of last 12,000 years

Climate records, like tree rings or ice cores, are invaluable archives of past climate, but they each reflect their local conditions. If you really want a global average for some time period, you're going to have to combine many reliable records from around the world and do your math very carefully. -- Ars Technica.

Take quick a look at OS X Yosemite Beta 6 in action

Take quick a look at OS X Yosemite Beta 6 in action

Just a week after Beta 5 for OS X Yosemite was released, Beta 6 is already here.

In today's video we take a quick look at the latest changes to Yosemite in action as we draw ever closer to it's official release. -- Cult of Mac.

3 Handy Tips to Make Preview More Productive

3 Handy Tips to Make Preview More Productive

Melissa Holt thinks Preview is pretty much the bee's knees when it comes to viewing and annotating PDFs. So in this Quick Tip, she's going to talk about three of her favorite tricks for using it. She probably won't explain her love of antiquated phrases like "the bee's knees," though, so don't hold your breath for that. -- The Mac Observer.

Setting Up an iOS 7 On-Demand VPN

Setting Up an iOS 7 On-Demand VPN

This is a "how to" article about configuring an iPhone to get it to activate a VPN "on-demand" connection according to some specific rules. My overall goal was to have the iPhone automatically create a VPN connection to our network and route all the iPhone's networking traffic through our network whenever the iPhone was not directly connected to our network via one of our network's WiFi connection points. -- Derman Enterprises.

Intuit releases redesigned Quicken 2015 for Mac, first new version in 7 years

Intuit releases redesigned Quicken 2015 for Mac, first new version in 7 years

Financial software firm Intuit on Thursday released Quicken 2015 for Mac, the first new version of the company's flagship personal finance and accounting suite to make its way to Apple's desktop platform in over seven years.

The new version of Quicken maintains many of the features found in previous releases, though some have been omitted. Among those missing are the ability to create a 12-month budget, show loan amortization, and pay bills directly within the application. -- AppleInsider.

16 tips for Mac users who must use Windows

16 tips for Mac users who must use Windows

I was forced to use a Windows PC the other day. It was a shock, particularly because search engines generally generate tips for switching from Windows to Mac when queried on this. It made me suspect Mac users may sometimes need a little help when they use Windows because they can't get to a Mac. I assembled these short tips to help such temporary migrants. -- Computerworld.

Doctors Raise Concerns Over Apple HealthKit

Doctors Raise Concerns Over Apple HealthKit

'One thing that is a problem is the purported accuracy of the data,' explains Gunasekera. 'Whilst having this data could be of use, a doctor is unable to guarantee that whichever blood pressure monitor, glucose monitor or fitness tracker a patient is using will be accurate. Because of this, it's unlikely that we'll ever be at a point where a doctor will take a look at your phone and be able to give a diagnosis.' -- Forbes.

Fix the iPhone's most common problems in 60 seconds

Fix the iPhone's most common problems in 60 seconds

Our iPhones are trusty sidekicks helping us save the day with every task we perform with them, but sometimes they meet their weaknesses. While our devices can't be perfect all the time, periodically home buttons become unresponsive and other common errors can occur with them.

In today's video, take a look at how you can fix an array of different iPhone problems in just 60 quick seconds. Find out the best way to fix an unresponsive home button, a water damaged iPhone and even clogged headphone/charging ports. -- Cult of Mac.

August 20 Wednesday's News

 

Apple's sixth beta of iOS 8 is for carrier testing only - report

Apple's sixth beta of iOS 8 is for carrier testing only - report

While developers were not supplied a new beta of iOS 8 this week alongside the latest pre-release version of OS X Yosemite, Apple's carrier partners were in fact provided iOS 8 beta 6 for testing prior to the release of the golden master. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates pro-level video suite with fixes for Final Cut Pro X, Compressor and Motion

Apple updates pro-level video suite with fixes for Final Cut Pro X, Compressor and Motion

Apple on Tuesday rolled out a point update for its Final Cut Pro for Mac professional level video editing software including a bug fix for Blu-ray handling, which was also applied to new versions of Compressor and Motion. -- AppleInsider.

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac launches with OS X 10.10 Yosemite support, speed boosts, more

Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac launches with OS X 10.10 Yosemite support, speed boosts, more

Parallels on Wednesday announced the release of Parallels Desktop 10 for Mac with built-in support for Apple's upcoming OS X 10.10 Yosemite, faster Windows app performance, better battery life and immediate availability for existing users. -- AppleInsider.

5 Great iPhone Accessories for Runners and Hikers

5 Great iPhone Accessories for Runners and Hikers

Your iPhone probably goes pretty much everywhere with you, and that includes fitness-related activities like walking, running and hiking. That magical slab of glass and metal is already capable of tracking and logging what you're doing, but there are some great accessories and apps that can make your workout or leisurely stroll even better. Read on to see a few of Jeff's favorites. -- The Mac Observer.

Week of Who, Day Two: Doctor Stew

Week of Who, Day Two: Doctor Stew

For Week of Who, day two, I offer you an amusing web series called Doctor Stew. It's mostly Doctor Who themed, but it's got a fair amount of Family Guy animation style and humor. It's not Stewie as the Doctor or anything, it just rhymed and made for a catchier title. Keep in mind if Family Guy is not your scene, Doctor Stew won't be either. Otherwise, check out the first episode below. -- The Mac Observer.

Expand all collapsed items in a list in OS X

Expand all collapsed items in a list in OS X

There are many times in OS X when you will come across items organized into list, be it in Finder windows where you might have List View selected, or Mail messages that are organized into conversations. You might also find this in panels like the Finder info window's various categories, or in places in the system preferences. If you regularly use these lists, then you might benefit from a little trick to help reveal or conceal items in them. -- MacIssues.

Apple was Granted 48 Patents Today Covering Percussion Gestures, Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro & More

Apple was Granted 48 Patents Today Covering Percussion Gestures, Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent wins for percussion gestures for GarageBand and Surround Sound for the MacBook Pro. Additionally, we cover three of Apple's latest design patents and wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

In Defense of Email

In Defense of Email

Email is far from hip these days. Pundits and investors salivate over ways to replace it with something more modern, but The Atlantic's Alexis Madrigal argues that it's still the best part of the Internet. Despite its many flaws, it's universal, decentralized, and isn't commercial. In fact, Madrigal argues that it may be users' best hope of taking the Internet back from large tech firms. -- The Atlantic.

Security breach is not reason for Gatekeeper app signing changes

Security breach is not reason for Gatekeeper app signing changes

Yesterday there were a few claims going around that Apple's recent change to Gatekeeper app signing for developers was the result of a Dev Center security breach. TUAW reported yesterday on a few random tweets and others picked up the story. As you'd probably expect, we have some good news: It's not true...

We've now confirmed with sources close to the situation that there is no truth to the rumors and that a Dev Center breach was not the reason behind the Gatekeeper app signing changes. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple activates screen sharing over iMessage accounts in latest Yosemite beta

Apple activates screen sharing over iMessage accounts in latest Yosemite beta

In June, we noted that Apple is adding a handy new feature to the upcoming OS X Yosemite: the ability for iMessage/Apple ID users to screen share via the Messages app. Screen sharing was a hallmark of early versions of Apple's Mac "iChat" application, but it has always required an AOL Instant Messenger (AIM), Gmail, Jabber, or Yahoo account. With Yosemite, users can have the same screen sharing experience with just an iMessage/FaceTime/or Apple ID account. Apple activated the feature in this week's beta release, and it brings some new tricks not found in earlier implementations. -- 9to5Mac.

HealthKit integration in iOS 8 will pull in billions for Apple

HealthKit integration in iOS 8 will pull in billions for Apple

While there's no doubt that a TV or watch from Apple would be interest and disruptive -- and I'm in no way ruling out such devices in the future -- the health related additions to iOS will be far more beneficial to Apple in the short to medium term. -- ZDNet.

What Apple's new content delivery network means for net neutrality, and for you

What Apple's new content delivery network means for net neutrality, and for you

In late July, Apple reportedly brought online its own content distribution network (CDN), a way of pushing data files closer to end-users. A CDN can reduce the number of hops and the amount of intermediate bandwidth required to speed files and data--like an iOS update, a streaming movie, or a software download--between the content provider and the recipient.

All of that can be a huge benefit to the ordinary user, but it's not all upside. Given that a CDN either connects its networks directly with major Internet service providers (ISPs) or co-locates server hardware within ISP network operations, they can also raise concerns in terms of net neutrality. And Apple's venture is no different. -- Macworld.

Problems with Windows 8 in Boot Camp 5

Problems with Windows 8 in Boot Camp 5

Wesley Heiss was having problems with Windows 8 on his MacBook Pro, so he updated Boot Camp to the version that Apple says works with Windows 8. (See our report to see which Boot Camp 5 version works for your Mac.) Unfortunately, he receives an error message saying that only Windows 7 is support. -- MacWindows.

Parallels Desktop 9 failing to load under latest Yosemite preview

Parallels Desktop 9 failing to load under latest Yosemite preview

Yesterday's Developer Preview 6 release of OS X Yosemite is breaking Parallels Desktop 9, users complain. After DP6 is installed, Desktop 9 is simply refusing to run. The issue appears to involve the dispatcher service failing to load, as a temporary solution involves forcing the service to start via a Terminal command.

Desktop 9 is a Mac app that lets users run Windows apps without having to boot into a separate partition. Given its popularity, fixing compatibility will likely be a high priority for Apple before the next developer preview is released, or at least before the gold master. -- MacNN.

OS X Yosemite Beta (DP6) Review: Your MacBook Is About To Get EPIC

OS X Yosemite Beta (DP6) Review: Your MacBook Is About To Get EPIC

A few weeks ago I reviewed the first public beta of OS X Yosemite (that's now over on Page 2), and if that early release was anything to go by, the next version of Apple's desktop operating system is going to be EPIC. But while there's only been one public release of the OS X Yosemite beta, there have actually been multiple releases for developers. Called Developer Previews (DP), these releases contain more advanced features than are available to the public. And Apple just dropped the latest build -- DP6 -- into the hands of its developers yesterday. -- Know Your Mobile.

You can legally unlock your smartphone -- so now what?

You can legally unlock your smartphone -- so now what?

Smartphone owners, cast off your chains. Your beloved iPhone, your cherished Galaxy, your esteemed Lumia is no longer bound to one carrier forever. Earlier, this month it became legal to unlock your mobile phone--President Obama's signature says so--ushering in a new era of more competition, as customers can easily switch carriers. Say goodbye to exorbitant roaming fees when you travel abroad. Say hello to greater freedom for selling that old, unused smartphone that's no longer linked to a lone carrier for life. And get ready for more choice, as competing carriers win our allegiance through all manner of innovative service offerings. -- TechHive.

How to restrict Game Center with parental controls on your iPhone or iPad

How to restrict Game Center with parental controls on your iPhone or iPad

Game Center comes built into every iPhone and iPad and lets you play multiplayer games against your friends. You can also compete for rankings and unlock achievements. However, if you don't want small children adding people without your consent or playing games with people they don't know, it's a good idea to restrict what they can do within Game Center without your permission. -- iMore.

August 19 Tuesday's News

 

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6, Xcode 6 beta 6

Apple releases OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6, Xcode 6 beta 6

Apple on Monday issued its sixth beta releases of OS X Yosemite and Xcode 6 to developers for testing ahead of their scheduled launches this fall, though no new beta of iOS 8 was released.

People familiar with OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 6 say it comes with a number of new built-in wallpapers. Various system icons have been tweaked or changed as well, including in the System Preferences screen and battery icon in the taskbar. The new beta also adds a "Do Not Disturb" switch for Notification center. -- AppleInsider.

Delaware becomes first state to give heirs broad digital assets access

Delaware becomes first state to give heirs broad digital assets access

Delaware has become the first state in the US to enact a law that ensures families' rights to access the digital assets of loved ones during incapacitation or after death.

Last week, Gov. Jack Markell signed House Bill (HB) 345, "Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets and Digital Accounts Act," which gives heirs and executors the same authority to take legal control of a digital account or device, just as they would take control of a physical asset or document. -- Ars Technica.

This gorgeous and elegant bamboo gadget will turn any desk into a standing desk

This gorgeous and elegant bamboo gadget will turn any desk into a standing desk

If you're anything like me, you're probably interested in trying a standing desk… but not quite so committed to the idea of standing all day that you'd be willing to throw out your office chair.

Which is why I'm so interested in the Lift. Now on Kickstarter, it's a gorgeous and elegant wooden desk gadget that allows you to convert your existing desk to and from a standing desk at will. -- .

How To Label Locations in Find My Friends

How To Label Locations in Find My Friends

Find My Friends is handy, but it can be even more useful if you label common locations. Kelly explains how to do this and how they can even make Siri more helpful. -- The Mac Observer.

4 Ways to Restart the Mac Finder

4 Ways to Restart the Mac Finder

There are times when it's necessary to restart the Mac's Finder. (It is, after all, just an app.) Perhaps it's locked up. Or perhaps you've made a configuration change that requires a Finder restart. John shows four different ways to handle the Finder with a view to a kill. -- The Mac Observer.

Week Of Who: Doctor Puppet

Week Of Who: Doctor Puppet

Doctor Who, a popular television program here at TMO Towers, is returning with a new season this coming Saturday. Needless to say, excitement is high so I'm sharing some of my favorite Doctor Who tributes/parodies with you. Today we're kicking off the Week Of Who with Doctor Puppet, created by Alisa Stern. It's a series of stop-motion videos, starring the Matt Smith version of the Doctor. They are impressively adorable and since they aren't lengthy it's easy to get caught up. Check out Doctor Puppet's adventures starting with the first episode. -- The Mac Observer.

Convert various text file formats in the OS X Terminal with textutil

Convert various text file formats in the OS X Terminal with textutil

There are a number of ways you can convert a text document to another format, by simply opening it in a text editor like TextEdit and then choosing Save As from the File menu to export it. With TextEdit, you can choose Word, Rich Text, Plain Text, and OpenDocument Text, among others, as the formats in which to save your current file; however, if you are a Terminal user then you might enjoy knowing you can do this right from the command line. -- MacIssues.

Digital Divide: Inequality and Web Search Trends

Digital Divide: Inequality and Web Search Trends

An analysis of a decade of web searches shows the different subjects that occupy people's thoughts in a highly unequal country.

In the hardest places to live in the United States, people spend a lot of time thinking about diets and religion. In the easiest places to live, people spend a lot of time thinking about cameras. -- New York Times.

XRay: A New Tool for Tracking the Use of Personal Data on the Web

XRay: A New Tool for Tracking the Use of Personal Data on the Web

A real problem with personal data today is that the terms of trade so often seem both opaque and askew. Browse for information, send messages or go shopping online and data about you, your habits and your preferences go off into the digital ether.

A team of computer scientists at Columbia has developed a research tool for tracking the use of personal data online. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted a Major Patent for a Multimode Fingerprint Scanner Supporting Financial Transactions

Apple Granted a Major Patent for a Multimode Fingerprint Scanner Supporting Financial Transactions

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a major invention relating to a multimode fingerprint scanner. The first scanner is noted as being a "stationary" mode scanner designed for the Home Button as it is today for unlocking the display and making purchases on iTunes. A secondary scanner is shown to be set in a secondary location on an iPhone that is considered a "moving mode" scanner designed specifically for financial transactions and our report will tell you why Apple is seriously considering this new moving mode. Apple's granted patent also indicates that the financial system component supports NFC which is rapidly becoming the industry standard. Whether Apple will actually use this standard remains an open question. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Patent for a Curved Touch Display that Could Support a Future Fitness Band or iWatch

Apple Granted a Patent for a Curved Touch Display that Could Support a Future Fitness Band or iWatch

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 48 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's patent for making a curved touched display. The most likely use for such a display could be in the form of Apple's future fitness-band (wrist computer or iWatch). -- Patently Apple.

iCloud storage warning emails already referencing iOS 8 & iCloud Drive

iCloud storage warning emails already referencing iOS 8 & iCloud Drive

Those annoying iCloud storage warning email notifications have begun referencing the upcoming iOS 8 and iCloud Drive, according to multiple tips from readers. This change in the copy within the emails likely indicates that Apple is already preparing for the upcoming debuts of the new iCloud and iOS releases. -- 9to5Mac.

OS X 10.9.4 doesn't fix ACL file sharing problems

OS X 10.9.4 doesn't fix ACL file sharing problems

Jacob Snyder reports that the OS X 10.9.4 update did not fix his problems with changing ACLs on file servers when Macs access files. We've posted a lot of user reports of these problems on our Mavericks File Sharing Tips page, with some suggestions. Snyder refers to a link at the JAMF users forums. Snyder said this:

We still are seeing major issues with ACLs in 10.9.4. This thread at JAMF starts out with earlier versions of 10.9 and the ACL issues seem to get resolved with 10.9.3 and 10.9.4, but if you keep going down the thread you can see that the issues return for several users. I'm one of those users and I'm working with Apple Enterprise support. They can recreate the issue, but they still don't have a solution. The problem is so bad that I'll have to revert to 10.8.5 until there is a resolution. -- MacWindows.

How to find and delete duplicate photos in iPhoto

How to find and delete duplicate photos in iPhoto

Duplicate photos always seem to find a way to creep into your iPhoto library, eating up precious storage space on your Mac. You could just let it go and forget all about it -- after all it's just a few duplicate photos -- but if you're anything like me, you just want your iPhoto library to be perfect. -- iDownload Blog.

How to mend ... a cracked iPhone screen

How to mend ... a cracked iPhone screen

If the iPhone in your pocket is sporting a broken screen right now, you're not alone. Nearly a quarter of iPhones on the streets look just like yours. After the glass cracks, your options are pretty limited: either pay for an expensive repair, or keep swiping at the shattered glass until your fingers bleed.

There is a third option, however. One that most don't ever consider: repair the screen yourself. It seems like a daunting task, but it's simpler than you might think. -- The Guardian.

August 18 Monday's News

 

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

Are processors pushing up against the limits of physics?

When I first started reading Ars Technica, performance of a processor was measured in megahertz, and the major manufacturers were rushing to squeeze as many of them as possible into their latest silicon. Shortly thereafter, however, the energy needs and heat output of these beasts brought that race crashing to a halt. More recently, the number of processing cores rapidly scaled up, but they quickly reached the point of diminishing returns. Now, getting the most processing power for each Watt seems to be the key measure of performance. -- Ars Technica.

Unemulated: Eleven classic arcade games you can't play at home

Unemulated: Eleven classic arcade games you can't play at home

Even with the minor arcade resurgence going on these days, the prolonged decline of the American arcade means that there's a whole generation of people who have had little opportunity to play any of the thousands of coin-operated games in their native cabinets. Even those who remember the '70s and '80s golden age of arcades probably only had the opportunity to sample a relative handful of games that were available at their local haunts. -- Ars Technica.

A brief history of USB, what it replaced, and what has failed to replace it

A brief history of USB, what it replaced, and what has failed to replace it

Like all technology, USB has evolved over time. Despite being a "Universal" Serial Bus, in its 18-or-so years on the market it has spawned multiple versions with different connection speeds and many, many types of cables. -- Ars Technica.

Apple Patches Safari WebKit Security Issues

Apple Patches Safari WebKit Security Issues

Apple released Safari 7.0.6 for OS X Mavericks and Safari 6.1.6 for OS X Lion and Mountain Lion on Wednesday to patch several WebKit-related security and memory corruption issues that could let attackers run arbitrary code on victim's computers. The security issue could also cause app crashes. -- The Mac Observer.

The Emerging War Over Desktop Push Notifications

The Emerging War Over Desktop Push Notifications

Push notifications may have grown up on mobile apps. But now the Web is making a comeback because of a push notification innovation introduced by Apple through Safari Mavericks. Warring standards are already beginning to emerge, though Apple holds the early lead. -- The Mac Observer.

An Amazing Customer Experience with Apple

An Amazing Customer Experience with Apple

Yesterday, John Martellaro's wife had a truly remarkable customer experience at the Apple retail store in Lone Tree, Colorado. The experience demonstrates something very interesting about Apple that makes it unique and hard to compete with. -- The Mac Observers.

Import bookmarks from another browser

Import bookmarks from another browser

If you want to use your bookmarks from a different web browser in Safari, you can export them from that web browser as an HTML file and then import them into Safari.

  1. Open the other web browser.
  2. Find the web browser's Export Bookmarks option, and then choose it.
  3. The Export Bookmarks option is normally in the File menu.
  4. Save the bookmarks as an HTML file, for example, "bookmarks.html."
  5. Open Safari and choose File > Import Bookmarks.
  6. Select the HTML file you created, and then click Import.

No Sooner do we Secure Our iPhones Than the Home Invasion Begins

No Sooner do we Secure Our iPhones Than the Home Invasion Begins

The pace of personal security continues to accelerate. First, we spent years learning how to secure our routers and Macs. Then we focused on our iPhone security. Now, a new wave of devices is poised to enter our homes, and they're not made by Apple. Danger is lurking once again. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Reveals a New Audio System Designed for thin Devices which Could Mean the iPhone 6

Apple Reveals a New Audio System Designed for thin Devices which Could Mean the iPhone 6

On August 14, 2014, the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple titled "Long-Throw Acoustic Transducer." Apple's invention generally relates to the field of audio speakers that use a moving magnetic piston as the sound producing element. The invention will be able to produce more vibrant audio for music and alerts with vibrations for future iDevices. Apple notes that their invention may be advantageous for acoustic transducers that are used in "thin" devices where the height of the acoustic transducer must be small to fit within the device. Theoretically that could mean that this was designed for the iPhone 6 and/or other future iDevices like the iPad mini and beyond. As far as the iPhone goes, we'll know if this was used or not the minute that iFixit does their teardown of the iPhone 6 in September. -- Patently Apple.

University Students Get a Deal if they buy a Mac before Sept. 9

University Students Get a Deal if they buy a Mac before Sept. 9

In a new email promotion, Apple is now offering students who buy a Mac before September 9 will get a $110 Apple Store Gift Card. They could also get another $55 if they buy a new iPhone or iPad. Why Apple isn't extending this offer to all students is a bit of a mystery.

Apple Invents In-Cell for OLED Displays & Touch ID for iPad

Apple Invents In-Cell for OLED Displays & Touch ID for iPad

Apple was granted a patent this week for their In-Cell or "Integrated Touch" display technology. Today, the US Patent and Trademark Office published Apple's patent application for their latest technology regarding "In-Cell for LED" or OLED/AMOLED displays. In a secondary patent filing Apple focuses on fingerprint imaging and quality characterization. One of the patent figures illustrates the iPad integrating Touch ID which is likely to debut this fall. -- Patently Apple.

The Biggest iPhone Security Risk Could Be Connecting One To a Computer

The Biggest iPhone Security Risk Could Be Connecting One To a Computer

Apple has done well to insulate its iOS mobile operating system from many security issues, but a forthcoming demonstration shows it's far from perfect. Next Wednesday at the Usenix Security Symposium in San Diego, researchers with the Georgia Institute of Technology will show how iOS's Achilles' heel is exposed when devices are connected over USB to a computer or have Wi-Fi synching enabled. The beauty of their attack is that it doesn't rely on iOS software vulnerabilities, the customary way that hackers commandeer computers. It simply takes advantage of design issues in iOS, working around Apple's layered protections to accomplish a sinister goal. -- ComputerWorld.

Pattern Recognition Algorithm Recognizes When Drivers Are on the Phone

Pattern Recognition Algorithm Recognizes When Drivers Are on the Phone

By some estimates, 85 percent of drivers in America use a mobile phone while at the wheel. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration estimates that during daylight hours, 5 percent of cars are being driven by people making phone calls.

Using a mobile phone while driving can significantly increase the chances of an accident. Now a dashboard cam can spot when drivers pick up the phone. -- MIT Technology Review.

Technology Can Make Lawful Surveillance Both Open and Effective

Technology Can Make Lawful Surveillance Both Open and Effective

With cryptography, surveillance processes could be open and privacy-preserving without undermining their investigative power.

Democracy rests on the principle that legal processes must be open and public. Laws are created through open deliberation by elected bodies; they are open for anyone to read or challenge; and in enforcing them the government must get a warrant before searching a person's private property. For our increasingly electronic society to remain democratic, this principle of open process must follow us into cyberspace. Unfortunately it appears to have been lost in translation. -- MIT Technology Review.

Gazelle paying up to $350 cash for old iPhones if you act now; doesn't need them till Oct 10

Gazelle paying up to $350 cash for old iPhones if you act now; doesn't need them till Oct 10

If you're looking to mitigate the cost of upgrading to Apple's 'iPhone 6' by getting the most cash possible for your current iPhone, buyback service Gazelle has just launched its most aggressive price-lock promotion yet: up to $350 for your old iPhone if you lock in a price quote today (and you don't need to send it in until Oct. 10 -- long after the iPhone 6 is expected on the market). -- AppleInsider.

How to enable Enhanced Dictation in OS X for streaming speech-to-text with live feedback

How to enable Enhanced Dictation in OS X for streaming speech-to-text with live feedback

OS X includes a nifty Dictation feature which allows you to control your Mac and apps with your voice. You can use "speakable items", basically a set of spoken commands, to open apps, choose menu items, email contacts and convert whole spoken sentences to text, wherever you can type text. -- iDownload Blog.

Monitor OS X network, CPU and disk activity in the Dock

Monitor OS X network, CPU and disk activity in the Dock

For those Mac users who love to push their hardware to its limits, the OS X Activity Monitor (found in Applications > Utilities) can be a handy tool. I often use it to find out if one process or another has suddenly decided to take over my iMac, to figure out if I'm redlining my network bandwidth, and to see if adding one more app while editing video is going to cause issues. This fun tip puts an updating icon into the Dock so you can keep an eye on one parameter while you're doing work. -- TUAW.

OS X Yosemite: Get to Know Notification Center's New Features

OS X Yosemite: Get to Know Notification Center's New Features

Apple's latest desktop operating system, OS X Yosemite, won't officially come out until sometime this fall. But now that its public beta is open, both developers and a large number of Mac owners are able to use a preview version of the landmark OS. -- Wired.

How to enable and disable notification badges on the Mac

How to enable and disable notification badges on the Mac

Badges are those app notifications that show you that something is waiting for you -- maybe a to-do list item is due, or maybe you have a new email. Sometimes badges can be helpful. Other times they can be really irritating. Here's how to activate them and deactivate them. -- iMore.

How To Monitor Your Network's Traffic In Real Time From Your Mac on the Cheap

How To Monitor Your Network's Traffic In Real Time From Your Mac on the Cheap

At one time or another, every Mac, iPhone, or iPad user is on a network. Got Wi-Fi at home or office? That's a network. Connected to the internet via a phone company or cable company? That's a network. How fast is your network? How much bandwidth does your network use? What can you do when the network your Mac is connected to begins to slow down? -- NoodleMac.

What It's Like Having Everything Done For You With An App

What It's Like Having Everything Done For You With An App

When I left New York for a three-month business trip to San Francisco, I exited my Upper East Side apartment at 5 a.m., held my hand out on 1st Avenue, and had a cab to Kennedy Airport within seconds. -- Business Insider.

Here's How To Identify Battery Draining Apps On iPhone

Here's How To Identify Battery Draining Apps On iPhone

Having a smartphone who's battery won't last a day is the kind of thing that drives most of us mad. If you're carrying around a large Android phone that's got a battery larger than most notebooks inside it, then you're probably fine but if you're using an iPhone, we're willing to bet that you're charging that bad boy at least once a day. Sometimes twice. -- Redmond Pie.

Which Apps Are Eating Your Battery? Normal Will Tell You

Which Apps Are Eating Your Battery? Normal Will Tell You

Somewhere, somehow, maybe less than a year after I got the latest version of my iPhone, its battery would mysteriously deplete in about half a day.

I wasn't really sure why. But now I can find out. -- TechCrunch.

The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV - Part 2

The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV - Part 2

In Part One of The Novice's Complete Guide to Setting Up and Using an Apple TV, I showed you how install, set up, and familiarise yourself with the basics of the Apple TV.

In this tutorial, I will show you how to:

  • Access each of the more unique channels
  • Hide channels that you aren't using
  • Set up Home Sharing
  • Access and change the important settings

Switching carriers? You may be able to take your iPhone 5S with you

Switching carriers? You may be able to take your iPhone 5S with you

"Will my Verizon iPhone 5S work on AT&T?" That's a question asked by one Ask Maggie reader confused by the puzzling state of device interoperability. This week's column tackles the issue. -- CNET.

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Your iPhone

10 Things You Didn't Know You Could Do With Your iPhone

The iPhone is the best smartphone you can buy right now. It's extremely user-friendly, and we'd be lost without it. While the iPhone is already chock-full of useful apps and games, it's also packed with a bunch of hidden features that can make life with your smartphone a whole lot easier.

Here are ten things you didn't know you could do with your iPhone.

  • Block People From calling or texting you
  • Have Siri read you emails
  • See which flights are above you
  • Make a passcode with a full keyboard
  • Turn CAPS LOCK on
  • Hold a key for extra options
  • Shake your iPhone to undo typing
  • Bold, italicize or underline words in emails
  • Check timestamps on your texts
  • Use your iPhone as a level

The Engineer of the Original Apple Mouse Talks About His Remarkable Career

The Engineer of the Original Apple Mouse Talks About His Remarkable Career

Jim Yurchenco was responsible for squeezing the guts inside the impossibly slim Palm V. He helped build the mouse for the Apple Lisa, which was significant in that it was the first mouse ever used by regular people. He was the first full-time employee at the company that would become Ideo, the massively influential design firm. But before all that, he was a sculptor. -- Wired.

There will be no news updates tomorrow as I will be out. See you back here on Monday. Have a good weekend. -mam

August 14 Thursday's News

 

Apple releases Safari 6.1.6 and Safari 7.0.6 with security improvements

Apple releases Safari 6.1.6 and Safari 7.0.6 with security improvements

Apple on Wednesday rolled out updated versions of its Safari Web browser for OS X, bringing fixes for WebKit corruption issues and other security concerns.

According to the security release notes accompanying Apple's latest Safari versions, the new software address a WebKit vulnerability that could allow for termination of arbitrary code after a user visits a malicious website. -- AppleInsider.

Apple reimagines the mouse with force sensors, haptic feedback

Apple reimagines the mouse with force sensors, haptic feedback

An Apple patent filing uncovered on Thursday describes an advanced mouse that employs sensors to measure the level and location of force exerted on its main button, as well as haptics systems for providing feedback. -- AppleInsider.

Internet routers hitting 512K limit, some become unreliable

Internet routers hitting 512K limit, some become unreliable

From performance issues at hosting provider Liquid Web to outages at eBay and LastPass, large networks and websites suffered a series of disruptions and outages on Tuesday. Some Internet engineers are blaming the disruptions on a novel technical issue that impacts older Internet routers. -- Ars Technica.

Apple seeds third OS X 10.9.5 beta to developers

Apple seeds third OS X 10.9.5 beta to developers

Apple has seeded the third beta of OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 build 13F14 to developers this morning, just six days after the previous beta and all its bug fixes were released.

Mac fans are anticipating the release of OS X Yosemite within the next few months, but Apple is still making refinements to Mavericks before setting it out to pasture. -- Cult of Mac.

For future computing, look (as always) to Star Trek

For future computing, look (as always) to Star Trek

"The step after ubiquity is invisibility," Al Mandel used to say and it's true. To see what might be The Next Big Thing in personal computing technology, then, let's try applying that idea to mobile. How do we make mobile technology invisible? -- I, Cringely.

OS X Maps: Right-Click for Fast Directions

OS X Maps: Right-Click for Fast Directions

With the Maps program on the Mac, you can get fast directions to any location you want. But what are the easiest ways to get that info if you don't know the address of your destination? That's the subject of today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple TV, the Ideal Hub for HomeKit Automation

Apple TV, the Ideal Hub for HomeKit Automation

Apple makes a little black box that hangs out on your network and waits for you to need it. Kelly explains how Apple TV + HomeKit = Crazy Delicious, and is likelier than you may think. -- The Mac Observer.

Smartphones Overstate Their Social Intelligence

Smartphones Overstate Their Social Intelligence

When a smartphone app wants to alert you to a coming appointment, a text message or some bit of breaking news from your social network, it sends a tiny flare that lights up your phone's lock screen. Depending on how you've set it up, the app might then buzz your pocket like a manic bee, sound a citywide panic alarm or begin playing "La Cucaracha."

With access to our calendars, contacts and location, phones should be able to communicate with great intelligence, but often buzz at just the wrong time. -- New York Times.

FOLLOWUP: 2011 MacBook Pro failures

FOLLOWUP: 2011 MacBook Pro failures

Yesterday I published an article about 2011 MacBook Pro failures. It was pointed out to me that people who were having these problems were using the wrong channels to resolve their problems.

Posting on social media sites will NOT get Apple's attention. I don't care what site or how many.

What gets Apple's attention is if you take your ailing MacBook Pro to you local Apple Store or if you are an education customer (call the AppleCare Education number - 800-800-APPL).

This doesn't guarantee a resolution you will immediately like - but at least AppleCare will have impact data. Apple Support Communities gives AppleCare zero data because - as the EULA clearly states - it is a place for users to communicate with and help other users.

Apple Reveals their New Fraud Detection Identity System

Apple Reveals their New Fraud Detection Identity System

An Internet-facing identity management system is vulnerable to a variety of attacks, including account take over, fraudulent activities, creation of fraudulent accounts and denial of service attacks. As hackers and fraudsters are getting better and more sophisticated in online transaction attacks, there is a need to detect and remediate fraud in real-time to protect consumers and businesses. Today the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals a new fraud detection ID management system. To a certain degree Apple is already using it context with their iTunes online store. As Apple moves into the e-commerce world with a future iWallet, such a system is going to be a huge benefit to users. So with Apple testing out their new fraud detection system out now, it will ensure that the system is in place once they introduce their iWallet application which, from many accounts, could debut in the next year or two. -- Patently Apple.

How People Consume Conspiracy Theories on Facebook

How People Consume Conspiracy Theories on Facebook

Do you believe that the contrails left by high-flying aircraft contain sildenafil citratum, the active ingredient in Viagra? Or that light bulbs made from uranium and plutonium are more energy-efficient and environmentally friendly? Or that lemons have anti-hypnotic benefits?

If you do, then you are probably a regular consumer of conspiracy theories, particularly those that appear on the Italian language version of Facebook (where all these were sourced). It is easy to dismiss conspiracy theories as background noise with little if any consequences in the real world.

But that may be taking them too lightly. In 2013, a report from the World Economic Forum suggested that online misinformation represents a significant risk to modern society. The report pointed to a number of incidents in which information had spread virally with consequences that could hardly have been imagined by its creators. -- Ars Technica.

As Siri gets more powers in iOS 8, we ask: Do you use it to its fullest or is it still a party trick?

As Siri gets more powers in iOS 8, we ask: Do you use it to its fullest or is it still a party trick?

When Siri lost its beta tag almost a year ago, I suggested it might be a good time for those who'd been frustrated with its early performance to give it another chance. What I discovered through your comments was that Siri seems to be one of those things that polarizes views: people either loving it and using it every day, or dismissing it as a useless gimmick. Not too many people seem to fall between the two. -- 9to5Mac.

How to access your Facebook messages in iOS without installing Messenger

How to access your Facebook messages in iOS without installing Messenger

Do you hate the fact that Facebook is forcing you to install the Facebook Messenger app if you want to send or access messages on your iPhone or iPad?

We do too. But luckily, it turns out that right now, there's an easy way to get around the restrictions and access your Facebook Messages through the vanilla Facebook app again. But better move on it: Facebook's not likely to let this loophole stay open for long. -- Cult of Mac.

Four Finder timesavers every smart Mac user should know

Four Finder timesavers every smart Mac user should know

For some users, "organizing files" in the Finder begins and ends with creating folders and moving files into them. But there are a bunch of other things you can do to manage your files in OS X that, whatever your workflow, will make things way easier. -- Macworld.

How to easily stream videos from your Mac to Xbox One

How to easily stream videos from your Mac to Xbox One

Have a lot of movies or TV episodes stored in your computer and want to watch them on your big screen TV? Here are the steps on how to easily stream those videos from your Mac to the Xbox One using this handy app from the Mac App Store called SofaPlay ($4.99 - Download now). It's so easy and convenient, that I want to slap myself for not knowing about it earlier. We've got a full on guide available for you at our sibling site, Windows Phone Central. So head on over and check it out! -- iMore.

How to see the names, passwords, and credit cards Safari saves

How to see the names, passwords, and credit cards Safari saves

Safari makes it very easy for you to store usernames, passwords, and credit cards that you've entered into websites on your Mac OS X 10.9 Mavericks or iOS 7 device. If you use iCloud Keychain syncing, you can even share that information between your different Apple devices. Personally, I don't store credit card info or important passwords there because I am one paranoid person, but I do use Safari and iCloud Keychain to keep track of usernames and passwords for non-critical sites and services. Here's how to review what you've asked Safari to store for you. -- TUAW.

Here's how to stop Facebook's annoying autoplay ads from eating through your data cap

Here's how to stop Facebook's annoying autoplay ads from eating through your data cap

Facebook is coming up with more and more ways to annoy its mobile users, including forcing them to use its Facebook Messenger app instead of the mothership Facebook app to chat with friends. The world's biggest social network has also annoyingly decided to automatically set its mobile app to play its autoplay video ads even if you're on a mobile data network and not a Wi-Fi network. It goes without saying that this can be a problem for some users who have capped data plans, which is why we're glad that iMore just posted some detailed instructions for how to stop this nuisance on your smartphone. -- BGR.

Four simple steps for securing your smartphone or tablet

Four simple steps for securing your smartphone or tablet

A friend of mine bought a new iPhone 5s recently, used it for just over a week, and then 'lost it'. It might have been stolen or simply misplaced, she has no idea. All she knows for certain is she no longer has it in her possession. That's bad enough, but she spent much of the first week copying over photos and other personal data to it from her old phone, but didn't devote any time -- at all -- to protecting the device.

So in other words, if someone else has her iPhone now -- which it's pretty safe to assume is the case -- they also have access to everything on it, which could be potentially catastrophic for her. The thing is, it's so easy to protect a smartphone these days it amazes me so many people don't bother to take the following simple steps. -- BetaNews.

August 13 Wednesday's News

 

Apple ignores calls to fix 2011 MacBook Pro failures as problem grows

Apple ignores calls to fix 2011 MacBook Pro failures as problem grows

Owners of early-2011 MacBook Pro continue to report GPU-related system failures, but Apple has yet to acknowledge the problem as widespread and, according to informed sources, is not planning a replacement program to remedy the issue. -- AppleInsider.

Tiny, reversible USB Type-C connector finalized

Tiny, reversible USB Type-C connector finalized

The USB Promoter Group announced today that it has finalized the design of the USB Type-C plug, a new type of USB plug that's designed to completely replace every size of all current USB connectors. Like Apple's Lightning cables, the new connector is reversible so that it can be used in any orientation. -- Ars Technica.

Apple issues diversity report, but how do Apple Store numbers figure?

Apple issues diversity report, but how do Apple Store numbers figure?

On Tuesday, Apple joined a growing list of tech companies issuing diversity reports about hiring practices, and like its peers, Apple's report broke down ethnicity and gender percentages in the categories of "tech," "non-tech," and "leadership." Taken at face value, the report paints Apple as a company with a higher percentage of underrepresented groups among its tech and leadership ranks. -- Ars Technica.

How to turn your Mac's trackpad into the ultimate timesaver

How to turn your Mac's trackpad into the ultimate timesaver

Mac are incredibly complex machines, but thanks to Jony Ive and the rest of the creators, they're also incredibly simple to use. Mose Mac users know to use keyboard shortcuts to make daily tasks even quicker, but not many know how to turn your Mac's trackpad into one of the best time-saving tools you'll ever use.

In today's video, we'll take a look at a little known feature called Hot Corners. We'll teach you how to set them up and how to use them. How to Put your display to sleep, clear your desktop and do even more useful actions, now with just a few quick flicks. -- Cult of Macs.

iPhone vs. Tricorder: Seeing the Future with Blurred Vision

iPhone vs. Tricorder: Seeing the Future with Blurred Vision

It's interesting to see how the blinders of the present affect our predictions of the future. The Star Trek Tricorder vs. the modern Apple iPhone is a case in point. John Martellaro looks at the technologies that SciFi from the 20th century never saw coming. -- The Mac Observer.

Quickly re-create a missing admin account on your Mac

Quickly re-create a missing admin account on your Mac

When you set up OS X for the first time, your initial account will be an administrative one, allowing you to configure the system and install applications. Albeit rare, errors that occur when upgrading or restoring from backup, or otherwise when making heavy modifications to the system, could result in your admin account being destroyed so you cannot log in to it or use it for changing system settings. -- .

Apple Wins Design Patents for iPhone, MacBook Pro & More

Apple Wins Design Patents for iPhone, MacBook Pro & More

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 55 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today plus 4 new design patents that cover the iPhone, MacBook Pro and more. Apple's design patents don't really describe anything. They simply boil down to being a bundle of patent figures that get approved and our report provides you with a number of jumbo graphics to review. A special note is made to the fact that Apple's late CEO Steve Jobs is one of the designers credited for the iPhone design. -- Patently Apple.

Why You Shouldn't Store Files on the Desktop

Why You Shouldn't Store Files on the Desktop

Over the years, I've repaired many computers. Most people just ask me to speed it up. I usually ensure they have enough RAM to run the latest version of OS X, update everything, clean out some caches if the hard drive is near full, and advise they reorganize things.

I usually don't have to mention the Desktop, unless it's really bad. And I've seen some bad ones. Hundreds of little icons. These people have adjusted the icon size to 16x16 pixels just to fit it all on the display. The thing is, they probably don't know how much it slows down their Mac.

In this tutorial, I'll outline several reasons why you need to keep the Desktop clear and explain how to do it more effectively. -- Tuts+.

Good Technology Mobility Index Report Highlights Enterprise Mobility Shift from Devices to Applications

Good Technology Mobility Index Report Highlights Enterprise Mobility Shift from Devices to Applications

The OS breakdown of enterprise app activations shifted this quarter, with Android apps claiming 12 percent of total activations and taking four percentage points of share from iOS.

Significant growth in Q2 across secure instant messaging, customer relationship management and business intelligence apps signals organizations mobilizing business processes and investing in more mature mobile strategies. -- Good Technology.

Which Mac laptop? MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro comparative review

Which Mac laptop? MacBook Air vs MacBook Pro comparative review

If you are in the market for a new laptop you might be wondering whether to opt for the MacBook Air or MacBook Pro. With the entry-level Retina MacBook Pro costing only £150 more than the 13in MacBook Air the decision isn't as obvious as you might think. -- Macworld UK.

How to check for Activation Lock before buying a used iPhone

How to check for Activation Lock before buying a used iPhone

Activation Lock is a great feature coming with every iOS device that has Find My iPhone enabled. This security feature prevents anyone from activating your phone without having access to your Apple ID or password in case they found or stole your device.

Even though they might not be able to activate the lost or stolen device, they might still try to put it up for sale, and if you don't know what to look for, you might very well be buying an iPhone that has been locked and cannot be activated.

In this post, we will show you what to check when buying a used iPhone or iPad from a third party -- iDownload Blog.

How to replace a broken iPhone 5S screen

How to replace a broken iPhone 5S screen

Bill Detwiler shows you how to replace a cracked screen on your Apple iPhone 5S. Before undertaking this DIY project, I suggest you watch my video on what to know before trying to fix a smartphone or tablet and then decide if you should repair the phone yourself or have someone else do it. -- CNET.

Painting the back of the Apple accessibility fence

Painting the back of the Apple accessibility fence

Robert and Allison of the Tech Doctor podcast, which focuses on accessibility, were gracious enough to invite me on to talk about Apple's efforts to increase iOS and OS X accessibility, and what iMore is doing to help promote them. -- iMore.

Do You Really Need Microsoft Office Anymore?

Do You Really Need Microsoft Office Anymore?

I get misty thinking back on my years with Microsoft MSFT +0.74% Office. After all, Word, Excel and PowerPoint have held my hand since my middle-school report on California, through my college-application essay about my mom, and on to the hundreds of articles and presentations I've worked on during my journalism career. Word, Excel and PowerPoint Alternatives From Google and Apple Have Many of the Same Features, but Microsoft's Subscription Service Comes With Perks. -- Wall Street Journal.

Twitter Reports 23 Million Users Are Actually Bots

Twitter Reports 23 Million Users Are Actually Bots

In its most recent quarterly report to the Securities and Exchange Commission, Twitter disclosed that approximately 8.5% of its users are actually bots. Some of these 23 million bots were created to make revenue-generating URLs, others were created to collect followers that would later be sold to whoever needs a ready audience, and a few were created to mimic stereotypes just for fun. Now that Twitter is a public company, some wonder if these bots help or hinder Twitter's stock value. -- PBS.

The Quiet Before the Next IT Revolution

The Quiet Before the Next IT Revolution

Now that the technologies behind our servers and networks have stabilized, IT can look forward to a different kind of constant change, writes Paul Venezia. "In IT, we are actually seeing a bit of stasis. I don't mean that the IT world isn't moving at the speed of light -- it is -- but the technologies we use in our corporate data centers have progressed to the point where we can leave them be for the foreseeable future without worry that they will cause blocking problems in other areas of the infrastructure. What all this means for IT is not that we can finally sit back and take a break after decades of turbulence, but that we can now focus less on the foundational elements of IT and more on the refinements. ... In essence, we have finally built the transcontinental railroad, and now we can use it to completely transform our Wild West. -- InfoWorld.

August 12 Tuesday's News

 

O Captain! My Captain! 1951-2014

O Captain! My Captain!

O Captain! My Captain!
BY WALT WHITMAN

O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done,
The ship has weather'd every rack, the prize we sought is won,
The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring;
But O heart! heart! heart!
O the bleeding drops of red,
Where on the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

O Captain! my Captain! rise up and hear the bells;
Rise up--for you the flag is flung--for you the bugle trills,
For you bouquets and ribbon'd wreaths--for you the shores a-crowding,
For you they call, the swaying mass, their eager faces turning;
Here Captain! dear father!
The arm beneath your head!
It is some dream that on the deck,
You've fallen cold and dead.

My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still,
My father does not feel my arm, he has no pulse nor will,
The ship is anchor'd safe and sound, its voyage closed and done,
From fearful trip the victor ship comes in with object won;
Exult O shores, and ring O bells!
But I with mournful tread,
Walk the deck my Captain lies,
Fallen cold and dead.

Surveillance leak shows spyware loves Android, but can't infect Apple's iPhones without jailbreak

Surveillance leak shows spyware loves Android, but can't infect Apple's iPhones without jailbreak

Secret documents that anonymously leaked from global surveillance firm Gamma Group detail broad powers to spy on Android users via its FinSpy tool sold to law enforcement, but note that the tools lack the ability to infect iPhones unless they have been jailbroken. -- AppleInsider.

Level 29 Brings Old-school BBS to the Modern World on an Apple IIGS

Level 29 Brings Old-school BBS to the Modern World on an Apple IIGS

Before the days of Web browsers and broadband Internet, online communities were hosted by single computers you connected to by dialing in over a traditional phone line via a modem. If you miss the old days -- or never had the chance to experience a BBS -- now you can, thanks to Level 29. The system runs on an Apple IIGS with a blazing fast (for 1983) 300 bps modem, but since not everyone happens to have a modem or physical phone line handy, you can also telnet in or connect via raw sockets. If you're still at a loss, go to the Level 29 website where you can view the BBS in your Web browser. It's retro-awesome, and it shows old computers can still do some really cool stuff. -- The Mac Observer.

Lost Your Fitbit? Use Your iPhone to Track it Down

Lost Your Fitbit? Use Your iPhone to Track it Down

You can use Find My iPhone to track down your misplaced iPhone, but what about Bluetooth devices that don't offer a similar feature, like your Fitbit? You can track that down, too, with the help of your iPhone and a little luck. Read on to learn how. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple In Talks to Rollout HealthKit to Medical Professionals Across U.S.

Apple In Talks to Rollout HealthKit to Medical Professionals Across U.S.

Apple is preparing to roll out its Healthkit development tools to health professionals across the U.S., and has been discussions with health providers at Mount Sinai, Cleveland Clinic, John Hopkins, and Allscripts to use the new system, reports Reuters.

Apple is said to be pushing Healthkit and its Health app as being an all-in-one solution for medical professionals to store patient data like blood pressure, pulse, and weight. Apple is also hoping that physicians will use the available data to improve diagnostics and treatment decisions. The company is also looking to partner with electronic health records provider Epic Systems to integrate its software and services.

How to forget Wi-Fi networks in OS X

How to forget Wi-Fi networks in OS X

When using your Mac with Wi-Fi, you have the option for OS X o remember your Wi-Fi network so when you are in the vicinity of this hotspot, you will seamlessly connect to it. While convenient, this can sometimes be a burden, especially if an otherwise preferred hotspot is running slowly or showing other problems. -- MacIssues.

Apple was Granted 55 Patents Today Covering Water Jet Shaping, Ultrasonic Bonding and Integrated Touch Technology

Apple was Granted 55 Patents Today Covering Water Jet Shaping, Ultrasonic Bonding and Integrated Touch Technology

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 55 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two manufacturing processes used by Apple's Jony Ives to deliver Apple's cool designs with their famous chamfered edges which Samsung is thinking of copying for a future smartphone design. This report also covers Apple's second granted patent regarding the iPhone's "Integrated Touch" display. This type of display is reportedly causing Apple some grief in respect to their new 5.5 inch iPhone model. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Track who's buying politicians with 'Greenhouse' browser add-on

Track who's buying politicians with 'Greenhouse' browser add-on

Nicholas Rubin, a 16-year-old programmer from Seattle, has created a browser add-on that makes it incredibly easy to see the influence of money in US politics. Rubin calls the add-on Greenhouse, and it does something so brilliantly simple that once you use it you'll wonder why news sites didn't think of this themselves.

Greenhouse pulls in campaign contribution data for every Senator and Representative, including the total amount of money received and a breakdown by industry and size of donation. It then combines this with a parser that finds the names of Senators and Representatives in the current page and highlights them. Hover your mouse over the highlighted names and it displays their top campaign contributors. -- Ars Technica.

What to do if your iPhone is lost or stolen?

What to do if your iPhone is lost or stolen?

Better safe than sorry, they say. This is particularly true when it comes to expensive items that contain a considerable amount of private information, such as your iPhone or your iPad. If you can't necessarily prevent losing your iPhone or even worse, having it stolen from you, there are however some steps you can make to ensure that in the eventuality such thing would happen, you will be completely ready to handle the situation.

While we hope you'll never have to deal with this, we want to make sure you know your options and have been proactive in securing your iOS device, whether it is an iPhone, an iPad, or an iPod touch. In this post, we will share with you some of the actions you can take to prepare your iPhone or iPad, and to protect it in case it is lost or stolen. -- iDownload Blog.

How to optimize broadband while on vacation

How to optimize broadband while on vacation

Reader Patty Hamilton is in the mood for travel but would like to remain connected. She writes:

My family and I are renting a house for a week's vacation. I've been told that wireless Internet is provided but I've found some of these "free" connections can be so slow that they're almost unusable. Any hints for using broadband on vacation? -- Macworld.

Apple's Secret Security Offensive

Apple's Secret Security Offensive

You know what the world really needs? I mean, beyond the basics of peace, good healthcare, plentiful food, and no more Google?

Security. We need improved security that is also easy to use. User IDs and passwords are not enough; they're challenging to use, and apparently easy to crack. No, the tech world needs a few more security levels that work like this one. -- Mac 360.

The Technologies Changing What It Means To Be a Programmer

The Technologies Changing What It Means To Be a Programmer

Modern programming bears little resemblance to the days of assembly code and toggles. Worse, or perhaps better, it markedly differs from what it meant to be a programmer just five years ago. While the technologies and tools underlying this transformation can make development work more powerful and efficient, they also make developers increasingly responsible for facets of computing beyond their traditional domain, thereby concentrating a wider range of roles and responsibilities into leaner, more overworked staff. -- InfoWorld.

August 11 Monday's News

 

Apple adds Family Sharing support information to iOS, Mac App Store listings

Apple adds Family Sharing support information to iOS, Mac App Store listings

Apple on Friday activated a new iOS and Mac App Store asset that notifies customers of compatibility with the company's upcoming Family Sharing program, which will allow family members to share purchased content. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's iOS 8 beta 5 pulls business info from Maps into Phone app's Recents list

Apple's iOS 8 beta 5 pulls business info from Maps into Phone app's Recents list

A new feature discovered in Apple's latest iOS 8 beta release automatically populates the Phone app's Recents list with information about points of interest when dialing out from Maps, applying correct name, addresses and even Yelp data to recent-dialed numbers. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's highly secretive Apple University profiled in NYT feature

Apple's highly secretive Apple University profiled in NYT feature

The brainchild of Apple cofounder Steve Jobs, Apple University is widely discussed, but little is known about the internal program meant to foster company culture. A New York Times feature offers a rare peek inside the school's walls.

Hacking is simple, says author claiming role in breach of spyware firm

Hacking is simple, says author claiming role in breach of spyware firm

The do-it-yourself guide explains how hackers can map entryways into a target's network, scan for vulnerable services and exploit any that are found. It also lists some of the most common methods hackers use to keep their IP addresses and other digital fingerprints off their attacks. Among other things, the how-to suggests installing Whonix inside a hidden encrypted volume created by TrueCrypt and carrying out all operations from there. It also counsels against using Tor and instead using hacked servers. Again, this is illegal. -- Ars Technica.

Meet WordHound, the tool that puts a personal touch on password cracking

Meet WordHound, the tool that puts a personal touch on password cracking

In the vexing pursuit of passwords that are both easy to remember and hard to crack, many people embed clues into their login credentials, choosing for instance, "playstationplaystationdec2014" to safeguard a recently created gaming account or "L0an@ w0rk!" for an IT administrative account at a financial services company. Now, a whitehat hacker is capitalizing on the habit with a tool that automates the process of launching highly targeted cracking attacks. -- Ars Technica.

See OS X Yosemite's Beta 5 changes in action

See OS X Yosemite's Beta 5 changes in action

The fifth beta of OS X Yosemite was released to developers a few days a go, with the operating system getting closer to a general release, in today's video we take a look at the subtle changes Apple has made in the latest beta.

Take a look at the video to see the changes in action. -- Cult of Mac.

Take a look at Apple TV's new styling

Take a look at Apple TV's new styling

In today's video we take a quick look into the revamped Apple TV software -- 7.0. Which was released to developers earlier this week, which gives us a good indication to what the final software will look and feel like when released to the public this Fall.

Take a look at the video above to see the 7.0 beta for Apple TV in action! -- Cult of Mac.

Foursquare is Tracking Your Every Move. Here's How to Turn that Off

Foursquare is Tracking Your Every Move. Here's How to Turn that Off

When Foursquare decided to split its business and restaurant discovery and social checkin app for the iPhone into two apps a couple months ago, that upset a lot of users, too. When the updated Foursquare app came out this week with the ability to always track your location even if the app isn't running, that really upset a lot of users. If you don't want Foursquare or Swarm knowing where you are all the time, you can turn the feature off -- assuming you know where to look. -- The Mac Observer.

Skype to Leopard Users: We Still Love You, Compatibility Update Coming

Skype to Leopard Users: We Still Love You, Compatibility Update Coming

Following the ruffled feathers and wailing and gnashing of teeth following the news that Skype support for versions of OS X below 10.6 are no longer supported, Microsoft's Skype team has said a new update is coming that'll let Leopard users continue to participate in their online text, voice and video chats. Currently, Mac owners running Leopard can't login to their Skype account thanks to compatibility changes that were made earlier this week. -- The Mac Observer.

Weaponize Pets: WarKitteh Detects Unsecured Neighborhood Wifi Networks

Weaponize Pets: WarKitteh Detects Unsecured Neighborhood Wifi Networks

Thanks to portable technology, pets can now scan neighborhood wifi networks. Wired reports on an upcoming DefCon talk from Gene Bransfield titled "How To Weaponize Your Pets", which is less a security talk and more a presentation of a clever way to find unsecured networks in the immediate area. Using a Spark Core board and the skills of the cat's human to sew a collar for it, he discovered more than a third of the hotspots in the area were less than secure. He says he did this for fun, but hopefully discovering a cat could detect open wifi networks might prompt some people to adjust their networks accordingly. -- The Mac Observer.

A Two-Step Plan to Stop Hackers

A Two-Step Plan to Stop Hackers

You may not be able to keep your digital credentials from being stolen, but there are options for keeping a cyber thief from using them successfully.

There are a number of ways that consumers could react to the news this week that Russian hackers got their hands on 1.2 billion username and password combinations. -- New York Times.

What Cars Did for Today's World, Data May Do for Tomorrow's

What Cars Did for Today's World, Data May Do for Tomorrow's

New technology products head at us constantly. There's the latest smartphone, the shiny new app, the hot social network, even the smarter thermostat.

As great (or not) as all these may be, each thing is a small part of a much bigger process that's rarely admired. They all belong inside a world-changing ecosystem of digital hardware and software, spreading into every area of our lives.

No matter how cutting-edge it may seem, almost every new product you see is part of a greater whole. At its heart is the cheap collection, shipment and computation of data. -- New York Times.

Apple Patent Covers Touchscreen Macs, Atomic Tasks and a Circular Gesture to Invoke Siri on the Desktop

Apple Patent Covers Touchscreen Macs, Atomic Tasks and a Circular Gesture to Invoke Siri on the Desktop

On Thursday we posted two reports about Siri for the desktop. The first report was titled "Apple Reveals 'Hey, Siri' Feature Relating to Future Apps for Restaurant Reservations, In-Vehicle Functionality and more." The second report was titled "Apple Files Major Siri Patent for Mac Desktop Functionality," showed us that Siri will be coming to the Mac to assist users with email, document searches and editing, opening folders, sending documents to the printer and much more. Although the report covered the overall invention very well, it failed to emphasize what Apple considered as one of the main points of their invention, which was the creation of a new gesture that will invoke Siri on the desktop. Today's follow-up report covers several finer points of Apple's patent application about Siri on the Desktop that you might find interesting. -- Patently Apple.

Apple and accessibility: Helping students with dyslexia

Apple and accessibility: Helping students with dyslexia

Can you imagine not being able to read printed words? What would your life be like if books, newspapers, websites, email, and even signs were all virtually incomprehensible to you? How would you get through the day? For up to one in five people like me with dyslexia these are not hypothetical questions, they are our reality. Yet, thanks to accessibility technologies built into Apple's iPhone, iPad, and Mac, it's a reality that can be challenged. -- iMore.

DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

DARPA Wants To Kill the Password

Many security experts agree that our current authentication system, in which end users are forced to remember (or, more often, write down) a dizzying array of passwords is broken. DARPA, the U.S. Defense Department research arm that developed the Internet, is trying to work past the problem by eliminating passwords altogether, replacing them with biometric and other cues, using off-the-shelf technology available today. -- ITWorld.

August 08 Friday's News

 

One Man's Opinion: Yosemite

One Man's Opinion: Yosemite

I finally had the time and inclination to setup a partition to install and run Yosemite. I must confess I am not impressed. From what I can tell, this is all about Apple and not about us.

Old benchmarks are meaningless. I have run Xbench and it gives crazy low results. So there is no way to compare 10.9 and 10.10. (My overall for 10.9 is over 400. My overall for 10.10 is UNDER 100.) Obviously something has changed big time. I don't mean that my Mac seems slow. I just mean that the old benchmark software can't give us a reference point any more. So on to the new:

NovaBench 1.1(2) benchmarking of my Intel iMac (2.9 GHz Intel Core i5, 16GB 1600 MHz DDR3 SDRAM, Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M 512 MB, 1TB Fusion Drive). Your mileage may vary.

Intel iMac
10.9.5 10.10
Over All Score: 1005 Score: 1070
CPU Tests
- Floating Point Operations/Second:
- Integer Operations/Second:
- MD5 Hashes Calculated/Second:
Score: 516
167669760
317081440
1247258
Score: 526
167139392
324102432
1294706
Ram Test
- RAM Speed:
Score: 224
9401 MB/s
Score: 224
9259 MB/s
Graphics Test
- 3D Frames Per Second:
Score: 240
860
Score: 296
1145
Hardware Tests
- Primary Partition Capacity:
- Drive Write Speed:
Score: 25
889 GB
88 MB/s
Score: 27
145 GB
98 MB/s

In my opinion Yosemite is just iOS for the desktop. You may remember that when Steve Jobs introduced OS X, he said, "one of the design goals was that when you saw it (OS X AQUA) you wanted to lick it!" I think that should sitll be the goal, but that is no longer true, unless you think iOS is "lickable."

Darkmode is nothing.

I installed Yosemite clean, not on top of 10.9, so I can not say what will run or won't. The install took a good 30 minutes.

Apps not purchased through the Apps store will not run unless you change your security setting. That was true before but it is more in System Preferences now.

I hate the new flat dock and trash can.

I will install it and run it here at work when it comes out, but I won't like it.

It just looks cheap.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Apple fixes podcast downloading, browsing bugs with latest iTunes update

Apple fixes podcast downloading, browsing bugs with latest iTunes update

Apple on Thursday rolled out the latest version of iTunes with bug fixes in place for updating of subscribed podcasts and episode browsing.

iTunes 11.3.1 addresses two separate podcast handling problems that caused the app to unexpectedly stop downloading new episodes of subscribed podcasts and freeze the program when browsing through podcast episodes in a list.

The minor update comes nearly one month after Apple released the last major update that brought HD iTunes Extras -- behind-the-scenes footage, short films, director commentaries, HD photos -- to Mac and Apple TV. Apple also announced that Extras will be available for iOS devices when iOS 8 debuts this fall. -- AppleInsider.

Skype ends support for Macs running OS X 10.5.8 and below

Skype ends support for Macs running OS X 10.5.8 and below

Confirming reports that Skype no longer works with older versions of Apple's OS X, Microsoft on Thursday announced it has ended support for Macs running OS X 10.5.8 Leopard or earlier. -- AppleInsider.

Foursquare kills off the 'social media' pretense of data collection

Foursquare kills off the 'social media' pretense of data collection

Foursquare has finally revamped its smartphone app into the version it promised long ago: a service that can passively track and log its users' locations and eventually use that information to offer recommendations. The data that the app will traffic in will prove extremely valuable to local businesses looking to advertise or get insight on how they can drive more people to their doorsteps. And the way that Foursquare captures this information obviates the need for the "social network" aspect that apps have long relied on to motivate (or trick, depending on your perspective) users into sharing. -- Ars Technica.

IBM researchers make a chip full of artificial neurons

IBM researchers make a chip full of artificial neurons

For raw calculating prowess, a run-of-the-mill computer can handily outperform the human brain. But there are a variety of tasks that the human brain--or computer systems designed to act along the same principles--can do far more accurately than a traditional computer. And there are some behaviors of neurons, like consciousness, that computerized systems have never approached.

Part of the reason is that both the architecture and behavior of neurons and transistors are radically different. It's possible to program software that incorporates neuron-like behavior, but the underlying mismatch makes the software relatively inefficient. -- Ars Technica.

Apple doesn't want you posting your messy iOS screenshots on the web anymore

Apple doesn't want you posting your messy iOS screenshots on the web anymore

It seems like a strange thing, but people who write about iOS apps on the web are often ashamed of their status bars. When they post screenshots of an app, they feel embarrassed by the fact that they don't have a full signal from their cellular carrier, or a clear connection to WiFi, or 100% battery life. It's an expression of the pursuit of perfection that marks Apple and its fans as a whole. -- Cult of Mac.

California closer to smartphone 'kill switch' law

California closer to smartphone 'kill switch' law

The state where the iPhone was born came a step closer to a law that might help keep it in your hands.

State Sen. Mark Leno's Smartphone Theft Prevention Act (Senate Bill 962) passed the state legislature this morning with a 51-18 vote. Now it will move on to the Senate for a vote on amendments. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 beta 2 lands on Mac Dev Center

OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 beta 2 lands on Mac Dev Center

Apple dropped a slew of new beta releases earlier this week for iOS 8, Yosemite and Apple TV, but the company is also patching up Mavericks with the second beta build of OS X Mavericks 10.9.5.

OS X 10.9.5 build 13F12 was seeded to developers this morning, after the company just released the first beta for OS X 10.9.5 a little over a week ago. The release notes don't mention any features have been added, but there are a number of new bug fixes. -- Cult of Mac.

5 iOS tips that will help maximize your storage space

5 iOS tips that will help maximize your storage space

We all enjoy stuffing our iOS devices with enough movies, music, photos, and other content to keep your iPhone entertainment system pumping for decades, but overtime your device can get too full.

New games, songs and even an iOS update can put users in quite the dilemma about where to trim some gigs of fat. Luckily when not wanting to part ways with your favorite iOS content there's other convenient ways to free up more storage space.

Today's video takes a look at 5 tidying tips that can free up more storage on your iOS device for when you need it most. Uncover how to manage your storage, address the dreaded "other" space on your device and find even more by simply using these tips. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Display and Locate GPS Coordinates With iPhone

How to Display and Locate GPS Coordinates With iPhone

In this article, John Martellaro shows how to, first, quickly display your latitude and longitude with an iPhone and then search for a latitude and longitude coordinate pair in an iOS map. -- The Mac Observer.

Pages: Rearranging Layered Objects

Pages: Rearranging Layered Objects

For today's article, Melissa Holt will be discussing how to manipulate layered objects in Pages, so if you'd like to change whether one item is behind or in front of another, she'll tell you how. This method is an easy way to move objects to the background or create interesting, multilevel graphics. (Note: Melissa reports that no interesting graphics actually appear in this article, so don't get your hopes up.) -- The Mac Observer.

How to view video files you cannot open in QuickTime

How to view video files you cannot open in QuickTime

Apple provides you with a number of media-handling options in OS X, with QuickTime being the core service for displaying video; however, there will likely be times when you have downloaded a video file that simply will not play in QuickTime. Even if the document looks like a QuickTime file, when opening it you may receive an error that prevents you from viewing its contents.

There are several ways to get around this issue if you run into it, and since it is so prominent, I recommend you keep at least a few of these around on your system to handle odd media files you might encounter. -- MacIssues.

Black Hat: Most Smartphones Come with a Poorly Secured Back Door

Black Hat: Most Smartphones Come with a Poorly Secured Back Door

A system designed to let carriers remotely install software on phones, or change their settings without a user noticing, is open to abuse.

A powerful remote-control system installed on most smartphones could be used by hackers to secretly take control of many devices, allowing theft of data or eavesdropping on communications. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple needs to find a way to outsmart the clones once and for all

Apple needs to find a way to outsmart the clones once and for all

Everyone wants to make a mint in the App Store. But while some developers slave away in coding dens on original ideas, others see a get-rich-quick shortcut through copying.

The result is an App Store littered with clones, frustrated devs, and Apple stuck playing a never-ending game of whack-a-mole to police the rip-off apps. -- Cult of Mac.

Selling an Old iPhone? Here Are Things to Consider

 Selling an Old iPhone? Here Are Things to Consider

Memory matters, but not the way you might expect, and other counterintuitive lessons from the used-phone marketplace.

Apple usually announces a new iPhone in September, so it's not too early to start thinking about your old iPhone. -- New York Times.

OS X Yosemite: Take a Tour of Mail's Best New Features

OS X Yosemite: Take a Tour of Mail's Best New Features

Apple's latest desktop operating system won't officially be released until sometime this fall. But now that the public beta of OS X Yosemite is open, both developers and a large number of Mac owners are able to preview the new OS.

For those who've just started using the beta or are anticipating its launch, we've got some tips on how to best take advantage of the redesigned OS and its many new features.

In this edition, we take on the new features in the beta version of Apple's native email client, Mail. -- Wired.

With iPhoto and Aperture being replaced, you should check out Photo +

With iPhoto and Aperture being replaced, you should check out Photo +

With iPhoto and Aperture being phased out in place of a new Photos app in Mac OS X Yosemite, it's time to take another look at ArcSoft Photo +. It's like iPhoto on steroids. They both handle most of the same tasks, but the new app is a bit beefier and faster. Plus, it's only US$9.99 at the Mac App Store. -- AppleDailyReport.

Emerging networking technology used by Apple, Cisco will frustrate firewalls

Emerging networking technology used by Apple, Cisco will frustrate firewalls

Today's security software is ineffective against an emerging networking technology already in use by Apple for its Siri voice-recognition software, according to research presented at the Black Hat hacking conference this week.

The technology, called Multipath TCP (MPTCP), is a souped-up sibling of TCP, a cornerstone Internet protocol for transferring data packets between computers. Cisco and Juniper have also put MPTCP in some of their equipment. -- IDG News Service.

Moving your iTunes library, holiday specials, and WAV vs AIFF

Moving your iTunes library, holiday specials, and WAV vs AIFF

It may be the dog days of summer, but questions to the iTunes Guy are still coming strong. This week, I look at three questions. I explain how to move an iTunes library to an external hard drive, I look at how to tag Christmas specials of TV series, and I discuss the pros and cons of ripping CDs in WAV and AIFF formats. -- Macworld.

The Devices & Services Myth

The Devices & Services Myth

The "devices & services strategy", as coined by Steve Ballmer, has long been my pet peeve. This is because it clearly attempts to conflate two business models that are diametrically opposed to one another -- monetizing hardware vs. services. While my initial analysis focused on Microsoft, this applies to other companies as well. Of course, this hasn't stopped analysts from arguing in favor of the very same "devices & services strategy" for Apple. The lack of specificity in this argument has always amused me. So let's be specific and look at the avenues available to Apple for monetizing services. -- Tech-Thoughts.

August 07 Thursday's News

 

Apple details 'Siri for Mac' desktop virtual assistant in new patent application

Apple details 'Siri for Mac' desktop virtual assistant in new patent application

While Apple's Siri has been an iOS staple since 2011, the tech has yet to make the jump to OS X. An exhaustive new patent filing, however, details a very similar desktop version of the virtual assistant that can perform dictation, high-level system commands and even act as a "third hand" for Mac users. -- AppleInsider.

What you should expect from Apple's 'iPhone 6'

What you should expect from Apple's 'iPhone 6'

It hardly seems like it's been a year since the iPhone 5S was released, but word on the street is that Apple is planning to reveal its next-generation iPhone on September 9. That's just over a month from now, and the rumor mill has been in full swing all summer, churning out speculation about what Apple will introduce. Since 2008's iPhone 3G, iPhones released in even-numbered years get a new design while phones in odd-numbered years are just and sped up and tweaked. Since this is a redesign year, people are especially interested in seeing how Apple moves the platform forward. -- Ars Technica.

Security expert calls home routers a clear and present danger

Security expert calls home routers a clear and present danger

During his keynote and a press conference that followed here at the Black Hat information security conference, In-Q-Tel Chief Information Security Officer Dan Geer expressed concern about the growing threat of botnets powered by home and small office routers. The inexpensive Wi-Fi routers commonly used for home Internet access--which are rarely patched by their owners--are an easy target for hackers, Geer said, and could be used to construct a botnet that "could probably take down the Internet." Asked by Ars if he considered home routers to be the equivalent of critical infrastructure as a security priority, he answered in the affirmative. -- Ars Technica.

5 tidying tips to help organize your Mac

5 tidying tips to help organize your Mac

Over time when using your Mac it's common to find your desktop in scattered disarray. With photos here and documents there, in the midst of this jumble mess completing further tasks seems trivial. Luckily there's a number of tips that you can use if you find yourself trapped in Mac disorganization.

In today's video take a look at some tips that will help you tidy up how you use your Mac and in return clean up your experience. See how to start tagging your files, use smart-apps and other great ways to get your Mac in structural order. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Secure Your Mac With OS X Gatekeeper

How to Secure Your Mac With OS X Gatekeeper

OS X Mountain Lion was the first version to introduce the Gatekeeper security mechanism. John Martellaro explains how to use it to make your Mac more secure from malware. -- The Mac Observer.

Options for managing Finder windows in OS X

Options for managing Finder windows in OS X

Apple's default approach for window management in the Finder is to provide you with one window in which you can access most of the locations you need on your Mac's file system. In this manner, you should not need to have too many windows open at once; however, there may be times when you will have a number of windows to manage.

This may be especially true if you find it more intuitive to move or copy items by dragging and dropping them from one location to the next, and thereby have a number of windows open for your source and destination locations.

While you can view and switch between windows relatively easily use Apple's Expose window-management feature, it may be a touch frustrating to constantly having your windows splay around on screen to grab them, and instead you might wish to have them in a more consolidated location on screen.

To do this, Apple has several services in OS X that can be used to manage your Finder windows. -- MacIssues.

Two Apple Inventions Surface Pertaining to Touch ID

Two Apple Inventions Surface Pertaining to Touch ID

There have been rumors about a new Touch ID sensor this month and today two patent applications from Apple surface concerning updates to Apple's new fingerprint feature. The first generally relates to circuits that may be used to support fingerprint sensing, including boost circuits, such as inductive boost circuits. The second relates to circuits and packaging for fingerprint sensors. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Reveals 'Hey, Siri' Feature Relating to Future Apps for Restaurant Reservations, In-Vehicle Functionality and more

Apple Reveals 'Hey, Siri' Feature Relating to Future Apps for Restaurant Reservations, In-Vehicle Functionality and more

In December 2013 the US Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that revealed a new restaurant ordering and reservation system that could work with various Apple iDevices. It covered "Managing a Wait List; an Exemplary Ordering System; and an Exemplary Notification System." Today the US Patent and Trademark Office reveals a new patent application from Apple that introduces an energy-efficient voice trigger that can be used to initiate voice- and/or speech-based services on a device via Siri; a low-powered voice trigger that can provide "always-listening" voice trigger functionality without excessively consuming limited power resources. One of the examples used by Apple relates back to the restaurant reservation system introduced in December. -- Patently Apple.

Skype Blocks Customers Using OS-X 10.5.x and Earlier

Skype Blocks Customers Using OS-X 10.5.x and Earlier

Yesterday, and without previous warning, all Mac users running Leopard or earlier versions of OS-X have been locked out of Skype. Those customers are given instructions to update, but following them does not solve the problem. The Skype Community Forum is currently swamped with complaints. A company representative active on the forum said "Unfortunately we don't currently have a build that OS X Leopard (10.5) users could use" but did not answer the question whether they intend to provide one or not. -- Skype Community Forum.

Using Swift in Place of AppleScript

Using Swift in Place of AppleScript

Programmers typically have to learn several languages to do their jobs. In the Apple world, that might include Objective-C to code Mac and iOS apps and AppleScript to automate common tasks. But developer Filip W has shown that Apple's new Swift programming language can be used both for app development and as a scripting language. As a proof of concept, he developed a script to change his Mac's wallpaper in Swift, without using Xcode. -- StrathWeb.

How to fix stuck Time Machine backups

How to fix stuck Time Machine backups

As I mentioned on Sunday, I had problems with Time Machine getting stuck when doing backups. It would say something like 'Backing up 28 MB of 1.25 GB' and stay stuck like that for hours at a time.

I tried the obvious things first -- using Disk Utility to repair disk permissions and the disks themselves. I did this for both my internal hard drive and the backup drive. But it didn't make a difference. I even reformatted the backup disk, wiping all my previous Time Machine backups, but that didn't work either. -- Neil Turner's Blog.

How to Keep Data Out of Hackers' Hands

How to Keep Data Out of Hackers' Hands

The numbers sound abstract: Hundreds of millions of email addresses and other types of personal identification found in the hands of Russian hackers. For people worried that they are caught in the mix, however, the discovery by Hold Security of a huge database of stolen data is very personal. But personal doesn't mean helpless. There are common sense steps everyone can take to keep the impact of hackers to a minimum. -- New York Times.

Using iMac as display for new Mac Pro

Using iMac as display for new Mac Pro

Stephen Hart asked about using a 2010 iMac 27" as an external monitor. It can be done using a Mini DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable. The 2010 (and Late 2009) iMac does not have Thunderbolt.

While I do not have a new Mac Pro, I have connected a 2010 iMac 27" as an external monitor to a new MacBook Pro Retina and a 2013 27" iMac. -- MacInTouch.

A Few Words On Cutting The Cable TV Cord And Using Apple Instead

A Few Words On Cutting The Cable TV Cord And Using Apple Instead

As much as I would like to cut the cable TV cord the only way that can be done is by losing much of the television content I want to watch. A digital video recorder (DVR) is the best tech entertainment invention since sliced bread and it works wonderfully with the 300 channels on my cable subscription so I can watch what I want, when I want to watch it.

How can an Apple watcher and gadget geek girl cut the cable TV cord? -- PixoBebo.

Who Can Save Us From The Coming Computer Security Apocalypse?

Who Can Save Us From The Coming Computer Security Apocalypse?

If I had to bet money, I'd bet on Apple being the one technology company that can save customers from the coming computer security apocalypse.

Apocalypse? Why not? Computer security breaches seem to increase in number and severity with each passing week (and those are only the ones we know about). How long can that continue before there's a true apocalypse; a financial meltdown, a political upheaval, and daily life is altered forever? -- Mac 360.

August 06 Wednesday's News

 

Apple to hold 'iPhone 6' media event on Sept. 9 - report

Apple to hold 'iPhone 6' media event on Sept. 9 - report

Apple is reportedly set to hold a "big media event" on Tuesday, Sept. 9, where it's expected the company will reveal its next-generation iPhone, rumored to come in two larger screen sizes and an all-new form factor. -- AppleInsider.

Apple notifies developers of ongoing iCloud Drive maintenance, reminds to perform routine backups

Apple notifies developers of ongoing iCloud Drive maintenance, reminds to perform routine backups

Apple on Tuesday sent out emails to developers using OS X 10.10 Yosemite Preview builds, warning them to perform regular backups as the company performs ongoing maintenance of iCloud services, including iCloud Drive. -- AppleInsider.

Verizon: We throttle unlimited data to provide an 'incentive to limit usage'

Verizon: We throttle unlimited data to provide an 'incentive to limit usage'

Verizon Wireless has told FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler that its policy of throttling unlimited data users on congested cell sites is perfectly legal and necessary to give heavy data users an incentive to stop using their phones so much. -- Ars Technica.

64-bit Chrome for OS X spotted in Canary and Dev beta channels

64-bit Chrome for OS X spotted in Canary and Dev beta channels

About two months after issuing the first 64-bit Chrome beta builds to Windows users, Google has introduced 64-bit support to the OS X version of the Chrome beta as well. The change was first spotted by iClarified, and we downloaded the Canary version of Chrome to confirm for ourselves. Chrome's Canary channel is the least stable of all the release channels, and it's often where new or experimental features make their first appearance. The Dev channel, also early and unstable but updated less frequently and therefore less tumultuous, has been updated with 64-bit support as well. -- Ars Technica.

Russian hacker group hijacked 1.2 billion usernames, passwords

Russian hacker group hijacked 1.2 billion usernames, passwords

A Wisconsin security firm claims that a Russian criminal group has accumulated the largest known collection of stolen online usernames and passwords via SQL injections, according to a new report in The New York Times on Tuesday.

The Age of Supply, not Demand

The Age of Supply, not Demand

I've been away for a few days not by choice but because this blog has been under continual attack so I couldn't log-in. I must have offended someone. Anyway, I appear finally to be back.

I had lunch last week with my old friend Aurel Kleinerman, an MD who also runs a Silicon Valley software company called MITEM, which specializes in combining data from disparate systems and networks onto a single desktop. Had the Obama Administration known about MITEM, linking all those Obamacare health insurance exchanges would have been trivial. Given MITEM's 500+ corporate and government customers, you'd think the company would have come to the attention of the White House, but no. -- I, Cringely.

The Most Enduring (and Endearing) Features of OS X Throughout the Years. Part II

The Most Enduring (and Endearing) Features of OS X Throughout the Years. Part II

Every new release of OS X brings a full complement of new features. As John Martellaro was looking at the new features of Yosemite last week, he started thinking about what items in the past have been significant and were brought into daily use - and which ones ended up just being gimmicks. This is part II: Lion to Yosemite. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Granted 58 Patents Today Covering Mac Pro Packaging, Siri & Flexible Circuits for Small Devices like a Wristwatch

Apple Granted 58 Patents Today Covering Mac Pro Packaging, Siri & Flexible Circuits for Small Devices like a Wristwatch

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 58 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover two patents. The first covers flexible circuitry suitable for smaller devices like a wristwatch. The second covers Siri. Apple was also granted ten design patents today. One of the key design patents covers the Mac Pro tower packaging. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

GraphicConverter 9.3 Adds Click Recording, Map Coordinates, More

GraphicConverter 9.3 Adds Click Recording, Map Coordinates, More

If you have an image file that can't be opened, then you haven't tried Lemke Software's GraphicConverter 9, a long-time Mac favorite that has been a work in constant motion since 1992. Imports 200 file types and exports 80, plus a quality slideshow player. -- FairerPlatform.

How to restrict Siri, AirDrop, and CarPlay with parental restrictions for iPhone and iPad

How to restrict Siri, AirDrop, and CarPlay with parental restrictions for iPhone and iPad

Every iPhone and iPad comes with a restrictions section built in, also known as parental controls. Aside from doing things like blocking in-app purchases, you can also restrict features such as the ability to use Siri, AirDrop, and CarPlay. Just enable restrictions and choose what features you want to block. -- iMore.

Handy iOS 7 tips and tricks

Handy iOS 7 tips and tricks

I've recently been delivering some bespoke iOS training courses across London and realized that there were quite a few useful tips and tricks that I was demonstrating, which long time users of iPhones and iPads were just were not aware of.

So, to continue in Amsys' ongoing mission to 'spread the Apple love', I thought I would jot a few down here for everyone -- in-case others have missed these too! -- Amsys.

Buying guide: The best computer display

Buying guide: The best computer display

There's a lot to consider when purchasing a new display: size, resolution, performance, and of course, price. If you're in the market to buy a new display for your computer, we're here to help you decipher the specifications and let you know what features to look for and what you can ignore. -- Macworld.

Now Is The Worst Time To Upgrade Your iPhone

Now Is The Worst Time To Upgrade Your iPhone

If you want to buy a new iPhone, don't.

It is reported that Apple will unveil the next iPhone on September 9. Assuming Apple keeps to its pattern, the new iPhone will go on sale the following week.

And when the new iPhone goes on sale, the current models -- the iPhone 5S, 5C, and 4S -- will either drop in price or go extinct. We're a month out from the next iPhone, so it makes little sense to upgrade right now.

Plus, the new iPhone is expected to be a big upgrade from the iPhone 5S. According to numerous reports, it'll have a larger, 4.7-inch screen, thinner design, and zippy internal specs. There has also been talk that there will be an even larger iPhone with a 5.5-inch screen.

If you upgrade to an iPhone 5S or 5C today, you're going to be stuck with a puny 4-inch screen.

But!

There is one reason you may want to upgrade now, even if the new iPhone is coming soon. If your phone is cracked, broken, slow, or nearly nonfunctional, just buy a new one today. The iPhone 5S is a great device, and you won't be disappointed. Plus, it's better to have a slightly outdated phone next month than no phone at all. -- BusinessInsider.

Opinion: Why I'd rather throw my money into a fire pit than give it to Verizon

Opinion: Why I'd rather throw my money into a fire pit than give it to Verizon

Verizon Wireless may be the nation's #1 carrier, but that doesn't mean it's America's most beloved wireless provider. Notorious for the love-hate relationship with its customers, Verizon frequently draws ire of the press and consumers alike who crucify the company and criticize its questionable business practices.

In the wake of a series of customer-friendly moves by T-Mobile, collectively branded under the 'Uncarrier' tagline, one after another horror story concerning Verizon is getting unfold and making headlines.

The press likes to dis Verizon as a greedy corporation that shamelessly takes its customers for a ride under the presumption that everyone else is doing it, too. Verizon's past and present business practices have been ticking me off for quite some time so here's why I'd literally rather throw my money into a fire pit than give it to them...

Here are three ways Verizon thinks you're stupid. -- iDownload Blog.

We should be able to gift, share, resell our digital content

We should be able to gift, share, resell our digital content

There is a growing demand from consumers globally to gift, share and resell digital content and video games according to research findings unveiled by WorldPlay, which specializes in payment processing, risk and alternative payments. It's something I'd love to see happen at Apple's online stores -- and something on which the company MAY be working. -- Apple Daily Report.

August 05 Tuesday's News

 

Apple's first price cuts on 2014 MacBook Pros hit, yield $100-$350 savings for Price Guide users

Apple's first price cuts on 2014 MacBook Pros hit, yield $100-$350 savings for Price Guide users

Continuing a trend of delivering the most cost effective Macs in its history, Apple last week introduced its more aggressively-priced 2014 family of MacBook Pros and then sweetened the pot less than a week later by authorizing additional price cuts on the new models through its resellers, which are now translating to $100 - $350 net savings for users of the AI Price Guides. -- AppleInsider.

Apple seeds fifth beta versions of iOS 8, OS X Yosemite to developers

Apple seeds fifth beta versions of iOS 8, OS X Yosemite to developers

Apple on Monday made iOS 8 beta 5 and OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 5 available to registered developers, bringing bug fixes and stability improvements to the company's next-generation operating systems. -- AppleInsider.

Apple brings iOS 7-style iconography to Apple TV in newest beta

Apple brings iOS 7-style iconography to Apple TV in newest beta

The latest Apple software to receive a Jony Ive-led user interface revamp is the company's Apple TV operating system, which sports an iOS 7-style "flat" look with new icons and updated typography in the latest beta. -- AppleInsider.

Adobe publishes how-to guide for migrating from Apple's Aperture to Lightroom

Adobe publishes how-to guide for migrating from Apple's Aperture to Lightroom

Taking advantage of Apple's decision to discontinue both Aperture and iPhoto in favor of the upcoming OS X Yosemite app "Photos," Adobe on Monday released a quick reference guide to migrating image files from Apple's program to Lightroom. -- AppleInsider.

Hands on: See iOS 8 beta 5′s new features in action

Hands on: See iOS 8 beta 5′s new features in action

Each developer preview of iOS 8 brings new changes to Apple's mobile operating system in preparation of it's official fall release, and while the newly unleashed version Beta 5 boasts many bug fixes, some small new changes to the interface have been sprinkled throughout the new update.

In today's video we go hands-on with iOS 8 Beta 5 and show off all the new tweaks and other additions the new version of iOS 8 has to offer, like accessing Spotlight quicker than ever before, optimization features for iCloud Photos, and so much more.

Take a look in the view above and subscribe to Cult of Mac TV on YouTube to ensure you catch all our latest videos. -- Cult of Mac.

5 changes Apple made in OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 5

5 changes Apple made in OS X Yosemite Developer Preview 5

Today Apple released the fifth developer preview of OS X Yosemite, its next major OS release for the Mac coming later this year.

Like usual, there are some noticeable and not-so-noticeable changes in the new version of Yosemite. Don't worry about spotting them yourself, though. We've got you covered. -- Cult of Mac.

Check out these 5 handy Office Hacks

Check out these 5 handy Office Hacks

Offices get boring quickly, especially if it's at work. Check out the video above for 5 great office hacks to bring some new life and tricks to your humble office. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Adds Spirometry Data Type to HealthKit in iOS 8 Beta 5

Apple Adds Spirometry Data Type to HealthKit in iOS 8 Beta 5

Apple released iOS 8 Beta 5 on Monday. The new developer seed includes a host of fixes across the board in iOS 8, including developer APIs and user features. -- The Mac Observer.

The Most Enduring (and Endearing) Features of OS X Throughout the Years. Part I

The Most Enduring (and Endearing) Features of OS X Throughout the Years. Part I

Every new release of OS X brings a full complement of new features. As John Martellaro was looking at the new features of Yosemite last week, he started thinking about what new features in each release have been significant and were brought into daily use - and which ones ended up just being gimmicks. -- The Mac Observer.

Verizon Responds to FCC's Concerns Over Unlimited Data Throttling, Says Plan is Legal

Verizon Responds to FCC's Concerns Over Unlimited Data Throttling, Says Plan is Legal

Verizon Wireless today wrote a response letter to the FCC's concerns over its plan to throttle its grandfathered unlimited data customers during peak usage times, insisting that its upcoming usage restrictions are permitted under current law. -- Mac Rumors.

iStat Menus 5 Brings Refreshed Look, OS X Yosemite Support, More Data

iStat Menus 5 Brings Refreshed Look, OS X Yosemite Support, More Data

Bjango today released iStat Menus 5, the newest version of its popular Mac system monitor. The program brings a refreshed design, compatibility with OS X Yosemite, and enhanced per-app metrics and stats. Additionally, time and world clocks are now available for more than 120,000 cities along with support for additional languages. -- Mac Rumors.

How to secure and lock down your Mac

How to secure and lock down your Mac

There are numerous ways that a thief can get into your Mac, including booting your system to another hard drive to bypass the security of the built-in operating system and access any file on disk, or simply booting to the OS X Recovery partition and using the password reset tools to change the password of an account on the system. While keychain information and other secured documents will be safe from such approaches, other non-secured files will still be accessible.

If you are concerned about theft, there are several ways you can ensure your Mac or at least the data on it are secured. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted a Major Magnetic Resonance Power System Patent

Apple Granted a Major Magnetic Resonance Power System Patent

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 58 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a patent that is titled "Combining power from multiple resonance magnetic receivers in resonance magnetic power system," which relate generally to utilizing a wireless power transmission in a portable computing environment. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted Patent for a Microwave Frequency Communication System Covering a Wireless Disposable Wristband

Apple Granted Patent for a Microwave Frequency Communication System Covering a Wireless Disposable Wristband

The US Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 58 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a surprising invention that relates to communications systems, and more particularly to an autonomous battery-free microwave frequency communication device like an iPhone which can communicate with a wireless disposable wristband, a future iWallet and beyond. Apple introduced their new HealthKit framework at their World Wide Developer Conference in June and we could now see how today's invention will be able to play a very important role within hospitals and other kinds of medical institutions. -- Patently Apple.

Apple hires Angela Ahrendts' confidant & former Nike exec to lead social media efforts

Apple hires Angela Ahrendts' confidant & former Nike exec to lead social media efforts

Apple is giving its social media department a significant shot in the arm this week. The Cupertino-based company has hired Musa Tariq, the former social media chief for both Nike and Burberry. At Nike, Tariq ran general social media marketing as well as social media partnerships with athletes across all Nike product platforms, and at Burberry he led "strategy and innovation" for social media. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple changing Gatekeeper app signing rules in OS X 10.9.5 & Yosemite, could break some apps

Apple changing Gatekeeper app signing rules in OS X 10.9.5 & Yosemite, could break some apps

An upcoming change introduced in the latest Mavericks and Yosemite developers previews will require some developers to re-sign their applications and submit updates to the Mac App Store in order to get around Gatekeeper's watchful eye. According to a technical note from Apple, any apps built and signed on a version of OS X older than 10.9 will now be flagged by Gatekeeper has not having a valid signature. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Granted Patent Backside iPad Gaming Controls & More

Apple Granted Patent Backside iPad Gaming Controls & More

Late last month we posted a report titled "Microsoft considers a new Splittable Xbox Controller for Surface Tablet Game Play," and therein noted that the smartest approach to gaming controls on a tablet actually came by way of Apple's cool patent about backside touch controls for the iPad. Today, the US Patent and Trademark Office officially granted Apple this patent. With Apple bringing their new gaming "Metal" technology to iOS 8 next month, we're bound to see console quality gaming for the first time coming to iDevices like the iPad. In fact we already know that the BioShock game is going to be one of the first debuting in September. If backside gaming controls were introduced later this year, Apple would certainly have iPads flying off the shelves for Christmas. In July we posted a report titled "Apple's CEO is sharply focused on the iPad with Hints of Significant Innovation on the Way." It's unknown at this time if Apple's backside controls will actually make it for 2014, but this is certainly considered a "significant innovation" for the iPad. I think this would send shockwaves through the industry if Apple pulled it off in the not-too-distant future. Yet as always, only time will tell. -- Patently Apple.

Clone a Mac with SuperDuper!

Clone a Mac with SuperDuper!

SuperDuper! is an application that makes a perfect clone, of a Mac's hard drive, on a different hard drive. When you use it to back up a Mac, it copies the entire operating system--along with all the applications, files and almost everything else. This gives it a couple of advantages over other backup solutions such as OS X's built in Time Machine.

In this tutorial I'll show you how to start using SuperDuper! clones as a backup, how to access the backups--if you need to--and how to restore from them. -- Tuts+.

August 04 Monday's News

 

Brains behind subscription Beats Music to also oversee Apple's iTunes Radio

Brains behind subscription Beats Music to also oversee Apple's iTunes Radio

Beats Music CEO Ian Rogers will assume control of Apple's iTunes Radio service, according to a new report, uniting both of Apple's streaming music services under a single executive as the company gears up for a renewed assault on incumbent industry leaders Spotify and Pandora. -- AppleInsider.

President signs bill making it once again legal to unlock cell phones

President Obama signs bill making it once again legal to unlock cell phones

President Obama on Friday put his signature to to the Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act, a bill resolving a number of legal conflicts under the Digital Millennium Copyright Act that previously presented legal challenges for consumers seeking to unlock their mobile phones. -- AppleInsider.

Terrorists embracing new Android crypto in wake of Snowden revelations

Terrorists embracing new Android crypto in wake of Snowden revelations

Security researchers announced Friday that they have found new evidence to bolster claims from the National Security Agency that terrorists have altered their countermeasures in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations. -- Ars Technica.

Get word and character counts for any selection in OS X

Get word and character counts for any selection in OS X

If you regularly need to count the words in text that you are composing or otherwise managing, then there are several approaches for doing this. A common one is to simply copy whatever text you are interested in and paste it in a Word or Pages document, and then use the word counting features in there to count your words; however, if you find yourself doing this frequently then you can create a special service for counting words. -- MacIssues.

Apple wants your OS X, iOS devices to manage power based on their location

Apple wants your OS X, iOS devices to manage power based on their location

Apple wants your Mac OS X and iOS devices to manage their power use based on where you are at a particular time. The company has filed a patent (number 8,793,520) with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for "power management of electronic devices based on charging location." -- AppleDailyReport.

Fixing Odd Mac Mouse or Trackpad Behaviors & Random Clicks

Fixing Odd Mac Mouse or Trackpad Behaviors & Random Clicks

The mouse and trackpad are pretty essential to desktop Mac users, so if the input devices start acting up with mystery clicks, clicks not registering, erratic motions, and other weird behavior, you have good reason to be frustrated. -- OS X Daily.

How to troubleshoot Mac Wi-Fi problems

How to troubleshoot Mac Wi-Fi problems

For most of us, Wi-Fi has become our preferred way to connect our Macs to other networked devices and the Internet. However, most of us also have times when those connections slow down or fail altogether. When that happens, however, there are several things you can do to diagnose and (ideally) fix the problem. -- Macworld.

Mac OS: Versions, builds included with PowerPC Macs (since 1998)

Mac OS: Versions, builds included with PowerPC Macs (since 1998)

Learn the version(s) of Mac OS included with PowerPC-based Macs produced since 01 Jan 1998. If you're looking for information about Intel-based Macs (produced since 2006), see this article.

Important: You cannot normally use a Mac OS version earlier than the one that was included with the computer. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Message to IT from Mac users: Tread lightly

Message to IT from Mac users: Tread lightly

Reader Anthony Lanier wishes to have a cordial conversation with his IT department. He writes:

The division I work in uses Macs but we've recently been told that our computers and devices will soon be run by the company IT department, which is very Microsoft and Windows-centric. They've solicited our feedback before proceeding but I honestly don't know what to suggest. Any ideas?

Before I embark on what may appear to be attacks on IT, let me say from the outset that working in IT is a thankless job. They hear from the people they're trying to help only when those people have a problem, and much of the time they're approached in anger. So first, be sympathetic to their work and next, be grateful that they care enough to ask for feedback. I'd suggest something along these lines. -- Macworld.

Which is the best movie streaming box for under £100? Roku Streaming Stick vs Apple TV vs Chromecast and more

Which is the best movie streaming box for under £100? Roku Streaming Stick vs Apple TV vs Chromecast and more

The rise in the number of media streaming services has been scarily rapid in the last couple of years. There are now so many ways to have movies and TV shows delivered to your home, at a variety of subscriptions and fees, that you could never be found wanting for something to watch.

Unless you don't have access to them, of course.

Smart TVs most often provide an easy solution, featuring apps for all the major services, Blu-ray players, TV set-top boxes, games consoles and there's always the old practice of hooking up your laptop to a telly. But what if you have none of these, or don't fancy the fuss? What else can you do to ensure you can watch Netflix, Amazon Prime Instant Video, Now TV, BBC iPlayer and the other major content providers? -- Pocket-lint.

Five iPhone Security Features to Protect Data and Privacy

Five iPhone Security Features to Protect Data and Privacy

Fast growing mobile technology is making it increasingly difficult to prevent theft of personal data and intrusion of privacy of users. Many have become victims of cyber attacks or cyber crimes and have had their passwords, identifications, and credit card details stolen.

Folks at Redmond Pie have posted a simple guide to secure your confidential data using a few security measures -- International Business Times.

Keep it Reel: Make your iPad into a professional recording studio

Keep it Reel: Make your iPad into a professional recording studio

Since the introduction of the iPad in 2010, I have dreamed of the day when I could walk into a studio and record, produce, and mix a live band using just my tablet. Recently, that dream became reality: I had the opportunity to produce and record a session for Ella Joy Meir--a very talented up-and-coming songwriter and composer based in the Boston/New York area. The plan was to record "You'll Return," an original song that she co-wrote with Michal Weiner, using a band made up of drums, acoustic and electric guitars, bass, vocals and piano. -- Macworld.

The best apps for shooting and editing videos

The best apps for shooting and editing videos

Let me fill you in on a little secret; no one wants to watch your hour-long vacation videos. Friends and family will oblige you, but they are only being polite. What would make everyone's day is if you would just throw together the best five or 10 minutes of the trip, set it to a nice soundtrack, add a few effects, and call it a day.

We've got a list of the best apps for shooting and editing videos so you can quickly slap together the perfect montage and keep your friends from falling asleep during your kid's graduation memories. -- iDownload Blog.

How to troubleshoot and fix common issues with your iPhone and iPad

How to troubleshoot and fix common issues with your iPhone and iPad

When you experience poor network connections, slow or sluggish performance, or even times when the device simply won't respond, there are a wide range of symptoms that may have one thing in common, a simple solution. -- Gigaom.

The Ultimate Guide For Using Your iPad

The Ultimate Guide For Using Your iPad

The best way to maximize your experience with one of the iPad is to learn as much as possible about its capabilities.Continue on to learn useful tips to make your iPad usage the best it can be. -- DMS.

August 01 Friday's News

 

Office for iPad update adds support for third-party fonts, ability to send as PDF

Office for iPad update adds support for third-party fonts, ability to send as PDF

Microsoft's Office for iPad suite, which includes Word, Excel and PowerPoint, was given a significant update on Thursday, giving users the ability to utilize third-party fonts in Word, and the option to export files as PDFs in all three programs, among other new additions. -- AppleInsider.

Apple activates in-house content delivery network, begins migrating content downloads - report

Apple activates in-house content delivery network, begins migrating content downloads - report

Following months of rumors, Apple appears to be in the early stages of launching its own in-house content delivery network, the latest in a series of steps taken by the company in recent years to reduce its reliance on third-party infrastructure vendors to deliver content to customers. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to roll out in-store iPhone 5s screen replacement program on Aug. 4

Apple to roll out in-store iPhone 5s screen replacement program on Aug. 4

Apple Stores will on Monday expand their iPhone repair services to include iPhone 5s screen replacements, helping to cut down on overall cost and turnover rates. -- AppleInsider.

5 tips to make your Mac the best college wingman ever

5 tips to make your Mac the best college wingman ever

Transitioning to the college lifestyle can be awkward at first. Being away from home, having a heavy workload and still wanting to hangout with friends can be a lot to manage all at once.

Luckily, your Mac can help relieve a little of that stress throughout the school year. In today's video, take a look at these five hot Mac tips that can make your new year of college easier: be prepared for thieves, find the best way to take notes and more. -- Cult of Mac.

Lust List: Gear so great we can't stop talking about it

Lust List: Gear so great we can't stop talking about it

You know you've found a great piece of gear when you can't wait to tell your friends about it. "Check this out," you gush, eager to share the latest thing you just can't live without. "You've gotta get one of these."

That's what Lust List is all about, and this month we're all abuzz about gear for music, grooming, eating, getting organized and maybe even saving your life. -- Cult of Mac.

Basic Tips for Using the Dock and Trash in OS X

Basic Tips for Using the Dock and Trash in OS X

Nancy Carroll Gravley offers up some basic tips for using and understanding the Dock and the Trash in OS X that will particularly helpful to people who are new to Macs. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X: Configuring FileVault

OS X: Configuring FileVault

For today's article, Melissa Holt is going to cover one of the most powerful security tools on your Mac-FileVault. She'll discuss why you need it, how you'll turn it on, and a really easy way you could lose access to all of the files on your computer. (Don't do that last thing, OK?) -- The Mac Observer.

Manage applications that use your location in OS X

Manage applications that use your location in OS X

Some apps you use in OS X may handle location information to bring you directions, weather, or other details about your location without you needing to enter zip codes or other details manually. While it may be no question that some applications like Maps will need to use your location information, at times seemingly unrelated programs may attempt to access your location and you might wish to know what they are and be able to disable them, if desired. -- MacIssues.

Apple Files Inventions Regarding In-App Programs, Fingerprint Scanning Enrollment and Two that Support the Disabled

Apple Files Inventions Regarding In-App Programs, Fingerprint Scanning Enrollment and Two that Support the Disabled

Only a few Apple inventions per week out of dozens filed present fresh ideas of things to come. Today we published an interesting one about future iWallet security features. Beyond this main invention, we noticed a few other inventions that might interest a few Apple fans. In March Apple -- Patently Apple.

The 12 reasons Apple employees love working for the company

The 12 reasons Apple employees love working for the company

Business Insider did some trawling through the employee reviews site Glassdoor to find out what Apple employees love about working for the company.

Perhaps unsurprisingly in a company co-founded by a man who saw his mission as changing the world, the feeling that you have a chance to do just that topped the list. It's the philosophy reflected in the memo Apple gave to new employees on their first day, saying that people who join the company want their work "to add up to something … something big … something that couldn't happen anywhere else."

Why Mac Benchmarks Don't Matter

Why Mac Benchmarks Don't Matter

How fast is your Mac? Back in the day we would buy a new computer based on how fast it was measured in megahertz and then gigahertz. Both were considered synonymous with speed.

The problem is that benchmarks don't really work in the world in which we actually work. You know, the real world. Benchmarks measure specific functions as numbers-- CPU speed, graphic speed, storage access speed, etc. For most of us, that's worthless. Here's why. -- Mac 360.