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March 31 Tuesday's News

 

Apple begins accepting non-iPhone trade-ins in the US, Europe

Apple begins accepting non-iPhone trade-ins in the US, Europe

Consumers looking to make the switch from an Android, BlackBerry, or Windows Phone device to an iPhone can now bring their old handset directly to Apple, where they could trade it in to receive credit toward the purchase of a new iPhone. -- AppleInsider.

Apple seeds OS X 10.10.3 Yosemite beta with tweaked Photos app

Apple seeds OS X 10.10.3 Yosemite beta with tweaked Photos app

Apple on Monday pushed out to developers and public beta testers a fresh OS X 10.10.3 version, building on recent releases introducing a new Photos app and APIs for MacBook Force Touch capabilities. -- AppleInsider.

Luxurious

Luxurious

Apple's new watches are priced in a pattern unlike any of the previous pricing models for Apple products.

Previous pricing model for iPhone, iPad, Mac and iPod were typically structured around storage differences. The higher the storage, the higher the price. The Mac had a slight variation where processor and graphics offered some additional configuration options. -- Asymco.

Experience tech's greatest-ever demo as an opera

Experience tech's greatest-ever demo as an opera

If you think the 2007 unveiling of the iPhone is tech's most impressive demo, you haven't seen anything yet!

Back in 1968, when Tim Cook was barely 8 years old, an engineer named Doug Engelbart put on a computer demonstration at the Fall Joint Computer Conference in San Francisco.

Over the course of 90 minutes, Engelbart showed off for the first time a stream of new technologies that would shape computing for the next half-century: windows, hypertext, computer graphics, the mouse, video-conferencing, word processing, real-time collaborative editing and more. -- Cult of Mac.

The Net Neutrality Mystery

The Net Neutrality Mystery

My friend Andy Regitsky, whom I have known for more than 30 years, follows the FCC, blogs about them, and teaches courses on -- among other things -- how to read and understand their confusing orders. Andy knows more about the FCC than most of the people who work there and Andy says the new Net Neutrality order will probably not stand. I wonder if it was even meant to? -- I, Cringely.

How to Use iTunes Match

How to Use iTunes Match

For $24.99 per year, or about two dollars per month, iTunes Match keeps all of your music in iCloud so you can access any song at any time from any device instead of picking and downloading your favorite playlists every time you sync your device. Plus, Apple will provide you with high quality playback using 256 Kbps AAC DRM free versions of your music, even if your original copy was lower quality. -- MacRumors.

How to prevent letters fading on your Mac's keyboard

How to prevent letters fading on your Mac's keyboard

Your Mac's keyboard is built to be fairly durable; however, there are instances where the letters on it may wear. For external Apple keyboards this can result in a blank white key, and for backlit keyboards you may find the sharp-edged letters are now a splotch of translucent white. This can have you considering a replacement, which can be expensive for MacBook systems. If you are noticing fading keys on your Mac, then there is an easy way to prevent the problem from spreading, and even fix a key that is already faded. -- MacIssues.

Learning to See Data

Learning to See Data

Developing instinctual learning can help scientists see patterns in the digital universe.

For the past year or so genetic scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York have been collaborating with a specialist from another universe: Daniel Kohn, a Brooklyn-based painter and conceptual artist.

Mr. Kohn has no training in computers or genetics, and he's not there to conduct art therapy classes. His role is to help the scientists with a signature 21st-century problem: Big Data overload.[I don't know what they are so excited about. Bob Muenchen and I were doing this with Systat back in the 80's. Well, "Everything Old is New Agan."] -- New York Times.

Apple Granted a Powerful Patent that allows Users to View Maps, Documents, Pictures & Medical Images in a Whole New Way

Apple Granted a Powerful Patent that allows Users to View Maps, Documents, Pictures & Medical Images in a Whole New Way

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 36 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a single patent that Apple has acquired from 3 North Carolina engineers represented by the law firm Ober | Kaler. The granted patent covers a user interface that allows control of the image (scrolling and magnification) on the device display by uniquely tilting the device. -- Patently Apple.

Meerkat and Periscope show how simple, fun, and weird live-streaming can be

Meerkat and Periscope show how simple, fun, and weird live-streaming can be

Like the frequent posture of its cute, furry namesake, a live-streaming video app called Meerkat recently got people to stand up and take notice.

Released about a month ago as an iPhone app, Meerkat lets you broadcast live videos that your Twitter followers can view through the app or on the Web. Broadcasts range from mundane clips of people's pets to live updates on breaking news, like last week's explosion in New York City. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple Watch FAQ: preorders, try-on appointments, availability -- what you need to know

Apple Watch FAQ: preorders, try-on appointments, availability -- what you need to know

With just over a week before Apple Watch previews and reservations kick off in Apple retail and online stores, there are a few things to keep in mind if you're planning on purchasing the device in the early weeks of availability. -- 9to5Mac.

Recommended settings for Wi-Fi routers and access points

Recommended settings for Wi-Fi routers and access points

These Wi-Fi router (or Wi-Fi base station) settings are for all Macs and iOS devices. These settings will give you the best performance, security, and reliability when using Wi-Fi.

Wi-Fi routers are 802.11a/b/g/n/ac access points that include AirPort Extreme base stations, AirPort Express, and AirPort Time Capsule. "Wi-Fi router" is a generic term and includes Wi-Fi base stations and third-party 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi access points. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Deregister iMessage: Frequently Asked Questions

Deregister iMessage: Frequently Asked Questions

Learn how and why to deregister iMessage.

You might need to deregister iMessage if you have a non-Apple phone and can't get SMS or text messages someone sends you from an iPhone. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Resolve issues between iTunes and third-party security software

Resolve issues between iTunes and third-party security software

If you can't open iTunes, download content, sync your device, or use Home Sharing, your security software might be the cause.

Security software created by companies other than Apple can prevent iTunes from connecting to Apple servers or to devices. Sometimes, you might see a numeric error message when you sync, update, back up, or restore your device. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

iCloud: Why am I getting junk mail (spam)?

iCloud: Why am I getting junk mail (spam)?

Unsolicited bulk email messages are commonly called junk mail or spam. Here's why you might get junk mail, and what you can do about it. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mac 911: Good backup habits making migrating to a new Mac easier

Mac 911: Good backup habits making migrating to a new Mac easier

To go forward, you must back up. This is an old rubric and bad joke about the importance of keeping regularly updated copies on hand of your personal and work documents and, ideally, your entire drive. Backing up is often an important stage in migrating to a new machine as well. This week, I cover my recommended methods. -- Macworld.

OS X: Easy Screen Sharing with Messages

OS X: Easy Screen Sharing with Messages

You don't need to pop round to help people fix their Macs any more, thanks to Screen Sharing in OS X. This gives you the power to share items on the screen, or even take control of a remote Mac. -- Computerworld.

How to Connect to Invisible Wi-Fi SSID Networks from Mac OS X

How to Connect to Invisible Wi-Fi SSID Networks from Mac OS X

A fair amount of wireless routers choose not to broadcast their identity (called an SSID) as a simple security precaution, thus knowing how to join an invisible network from a Mac is important. -- OS X Daily.

Joe Kissell Takes Control of Automating Your Mac Again

Joe Kissell Takes Control of Automating Your Mac Again

Joe Kissell is back with an update to Take Control of Automating Your Mac, bringing the book to v1.1, and providing more information on getting things done faster, easier, and automatically. From the ease of an application launcher to the power of Keyboard Maestro to the complexity of Microsoft's Visual Basic in Office, Joe shares some examples and advice on how getting started and then pushing it to the next level. Find out why you shouldn't worry about system updates breaking your workflows, what you can do with built-in Yosemite's Dictation Commands and more. -- MacVoices.

How to Print iPhone Photos Without Any Hassle

How to Print iPhone Photos Without Any Hassle

I bet all your recent photos are in digital format.

While it's always nice to have photos at your fingertips anytime, anywhere, there is something to be said about having special pictures printed out.

If you're looking to print iPhone photos without any hassle, here are three options. -- Apple Gazette.

iCloud Photo Library: Explained

iCloud Photo Library: Explained

iCloud Photo Library -- currently in beta -- was designed to keep all your personal photos and videos safe, synced, and available on all of your devices.

That sounds simple, but the idea of a hybrid library, where our content seamlessly spans the internet and our iPhones, iPads, and Macs -- where the line between online and offline blurs -- can be tough to grasp. -- iMore.

I gave up my iPhone for a week, and my life didn't end

I gave up my iPhone for a week, and my life didn't end

When I called my mother to tell her I was putting away my iPhone for a week and she wouldn't be able to call me, she asked why. Sometimes the woman who gave me half my genes says things that sound like they were borne from some bizarre, inaccessible plane of reality, and sometimes she says things that are so spot-on, I start to suspect she's taken up residence in my brain. When I told her I felt I needed to separate myself from this little glowing, vibrating device, her response fell under the latter category. -- Grist.

Apple Watch Edition perks vs. price: There's an absurdity to it

Apple Watch Edition perks vs. price: There's an absurdity to it

The emerging world of luxury devices---enter the Apple Watch Edition---means no lines, VIP phone support and private service. But there's an absurdity to it given the technology won't hold value over time. -- ZDNet.

March 30 Friday's News

 

Apple's new MacBook employs unorthodox keyboard design to achieve maximum thinness

Apple's new MacBook employs unorthodox keyboard design to achieve maximum thinness

To pursue its continuing obsession with thinness, Apple has gone to extraordinary lengths with the keyboard on the new 12-inch MacBook, redesigning it in a way that is thoroughly distinct from its Macbook Air and MacBook Pro stablemates. -- AppleInsider.

How Apple's new MacBook gets nearly as much battery life as the MacBook Pro with a battery half the size

How Apple's new MacBook gets nearly as much battery life as the MacBook Pro with a battery half the size

Apple has packed its all-new MacBook with some impressive technology, but its outstanding battery life -- nine hours from a single charge -- may be the most staggering. AppleInsider took a look under the hood to see how they could have done it. -- AppleInsider.

Inside iCloud: Apple Inc has quietly doubled its Reno, Nevada data center site

Inside iCloud: Apple Inc has quietly doubled its Reno, Nevada data center site

Apple has greatly expanded its data center near Reno, Nev., about four hours east of Silicon Valley. However, it appears that the company's aggressive growth in iCloud server capacity is only just getting started, with massive room for expansion surrounding the facilities. -- AppleInsider.

AT&T's plan to watch your Web browsing--and what you can do about it

AT&T's plan to watch your Web browsing--and what you can do about it

If you have AT&T's gigabit Internet service and wonder why it seems so affordable, here's the reason--AT&T is boosting profits by rerouting all your Web browsing to an in-house traffic scanning platform, analyzing your Internet habits, then using the results to deliver personalized ads to the websites you visit, e-mail to your inbox, and junk mail to your front door. -- Ars Technica.

British users can sue Google in UK over 'secret tracking'

British users can sue Google in UK over 'secret tracking'

The UK's Court of Appeal has confirmed an earlier landmark High Court decision that a group of British consumers using Apple's Safari browser to access Google's services can sue the US company in the UK. Google has always argued that the appropriate forum for such cases is in the US, so this sets an important precedent for future legal actions against foreign companies operating in the UK. -- Ars Technica.

The best cable modem (for most folks)

From The Wirecutter: The best cable modem (for most folks)

If you're paying for cable Internet, you're probably paying a separate monthly fee for the privilege of renting a cable modem from your ISP. Your ISP gets free money and you get a cable modem that might not even be good enough to hit the speed you're paying for. If you buy your own cable modem, you can get something better and recoup the cost in as little as a year--and then start saving anywhere from $6-10 each month. -- The Wirecutter.

The only good way to brick your MacBook

The only good way to brick your MacBook

I pretty much love Apple and Lego in equal measure, so the idea of somehow combining the two is never going to fail to win my approval.

Assuming that I'm not the only person to feel this way, allow me to introduce the Brik Case: a fantastic Kickstarter campaign intended to raise the cash needed to manufacture a MacBook case that can be decorated with Lego bricks, to create any design of your choosing. -- Cult of Mac.

How App Store optimization can harm indie developers

How App Store optimization can harm indie developers

I followed the advice of an App Store optimization expert last year in an attempt to promote my iPhone app. Big mistake. It felt wrong at the time, and it did more harm than good. Now I've learned to trust my gut instincts instead.

Marketing gurus and snake oil salesmen have been selling search engine optimization (SEO) for years. The trouble is that there are millions of websites competing for the top spot and they can't all win.

Now, with more than a million apps on the App Store and only a handful ever visible in the rankings, a new industry of App Store optimization, or ASO, has emerged. And like SEO, it has big problems. -- Cult of Mac.

Make your Mac safer for your kids

Make your Mac safer for your kids

Keeping your kids safe on your computer is one of the more important things you can focus on as a parent. Mac OS X has a great tool built right in to do just that: Parental Controls.

It's fairly easy to set up Parental Controls on Mac, but if you need a quick hand at making them work for you, our video will walk you through the process. -- Cult of Mac.

Numbers: Using the Quick Calculations Bar

Numbers: Using the Quick Calculations Bar

Today's Quick Tip is all about how to work with that fancy calculations bar that'll appear at the bottom of your Numbers window when you select a group of cells. Using that, you can quickly add formulas to your spreadsheet, for example, or learn more about the different functions available to you. Come on in and check it out! -- The Mac Observer.

Intel's New 3D NAND Technology Allows for Greater Than 10TB Solid-State Drives

Intel's New 3D NAND Technology Allows for Greater Than 10TB Solid-State Drives

Intel and Micron on Thursday announced the availability of new 3D NAND technology that enables high-density flash devices with three times more storage capacity than other NAND technologies in production. 3D NAND technology is also more cost efficient than planar NAND, with faster performance, improved latency and new sleep modes that result in low-power use by cutting power to inactive NAND die.

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

Probing the Whole Internet for Weak Spots

Rapidly scanning the Internet have become vital to efforts to keep it secure.

When a major flaw in the encryption that secures websites was revealed this March, Zakir Durumeric, a research fellow at the University of Michigan, was the first person to know how serious it was. By performing a scan of every device on the Internet he realized its full potential, before even the researchers who had first identified the flaw, known as FREAK.

How To Use Siri to search the App Store, iTunes Store and iBooks Store

How To Use Siri to search the App Store, iTunes Store and iBooks Store

Sometimes searching the App Store can be an overwhelming task. You might already know what you want to download, or other times you might get distracted when you open the store and forget why you were there, and typing in what you want to download is old fashioned now. With iOS 8, you can use Siri to search the App Store, iTunes Store, iBooks Store, and more for you. It's all a matter of asking Siri with the right commands. -- 9to5Mac.

iTunes: Frequently asked questions about viewing and syncing videos

iTunes: Frequently asked questions about viewing and syncing videos

You can play videos and even sync them to iPad, iPhone, and some iPod models. Here are answers to frequently asked questions about video playback in iTunes and on mobile devices. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Resetting an AirPort base station FAQ

Resetting an AirPort base station FAQ

This article answers questions about resetting AirPort base stations including AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, and AirPort Time Capsule. It also includes steps for how to reset your AirPort base station. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Solutions for connecting to the Internet, setting up a small network, and troubleshooting

Solutions for connecting to the Internet, setting up a small network, and troubleshooting

This article covers solutions for connecting to the Internet, setting up a small network, and troubleshooting. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Can a Mac be a gaming Pc? How the planet is altering for Mac gamers

Can a Mac be a gaming Pc? How the planet is altering for Mac gamers

For years, Mac gaming has been virtually an oxymoron - not definitely worth thinking of if your appreciate of games extends beyond Football Manager. But factors are changing. Big games are coming to Mac faster and quicker, instead of arriving 3 years later..." 7:58 AM -- Sentry Review.

Hands On: Dragon Dictate 4.0.6 (OS X, Windows)

Hands On: Dragon Dictate 4.0.6 (OS X, Windows)

Do not ever give voice recognition software to a writer who's a keyboard junkie. Do not ever give Dragon Dictate to any one who saw how rubbish dictation software was in the 1980s, 1990s and probably 2000s but they didn't check. For a few minutes sitting in front of Dragon Dictate will destroy their worldview like a politician discovering that encryption makes monitoring computers hard. Dragon Dictate works and it works extremely, just extremely well. It also does more than dictation: this is powerful software for word processing by voice command. -- MacNN.

How to Exit Out of Full Screen Mode in OS X Yosemite

How to Exit Out of Full Screen Mode in OS X Yosemite

Now that the Mac windows green maximize button defaults to sending apps and windows into Full Screen Mode, a notably sized cohort of OS X users who perhaps didn't know this behavior changed until accidentally finding out, are left confused with the following question; "how do I get out of full screen mode in OS X?" The good news is that exiting out of Full Screen Mode in any Mac app in OS X Yosemite is really easy, and if you do find yourself in this situation don't feel dumb, because some very techy folks have stumbled into the same situation. -- OS X Daily.

Hands On: Carbon Copy Cloner 4.0.6 (OS X)

Hands On: Carbon Copy Cloner 4.0.6 (OS X)

Nothing digital really exists unless it exists twice. For all that we have these great interconnected cloud services, there is still a hard drive holding on to our data somewhere and all hard drives fail eventually. They're like politicians in that respect: they go on until they fail. Carbon Copy Cloner is a way to make failures annoying rather than fatal to your work. It backs up any or all of your files and it also optionally creates a separate and bootable hard drive. -- MacNN.

USB Type-C peripherals are on the way, and storage devices are first up

USB Type-C peripherals are on the way, and storage devices are first up

With Apple's latest MacBook and Google's newest Chromebook just out and featuring the new USB Type-C connector, we're on the lookout for peripherals that use the interface, and storage devices appear to be first out of the gate. -- IDG News Service.

The Process behind Apple's 'Sensor-on-Glass' or 'In-Cell' Touch Displays Comes to Light

The Process behind Apple's 'Sensor-on-Glass' or 'In-Cell' Touch Displays Comes to Light

In September 2012 Apple introduced new In-Cell iPhone glass technology that Phil Schiller referred to as "Integrated touch." Months later, one of Apple's patents covering in-cell displays came to light. Late yesterday a patent application from Apple was filed in Europe revealing their specialized lamination process that they referred to as sensor-on-glass. It's now commonly known as "In-Cell." Apple had some production problems with devices using this process initially and had a temporary fall out with LG over the technology. While it may be commonplace today to use such touch displays, Apple was one of the first to bring it to market. -- Patently Apple.

Hands-On With the Apple Watch: A Developer's Experience at Apple's WatchKit Labs

Hands-On With the Apple Watch: A Developer's Experience at Apple's WatchKit Labs

Earlier this month, Apple began inviting a select number of developers to an Apple Watch development lab in Sunnyvale, California, located near the company's main Cupertino campus. Developers were invited to reserve a testing appointment to test their Apple Watch apps on actual Apple Watch devices to get ready for the device's April 24 launch.

One of the developers who had a chance to visit Apple's WatchKit lab and get hands-on time with the Apple Watch shared his testing experience with MacRumors and gave us some of his thoughts on the device after spending all day using it. -- MacRumors.

How To Delete iPhone Apps For Good

How To Delete iPhone Apps For Good

What Apple's iPhone platform provides in ease of use, it takes away in control. As easy as it is to learn how to use an iPhone, it can be tricky to get it to behave exactly like you want it to -- that's why almost nobody was particularly thrilled when Apple decided to upload U2's newest album onto iPhones across the world without asking first. -- Time.

How to manage email and not let it manage you

How to manage email and not let it manage you

Unless you do your job exclusively via email, there's no excuse for you to have that tab or app open. There I said it...

But you do have it open most of the time, right? It's hard to ignore. Suddenly you see the Inbox (1) in bold appear and you rush to see what it is. And it's never a game changing message. But the micro-second between seeing it and comprehending it gives us a rush, and that rush becomes addictive. Email is an important medium of communication, indisputably. -- The Next Web.

3 Apple TV Surprises

3 Apple TV Surprises

Apple surprised a lot of people when it did not announce a new version of its Apple TV hardware at its Spring Forward media event earlier this month. Instead, the company slashed the price of its current streaming box, which was introduced in 2012, from $99 to $69. -- The Motley Fool.

The part of Apple TV experience that really sucks

The part of Apple TV experience that really sucks

Setting up an Apple TV for basic streaming and iTunes access is ridiculously easy: Plug it in, turn it on, then hold your iPhone or iPad to the top of the Apple TV. The Apple TV copies Wi-Fi and iTunes account information from the iOS device and you're off and running. When it comes time to watch stuff from cable channels, however, the setup process becomes a nightmare. -- iMore.

Too Embarrassed to Ask: What Is Apple TV, Anyway?

Too Embarrassed to Ask: What Is Apple TV, Anyway?

What is Apple TV and do I need an iPhone to use it?

The question isn't silly. Even the tech media is seemingly confused by Apple TV sometimes -- does "Apple TV" refer to the hardware that exists today, the cable-killing video service that Apple is trying to create or a theoretical Apple-branded television set? -- Re/code.

Living with: Nine years of the Apple TV

Living with: Nine years of the Apple TV

Prognostications after long term use of Apple's set top box.

Once upon a time, there was a nascent technologist in the early part of the century. This writer was flummoxed by having to burn DVD for video playback for his occupation at the time, given the cost of the media. Then, a certain Cupertino fruit-branded computer company released the Mac mini's first iteration. Connected with a $20 video dongle, and an audio adapter, the (at the time) cutting-edge concept of a computer connected to a television solved many local problems. Apple, and this technologist, have both come a long way since then. The vast majority of the functionality of a Mac mini connected to a TV was replaced by the Apple TV shortly thereafter. The future is bright, but vague, for Apple's once-hobby. What's come before, and what's yet to come? -- MacNN.

March 27 Friday's News

 

Apple concept would require users to input health data to keep using their iPhone

Apple concept would require users to input health data to keep using their iPhone

Apple has explored presenting iPhone users with non-dismissible notifications, such as requiring personal health data to be entered before resuming normal use of their device, in a concept that could help break bad habits. -- AppleInsider.

Woz: Apple wasn't built to sell $17,000 watches

Woz: Apple wasn't built to sell $17,000 watches

Steve Wozniak seems to have a complex relationship with both modern-day Apple and, particularly, the Apple Watch. In an interview at the Automate/Promat Show in Chicago yesterday, Apple's co-founder said Apple's foray into high-end wearables marks a very different turn for the company he helped to found. -- Cult of Mac.

Create a more secure iPhone passcode with special characters

Create a more secure iPhone passcode with special characters

Sure, you've got Touch ID set up on your iPhone 6, but you'll still need a passcode to keep your iPhone secure. If you have an older iPhone without Touch ID, or your fingerprint isn't recognized for any reason, you'll need to fall back on a passcode.

If you want to make your passcode even more secure, try using our recipe for a code with special characters instead of a simple number-based solution. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Digitally Sign a PDF Using Preview on Mac

How to Digitally Sign a PDF Using Preview on Mac

When you receive a PDF document by email that you must sign, the process of printing out the file, signing on the dotted line with a pen, scanning the signed document and sending it back can be a rather tedious task. Fortunately, Apple introduced the ability to digitally sign a PDF document using Preview, a program that comes preinstalled on every Mac, on OS X Lion or later. -- MacRumors.

Use Preview's Loupe to Emphasize Areas of PDFs and Images

Use Preview's Loupe to Emphasize Areas of PDFs and Images

If you use Apple's Preview program regularly to view images and PDF documents on your Mac, then you might find yourself opening some documents where you might need to zoom in on some details. There are several ways to do this in Preview using its standard Zoom function, but in addition you can use the Loupe to keep your document mainly at one zoom level, and only increase the zoom of the area under the loupe. -- MacIssues.

Apple Invents a Thinner Display Structure for iDevices that Could Eventually Lead to a new iPhone Form Factor

Apple Invents a Thinner Display Structure for iDevices that Could Eventually Lead to a new iPhone Form Factor

On March 26, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals methods of thinning down iDevices with a new display assembly method. The invention also covers a ceramic or sapphire surface glass having an electrically energized component embedded within it that could eventually lead to new iPhone form factors down the road. -- Patently Apple.

Two Apple Camera Related Inventions Reveal Aspects of Autofocus & In-Stream Rolling Shutter Compensation Features

Two Apple Camera Related Inventions Reveal Aspects of Autofocus & In-Stream Rolling Shutter Compensation Features

In 2013 Apple updated iMovie with a new Rolling Shutter feature. Apple noted on their support page that "Many camcorders record video in a way that can cause image distortion if the camera moves a lot during recording (especially quick panning movements), or if the camera is recording fast motion. A video clip may appear wobbly or skewed in these instances. iMovie has a Fix Rolling Shutter feature to reduce this kind of motion distortion." Today, Apple's patent application that's behind this feature has been published by the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. In a second patent application published today, we learn a little more about the technology behind Apple's autofocus feature using an artificial muscle which is referred to in the industry as an Electro-Active Polymer Device. -- Patently Apple.

Quick Tour of Office 2016 for Mac

Quick Tour of Office 2016 for Mac

If you're interested in Office 2016 for Mac, this is an 12 minute video report discussing the new suite.

Office 2016 for Mac was announced earlier this month and includes updates to Word, Excel, PowerPoint along with Outlook and OneNote. Office 2016 for Mac Preview is integrated with the cloud so you can access your documents on OneDrive, OneDrive for Business and SharePoint at anytime, anywhere and on any device. You can also share your files easily with others right from the Word, Excel or PowerPoint.

How To Decode Apple's Tech Specs pages before buying a new Mac, Part 2

How To Decode Apple's Tech Specs pages before buying a new Mac, Part 2

As I noted in Part 1 of How-To: Decode Apple's Tech Specs pages before buying a new Mac, Apple has designed the Mac purchasing process to be easy: pick a model, pick the good, better, or best configuration, hand over your cash, and enjoy your computer. Since most people get confused by tech specs -- bullet points filled with numbers and acronyms -- Apple downplays them in its marketing materials, leaving customers to sort through the details and figure out what most of them mean.

But these specs are really important when you're shopping for the right Mac for your current and future needs. So I've created this How-To guide to walk you through each of Apple's Tech Specs pages using clear explanations, hopefully enabling you to properly understand what you're about to buy. Part 1 focused on the "big 5″ Mac specs you really need to know about, and this Part 2 looks at the rest -- generally things that remain the same in a given model, regardless of the configuration you choose. -- 9to5Mac.

Create your own iTunes Radio station

Create your own iTunes Radio station

Tap New or New Station on the iTunes Radio screen. Tap to select a genre, or search for your favorite artist, song, or genre.

You can also create a station from the Now Playing screen in iTunes Radio by tapping and selecting New Station from Artist or New Station from Song. If you're listening to a song from your music library, just tap Create. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

OS X: When your computer spontaneously restarts or displays "Your computer restarted because of a problem."

OS X: When your computer spontaneously restarts or displays

In rare situations, your Mac may do one or more of the following: spontaneously restart, become unresponsive, turn off, display a message "Your computer restarted because of a problem." or display a message "You shut down your computer because of a problem." -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Turn on "three finger drag" for your Force Touch trackpad

Turn on

"Three finger drag" is a Multi-Touch gesture in OS X. It lets you use three fingers to move the active window on your screen.

Here's how to turn on three finger drag if your Mac has a Force Touch trackpad. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

About the 'Automatically Add to iTunes' folder

About the 'Automatically Add to iTunes' folder

Learn how iTunes uses the "Automatically Add to iTunes" folder to automatically import iTunes-compatible content into your iTunes library.

The iTunes Media folder contains an "Automatically Add to iTunes" folder.

When you put iTunes-compatible content in this folder, iTunes analyzes it for compatibility and then adds it to your iTunes library. If a file isn't compatible, iTunes places it in the Not Added folder. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Control a Mac With Siri-Like Voice Commands

Control a Mac With Siri-Like Voice Commands

While Siri hasn't yet made its way to the Mac, it's still possible to replicate some of the functionality provided by Apple's digital personal assistant with tools available in OS X.

In this tutorial, I'll show you how to recreate some of Siri's magic using custom Dictation Commands, available within Automator in OS X 10.10 Yosemite. -- Tuts+.

OS X: Back to the Beginning

OS X: Back to the Beginning

It's hard to believe that 14 years have elapsed since OS X -- then Mac OS X -- was originally released as a supposedly finished product. But it wasn't quite the first version of Apple's Unix-based OS to be available to the public. The previous September, Apple sold you a Public Beta, for $29, designed to demonstrate that, first and foremost, the new OS was real and that it would soon be ready for public consumption. -- The Tech Night Owl.

iPhone or iPad freezing when you delete apps? Here's the work-around

iPhone or iPad freezing when you delete apps? Here's the work-around

You touch and hold an icon to put your iPhone or iPad into jiggly mode, tap the X button to delete an app, and then... nothing.

Literally nothing. Everything just freezes up and seems to hang for a while. Eventually the confirm delete dialog box pops up, but it takes way longer than it should. Instead of letting you quickly delete an app and get on with using your device, it just feels like everything is locked up and you're stuck. If you're experiencing this problem on iOS 8 here's the good news -- there is a workaround, and we're tacking it on this week's iOS Help. -- iMore.

History of the Dogcow

History of the Dogcow

The dogcow was originally a character in the Cairo font that used to ship with the Macintosh; it was designed by Susan Kare. I had always been interested in this critter ever since I first saw it in the LaserWriter Page Setup Options dialog, sometime during my stint in Apple's Developer Technical Support (DTS) group in 1987. To me it showed perfection in human interface design. -- Egg Freckles.

How Steve Jobs Made Presentations Look Effortless

How Steve Jobs Made Presentations Look Effortless

Steve Jobs turned presentations into an art form because he approached keynote presentations like an artist. Musicians, actors, and designers master their crafts over many hours--10,000 hours, according to writers like Malcolm Gladwell. Mastering public speaking skills is no exception and Steve Jobs was an artist in the field. -- Forbes.

Big Vulnerability In Hotel Wi-Fi Router Puts Guests At Risk

Big Vulnerability In Hotel Wi-Fi Router Puts Guests At Risk

Guests at hundreds of hotels around the world are susceptible to serious hacks because of routers that many hotel chains depend on for their Wi-Fi networks. Researchers have discovered a vulnerability in the systems, which would allow an attacker to distribute malware to guests, monitor and record data sent over the network, and even possibly gain access to the hotel's reservation and keycard systems. The vulnerability, which was discovered by Justin W. Clarke of the security firm Cylance, gives attackers read-write access to the root file system of the ANTlabs devices. The discovery of the vulnerable systems was particularly interesting to them in light of an active hotel hacking campaign uncovered last year by researchers at Kaspersky Lab. In that campaign, which Kaspersky dubbed DarkHotel. -- Wired.

March 26 Thursday's News

 

Why Apple is banking on USB-C for its all-new 12-inch MacBook and beyond

Why Apple is banking on USB-C for its all-new 12-inch MacBook and beyond

Apple recently made a splash by announcing a new 12-inch MacBook that features a single port for both power and data transfers: USB-C, a new connector spec that may sweep away not just USB 2.0, but also Thunderbolt -- and possibly even Apple's Lightning. -- AppleInsider.

Apple, U.S. tech giants call for government spying reform in open letter to Congress

Apple, U.S. tech giants call for government spying reform in open letter to Congress

A number of powerful tech companies sent an open letter to Congress, President Barack Obama and other government agencies on Wednesday, arguing for drastic change in the nation's surveillance laws that currently allow for bulk consumer data collection. -- AppleInsider.

Fake Apple Store employees try to sell customers on Microsoft

Fake Apple Store employees try to sell customers on Microsoft

I've always found the people who work in Apple Stores to be incredibly helpful and, considering that their job is to sell you on expensive products, honest. One thing that's never happened to me, however, is having an Apple Store employee suggest that I consider choosing a Samsung handset or Windows Phone over an Apple device. -- Cult of Mac.

Your location has been shared more than 5,000 times in the last two weeks

Your location has been shared more than 5,000 times in the last two weeks

Smartphone users know that sharing personal data with apps can be part of the price of free apps, but when it comes to how frequently those apps give that data to third parties, the numbers will shock you. -- Cult of Mac.

How to get all the awesome extra sounds for GarageBand 10

How to get all the awesome extra sounds for GarageBand 10

If you dig creating fresh beats and smooth grooves on your Mac, you'll likely love GarageBand. It's a fantastic bit of musical creation kit for anyone, regardless of native ability or experience. You can use loops to make new songs, play your own music with MIDI keyboards--even make your own ringtones for your iPhone. It's quite versatile. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X: Use Shortcuts to Jump Around in Text

OS X: Use Shortcuts to Jump Around in Text

If you didn't know that you could use keyboard shortcuts to move to the beginning or end of a line, paragraph, or document under OS X, then boy, do we have a Quick Tip for you. In this article, we'll cover our most-used shortcuts, and we'll even point you toward a list of dozens more you can use if you're so inclined. We're good like that. -- The Mac Observer.

A New Apple TV with 4K Would NOT Break the Internet

A New Apple TV with 4K Would NOT Break the Internet

Often, for the sake of dramatic effect and the attention it brings, technical articles are couched in terms of dramatic change. And while change is what our industry is all about, the technical people behind the scenes know that nothing all happens at once. The same applies to 4K streaming. -- The Mac Observer.

How To Recycle Old iPhones, iPads, and Other Mobile Devices

How To Recycle Old iPhones, iPads, and Other Mobile Devices

Now that we've wrangled all those now unnecessary cables, it's time to chip away at the devices that go with them. If you have some old iPhones or even feature phones tucked away, now's the time to set them free. Kelly explains the digital equivalent of sending them off to a farm in the country. -- The Mac Observer.

Facebook Turns Messenger Into a Platform, Allows Third-Party iOS App Integration

Facebook Turns Messenger Into a Platform, Allows Third-Party iOS App Integration

At today's F8 Facebook Developer Conference, Facebook debuted its new Messenger Platform, a major update to the Messenger service that allows users to send content like GIFs, photos, videos, and more from third-party apps within the Facebook Messenger app for iOS. -- MacRumors.

Unable to boot to a secondary hard drive? This may help

Unable to boot to a secondary hard drive? This may help

One long-standing and useful feature in OS X is its ability to boot from practically any mountable partition, including external drives. This allows for quick ways to test an installation, isolate different uses of your Mac to separate boot drives, troubleshoot aspects of your Mac's hardware and internal storage, and create bootable backups of your Mac's hard drive. While useful, there are times when your Mac will not boot to such partitions, even if they are perfectly healthy. If so, then here is what to do about it. -- MacIssues.

Critical Sharks

Developers and the Fear of Apple

UI designer Eli Schiff has posted an article about the "climate of fear" surrounding Apple in the software development community. He points out how developers who express criticism in an informal setting often recant when their words are being recorded, and how even moderate public criticism is often prefaced by flattery and endorsements. Beyond that, the industry has learned that they can't rely on Apple's walled garden to make a profit. The opaque app review process, the race to the bottom on pricing, and Apple's resistance to curation of the App Store are driving "independent app developers into larger organizations and venture-backed startups." Apple is also known to cut contact with developers if they release for Android first. The "climate of fear" even affects journalists, who face not only stonewalling from Apple after negative reporting, but also a brigade of Apple fans and even other journalists trying to paint them as anti-Apple.

  1. Critical Sharks Part I: "You Can't Say That!"
  2. Critical Sharks Part II: Schmearing Colored Paint
  3. Critical Sharks Part III: Design Fallacies
  4. Critical Sharks Part IV: Fear of Apple

How To Decode Apple's Tech Specs pages before buying a new Mac

How-To: Decode Apple's Tech Specs pages before buying a new Mac (Part 1)

Buying a Mac is designed to be easy. Apple has a handful of different models, each generally available in good, better, and best configurations. You're supposed to start with the specific Mac model that fits your needs, pick a configuration that has the price and features you want, and walk away happy with your purchase. (Better yet, do your research online and save money after ordering from Amazon, or use the product guides off to the bottom right of this page.) -- 9to5Mac.

If you can't back up or restore your Mac using Time Machine

If you can't back up or restore your Mac using Time Machine

Check these things if you see an alert that Time Machine is unable to back up your data, or if you can't select your backup disk in Time Machine preferences. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

iPhoto: Troubleshooting Camera Connections

iPhoto: Troubleshooting Camera Connections

iPhoto does not recognize a camera connected to the computer.

This document contains troubleshooting steps for connecting digital cameras with iPhoto. These steps include ensuring the camera is compatible, the computer has the latest version of Mac OS X, iPhoto is the most current, and the camera works with the Picture-Transfer-Protocol (PTP) feature. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Contact Apple TV content providers

Contact Apple TV content providers

Learn how to get information or support from a third-party content provider.

For information or support from one of these third-party content providers, contact the provider directly. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Invents Smart Packaging that's Able to Set Up your New Device while Still in the Packaging at the Apple Store

Apple Invents Smart Packaging that's Able to Set Up your New Device while Still in the Packaging at the Apple Store

On March 26, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals smart packaging that can assist in performing personalization of a new electronic device while still in the packaging at the Apple Store. Today, Apple Store reps will help a user set up their new devices if they so wish at the store. This new process will simply expedite this personalized service without removing the device from the packaging. -- Patently Apple.

Apple and Beats Developing Streaming Music Service to Rival Spotify

Apple and Beats Developing Streaming Music Service to Rival Spotify

In what would be the biggest change to its music strategy in years, Apple is pressing ahead with a sweeping overhaul of its digital music services that would allow the company to compete directly with streaming upstarts like Spotify. -- New York Times.

What You Don't Usually Need To Do Is Now Easily Done On Your Mac

What You Don't Usually Need To Do Is Now Easily Done On Your Mac

Here's a blast from the past. Remember file extensions? Of course not. You're a Mac user. But if you remember DOS or came from Windows, file extensions were the norm.

Interestingly enough, file extensions are the norm on the Mac, too, but Apple prefers to hide them in OS X, because, you know, Apple. If you don't have any money to devote to an expenditure that reminds you of Microsoft and the 1980s, try ManageNameExt. Go ahead. It's free. -- BohemianBoomer.

How To Rip The Color From Photos

How To Rip The Color From Photos

Nearly every Mac graphics app or photo enhancement app has an option to strip the color from a photograph. So, why would you pay money for an app that does nothing else?

Good question. But in the spirit of different strokes for different folks I tried Monochrome for Mac. As the name suggests, Monochrome rips the color from photographs. If you ever wanted to see the world in blazing black and white, this is the app to use. -- TeraTalks.

Censoring myself for Apple

Censoring myself for Apple

In his widely circulated "Fear of Apple" post, Eli Schiff accuses iOS developers of withholding criticism of Apple or censoring themselves to stay on Apple's good side, prominently including and citing me. -- Marco Arment.

iOS 8 review: Six-months later

iOS 8 review: Six-months later

Six months ago Apple released iOS 8, the biggest update to the company's mobile operating system since the advent of the App Store in 2008. We reviewed iOS 8 when it went live in September, and took a second look at iOS 8 three months later in our roundtable. Now it's been half a year, iOS 8.2 has been released, iOS 8.3 is already in beta, and adoption is inching close to 80 percent. So, it's time to take another look, six months later. -- iMore.

Preparing Your Mac For Resale or Recycling

Preparing Your Mac For Resale or Recycling

You can erase your Mac and set it up so it is ready for a new owner by using the recovery partition. This hidden part of your hard drive allows you to boot into a special mode where you can erase all of the contents on your Mac and re-install the system. There are a few things you should do first, such as logging out of iCloud and deauthorizng your account in iTunes. By using a special security feature of Disk Utility on the recovery partition, you can ensure that your data is erased. -- MacMost.

How to make and receive phone calls on your iPad

How to make and receive phone calls on your iPad

Now with Continuity on iOS 8 you can actually make and receive phone calls on your iPad. Want to hear more? It's actually pretty simple, and it can be very helpful and convenient for those times when you hear your iPhone ringing, but realize it is in the other room. Maybe you can't answer the call in time, or you just don't feel like getting up to go retrieve it to see who is calling you. It's situations like these that make continuity such a great feature. As long as your iPad and iPhone are both running iOS 8, and are on the same Wi-fi connection, making and receiving calls on your iPad is both simple and convenient. -- iPad Insight.

Portgate: Why people need to stop panicking about the MacBook's USB-C port

Portgate: Why people need to stop panicking about the MacBook's USB-C port

What came first iPad or MacBook? MacBook right? Maybe not. This new MacBook (reviewed here: 2015 MacBook review) is what you get if you cross the iPad with a MacBook Air. In many ways the old iBook brand, discontinued in 2006 when Apple made the switch to Intel processors, would have been a better name for it. I bet someone at Apple is kicking themselves for giving the iBookstore that name. -- Macworld UK.

I tried to live with a high-end feature phone. I can't.

I tried to live with a high-end feature phone. I can't.

The feature phone. Still big in Japan. Still being sold in the millions. Still relevant, though? And does it even matter what a 30-something tech writer at a Western tech site thinks? Japan's large elderly population -- people who haven't even heard of Angry Birds, Gmail or Uber -- they're the ones sticking to their flip phones. Hardy, easy to use and cheaper than an iPhone. (If you need a primer on the phenomenon of gara-kei, you should probably read up on that here, but in short, it's how Japan's mobile phone market sped ahead with early technologies, then faltered when smartphone competition arrived.) So let's try using one. The best and newest feature phone available in Japan, no less. It's pitched as bringing the best smartphone features to the flip form factor. Is it better than a plain, old smartphone? Good lord, no. -- Engadget.

Dad and daughter recreated 'Jurassic Park' with $100,000 in Lego pieces

Dad and daughter recreated 'Jurassic Park' with $100,000 in Lego pieces

Lego pieces and dino-DNA -- both considered "building blocks of life" and very useful for creating dinosaurs from scratch. -- Mashable.

March 25 Wednesday's News

 

Apple releases new iOS 8.3 betas for both developer and public testing

Apple releases new iOS 8.3 betas for both developer and public testing

The fourth beta of iOS 8.3 was issued to developers on Tuesday, while members of the public iOS beta program were given their second build of the forthcoming software update. -- AppleInsider.

iOS 8.3 allows users to turn off password requirement for free App Store downloads

iOS 8.3 allows users to turn off password requirement for free App Store downloads

Apple's pre-release betas of iOS 8.3 include an option to disable password entry when downloading free applications from the App Store, removing a potential inconvenience for users. -- AppleInsider.

Apple buys flexible, fast database software firm FoundationDB with eye on the cloud

Apple buys flexible, fast database software firm FoundationDB with eye on the cloud

A report on Tuesday claims Apple recently purchased FoundationDB, a database software company that touts fast speeds via a durable and scalable NoSQL, ACID-compliant architecture. -- AppleInsider.

Tennessee fights for its right to squash municipal broadband expansion

Tennessee fights for its right to squash municipal broadband expansion

The State of Tennessee is fighting for its right to enforce a law that prevents municipal broadband networks from providing Internet service to other cities and towns. -- Ars Technica.

Machine consciousness: Big data analytics and the Internet of Things

Machine consciousness: Big data analytics and the Internet of Things

During my visit to General Electric's Global Research Centers in San Ramon, California, and Niskayuna, New York, last month, I got what amounts to an end-to-end tour of what GE calls the "Industrial Internet." The phrase refers to the technologies of cloud computing and the "Internet of Things" applied across a broad swath of GE's businesses in an effort to squeeze better performance and efficiency from the operations of everything from computer-controlled manufacturing equipment to gas turbine engines and power plants. It's an ambitious effort that GE is hoping to eventually sell to other companies as a cloud service--branded as Predix. -- Ars Technica.

Yes, the 2015 MacBook Air supports 4K displays at 60Hz

Yes, the 2015 MacBook Air supports 4K displays at 60Hz

When the new MacBook Pros and Airs were announced, we reported that both systems were capable of driving 4K displays at a refresh rate of 60Hz. In our head-to-head comparison of the two systems, we did it again. But in the last few days a number of readers have pointed out that Apple's tech specs page for the new MacBook Airs claims a maximum resolution of 2560×1600. -- Ars Technica.

Lego brick master turns heads with turntable

Lego brick master turns heads with turntable

Standing in front of a classic turntable, you might not expect to be impressed by the brick work.

But it's the first thing that comes to mind when beholding the sci-fi hi-fi created by Korean Lego artist Hayarobi.

No detail is overlooked on Hayarobi's record player, which he called The Planet. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple could take location tracking to the next level

Apple could take location tracking to the next level

You're driving home late one night with your friend following. You lose him at a red light and, realizing he doesn't have your address, need to tell him where to go.

You ask Siri to share your route with your friend, and voila, he's able to follow your location as you drive with the Maps app.

Such is the kind of scenario that could arise in the future, thanks to a new Apple patent. -- Cult of MX.

How to mark all iMessages as read on your iPhone

How to mark all iMessages as read on your iPhone

If you're like me, you've got a ton of unread iMessages on your iPhone and tapping through them all just to get rid of your app badge anxiety seems like a bit too much effort. -- Cult of Mac.

How To Unload Unneeded Cables from Your Old Electronic Devices

How To Unload Unneeded Cables from Your Old Electronic Devices

Odds are good if you have been a technology user for any length of time, you have extra cables laying around. What should you do with them? Kelly has a few ideas to help you clean out those drawers. -- The Mac Observer.

Two More Cool-But-Semi-Hidden Yosemite Features

Two More Cool-But-Semi-Hidden Yosemite Features

Continuing the theme I began here last week, allow me to introduce you to another pair of useful but semi-hidden OS X Yosemite features. Feature #1 is recording movies of your Mac or iDevice screen; #2 is putting your written signature onto a PDF document. -- The Mac Observer.

How to overcome Safari hijacked by a JavaScript warning

How to overcome Safari hijacked by a JavaScript warning

Whether it is from clicking on spam or otherwise being caught in a malicious trap, every now and then such oversights when browsing the Web can have you inadvertently load phishing or spam pages that attempt to pull ransomware attacks on you. When this happens, you will see a warning window claims your browser has been locked and you will have to pay a fee or give them information to release it. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted a Patent for a Cooperative Magnetic Attachment System Supporting Various Dual iPad Pro Scenarios & Beyond

Apple Granted a Patent for a Cooperative Magnetic Attachment System Supporting Various Dual iPad Pro Scenarios & Beyond

On March 24, 2015, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 60 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular granted patent report we cover Apple's advanced magnetic attachments units that could lead to a possible dual iPad configuration supporting a virtual keyboard to make it function as a notebook, a digitizing board and beyond. The patent covers other configurations that could fit various iPad Pro scenarios as well as new kinds of stands and applications for the car and more. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted 60 Patents Today Covering Depth Mapping for Face Detection, a New Flexible Lighting Connector Dock & More

Apple Granted 60 Patents Today Covering Depth Mapping for Face Detection, a New Flexible Lighting Connector Dock & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 60 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover two of Apple's distinct granted patents. The first one was first highlighted in our 2013 report titled "Take a Peek at a Few Key PrimeSense Patents that Apple Gained." The patent covers in-depth 2D and 3D mapping in context with face detection which is a precursor to facial recognition. In the second patent we cover a new iPhone dock using a flexible connector system. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

How To Rearrange and hide Apple TV channels to personalize and declutter your home screen

How-To Rearrange and hide Apple TV channels to personalize and declutter your home screen

As the current Apple TV continues to add countless new and sometimes unfamiliar channels to the home screen, the out-of-the-box experience grows increasingly complex for new and existing users. The Apple TV home screen consists of colorful rectangles that represent various content providers for serving up entertainment over the Internet to your television, but actually finding something to watch can prove difficult and intimidating for even a seasoned Apple TV owner. Many of the channels require authenticating an active cable or satellite subscription to unlock full access while others are interest-specific likes sports or culture. -- 9to5Mac.

If you forgot your Apple ID password

If you forgot your Apple ID password

Use these steps to reset your Apple ID password and regain access to your Apple ID account. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Import contacts from your SIM card

Import contacts from your SIM card

Learn about the SIM card in your iPhone and how to use it to import contacts from your old phone.

Like most cellular phones, the iPhone uses a SIM card to determine the phone number, carrier, and features that are available for the account. Unlike some phones, the iPhone doesn't store contacts and phone numbers on the SIM card.

This article applies to all iPhone models except for the iPhone 4 (CDMA model), which doesn't have a SIM card. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Freedom Takes Another Blow From Apple, Microsoft

Freedom Takes Another Blow From Apple, Microsoft

Both are reducing OS choices for PC owners, pushing PCs further towards becoming disposable appliances.

Call it another blow against OS freedom, part of the slow creep towards turning PCs into consumer appliances. Call it the choice of security over liberty, one our society has made so many times since 2001. Call it annoying. But in the wake of both Apple and Microsoft cracking down on what OSes can be installed on their PCs, I'd like to call it unnecessary. -- PC Magazine.

How to Use iCloud Password to Login & Unlock Mac OS X

How to Use iCloud Password to Login & Unlock Mac OS X

Rather than remembering a separate password and set of login information for unlocking a Mac, OS X offers the option to use an iCloud password to login to the computer at boot, reboot, authentication, locked screens, and all login windows instead. This is a helpful feature for users who like to keep things simple and use a single login and password for all Apple related tasks on their Mac, since the Apple ID can access iCloud, the App Store, iTunes Store, Mac App Store, FileVault, and quite a bit more. -- OS X Daily.

Enable Single Sign On Printing in OS X

Enable Single Sign On Printing in OS X

I've been to a fair few of our clients' sites now that run a managed print server for their network printing needs. Almost every time, the print queues need to be SSO / Kerberised to work with Active Directory accounts. Otherwise the users are asked to provide authentication for these AD accounts every time they print.

This is easy enough to fix from the command line, but what if you have a number of printer queues of which most or even all need to be kerberised? -- Amsys.

Got Boot Camp And Windows On Your Mac? Here's How To Back It Up

Got Boot Camp And Windows On Your Mac? Here's How To Back It Up

By night I'm a couch potato. By day I fight computer problems with a trusty Mac. And, yes, it runs Windows, too; specifically Boot Camp.

I can do that because the world is infested with Windows PCs and many users need my help. I can do it on a Mac because Apple was courageous enough to allow OS X and Macs to run Windows, which means a Mac can run about anything. -- BohemianBoomer.

March 24 Tuesday's News

 

Apple posts fifth OS X 10.10.3 beta, adds OS X Recovery updates

Apple posts fifth OS X 10.10.3 beta, adds OS X Recovery updates

Apple on Monday seeded an updated beta build of OS X 10.10.3 to developers and public beta testers, the fifth pre-release version of the company's desktop operating system that brings updates to the new Photos app as well as OS X Yosemite's recovery tools. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's new Apple Pay acceptance decal kits raise customer awareness at participating merchants

Apple's new Apple Pay acceptance decal kits raise customer awareness at participating merchants

Apple recently activated a program allowing merchants to order Apple Pay decal kits to dress up shop windows and registers, which raises customer awareness of where Apple's payment service is accepted. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents 3-sensor iPhone camera with light splitting cube for accurate colors, low-light performance

Apple invents 3-sensor iPhone camera with light splitting cube for accurate colors, low-light performance

An Apple patent published on Tuesday details a miniaturized iPhone camera system that employs a light-splitting cube to parse incoming rays into three color components, each of which are captured by separate sensors. -- AppleInsider.

Apple location sharing patent could bring path tracking to Find My Friends

Apple location sharing patent could bring path tracking to Find My Friends

Apple's current Find My Friends app lets iPhone and iPad users spot acquaintances on a map, but an invention detailed on Tuesday takes things to a whole new level with path tracking and route following. -- AppleInsider.

Chrome for Mac no longer crashes when loading strings that can't be named

Chrome for Mac no longer crashes when loading strings that can't be named

Users of Google Chrome for Mac are no longer vulnerable to strings of foreign-language characters that for more than six weeks triggered crashes each time the browser attempted to render them. -- Ars Technica.

Woz: 'The future is scary and very bad for people'

Woz: 'The future is scary and very bad for people'

Tech pioneers like Bill Gates, Stephen Hawking, and Elon Musk have warned humanity of the dangers of AI for years, and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak says he's finally a believer in the doomsday scenarios. -- Cult of Mac.

Hidden iOS 8 trick lets you change words to ALL CAPS with a tap

Hidden iOS 8 trick lets you change words to ALL CAPS with a tap

Sometimes you just need to emphasize something. One of the best ways to do so when you're texting is to make the words you really need to get across in all capitals. Or maybe you just want to shout at someone, and an ALL CAPS sentence will certainly get that across for you. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Surf the Web on a Mac Plus

How to Surf the Web on a Mac Plus

The Internet as we know it today didn't exist when the Mac Plus was introduced in 1986, so is it even possible to get one online and loading modern Web pages? Turns out the answer is yes, and Jeff Keacher did it just to show it can be done. -- The Mac Observer.

Images of Apple Wireless Keyboard With Backlight Keys and Power Button Appear in Online Store

Images of Apple Wireless Keyboard With Backlight Keys and Power Button Appear in Online Store

A new Apple wireless keyboard featuring backlight keys and a power button has been spotted on the Apple Online Store in Czech Republic and Hungary, with an identical Arabic version appearing on the U.S. storefront. The graphic render shows controls for adjusting the brightness of the backlight added to the F5 and F6 keys, as found on current MacBook models, while the eject key for CDs has been replaced with a power button. -- MacRumors.

New iOS 8.3 Features: Speaker Calls With Siri, No Password Required to Download Free Apps

New iOS 8.3 Features: Speaker Calls With Siri, No Password Required to Download Free Apps

The most recent iOS 8.3 beta was seeded to developers on March 12, but even though its been in the hands of testers for over a week, people are still discovering hidden features. Over the weekend, two new iOS 8.3 features were found, including an update to Siri and an update to app purchase settings. -- MacRumors.

Remote Apple Events may break with Security Update 2015-002

Remote Apple Events may break with Security Update 2015-002

Remote Apple Events allows you to use AppleScript routines to control another Mac; however, if you have installed the latest security updates for OS X, then you might find your scripts and any programs that use Remote Apple Events may not work, and give you an error. This may be especially true for communication between systems running OS X 10.8 and 10.9 Server, and OS X 10.10. -- MacIssues.

Holy smoke! The new MacBook Pro literally is twice as fast

Holy smoke! The new MacBook Pro literally is twice as fast

Benchmark tests performed on the 2015 MacBook Pro revealed it does have twice the read/write performance as the mid-2014 model.

Tests performed with the Blackmagic benchmark tool revealed read/write speeds of more than 1,300MBps/1,400MBps, respectively. So what's changed?

The new MacBook Pro does have a faster Intel dual-core i7 2.9GHz processor and 1866MHz LPDDR3) RAM, but the real performance gain is in the latest PCIe M.2 flash module. The 2014 model used a PCIe 2.0 x2 card and the 2015 model uses a PCIe 3.0 x4 (four I/O lanes) card. Twice the lanes, twice the speed. While Apple uses a proprietary flash card made by Samsung, Intel, Micron and SanDisk are all working on similar technology, so it's likely to soon wind up in high-end PCs. -- ComputerWorld.

Use third-party keyboards on your iPhone or iPad

Use third-party keyboards on your iPhone or iPad

With iOS 8, you can use third-party keyboards instead of your standard keyboard in Messages, Mail, and more. Learn how to install, add, and use a new keyboard. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

About HTML widget creation in iBooks Author

About HTML widget creation in iBooks Author

Learn how to use HTML5 widgets in the books you create in iBooks Author.

iBooks Author supports HTML5 widgets (with the extension .wdgt). To create an HTML widget for iBooks Author, use a text editor or web content creation app to create these files: -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to update Flash on your Mac safely and avoid malware

How to update Flash on your Mac safely and avoid malware

Got a message on your Mac that says you have to update Flash? Make sure it's not a malware hijack, and update Flash safely!

Adobe frequently updates its Flash software with security improvements and other changes. Seeing update messages has become routine enough that some malware developers have started using "Flash updates" as a way of infecting your computer. Learn how to safely update your Mac to the latest version of Flash without worrying about malware or adware getting on there too. -- iMore.

More ways to bring text into Keynote -- using handwritten annotations to bring spontaneity and engagement to your presentations

More ways to bring text into Keynote -- using handwritten annotations to bring spontaneity and engagement to your presentations

Last week I showed you some advanced text rendering options for Apple's Keynote presentation software.

Following the first part of a two-part workshop for psychologists, conducted this past weekend, I wanted to show how one can bring in hand-written text appropriately onto a Keynote slide so as to keep the presentation spontaneous and engaging. -- Les Posen's Presentation Magic.

How to view all the songs you've identified with Siri

How to view all the songs you've identified with Siri

If you do several songs in a row, or it's been a while since you identified the song, it can be tough to remember. Luckily, when you ask Siri to identify a song, it keeps a record. In fact, it keeps an entire list right in iTunes. So, if you later decide you want to buy the song, or listen to it in your favorite music streaming app, all you have to do is know where to look! -- iMore.

How To Downgrade iOS 8.2 On iPhone Or iPad [Tutorial]

How To Downgrade iOS 8.2 On iPhone Or iPad [Tutorial]

Want to downgrade iOS 8.2 back to more stable iOS 8.1.3? The following step by step tutorial will help you do just that on iPhone or iPad. -- Redmond Pie.

Beat boredom with these fun photo ideas for iPhone and iPad

Beat boredom with these fun photo ideas for iPhone and iPad

Trapped inside due to weather? Itching to make photos but you've been too busy? Or do you just have a few hours to kill? It's easy to think we can't capture photos unless we wake up before dawn to welcome the sunrise or travel to picturesque locales, but fun photos can be made anywhere and at any time.

They also don't require expensive, dedicated photo gear. Here are three photo ideas for boring days that you can create with an iPhone or iPad that you probably already have at hand. -- Macworld.

Sending quick Audio iMessages

Sending quick Audio iMessages

While the button for sending audio messages in the iOS 8 Messages app is readily apparent, one feature that may not be so obvious is that you can actually record and send audio messages even more quickly by simply raising your iPhone to your ear. For this to work, you need to ensure that the "Raise to Listen" option is enabled under Settings, Messages and your iPhone screen must be on and showing an active iMessage conversation. -- iLounge.

Pixar Releases Free Version of RenderMan

Pixar Releases Free Version of RenderMan

A year ago, animation studio Pixar promised its RenderMan animation and rendering suite would eventually become free for non-commercial use. This was originally scheduled to happen in the SIGGRAPH 2014 computer graphics conference, but things got delayed. Nevertheless, today Pixar is releasing the free version into the wild. Free, non-commercial RenderMan can be used for research, education, evaluation, plug-in development, and any personal projects that do not generate commercial profits. This version is fully featured, without a watermark or any kind of artificial limits. Featuring Pixar's new RIS technology, RenderMan delivers extremely fast global illumination and interactive shading and lighting for artists. The software is available for Mac, Linux, and Windows. In conjunction with the release, Pixar has also launched a new RenderMan Community site where users can exchange knowledge and resources, showcase their own work, share assets such as shaders and scripts, and learn about RenderMan from tutorials. -- Geeks 3D.

Modern PHP: New Features and Good Practices

Modern PHP: New Features and Good Practices

In recent years, JavaScript has enjoyed a dramatic renaissance as it has been transformed from a browser scripting tool primarily used for special effects and form validation on web pages, to a substantial client-side programming language. Similarly, on the server side, after years as the target of criticism, the PHP computer programming language is seeing a revival, partly due to the addition of new capabilities, such as namespaces, traits, generators, closures, and components, among other improvements. PHP enthusiasts and detractors alike can learn more about these changes from the book Modern PHP: New Features and Good Practices, authored by Josh Lockhart. -- Slashdot.

March 23 Monday's News

 

Apple to reveal new Apple TV with App Store, Siri & A8 CPU at WWDC in June

Apple to reveal new Apple TV with App Store, Siri & A8 CPU at WWDC in June

Apple is planning to take the wraps off of a brand new Apple TV set-top box, featuring Siri integration and support for a native App Store, at its annual Worldwide Developers Conference this June, according to a new report. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's Boot Camp drops support for Windows 7 with latest MacBook models

Apple's Boot Camp drops support for Windows 7 with latest MacBook models

Apple has dropped Boot Camp support for installations of Windows 7 on the recently refreshed 13-inch MacBook Pro and MacBook Air lineup, meaning users will have to switch to third-party virtualization software, upgrade to Windows 8 or wait for Microsoft to release Windows 10. -- AppleInsider.

Intel Core M lets new MacBook go light and fanless, but with sacrifices

Intel Core M lets new MacBook go light and fanless, but with sacrifices

At the heart of Apple's upcoming 12-inch MacBook is the Intel Core M, a processor series launched late last year and meant to power extremely light notebooks and tablets. But the new chips come with their own set of benefits and sacrifices, particularly for people considering other MacBook models. -- AppleInsider.

The 2015 MacBook Air's once-trailblazing design is showing its age

The 2015 MacBook Air's once-trailblazing design is showing its age

The current design of the MacBook Air was a big deal when it was unveiled back in 2010. Its construction and design were a major improvement over previous Airs, it was Apple's first Mac to go with solid-state storage across the lineup, and it came with a price drop that made them palatable to people who otherwise would have just bought a vanilla MacBook. The MacBook Pro soon imitated the Air by getting thinner, moving to standard SSDs, and dumping stuff like FireWire and the optical drive. And the new MacBook takes the qualities of the Air--thin, light, minimalist--to their logical extremes. -- Aris Technica.

Messages master class: How to set up Continuity in iOS 8 and Yosemite

Messages master class: How to set up Continuity in iOS 8 and Yosemite

The new messaging capabilities built into OS X Yosemite make your Mac even more useful for day-to-day communication. With this new set of features (part of Continuity), you can send SMS text messages and make phone calls from your Mac. Than can be super-helpful if you're forgetful and leave your iPhone in another room. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Take Great Landscape Photos with Your iPhone

How to Take Great Landscape Photos with Your iPhone

Shoot great landscapes with tips from Vern Seward in this week's iPhoneography 101.

In this series I've talked about tripods, camera apps, post processing apps, filters (both software and hardware), even remote shutter releases. Now it's time to put some of stuff to good use. Let's talk about shooting landscapes. -- The Mac Observer.

Anti-Reflective coatings separating on MacBook displays

Anti-Reflective coatings separating on MacBook displays

The anti-reflective display coating on some MacBook systems may separate from the glass panel over time, leaving a notable permanent discoloration on the display. When this occurs, the discoloration may spread quite easily as the separation expands. Given that Apple has used anti-reflective coatings on many MacBook systems (both retina and non-retina), this problem may be a potential issue for many people. -- MacIssues.

Technology and Persuasion

Technology and Persuasion

Persuasive technologies surround us, and they're growing smarter. How do these technologies work? And why?

GSN Games, which designs mobile games like poker and bingo, collects billions of signals every day from the phones and tablets its players are using--revealing everything from the time of day they play to the types of game they prefer to how they deal with failure. If two people were to download a game onto the same type of phone simultaneously, in as little as five minutes their games would begin to diverge--each one automatically tailored to its user's style of play. -- MIT Technology Review.

Yosemite & iOS 8 How-To: Record video from your iOS device on the Mac

Yosemite & iOS 8 How-To: Record video from your iOS device on the Mac

Have you ever wanted to create an iOS gaming video or a tutorial of how to use your iOS device? Now, with Yosemite and iOS 8 you can record and make a video of what you are doing on your iOS device using your Mac. Here's how. -- 9to5Mac.

'Hey Siri' in iOS 8.3 allows for automatic speakerphone calls

'Hey Siri' in iOS 8.3 allows for automatic speakerphone calls

Apple has made a small, but helpful, change in the way that iOS 8.3 can make phone calls via Siri. With the launch of iOS 8.0 last fall, Apple added a feature to Siri that allows users to activate the service hands-free by saying the phrase "Hey Siri" if the phone is plugged into power. However, if a user asked Siri to make a phone call via the "Hey Siri" hands-free command, the call would strangely not automatically transfer to speakerphone. Based on our tests, this will change in iOS 8.3. As can be seen in the screenshots above, if a user asks Siri to make a phone call through speakerphone, the call will actually be made on speaker phone. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS 8.3 includes settings to download free apps and iTunes content without requiring a password

iOS 8.3 includes settings to download free apps and iTunes content without requiring a password

A reader has spotted that iOS 8.3 includes some new configuration options for password entry in the iTunes and App Store. Labelled as 'Password Settings', the new view allows users to configure how frequently Apple should ask for the user's iTunes Store password for purchases. This includes allowing users to choose to allow free apps to be downloaded, no password necessary. [Don't do it Luke! It's a trap!] -- 9to5Mac.

Open Directory: Enabling SSL for Open Directory with Replicas

Open Directory: Enabling SSL for Open Directory with Replicas

Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) can be enabled to provide encrypted communications between an Open Directory Master, Replica, and the computers that access the LDAP directory domain. SSL uses a digital certificate to provide a certified identity for the servers. You can use a self-signed certificate or a certificate obtained from a certificate authority. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Get help using iCloud storage

Get help using iCloud storage

Get help upgrading or downgrading your iCloud storage.

First, try these steps to upgrade or downgrade your iCloud storage. If you purchase an iCloud storage plan, you'll be charged immediately, then each billing period until you downgrade or cancel your plan. Review the iCloud Terms and Conditions for more information. If you downgrade, the change will take effect after your current monthly or annual subscription ends.

If you need help choosing a different iCloud storage plan or saving your payment information, try the steps below. Test after each step to see if you resolved the issue. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mac Basics: Use Mail on your Mac

Mac Basics: Use Mail on your Mac

Use OS X Mail to compose, reply to, and store email on your Mac. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Mac OS X: Gray screen appears during startup

Mac OS X: Gray screen appears during startup

Instead of seeing the Finder or the login window after startup, your computer may stop responding and the display may only show a persistent gray screen (you may also see an Apple logo, spinning gear, spinning globe, prohibitory sign, or a folder with a flashing question mark on it). -- AppleCare Knowelge Base.

Mac doesn't start up from disc

Mac doesn't start up from disc

If your Mac stops responding when starting up from a Mac OS X Install DVD, learn about some troubleshooting steps you can use. -- AppleCare Knowlege Base.

If your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch is lost or stolen

If your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch is lost or stolen

If you lose your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch or think it might be stolen, these steps might help you locate it and protect your data. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Authenticating with Touch ID and the iPhone pin

Authenticating with Touch ID and the iPhone pin

One thing I really love about the new iOS devices - iPhone 5S, 6, 6+ and the iPad Air 2 - is the Touch ID sensor. I've always had a PIN on my devices - there is too much important information on my phone to not have one - and TouchI ID takes the pain out of it1. It's also core to the iOS experience: Apple Pay relies on it, and it's used by iTunes and a lot of other Apple apps. -- Fast Chicken.

How to disinfect the Apple internal or external keyboard, trackpad, and mouse

How to disinfect the Apple internal or external keyboard, trackpad, and mouse

Learn how to disinfect your Apple internal or external keyboard, trackpad, and/or mouse.

In addition to regular cleaning of your computer and input devices (keyboards, trackpads, and mice), you may find it necessary to disinfect them.

When a single computer is being used by multiple people either in a home, school, or another setting you may wish to disinfect the parts of the computer that people come into contact with, such as the the keyboard, mouse, or trackpad. This also applies to Magic Trackpad and other wireless input devices made by Apple. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

The top 50 apps for creative minds

The top 50 apps for creative minds

Our pick of the best tablet and smartphone tools to enable you to make video, music, art and more.

Video and photography apps now contain editing features based on those used in professional software, but made accessible enough for anyone to use in a couple of taps, and music-making apps are reducing the barrier to making listenable sounds. In all cases, this isn't about you suddenly becoming a professional just because an app is holding your hand -- instead, it's about opening up the experience of artistic creation to a wider audience. -- The Guardian.

March 20 Friday's News

 

iMovie gains haptic feedback on Apple's new Force Touch trackpads

iMovie gains haptic feedback on Apple's new Force Touch trackpads

iMovie has become the first of Apple's apps to receive support for haptic feedback via the new Force Touch trackpad, providing a glimpse of Apple's plans for the technology. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues iPhoto update in preparation of Photos, security fixes for OS X Yosemite

Apple issues iPhoto update in preparation of Photos, security fixes for OS X Yosemite

Apple on Thursday released a trio of software updates for Mac owners, including a bug and compatibility fix for iPhoto, and twin security updates for OS X 10.10.2, matched to different hardware. -- AppleInsider.

Apple debuts programatic iAd buys on iTunes Radio, 'Customer Match' demographic targeting

Apple debuts programatic iAd buys on iTunes Radio, 'Customer Match' demographic targeting

Apple on Thursday officially started accepting programatic, or automated, iAd buys for iTunes Radio and rolled out a new user targeting feature called Customer Match. -- AppleInsider.

Insiders detail beginnings of Apple's ResearchKit health data framework

Insiders detail beginnings of Apple's ResearchKit health data framework

After a surprise debut earlier in March, Apple's open source ResearchKit framework is being hailed by some as the future of distributed medical research. Dr. Stephen Friend, who worked on the project and now serves as a medical technology advisor at Apple, paints a picture of the tool's early days. -- AppleInsider.

Why do I have to pay for it? Mom and dad didn't

Why do I have to pay for it? Mom and dad didn't

Paying for TV has been a curious consumer phenomenon. There was a time when TV was free to consumers. It was delivered as a broadcast over-the-air and paid for either by commercials (US mostly) or by taxes on viewers (Europe mostly). The consumers were delighted with the idea as it was far better than radio and radio was delightful because it was far better than no radio.

The process of convincing consumers to pay for something that used to be free was quite interesting. The first benefit to be articulated was that the quality of the picture would be much better. It would, in essence, be noise-free. -- Asymco.

A Pair of Cool-But-Semi-Hidden OS X Yosemite Features

A Pair of Cool-But-Semi-Hidden OS X Yosemite Features

Mac OS X 10.10 Yosemite has gotten better since its initial release… But I notice that several of useful features are semi-hidden by default. For example, your Mac can take dictation and turn your words into text without having to buy Dragon Dictate. But it's disabled by default. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple's Yosemite 2015-003 Security Update Patches Hole in iCloud Keychain

Apple Releases Security Update 2015-003 for Yosemite, No Info on What it Fixes

Apple released security patch notes for Security Update 2015-003 for Yosemite Thursday evening. The software update went live with little information on its contents, but Apple's security page now indicates the update patches two issues that could allow the bad guys to take over your Mac. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X: How to Optimize Your Privacy with Skype

OS X: How to Optimize Your Privacy with Skype

There are some important things to know about Skype that will improve your privacy on a Mac. This means tweaking just a few of Skype's privacy settings. It's easy, and John Martellaro walks you through it with just a few clicks. You'll be glad you did it. -- The Mac Observer.

Three approaches for quickly accessing shared folders in OS X

Three approaches for quickly accessing shared folders in OS X

Do you access shared folders often on your Mac? While the use of AirDrop, Messages, e-Mail, and online drive options are great for personal and workgroup sharing, often in corporate environments you might have central shared folders to store data. You might also have a theater system, file server, or other central storage set up on your home network that you might wish to access regularly. -- MacIssues.

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

A Sucker Is Optimized Every Minute

Not long ago, our blockbuster business books spoke in unison: Trust your gut.

Now that we have hard data on everything, we no longer make decisions from our hearts, guts or principles. -- New York Times.

Apple Invents New Touch Technology and a Unique Hybrid Device for the Home or Office

Apple Invents New Touch Technology and a Unique Hybrid Device for the Home or Office

On March 19, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that's about touch displays. Of interest is one very large touch display. -- Patently Apple.

Macs Not Vulnerable to BadUSB Attack

Macs Not Vulnerable to BadUSB Attack

Some publications are singling out the new 12-inch MacBook's single USB-C port as a major security risk. But the risks, which aren't even new, are being overstated. These articles are pure clickbait. -- TidBITS.

Apple reportedly cracks down on antivirus apps from iOS App Store, many apps pulled

Apple reportedly cracks down on antivirus apps from iOS App Store, many apps pulled

Apple has seemingly decided to crack down on antivirus and antimalware apps, removing them from the App Store. Although there has been no official statement from Apple on a policy change, Apple's loose guidelines allow them to pull pretty much anything at any time, particularly something like antivirus which has questionable utility within the sandboxed iOS environment of iPhones and iPads. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS 8: Using the Lock Screen to Manage Your Email

iOS 8: Using the Lock Screen to Manage Your Email

Did you know you can use your iPhone or iPad's lock screen to mark an incoming email as read or send it to the trash? It's true, and if you've received a particularly private email, you can even dismiss the notification for it without unlocking your device. Both privacy and convenience tricks are here in today's Quick Tip! -- The Mac Observer.

March 19 Thursday's News

 

New 'IP Box' tool bypasses 10-try limit for PINs on older iOS versions, automates brute force attacks

New 'IP Box' tool bypasses 10-try limit for PINs on older iOS versions, automates brute force attacks

A relatively new $300 device could allow attackers to crack the PIN codes on out-of-date iPhones or iPads, taking advantage of a flaw in iOS versions older than 8.1.1 that allows unlimited attempts at PIN entry, even when users enable Apple's 10-try limit. -- AppleInsider.

CEO Tim Cook talks Apple Watch, Apple corporate culture in new interview

CEO Tim Cook talks Apple Watch, Apple corporate culture in new interview

In an interview published Wednesday, Apple Chief Executive Tim Cook discussed a slew of topics ranging from Apple corporate culture, to the prospects for the Apple Watch, to whether the company's all-encompassing product ecosystem is still manageable. -- Fast Company.

Apple releases Safari 7.1.5, and 6.2.5 betas to developers with new features and bug fixes

Apple releases Safari 7.1.5, and 6.2.5 betas to developers with new features and bug fixes

Apple on Wednesday seeded a round of Safari betas to developers for testing, following up on a version for OS X 10.10 Yosemite that contained references to the upcoming Photos app. -- AppleInsider.

13-inch Broadwell MacBook showdown: Should you go Pro or get an Air?

13-inch Broadwell MacBook showdown: Should you go Pro or get an Air?

The 13-inch MacBook Pro and the 13-inch MacBook Air were once very different computers that served very different needs. One was bulkier but pretty fast and user-serviceable, while the other was thin-and-light to a fault, arriving with anemic low-power CPUs and GPUs, slow hard drives, and no easy means to upgrade. -- Ars Technica.

USB-C is a dead ringer for Apple's Cinema Display power cord

USB-C is a dead ringer for Apple's Cinema Display power cord

There's been a lot of talk that Apple invented USB-C, even though the company hasn't made any official claims yet. The evidence is already compelling, but here's another sign Apple had its hand in USB-C: It looks just like the company's Cinema Display power cable. -- Cult of Mac.

How a biomedical expert inspired Apple to create ResearchKit

How a biomedical expert inspired Apple to create ResearchKit

Apple's new open source platform, ResearchKit, could change our lives more than Apple Watch, and according to a report from Fusion detailing the inside story of ResearchKit, Apple may have got some outside inspiration for the project. -- Cult of Mac.

Net Neutrality, Apple, and the future of TV

Net Neutrality, Apple, and the future of TV

I've been hesitant to comment on the FCC's proposed Net Neutrality rules until I could read them. You'll recall the actual rules weren't released at the time of the vote a couple weeks ago, just characterized this way and that for the press pending the eventual release of the actual order. Well they finally published the rules last week and I've since made my way through all 400+ pages (no executive summary commenting for me). And while there are no big surprises -- much less smoking guns -- in the FCC report, I think that taken along with this week's Wall Street Journal story about an Apple over-the-top (OTT) video service the trend is clear that the days of traditional cable TV are numbered. -- I, Cringely.

OS X: Using Spotlight's Privacy Features

OS X: Using Spotlight's Privacy Features

Got some folders that you don't want prying eyes to see? Even if you've hidden them well, they'll still show up in Spotlight searches. Fortunately, this isn't a gigantic bummer if you know how to prevent Spotlight from revealing all of your secrets, so we'll help you keep your embarrassing folders private in this Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

How to significantly decrease your iOS device's brightness

How to significantly decrease your iOS device's brightness

If you have an iPad or iPhone, chances are that you periodically use it in a location or two that have very low light, where even the brightness level at its lowest settings may still cause the device to glare and be somewhat intrusive. Specific instances of this might be if you want to read in bed but have a partner who is sleeping, or are otherwise in an environment where others are enjoying the dark. In these instances, you can make use of a hidden feature in your iOS device to make its brightness even dimmer. -- MacIssues.

Apple continues their Work on a Virtual Keyboard for the iMac

Apple continues their Work on a Virtual Keyboard for the iMac

On March 19, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals their continuing work on a virtual keyboard for the iMac. The device could use the same kind of board construction that is currently being used with their Magic Trackpad. The virtual keyboard would use advanced haptics with actuators under each virtual key to make it feel like regular typing with physical keys. With so many people now used to working with virtual keyboards on iDevices, the idea of leaping to one for the iMac today isn't as dramatic as it would have been back in 2009 when the patent was originally filed. -- Patently Apple.

How-To Transfer, edit, and share DSLR or point-and-shoot photos using your iPhone or iPad

How-To Transfer, edit, and share DSLR or point-and-shoot photos using your iPhone or iPad

Apple's iPhones became Flickr's most popular camera phones in 2008 and most popular cameras overall soon thereafter, but even now, iPhones constitute only 9.6% of the photo-sharing site's userbase. Despite the iPhone's undeniable popularity, over 90% of photographers are using other cameras: Canon has a 13.4% share, Nikon 9.3%, Samsung 5.6%, and Sony 4.2%, with tons of other brands following close behind. While the cameras in phones continue to improve every year, they're not the best tools for photography -- they're just the ones most people carry with them all the time. -- 9to5Mac.

Logic Pro 10.1 review

Logic Pro 10.1 review

Apple's music production software was already an impressive package at its current price, but now it's received a substantial upgrade that brings a wealth of electronic music options and some very useful editing controls. The best part? It's free for existing users, and the normal price has been retained for those new to the suite. -- Macworld UK.

Mac Data Recovery Guru can help bring deleted files back to life

Mac Data Recovery Guru can help bring deleted files back to life

Nearly everybody loses some files that they want back at some point. When that happens, you need advanced file recovery solutions. One of the best is Mac Data Recovery Guru, recently revved to version 2.5. It requires Mac OS X 10.6 or higher, costs US$79. -- AppleDailyReport.

Why Your Psychiatrist Will Hate This Mac App

Why Your Psychiatrist Will Hate This Mac App

Who knows your personality better than your mother? Your psychiatrist? Perhaps. One thing is for sure, though.

Your psychiatrist would rather you not spend money on a Mac app that tests your personality because that might put a dent in his or her $300 an hour practice. No, I'm not equating the benefits psychiatry with an app that can assess your personality based on a bunch of colors, just the economics. -- TeraTalks.

Unscrupulous website adverts again redirecting some users to App Store from Safari

Unscrupulous website adverts again redirecting some users to App Store from Safari

Website advertisement companies have found a way to circumvent the protections introduced in iOS 8 to stop users from being kicked to the App Store because of certain cleverly-coded JavaScript advertisements.

I am now experiencing this myself, and it makes browsing on the iPhone unusable. Browsing to websites such as Reddit and Reuters and others now automatically open the App Store. In many cases, there is no way for me to read the actual content on the pages. You can see this happen in the included video. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple's new MacBook: How does its Retina display compare to other Macs?

Apple's new MacBook: How does its Retina display compare to other Macs?

The new MacBook recently revealed at Apple's Spring Forward event hits stores on April 10th. It's the second MacBook product to feature what Apple calls a "Retina display," joining the Retina MacBook Pro which first appeared in 2012. What does Retina display mean, and how does the new MacBook's Retina display compared to existing Macs? -- iMore.

How to Join a Hidden Wi-Fi Network with No Broadcast SSID from iOS

How to Join a Hidden Wi-Fi Network with No Broadcast SSID from iOS

Hidden wi-fi networks are becoming more common as network administrators look for additional measures to secure wireless connections. Hiding the network functions as a means of security by obscurity, but the main user-side issue with a hidden Wi-FI network is that the routers SSID is not broadcast which can make it difficult to find for users on an iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Apple Watch. Fortunately, joining a hidden wi-fi network from iOS is really easy, you just have to know how to do it. -- OS X Daily.

Sending Your location with Messages

Sending Your location with Messages

Sending your location to another person can be handy… and even a lifesaver if you happen to be injured on a trail or off a road but can still use your iPhone. In this quick tip, you'll see just how easy it is to send your exact location to another person through the Messages app. -- Rocket Yard: The Official OWC Blog.

Improving password security in iOS

Improving password security in iOS

While some may argue about the importance of locking your iPhone or other iOS device with a passcode, in this day of identity thieves and other ne'er-do-wells, it's generally something we here at iLounge strongly recommend users do. In fact, if you've got a device with Touch ID, there's really little good reason to not have a passcode, which was Apple's primary motivation for introducing the feature. -- iLounge.

Why the new MacBook's single port is all you really need

Why the new MacBook's single port is all you really need

Apple's revelation of a single-port MacBook had been leaked months ahead of time. Still, many were in denial and remain so. From their perspective, which you can read in comments on Macworld articles and widely elsewhere, a single port is a nonstarter. -- Macworld.

The MacBook doesn't need more ports, just a good dock

The MacBook doesn't need more ports, just a good dock

If you're thinking that because the new MacBook just has a single port, it's not ever going to be able to work sitting on top of your desk attached to an external monitor and a bunch of peripherals, don't despair. The USB-C format is clever and versatile, and USB-C docking stations should be on the horizon. -- Macworld.

Apple May Start Accepting Android Phones As Trade-Ins

Apple May Start Accepting Android Phones As Trade-Ins

Apple Inc. plans to start accepting non-Apple devices as trade-ins, a person with knowledge of the matter said, as the company seeks to extend market-share gains against smartphones based on Google Inc.'s Android software. -- Bloomberg.

March 18 Wednesday's News

 

Apple luring TV content owners for streaming service with promise of more open data sharing

Apple luring TV content owners for streaming service with promise of more open data sharing

Apple has reportedly offered to partially open its customer data trove to content owners if they sign on to its new web television initiative, marking a stark turn for the company that has traditionally balked at sharing information with partners. -- AppleInsider.

First look: Apple's Force Touch trackpad on the early 2015 MacBook Pro

First look: Apple's Force Touch trackpad on the early 2015 MacBook Pro

The newest revision of Apple's littlest MacBook Pro packs faster flash memory and Intel's latest Broadwell chips, but the star of the show is its new Force Touch trackpad. AppleInsider went hands-on with the clickless wonder to see if it upholds Apple's tradition of finger-navigating excellence. -- AppleInsider.

Latest Safari update brings fixes for WebKit security flaws

Latest Safari update brings fixes for WebKit security flaws

Apple on Tuesday issued new versions of its Safari Web browser for OS X with fixes for two WebKit vulnerabilities that could allow maliciously crafted code to run on a target Mac. -- AppleInsider.

HTTPS-crippling FREAK exploit affects thousands of Android and iOS apps

HTTPS-crippling FREAK exploit affects thousands of Android and iOS apps

While almost all the attention paid to the HTTPS-crippling FREAK vulnerability has focused on browsers, consider this: thousands of Android and iOS apps, many with finance, shopping, and medical uses, are also vulnerable to the same exploit that decrypts passwords, credit card details, and other sensitive data sent between handsets and Internet servers. -- Ars Technica.

OS X Yosemite's Four Finder Views Explained

OS X Yosemite's Four Finder Views Explained

In the Finder, there are four window views available. Each one has its advantages, Kelly explains the difference and what might be helpful from each one. -- The Mac Observer.

Safari bug saves Web page URLs in Private mode

Safari bug saves Web page URLs in Private mode

Private Browsing mode should prevent most Web browsers from saving loaded content in any way. Any such information such as that in your browser's cache, its history, or cookie information should be stored temporarily for the current session, and then discarded when you close your browser window. However, in Safari your pages might be logged by a small but overlooked aspect of how Safari handles Web pages. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted Their First Fuel Cell Patent

Apple Granted Their First Fuel Cell Patent

In Apple's search for ways to extend mobile device battery life, Apple was granted a patent today by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office regarding fuel cell technology. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted 42 Patents Today Covering the Apple Watch Band, Hover Sensors, the New MacBook Keyboard & More

Apple Granted 42 Patents Today Covering the Apple Watch Band, Hover Sensors, the New MacBook Keyboard & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 42 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's design patent win for the basics of the Apple Watch Band, hover sensors and the foundation of the invention which led to Apple's new MacBook low profile keyboard with stable keys. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Pointing Fingers in Apple Pay Fraud

Pointing Fingers in Apple Pay Fraud

An industry consultant, Cherian Abraham, put the fraud rate [for Apple Pay] at 6 percent, compared with a traditional credit card fraud rate that is relatively minuscule, 10 cents for every $100 spent. [i.e. one tenth of one percent].

The vulnerability in Apple Pay is in the way that it -- and card issuers -- "onboard" new credit cards into the system. Because Apple wanted its system to have the simplicity for which it has become famous and wanted to make the sign-up process "frictionless," the company required little beyond basic credit card information about a user. Nor did it provide much information to the banks, like full phone numbers and addresses, that might help them detect fraud early.

The banks, desperate to become their customers' default card on Apple Pay -- most add only one to their iPhones -- did little to build their own defenses or to push Apple to provide more detailed information about its customers. Some bank executives acknowledged that they were were so scared of Apple that they didn't speak up. -- New York Times.

iCloud Not Receiving Mail Reliably from Gmail

iCloud Not Receiving Mail Reliably from Gmail

iCloud users are reporting problems receiving email messages sent from Gmail. There doesn't appear to be anything that can be done about it, other than pointing Gmail-based correspondents to an alternative email address. -- TidBITS.

Opinion: My cable subscription woes and the appeal of an 'Apple Cable' service

Opinion: My cable subscription woes and the appeal of an 'Apple Cable' service

My cable provider is pretty terrible. I don't need to name any names because this likely applies to your cable provider as well. They are all horrible. I often experience drops on popular channels, get bonus filler channels that no one wants, and see indiscriminate additional subscription fees and charges without any real reason. This Onion article, though it is satire, doesn't stray too far from the truth.

For a very casual TV watcher, it's not a great experience -- to put it mildly. -- 9to5Mac.

Use AirPlay to wirelessly stream content from your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

Use AirPlay to wirelessly stream content from your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

With AirPlay, you can stream music, photos, and videos to your Apple TV, or stream music to your AirPort Express or AirPlay-enabled speakers. And with AirPlay Mirroring, you can display your iOS screen on your Apple TV. -- AppleCare Knowledge.

How Your USB Cables Are About to Change Forever

How Your USB Cables Are About to Change Forever

When the new USB-C port was being dreamt up, engineers focused on three fundamental features: performance, power, and convenience. From a data performance perspective, USB-C has the potential to one day deliver up to 20 gigabits per second -- but for now, it's just 10 gigabits per second. (USB 3.1, USB-C's predecessor, can also push through 10 gigabits per second, but the smaller Micro-B connector found on many smartphones can only handle half as much.) As for power, the new, smaller connector can pack up to 100 watts. In comparison, Apple's Lightning cable currently charges iPads and iPhones with a 12 watt charger, and the Macbook Pro MagSafe power adapter pulls 85 watts from wall outlets. The convenience aspect of USB-C is that it's the first truly reversible USB cable, which means, similar to Apple's Lightning cable, either side can face up. -- Time.

In with the new: USB-C connector on new MacBook explained

In with the new: USB-C connector on new MacBook explained

Apple spent very little time detailing USB Type C alongside its new MacBook -- this is expected, given the magnitude of the overall announcement. Despite a spec for it being released in parts over the last two years, USB Type C isn't well understood, and we'd like to help. So, once again, MacNN and Electronista have pored over some of the technical documents so you don't have to. -- Electronista.

Change this iPhone setting right now to protect your privacy

Change this iPhone setting right now to protect your privacy

You're conscientious about protecting your privacy and have followed all suggestions to help do so. You've gone through all recommended settings on your iPhone and set them to keep your information secure. Even so, chances are there is one setting you've missed that can help bad guys spot you in real life. -- ZDNet.

Apple And The Death Of Simplicity

Apple And The Death Of Simplicity

Look at the image to the left. What you'll see are a couple of faces from Apple Watch. Visit the Apple website and you'll see hundreds more.

What's missing in those screens? Simplicity. Elegance. Intuitive understanding of the interface. Already Apple is being knocked by critics and fans alike for creating a complex user interface. Why is it complex? To make a use case, Apple had to cram in plenty of features, and plenty of features means complexity. -- Mac 360.

March 17 Tuesday's News

 

Apple issues new OS X 10.10.3 beta, fixing bug that affected latest MacBooks

Apple issues new OS X 10.10.3 beta, fixing bug that affected latest MacBooks

Only a few days after the previous build was issued to developers, Apple has provided a new beta of OS X 10.10.3, addressing a crashing bug that affected the newly released 13-inch MacBook Pro. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to accept non-iPhone trade-ins with expanded Reuse and Recycling Program, report says

Apple to accept non-iPhone trade-ins with expanded Reuse and Recycling Program, report says

Apple is planning to add Android, BlackBerry and Windows Phone handsets to the list of acceptable trade-ins for its Reuse and Recycling Program, which exchanges used hardware for Apple Store gift cards. -- AppleInsider.

Online privacy nihilism runs rampant in US, survey says

Online privacy nihilism runs rampant in US, survey says

A majority of Americans have not altered their online behavior in the wake of the Edward Snowden revelations detailing widespread US government electronic surveillance activities, according to a Pew Research Center survey published Monday. -- Ars Technica.

Hide iOS QuickType bar and free up screen space

Hide iOS QuickType bar and free up screen space

Got an iPhone 6 or smaller? You might be feeling a little cramped for space on your screen due to iOS 8's new word-prediction system.

That little gray bar that sits just above your iOS keyboard is called the QuickType bar, and it's where all the auto-correct and typing suggestions appear when you're sending an email, typing a note or iMessaging with someone. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple TV streaming service coming in June with 25 channels

Apple TV streaming service coming in June with 25 channels

It's looking like 2015 will finally be the year that Apple's dream TV service becomes a reality.

After years of reports that the company has been trying to get its own TV subscription off the ground, June is on track to be the month it's debuted for the world to see. The service will reportedly offer around 25 channels and cost a little more than the competition. -- Cult of Mac.

Retina MacBook Pro Users Complain of Anti-Reflective Display Coating Wearing Off

Retina MacBook Pro Users Complain of Anti-Reflective Display Coating Wearing Off

A growing number of users have turned to the Apple Support Communities, MacRumors discussion forums and Facebook in recent weeks to voice their complaints about the anti-reflective coating on Retina MacBook Pros becoming stained or wearing off. The long-standing display issue appears to affect several MacBook Pros, including mid-2012 to mid-2014 models sold between June 2012 and present. -- MacRumors.

How to print in Black and White in OS X

How to print in Black and White in OS X

If you need to print in black and white or in grayscale from your Mac, you might be hard-pressed to find an option to do so in the standard print window. OS X supports a number of different printers; however, besides general "quality" sliders, many of the drivers do not have an option to limit color settings. Nevertheless, you can still use a relatively straight-forward OS X feature to print a document in either grayscale or black and white. -- MacIssues.

DealBook: Pointing Fingers in Apple Pay Fraud

DealBook: Pointing Fingers in Apple Pay Fraud

When Apple was planning its Apple Pay electronic payment system last summer for its iPhones, the nation's banks raced to be included among the first credit card issuers associated with the new technology.

Some of the nation's banks are privately complaining that Apple Pay may not be so great after all, but the banks may largely have themselves to blame. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted a Second Major Patent for a Reversible USB Connector (USB Type-C)

Apple Granted a Second Major Patent for a Reversible USB Connector (USB Type-C)

Talk about timing. There's a report out today trying to downplay Apple's contribution to the USB Type-C connector standard. The news site downplayed Apple's first reversible USB patent as being of any value, but today Apple was granted a second major patent by the U.S. Patent Office regarding what is now known to be the USB Type-C connector that provides further evidence that Apple played a major role in the development of this new standard despite the naysayer's denial. -- Patently Apple.

Photos Not Available to the Scree Saver After Yosemite Update

Photos Not Available to the Screesaver After Yosemite Update

I have my Screen Saver set to use my Photos folder. However, every time I update to a new version of Yosemite it resets my Screen Saver to National Geographic.

When I open System Preferences to reset it back to Photos I cannot because Photos is NOT available.

In order to make available I have to open Photos from the desktop. Photos will then rebuild its index.

Now when you go back into Screen Saver you will be able to select it.

The iPhone's Slo-Mo Video Has Become a Dancer's Best Friend

The iPhone's Slo-Mo Video Has Become a Dancer's Best Friend

I've used my iPhone 6's slow motion superpowers to capture waves crashing on the beach, bicycle wheels spinning by in a race, and to turn a dog's adorable yaps into a ferocious 240 fps growl. But plenty of people have started using slow motion to more practical ends. Including dancers. -- Wired.

Life With the MacBook's Single Port Won't Be Easy--Yet

Life With the MacBook's Single Port Won't Be Easy--Yet

Apple has a history of "addition by subtraction" when it comes to ports and drives. It has over the years ditched FireWire, Ethernet, and optical drives. Now, with the MacBook, it says goodbye to all but a lone pioneering port. This probably was inevitable. So just how big of an adjustment are you in for?

Bigger than you might realize. At least for now. -- Wired.

It's Time To Fear The Internet Of Things

It's Time To Fear The Internet Of Things

There's a new buzzword sweeping the technology world these days. It's called 'The internet of things.' IoT.

Basically, IoT means products, 'things', can connect to other products or services or devices using wired or wireless (but mostly wireless) communication over the internet. The Internet of Things is to be feared. But it's not what you think. -- Mac 360.

March 16 Monday's News

 

Announcing...

Announcing...

 

Google is cranking up its 'technological artillery' to protect against sketchy websites

Google is cranking up its 'technological artillery' to protect against sketchy websites

Get ready to see more red warning signs online as Google adds ammunition to its technological artillery for targeting devious schemes lurking on websites.

The latest weapon is aimed at websites riddled with "unwanted software" -- a term that Google uses to describe secretly installed programs that can change a browser's settings without a user's permission. -- Business Insider.

Good Eats: Loa Amigos Mexican Restaurant

Good Eats: Loa Amigos Mexican Restraunt

MacGuru James Ledbetter, has added a new item to our Good Eats page, Loa Amigos Mexican Restaurant 409 Cusick Street in Maryville. He did not tells us anything about it but it as been there for 21 years.

For those that do not know Good Eats tries to catalog the best local independent restaurants.

Gazelle wants to buy your old MacBooks and is throwing in some extra cash for the next week

Gazelle wants to buy your old MacBooks and is throwing in some extra cash for the next week

Gazelle this week is looking to help readers make the jump to one of Apple's newly announced MacBooks by offering to pay hundreds of dollars -- and in some cases over $1000 -- for previous generation MacBooks, with an added $20 bonus and extended 45 day price lock. -- AppleInsider.

Who's afraid of the Apple Watch?

Who's afraid of the Apple Watch?

Apple Watch has incited more mocking disbelief, concerned handwringing and passionate prognostications of doom--for Apple, for its buyers, for society in general--than any product since iPhone, with the potential exception of iPad. Maybe Apple is onto something here. -- AppleInsider.

Is your smartphone making you dumb?

Is your smartphone making you dumb?

A new study in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that an over-reliance on smartphones may allow people to "offload" thinking to technology, resulting in lazier thinking. But the results of the study aren't necessarily cause for alarm, argue Sabrina Golonka and Andrew Wilson. -- Ars Technica.

Explaining the 'USB 3.1 Gen 1' port in the Retina MacBook

Explaining the 'USB 3.1 Gen 1' port in the Retina MacBook

The announcement of the new Retina MacBook has prompted a flurry of attention to the USB Type C spec, a story we've been following since the port was just a gleam in the USB-IF's eye. It's not the first device to use Type C, but it's certainly the most noteworthy, and it's the first laptop that insists on using Type C for everything from power to data to display output.

Apple's spec page for the new MacBook says that this port supports "USB 3.1 gen 1," which there hasn't been much discussion about. We know that the USB Implementers Forum finalized the USB 3.1 spec back in 2013, and that it raises the theoretical bandwidth of the USB bus from USB 3.0's 5Gbps to 10Gbps. That's not the version of the USB 3.1 spec that Apple is offering. -- Ars Technica.

Downgrading iOS to previous versions might be a possibility again very soon

Downgrading iOS to previous versions might be a possibility again very soon

Back in the good old days of jailbreaking, your first step before upgrading to the latest version of iOS was to plug your device into an app called TinyUmbrella and save your SHSH blobs.

What are blobs? Simply put, saving your blobs gave jailbreakers the possibility of downgrading their devices to a previous version of iOS. Unfortunately, with iOS 5, Apple caught up with the way jailbreakers were using blobs, making TinyUmbrella virtually useless. -- Cult of Mac.

Benchmarks Confirm New MacBook Air Brings Decent Speed Improvements, MacBook Pro Less So

Benchmarks Confirm New MacBook Air Brings Decent Speed Improvements, MacBook Pro Less So

Earlier this week, we shared some Geekbench benchmarks for the Broadwell processors in the new 13-inch Retina MacBook Pro and the new 13-inch MacBook Air, which pointed towards speeds that were comparable to mid-2014 models. -- MacRumors.

The inner-workings of Apple's Force Touch trackpad revealed

The inner-workings of Apple's Force Touch trackpad revealed

If you are interested in the Force Touch trackpad on Apple's new MacBook, iFixIt has performed a full teardown of the new system to reveal its underpinnings, and in doing so has outlined some of how the trackpad works. Apple's trackpad brings several key advancements to its input technology, and while it may not fit everyone's tastes, it should help overcome a number of limitations to Apple's current trackpads. -- MacIssues.

How to silence your Mac's startup sound

How to silence your Mac's startup sound

When you press the power button to start up your Mac, you will be met with a boot chime that lets you know your system is healthy and ready to load OS X. However, this sound can be a bit intrusive, and there may be times when you would prefer to not have it play. Since sleep mode will not make such sounds when waking, you can always use it instead of shutting down your Mac; however, if you need to cold-boot your Mac, then you have a couple of approaches for muting that boot chime. -- MacIssues.

A Police Gadget Tracks Phones? Shhh! It's Secret

A Police Gadget Tracks Phones? Shhh! It's Secret

A growing number of law enforcement agencies have acquired sophisticated surveillance technology to track cellphones but have done so with an unusual restriction: They must not talk about it. -- New York Times.

Why Apple Won't Adopt a Wireless Charging Standard

Why Apple Won't Adopt a Wireless Charging Standard

As the battle for mobile dominance continues among three wireless charging standards, with many smartphone and wearable makers having already chosen sides, Apple continues to sit on the sideline. While the new Apple Watch uses a tightly coupled magnetic inductive wireless charging technology, it still requires a cable. The only advantage is that no port is required, allowing the watch case to remain sealed and water resistant. The iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, however, remain without any form of wireless charging, either tightly coupled inductive or more loosely coupled resonant charging. Over the past few years, Apple has filed patents on its own flavor of wireless charging, a "near field" or resonant technology, but no products have as yet come to market. If and when it does select a technology, it will likely be its own proprietary specification, which ensures accessory makers will have to pay royalties to use it. -- Computer World.

The Arrogance, Audacity, And Alchemy Of Apple As It Challenges Human Evolution

The Arrogance, Audacity, And Alchemy Of Apple As It Challenges Human Evolution

Apple's dominance permeates society. ... What has Tim Cook achieved? Philosophically he has managed to place Apple at every major intersection of life. ... While everyone else is selling smartphones, Tim Cook is doing something more akin to alchemy. He is acting as an agent of social change, he is pouring his mercury into every corner of humanity, and he is comfortable in his role as an agent provocateur. The iPhone is not just the primary symbol of Apple, but each iPhone is a symbol of its owner. By driving material change through each iPhone, Cook can drive social change through each owner, and drive material change on society. -- Forbes.

Apple updates developer guidelines for medical research apps

Apple updates developer guidelines for medical research apps

Apple has updated its iOS development guidelines to spell out what consent mobile apps dealing with human medical research must obtain.

A new clause states that this type of app must get permission from participants, and if they are minors, from a parent or guardian. -- PCWorld.

Why is my Mac full of a million tiny files?

Why is my Mac full of a million tiny files?

Doug Eldred writes in with a concern about a form of file bloat--but not about bloated sizes. Rather, the sheer number of items that seem to appear on his drive.

Whatever or wherever they are, they must not be terribly large, but my Mac used to have less than a million files (according to various tools, including SuperDuper!), and now it's [up] to 1.3 million. Trust me, I haven't knowingly created 300K new file recently! -- Macworld.

How to Make Time Machine Restore to a New Hard Drive

How to Make Time Machine Restore to a New Hard Drive

I've just restored my Late 2012 iMac running Yosemite. I was asked to restore from Time Machine, but I opted not to and reinstalled the OS instead. After a few days, I noticed Time Machine had done a few backups, but now it will neither let me view nor restore any of my files from before my system restore. Time Machine says it has 41.9MB free of 1TB, so my data is still on there! -- Mac|Life.

How to show the ~/Library folder on Mac

How to show the ~/Library folder on Mac

By default, the ~/Library folder is hidden on Mac. This is a folder that Apple feels you shouldn't need access to most of the the time, but occasionally, you may need it for specific things. I use it often to view the preferences for the apps I have installed on my Mac. I also use it to access the Application Support folder, which as its name alludes to, features supporting files for apps. -- iDownload Blog.

OS X Activity Monitor: Yet more evidence of Apple's sloppy work in Yosemite

OS X Activity Monitor: Yet more evidence of Apple's sloppy work in Yosemite

Here's another example of Apple's sloppy work in OS X 10.10 (Yosemite) that is very easy to reproduce (at least on my Mac Pro):

  • Open the Activity Monitor application (in the Application/Utilities folder).
  • Option-click on your desktop to hide the foreground application, i.e. Activity Monitor, and switch back to the Finder.
  • Click on the Activity Monitor icon in the Dock or press command-Tab to switch back to Activity Monitor.

Betalogue.

Secret Apple TV controls: Fifteen button combos to power up your viewing

Secret Apple TV controls: Fifteen button combos to power up your viewing

Apple has just reduced the price of the Apple TV to $69 and that means it's less expensive than ever to pick up one -- or pick up additional ones -- and get all your iTunes and other content onto your big screen TV. With AirPlay you can even stream most video and audio right off your iPhone or iPad, and mirror the display of your iOS device or Mac in your living room or conference room. It makes a personal experience into a group experience -- and if you know all of these controls, it makes it easy! -- iMore.

Hands-on tests with Apple's Force Touch trackpad reveal a serious shortcoming

Hands-on tests with Apple's Force Touch trackpad reveal a serious shortcoming

It feels like Force Touch needs to be recalibrated or reengineered in the MacBook Pro. The feature may work better in the forthcoming Retina MacBook, but I don't know why it would -- there's even less space to work in that smaller machine.-- VentureBeat.

Why some cable cord cutters still don't want Apple TV

Why some cable cord cutters still don't want Apple TV

Brian Lardin finally cut the cord on Feb. 20, 2015 -- and he doesn't want Apple TV, even though it's now $30 cheaper. -- MarketWatch.

The Promise (and Limitations) of Apple's ResearchKit

The Promise (and Limitations) of Apple's ResearchKit

Fifteen minutes into the glittering product parade presented during Apple's "Spring Forward" event on 8 March 2015, the presentation focused on ResearchKit, a non-glittery, pro bono initiative that seemed strangely out of place yet provided a real, and exciting, example of what mobile smart technology can do beyond allowing you to collect green chiclets in the Candy Kingdom.

Until now, much more has been heard from Google Research and Microsoft Research than from Apple in supporting research, so it's nice to see Apple stepping up to the plate to help make the world a better place in ways other than just producing compelling products. -- TidBITS.

March 13 Friday's News

 

Apple releases third beta of OS X 10.10.3 with Force Touch developer tools, plus iOS 8.3 beta 3

Apple releases third beta of OS X 10.10.3 with Force Touch developer tools, plus iOS 8.3 beta 3

Apple on Thursday issued a number of new beta releases for developers, including an OS X 10.10.3 Yosemite beta with Force Touch trackpad support for third-party apps, as well as new betas of iOS 8.3, Xcode and OS X Server. -- AppleInsider.

Apple launches iOS 8.3 public beta

Apple launches iOS 8.3 public beta

Apple on Thursday officially expanded its public software beta program to include iOS, seeding members with iOS 8.3 beta 3, the same version provided to registered developers earlier in the day. -- AppleInsider.

Apple updates developer guidelines to cover ResearchKit, Apple Pay, media rippers

Apple updates developer guidelines to cover ResearchKit, Apple Pay, media rippers

Apple has made small but important changes to its official App Store Review Guidelines for iOS developers, addressing consent issues with the company's new ResearchKit platform, along with recurring payments under Apple Pay, and downloads of third-party music and video. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Watch Naysayers Misunderstand Apple Customers

Apple Watch Naysayers Misunderstand Apple Customers

Apple makes products that make us feel good when they use them. The same is often said for higher-end wristwatches. Why, then, are all the naysayers ignoring this? -- The Mac Observer.

Apple's ResearchKit Poised to Revolutionize Large-scale Medical Studies

Apple's ResearchKit Poised to Revolutionize Large-scale Medical Studies

Apple changed the landscape for medical science research with the introduction of ResearchKit. Scientists have been stuck with essentially the same data collection methods they've used for decades, but now they have a radically new way of gathering that information that's faster, and potentially more accurate and less expensive. -- The Mac Observer.

The inner-workings of Apple's Force Touch trackpad revealed

The inner-workings of Apple's Force Touch trackpad revealed

If you are interested in the Force Touch trackpad on Apple's new MacBook, iFixIt has performed a full teardown of the new system to reveal its underpinnings, and in doing so has outlined some of how the trackpad works. Apple's trackpad brings several key advancements to its input technology, and while it may not fit everyone's tastes, it should help overcome a number of limitations to Apple's current trackpads. -- MacIssues.

iPad Seen as 'Weakest Link' in Stagnating Tablet Market

iPad Seen as 'Weakest Link' in Stagnating Tablet Market

IDC on Thursday reduced its five year forecast for worldwide tablet shipments following the tablet market's first year-over-year decline in the fourth quarter. The research firm estimates that 234.5 million tablets will be shipped during 2015, representing marginal growth of 2.1% from 2014. -- MacRumors.

Will your new MacBook crash to the ground without MagSafe? (Yes)

Will your new MacBook crash to the ground without MagSafe? (Yes.)

MagSafe may be on its way out, if the USB Type-C new 12-inch MacBook is anything to go by. That's a shame, because Apple has retrained people of all ages to not worry about Mac laptop power cables. Should we be worried? -- Macworld.

Apple's Invention Regarding the Creation of New Gold Alloys for the Apple Watch Edition Emerges

Apple's Invention Regarding the Creation of New Gold Alloys for the Apple Watch Edition Emerges

During Monday's Special Spring Forward Apple Event we learned a little more about the Apple Watch which is launching on April 24, 2015. We specifically learned more about the new customized metal alloys that will provide the Apple Watch with such value. Apple states that "Inspired by the inherent beauty of gold, we created Apple Watch Edition in 18-karat solid gold. Since it's a soft metal, susceptible to nicks and scratches, our metallurgists engineered an entirely new alloy that's up to twice as hard as standard gold. -- Patently Apple.

The Good News about the CIA Targeting Apple

The Good News about the CIA Targeting Apple

While I have no doubt the CIA (and every other intelligence agency and criminal organization in the world) targets Apple along with all the other major technology companies, that doesn't mean they always succeed, or that their successes last long. It's also important to note that most of the attacks listed in the article are better suited for targeting individuals, not the mass spying that has so dominated the headlines. -- TidBits.

Developer unlocks Activity app inside iOS 8.2, appears when an Apple Watch is paired to iPhone

Developer unlocks Activity app inside iOS 8.2, appears when an Apple Watch is paired to iPhone

Developer Hamza Sood has done some digging inside the public iOS 8.2 build that was distributed to users on Monday. Although the Apple Watch is included by default as stock app (undeletable, whether you like it or not), the OS also includes an Activity app. Although it was previously known that the app existed, Apple has not shared details about what features the app has or even how you installed onto your phone. -- 9to5Mac.

OS X Server 4.1 Developer Preview (14S1062i) Now Available

OS X Server 4.1 Developer Preview (14S1062i) Now Available

What's New In OS X Server 4.1 Preview 14S1062i:

  • Profile Manager support for new features, MDM commands, and payloads in iOS 8.2 and iOS 8.3.
  • Caching Server configuration option to output DNS TXT records in Windows format.
  • User and group accounts can now be exported to a file.
  • Bug fixes.

Warning YouTube: Apple has big iTunes plans

Warning YouTube: Apple has big iTunes plans

Apple's move to cut Apple TV prices alongside music industry gossip suggest Apple is almost ready to attack Google's YouTube and Spotify where it hurts -- content. -- Computerworld.

Apple looks into a method for sandboxed OS X apps to communicate

Apple looks into a method for sandboxed OS X apps to communicate

Apple is looking into a method for "sandboxed" applications in Mac OS X to communicate. The company has filed for a patent (number 20150074165) with the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office for "mediated data exchange for sandboxed applications." -- Apple Daily Report.

How-To Choose the best external hard drive for your Mac (or iOS device!)

How-To Choose the best external hard drive for your Mac (or iOS device!)

I feel old saying this, but having used computers since before external hard drives existed, I can say with certainty that buying a hard drive is easier today than it's ever been before. For traditional drives, prices are low, options are numerous, and capacities are so high that your only choices are "enough space," "more than enough space," and "way more than enough space." I could point you towards a gigantic 5-Terabyte $139 Seagate USB 3.0 hard drive right now and end this article without another paragraph. Since Apple doesn't even sell a Mac with that much disk space, you could back up five (or more) computers to that drive without running out of room. Or you could store a decade worth of digital photos alongside a giant media library. For $139! -- 9to5Mac.

Goodbye Apple fanboy: how the watchmaker alienated its audience

Goodbye Apple fanboy: how the watchmaker alienated its audience

First U2, now marathon-running 80s supermodels -- where did it all go wrong for the once sleek, minimalist Apple launch event? The whole of Monday's Spring Forward event -- at which the Cupertino team unveiled its much-anticipated Apple Watch -- seemed geared around asserting Apple's caring, sharing credentials. -- The Guardian.

The truth behind The Guardian's negative Apple Watch story

The truth behind The Guardian's negative Apple Watch story

Apple Watch is bringing people to their keyboards in droves, writing opinions and asking questions about Apple's newest device. That's a great thing--unless you represent many of the world's larger luxury watchmakers and you write a purely negative article about Apple Watch for The Guardian. -- The Loop.

March 12 Thursday's News

 

One Man's Opinion

One More Man's Opinion

It seems that the conversation which started on Tuesday and continued on Wednesday about Apple's announcements is still awakening opinions on MacGuru list members. What follows is a conversation I have been having with a very old friend:

The first time I pass through TSA with no paper and my phone already in my backpack because of the useless device on my wrist, I'll send a quiet smile in your direction.

Yes but I am not rich enough to have an iPhone AND a watch and since I have to have an iPhone to have a watch...

And you know that no one keeps their iPhone in their backpack. No one except for myself and my wife can go more than 30 seconds without checking there iPhone.

And it only takes one hand to "use" an iPhone app but with the watch both are involved.

And of course if you are wearing a watch I expect you to also be wearing a big sign that says: ROB ME! Remember they will be able to see the watch but they cannot see my iPhone in my backpack. An everyone already has an iPhone.

It is still Prada and Vogue. (It is beautiful.)

Ah, but TSA is the great equalizer. All your crap has to go in that bag at your airport's genital, er, metal scanners.

Seriously, nobody thinks the Watch is for everybody. But for those of us with the "old, out-of-date" iPhone 5s it means ApplePay without having to pony up to break a contract AND buy a 6.

And I rather like the idea of a gentle "tap tap" on the wrist as opposed to a buzz in the pocket (or, heaven forbid, out on top of a desk).

Now if we can just get NFL ticket barcodes on there (and, of course, a real NFL team in Nashville again)...

And he and his friends take exception with the Intercept story that I mentioned yesterday:

Several of my colleagues and I had also picked up on that Intercept story (I think I might have mentioned that we have a little working group of education SEs on security). I don't doubt the general thrust, although the story betrays some fundamental misunderstanding of how iOS apps can be distributed. The only thing that bugs me is that it's become just a little too much of a deus ex machina to say that key parts of your argument came from "documents revealed by Edward Snowden." I'd love to see some sort of fact-checking site for Snowden authenticity - maybe call it Snowpes.com?

Anyway that's one man's opinion.

If you have an opinion or insight about something you read on MacVolPlace, please share.

Over 10K participants sign up for Stanford medical trial after ResearchKit debut

Over 10K participants sign up for Stanford medical trial after ResearchKit debut

The number of participants in a Stanford University cardiovascular study conducted using Apple's new ResearchKit medical research platform ballooned to more than 10,000 overnight, researchers say, after the trial was featured on stage during Apple's "Spring Forward" event earlier this week. -- AppleInsider.

Teardown shows new 2015 MacBook Airs sticking with non-adhered batteries

Teardown shows new 2015 MacBook Airs sticking with non-adhered batteries

A teardown of the latest 11- and 13-inch MacBook Airs shows few differences over their 2014 counterparts, and in fact demonstrates a rare decision by Apple to continue using non-adhered batteries. -- AppleInsider.

Apple investigating iPhone dock with integrated display, touchpad, sensors, inductive charging, more

Apple investigating iPhone dock with integrated display, touchpad, sensors, inductive charging, more

A patent application published on Thursday reveals Apple's interest in a docking solution for iPhone and iPad that supports multiple accessories and incorporates a display, advanced gesture controls, wireless communications and even inductive charging. -- AppleInsider.

Conversations with Apple's brand

Conversations with Apple's brand

According to Folkore, in 1981 Apple took out a two page ad in Scientific American which explained that whereas humans cannot run as fast as other animals, a human on a bicycle is the fastest species on earth. -- Asymco.

The $10,000 Apple Watch's 'killer app'

CollegeHumor explains the $10,000 Apple Watch's 'killer app'

As soon as Tim Cook announced that the Apple Watch Edition starts at $10,000, you could practically hear the scratch of jokes being written. This one, by YouTube's CollegeHumor channel, is among the best so far. It describes the "groundbreaking" feature of letting wearers reveal with a single flash of the wrist that they have crazy amounts of money to spend. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple engineer reveals the true story behind the MacBook design process

Apple engineer reveals the true story behind the MacBook design process

The new MacBook is the biggest revolution the MacBook line has seen in a decade, yet it's not with out its haters. A mobile processor. One USB-C port. A 480p front camera. And a $1299 price tag. "Just who the hell at Apple signed off on this thing?!" some fans might be asking.

Well, thanks to some very rare footage of an Apple engineer speaking about the design process of the new MacBook, we finally know what was going through Jony's and Tim's heads when they signed off on production.

Getting a New Mac: How Much Storage Do You Need?

Getting a New Mac: How Much Storage Do You Need?

Thinking of a new Mac after Apple's recent announcements? Well, the most important consideration for what to buy is how much storage you're using (and what you'll need to grow comfortably over the life of a new machine). With today's Quick Tip, you'll be able to figure out how much data you have, and you'll learn how to use that info to pick out your perfect new Mac. -- The Mac Observer.

The Ultimate Apple Watch Comparison Chart

The Ultimate Apple Watch Comparison Chart

Rob Griffiths has posted a great comparison chart for Apple Watch. It lists every model with every strap option, and includes the price, weight, and size of the model. If you're interested in this device, it's a must-see. -- The Mac Observer.

Teardown Reveals New 13-Inch MacBook Air SSD is Nearly Twice as Fast as SSD in New 11-Inch MacBook Air

Teardown Reveals New 13-Inch MacBook Air SSD is Nearly Twice as Fast as SSD in New 11-Inch MacBook Air

Apple on Monday refreshed its MacBook Air lineup, adding Broadwell chips and Intel 6000 graphics. Both models received the same processor updates, but the 13-inch MacBook Air got an extra boost -- new PCIe-based flash storage that Apple says is "up to two times faster" than the flash storage used in the previous generation MacBook Air. The 11-inch MacBook Air did not receive the same flash storage update. -- MacRumors.

Apple's 'Force Touch' Trackpad Fools Users Into Feeling Clicks Without Actually Moving

Apple's 'Force Touch' Trackpad Fools Users Into Feeling Clicks Without Actually Moving

At its "Spring Forward" event on Monday, Apple announced a brand-new MacBook and updated 13-inch MacBook Pros with a fully redesigned trackpad called the Force Touch trackpad.

Like on the Apple Watch, Force Touch allows the device to distinguish between a light press and a deep press, opening up new methods for interaction. For example, while a light press could be a simple click, a deep press while browsing in Safari could bring up a Wikipedia entry in a pop-up window. -- MacRumors.

How to fix unexpected error -50 in OS X when deleting or moving files

How to fix unexpected error -50 in OS X when deleting or moving files

Despite its user-friendly interface, OS X sometimes gives no more information than an error code when something goes wrong. One of these is error code -50, which may occur when you attempt to copy, move, or delete files from external hard drives. If this occurs and you are stuck with a file you cannot manage, then you can likely overcome this error with a few possible approaches. -- MacIssues.

Slack, the Office Messaging App That May Finally Sink Email

Slack, the Office Messaging App That May Finally Sink Email

People in the tech industry have been digging a grave for email for more than a decade, but their predictions have always seemed a little out of touch.

The start-up Slack is changing the way workers communicate, with a group chat app that eschews privacy and automatically archives almost everything. -- New York Times.

How Apple's embrace of the new USB points to world without wires

How Apple's embrace of the new USB points to world without wires

Apple's reliance on a single, more powerful version of the USB port in its new MacBook might alienate customers today, but analysts say the company is leading the way to future PC design. -- CNET.

How to troubleshoot Wi-Fi issues in OS X Yosemite

How to troubleshoot Wi-Fi issues in OS X Yosemite

Updating to a new version of an OS can sometimes present frustrating problems for the end user. Unfortunately, many Mac users who upgrade to OS X Yosemite have been running into problems with Wi-Fi connectivity. -- TechRepublic.

Six things to know about the USB 3.1 port in the new MacBook

Six things to know about the USB 3.1 port in the new MacBook

Apple is challenging laptop users to adapt to fewer ports with the bold design of its new 12-inch MacBook, which has just one USB 3.1 port and a headphone jack. Apple laid out a similar challenge with its first MacBook Air in early 2008, which had just one USB 2.0 port to connect peripherals and a micro-DVI port to connect monitors. -- IDG News Service.

MacBook Air 13" Early 2015 Teardown

MacBook Air 13

It's that time of year again: the MacBook Air has come out of hibernation with some new specs for spring.

At Monday's "Spring Forward" event, Apple promised us next-gen Broadwell CPUs with updated graphics, Thunderbolt 2, and faster flash memory. Join us as we pop the hood to confirm, and see if anything has changed in these past eleven months.

The 11" MacBook Air got a refresh too, so we're on double teardown duty. -- iFixit.

MacBook Air 11" Early 2015 Teardown

MacBook Air 11

Tick, tock--that's the sound of Intel punching out another line of processors, the newly minted Broadwell series. They splashed down into Apple's MacBook Air lineup just yesterday, and we wasted no time in picking them apart. With the 13" model duly dispatched, we turn our attention to its 11" counterpart. Join us in tearing down the Early 2015 MacBook Air 11". -- iFixit.

The Death of Thunderbolt?

The Death of Thunderbolt?

Ever since Apple's Monday Spring Forward event and the release of the new USB Type C Connector MacBook, people have been asking about the future of Thunderbolt; Apple's previous all-in-wonder solution for high speed I/O. -- Egg Freckles.

March 11 Wednesday's News

 

One More Man's Opinion

One More Man's Opinion

Yesterday, you may remember, I expressed my opinion regarding Apple's latest announcements. Well it seems that what I said about Apple's ResearchKit struck a nerve with one of the smartest people I know. And he says:

Of course Apple's real reason is to get the FDA to standardize on iOS and create high hurdles for competitors.

If Apple really wants to help the world, Open Source Mac OS 10.6, call it "Mac OS Classic" and allow Dell to make hardware for it.

If you have an opinion regarding Apple's announcement or some aspect of if that has been over looked, please share.

Anyway, that's one more man's opinion

Google Calendar comes to iPhone, 'Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath' hits Mac

Google Calendar comes to iPhone, 'Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath' hits Mac

Two significant apps hit Apple's mobile and desktop operating systems today, as the long-awaited Google Calendar debuted for iPhone and console classic Oddworld: Stranger's Wrath landed on Mac. -- AppleInsider.

Booming retail sales enable Apple to negotiate low rent prices at malls

Booming retail sales enable Apple to negotiate low rent prices at malls

The popularity of Apple's retail outlets has enabled the company to negotiate extremely low rent rates at malls, which in turn benefit from the additional foot traffic. -- AppleInsider.

Will the iPhone transform medicine? The FDA may have something to say

Will the iPhone transform medicine? The FDA may have something to say

Apple's keynote this week produced a lot of hype-worthy news, as such Apple announcements often do. And who could forget the claims that the iPhone is now going to transform medical research? The keynote seemed to imply that iPhones, and ResearchKit, would transform our smartphones into medical tricorders, ready to diagnose Parkinson's disease or atherosclerosis at the tap of a screen. Not so fast.

As much as Silicon Valley likes to think of itself as a force for good, disrupting this and pivoting that, it sometimes forgets that there's a wider world out there. And when it comes to using devices in the practice of medicine, that world contains three very important letters: FDA. That's right, the US Food and Drug Administration, which Congress has empowered to regulate the marketing and research uses of medical devices. -- Ars Technica.

The new MacBook: I hope you like dongles

The new MacBook: I hope you like dongles

There is one refrain that, for the last few years, always pops up at Apple events: thinness. Through magical material, design, and manufacturing advances, Apple keeps making its devices thinner. That's why it always amuses me when people slot the 6.9mm-thick iPhone 6 into a chunky case that completely counters Apple's advances. As Phil Schiller unveiled the new MacBook yesterday, a similar thought came to mind: If you buy a MacBook, the svelte silhouette of your new laptop might be ruined by a bunch of dongles. -- Ars Technica.

CIA spends years trying to break Apple's security

CIA spends years trying to break Apple's security

The CIA has been been involved in a multi-year effort to crack iOS security, according to new information provided to The Intercept by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The attempts have been the focal point of multiple yearly CIA conferences called "The Jamboree."

Get a lifetime of hacker protection with VPN Unlimited

Get a lifetime of hacker protection with VPN Unlimited

Say goodbye to all your online privacy worries, for life. VPN Unlimited is your one-stop shop for protecting your WiFi connection, securing your online activity, and bypassing web content restrictions. Start protecting your online identity today, with a lifetime subscription to VPN Unlimited, 70% off at Cult of Mac Deals for a limited time.

A VPN, or virtual private network, is a third party service that encrypts your data and hides your physical location from others. When you employ a VPN service, you are completely untraceable and invisible. It's something that every internet user should have these days, particularly those who frequent public Wi-Fi hotspots, corporate networks, or cellular data networks. -- Cult of Mac.

The new MacBook isn't for you, it's for the future

The new MacBook isn't for you, it's for the future

The new MacBook is one of the most impressive pieces of technology Apple has unleashed in five years. It boasts a Retina display, USB-C, butterfly-hinged keyboard, Force Touch trackpad and terraced batteries. All crammed inside a body that's smaller than the MacBook Air, made possible by a new fanless processor.

Despite being an unapologetically gorgeous piece of hardware, the new MacBook's biggest weapon -- the fanless processor -- is also its greatest weakness. -- Cult of Mac.

Read This Before You Install OS X Yosemite (10.10.3) Public Beta

Read This Before You Install OS X Yosemite (10.10.3) Public Beta

Anyone can now join the fun and install the pre-release beta of OS X 10.10.3, which includes the new Photos app. It may sound tempting but my advice is: Don't do it. -- The Mac Observer.

New MacBook Pro and Air Benchmarks Comparable to Mid-2014 Models

New MacBook Pro and Air Benchmarks Comparable to Mid-2014 Models

The newly refreshed 13" Retina MacBook Pro announced on Monday is seeing comparable performance to the mid-2014 model, according to the latest Geekbench benchmark. The early 2015 model with an Intel Core i5 processor clocked at 2.7GHz achieved a single-core score of 3043 and a multi-core score of 6448, a minor variance from last year's low-end 13" Retina MacBook Pro single-core score of 3056 and multi-core score of 6554. -- MacRumors.

Does USB Type C Herald the End of Apple's Proprietary Connectors?

Does USB Type C Herald the End of Apple's Proprietary Connectors?

The Verge has an interesting editorial about the USB Type C connector on the new Macbook, and what this might mean for Apple's Lightning and Thunderbolt connectors. The former is functionally identical to USB Type C, and the latter has yet to prove popular in the external media and "docking" applications for which it was originally intended. Will Apple phase out these ports in favor of a single, widely-accepted, but novel standard? Or do we face a dystopian future where Apple sells cords with USB Type C on one end, and Lightning on the other?

How's the Weather There? Crowdsourcing App Promises Better Forecasts

How's the Weather There? Crowdsourcing App Promises Better Forecasts

An app called Sunshine taps into users' smartphone sensors to provide localized weather predictions.

An app called Sunshine wants you to help it create more accurate, localized weather forecasts.

The app, currently in a private beta test, combines data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) with atmospheric pressure readings captured by a smartphone. The latest iPhones, and some Android smartphones, include barometers for measuring atmospheric pressure. These sensors are generally used to determine elevation for navigation, but changes in air pressure can also signal changes in the weather. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple blocks devs from using many of Watch's best features

Apple blocks devs from using many of Watch's best features

A new report for Reuters says that app makers are struggling to come up with the kind of "killer app" that will be a winner for the Apple Watch in the way that Instagram or, more recently, Snapchat was for the iPhone. The report notes that Apple has blocked certain features of the Apple Watch, including its gyroscope and accelerometer, on the initial WatchKit developers' kit, but won't reveal exactly why this has been done.

Why Does the Apple Watch Exist? Who Knows

Why Does the Apple Watch Exist? Who Knows

Yesterday's event provided a few key details about the Apple Watch. We learned how much it will cost, and when we'll be able to buy it. But there's still a very big hole in the center of the Apple Watch picture. Tim Cook and associates showed off a grab bag of features, but they once again failed to give any overarching sense of why this thing exists. What is the Apple Watch? How will we use it? Where does it fit in our lives? In what ways does it replace our phones? In what ways does it complement them? -- Wired.

OWC Unboxes, Tests Speeds of SSDs in New 2015 MacBook Airs

OWC Unboxes, Tests Speeds of SSDs in New 2015 MacBook Airs

Perhaps overshadowed by Apple's introduction of the new 12" Retina MacBook, the 11" and 13" MacBook Air models were also given some attention at yesterday's Spring Forward event -- but to much less fanfare.

We were able to get our hands on the new 2015 MacBook Air models and performed a teardown on both and ran benchmarks on the 13″ model which featured a 4 lane PCIe SSD. -- Rocket Yard.

How to Print from an iPad or iPhone

How to Print from an iPad or iPhone

iPads are useful for a lot of things, but what do you do when you want to use one to print something out? It's not like a computer that you can just hook up to a printer, right? Actually, it is pretty darn easy: Apple introduced AirPrint a few years back as a way for users to be able to print from their iOS devices. Even if you don't have AirPrint-compatible printer, then you can use a piece of software for your Mac like Printopia to enable wireless printing. Here's an explanation of how to make AirPrint work. -- Mac|Life.

Is iOS 8.2 killing your battery life? Try this trick

Is iOS 8.2 killing your battery life? Try this trick

If you've found your iPhone's battery performance has gotten worse since you installed iOS 8.2 earlier this week, it may be because of the new fitness tracking features that Apple added to the software. A Reddit user who goes by the name of lil_breesy has helpfully posted a quick step-by-step guide for shutting off iOS 8.2's fitness tracking features and hopefully making your battery last longer. -- BGR.

5 Superior Alternatives To Apple's New MacBook

5 Superior Alternatives To Apple's New MacBook

Apple describes their New MacBook as "the future of the notebook." But I'm not buying that prophesy, and neither should you. From an engineering standpoint, Apple's newest SKU is nothing short of brilliant; its elegant chassis a true evolution in a tech world that measures sexiness in millimeters. It's 24% thinner than my beloved MacBook Air and 17% lighter. But it's also less powerful and will carry an exorbitant price tag. -- Forbes.

March 10 Tuesday's News

 

Apple Event MacVolPol

Apple Event MacVolPol

As you can see from the results of the last MacVolPol below your interest reflects what you did in the market place. You bought more iPhones that anyone could believe.

Apple Event MacVolPol

So now Apple has had a new event and showed new products and updates. Please let us know what you think by taking the MacVolPol on right side of this page.

Remember if you ever want to see results of old MacVolPols or see how the current is trending, just click on the MacVolPol logo.

One Man's Opinion

One Man's Opinion

The thing I am most excited about from Apple's announcements yesterday is ResearchKit. When I think of how it could help and improve medical studies I get very excited about how it could help so many people. Even if the don't own an Apple product of any kind.

The most useless product Apple has ever released is the Apple Watch. It can't do anything an iPhone can. It must be paired with and iPhone to download software and manage it. And it costs more than the first car I ever owned. This is only a status symbol. And what is that 10K watch all about. It certainly is not function. So now Apple is like Prada, a fashion designer instead of a technology company.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Apple targeting independent merchants for Apple Pay, adds new FAQ and telephone support

Apple targeting independent merchants for Apple Pay, adds new FAQ and telephone support

As Apple seeks to expand the network of businesses that accept Apple Pay, recent updates to the company's marketing collateral for the mobile payment system have begun to focus on recruiting independent merchants, answering a number of frequently-asked questions and offering a telephone support hotline. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to releases iOS 8.2

Apple to releases iOS 8.2

Apple's latest iOS update will launch later today with backend support for Apple Watch, and new apps for controlling the wearable's software.

Apple's latest iOS 8.2 update is available for download with bug fixes and a patch for the FREAK secure transport flaw.

First look: Hands-on with Apple's all new 12" MacBook with Retina display

First look: Hands-on with Apple's all new 12

Following the redesigned 12-inch MacBook's unveiling on Monday, AppleInsider was on hand to take a first look at Apple's latest thin-and-light, which comes in three colors including gold.

Announced earlier today, the all new MacBook is the lightest and thinnest Mac Apple has ever made, weighing in at only two pounds and measuring 13.1 millimeters at its thickest point. -- AppleInsider.

iMovie for OS X gets support for Photos beta in latest update

iMovie for OS X gets support for Photos beta in latest update

Apple has released an update to the OS X edition of iMovie, making several minor but important changes, including integration with Yosemite's new Photos app, which is bundled with the current OS X 10.10.3 beta. -- AppleInsider.

Apple reportedly backs down in push to lower relaunched Beats Music service prices

Apple reportedly backs down in push to lower relaunched Beats Music service prices

As it continues to negotiate with music labels on a rumored Beats Music relaunch, Apple has reportedly surrendered on one of its key initiatives: lowering the cost of the rebooted service to $8 per month. -- AppleInsider.

Apple addresses 'FREAK' attack in latest OS X, Apple TV and iOS security updates

Apple addresses 'FREAK' attack in latest OS X, Apple TV and iOS security updates

Apple on Monday rolled out a security update for OS X, as well as separate updates for iOS and Apple TV, that addresses a number of recently discovered vulnerabilities, including a widely publicized SSL/TSL flaw dubbed "FREAK" that could in some cases allow malicious users to intercept secure communications. -- AppleInsider.

Hands-on with the Retina MacBook: One-port wonder

Hands-on with the Retina MacBook: One-port wonder

pple announced a new MacBook today--not MacBook Air, not MacBook Pro, just MacBook. It's the first one of those that Apple has offered since it killed the plastic MacBooks earlier this decade, and while those computers were low-cost alternatives to the MacBook Pro and then the MacBook Air, this laptop is a much different beast.

It's Apple's first fanless MacBook. It's the first to use Intel's ultra-low-power processors in the form of the Broadwell-based Core M. It's got a Retina Display. It's not a cut-down budget model, and it's not quite a MacBook Air replacement. We got a chance to take the laptop for a test drive at Apple's event today, and here's what it's like to use. -- Ars Technica.

iOS 8.2 is here with an Apple Watch app you can't delete

iOS 8.2 is here with an Apple Watch app you can't delete

Apple's big keynote just ended, and iOS 8.2 has already been released.

The update includes the new companion app for the Apple Watch, which will be required for setting up the device and loading apps. It also can't deleted, which means it will be a constant reminder of the Watch you do. -- Cult of Mac.

ResearchKit turns every iPhone into a medical crowdsourcing tool

ResearchKit turns every iPhone into a medical crowdsourcing tool

Aside from the gorgeous new 12-inch MacBook Air, the part of today's Apple keynote that excited me the most was the announcement of what Apple is calling ResearchKit, a new open-source iOS software framework designed to crowdsource volunteers for medical research studies. -- Cult of Mac.

Retina MacBook's 'butterfly' keyboard feels a bit buggy

Retina MacBook's 'butterfly' keyboard feels a bit buggy

But journalists in attendance were just as excited to learn about a completely reinvented Retina MacBook. Reporters covering the Apple unveiling eagerly shared initial impressions once they got their hands on Apple's thinnest, lightest computer yet.

The look impressed. The touch was another matter. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple quietly killed its glowing logo today

Apple quietly killed its glowing logo today

The new MacBook is gorgeous, insanely thin, revolutionary, and pressure sensitive. It's also missing one killer feature: a glowing Apple logo.

The glowing Apple logo has became a pop culture icon ever since Apple released the Powerbook G3 in May 1999. However, it looks like Jony Ive's design team is ready to sacrifice the shinning Apple beacon in the name of thinness. You'll still find a glowing logo on the MacBook Airs and MacBook Pros, but it was never meant to be on Apple's new golden beauties. -- Cult of Mac.

The sky is falling and the FAA isn't ready

The sky is falling and the FAA isn't ready

According to a new report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO), the U.S. airspace system is incredibly vulnerable to hacking and a state-sponsored hacking effort could paralyze air traffic over North America. Very scary stuff. And as a licensed pilot for 45 years, I can tell you that it's both true and not true, that the system is horribly hackable but that very vulnerability might be what we need to stimulate real airspace innovation. -- I, Cringely.

Apple TV Status Remains a Disappointment and a Mystery

Apple TV Status Remains a Disappointment and a Mystery

Apple must be working on something really big related to the Apple TV. The last major release, the 3rd generation Apple TV, was on March 7, 2012. Three years is an eternity in the tech industry. John Martellaro expresses his disappointment that no new hardware was announced. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Rolls Out Apple TV Software Update

Apple Rolls Out Apple TV Software Update

Apple didn't release a new Apple TV model during its "Spring forward" media event, but it did push out a new software update for the set top entertainment box. The update for Apple TV 3 doesn't include any noticeably flashy changes-like the promised HBO Now channel-so it's more likely a compatibility update for iOS 8.2 and the upcoming OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 update. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Updates Mac Comparison Chart to Include New MacBook

Apple Updates Mac Comparison Chart to Include New MacBook

Apple has has updated its Macintosh comparison chart page to include the new MacBook announced at the Spring Forward event. Those who may be on the fence about MacBook, Air and Pro prices and specs will find this to be a helpful chart. -- The Mac Observer.

USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter for New MacBook Includes HDMI and USB 3.1 Connectors

USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter for New MacBook Includes HDMI and USB 3.1 Connectors

Announced in conjunction with the new line of MacBooks revealed at today's "Spring Forward" event in San Francisco, the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adaptor will allow users a dock-like experience with included HDMI, USB 3.1, and USB-C inputs located on the device.

A 29W USB-C Power Adapter ($49) looks like the middle child between Apple's 12W USB Power Adapters for iPads and the 40W adapters it sells for MacBook Airs. The glossy white power cube does not include Apple's USB-C Charge Cable, or a Power Adapter Extension Cable, both of which are sold separately.

The 2-meter USB-C Charge Cable ($29) has USB-C plugs on both ends and connects to the MacBook for charging. Apple notes that it supports USB 2 for syncing and data transfer between devices.

A USB-C VGA Multiport Adapter ($79) features three ports: a VGA monitor port, a USB port, and a USB-C port for charging. You can use it to mirror the MacBook's screen to a 1080p display, as well as for the USB adapter features of the standalone USB-C to USB Adapter. It supports USB 3.1 Gen 1.

Finally, the USB-C Digital AV Multiport Adapter ($79) includes one HDMI port for a self-supplied HDMI cable, one USB-C port for charging, and one standard USB port like the ones in the USB Adapter and VGA Multiport Adapter. It also supports USB 3.1 Gen 1.

First Impressions of New 12-Inch MacBook: Ridiculously Light, but Thin Keys and Trackpad Take Getting Used To

First Impressions of New 12-Inch MacBook: Ridiculously Light, but Thin Keys and Trackpad Take Getting Used To

Following today's "Spring Forward" media event, Apple allowed members of the media in attendance to get some hands-on time with the brand-new 12-inch Retina MacBook. Many sites are now sharing their first impressions of the notebook, which includes an incredibly thin design (13.1mm), a revamped trackpad, a Core M processor, silent operation thanks to the lack of a fan, an edge-to-edge keyboard, and a single USB-C port. -- MacRumors.

Apple Granted a Patent for Future iDevices with Sidewall Displays

Apple Granted a Patent for Future iDevices with Sidewall Displays

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 41 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's granted patent relating to possible future iDevices like the iPhone having sidewall flexible displays that could represent virtual buttons to replace physical buttons for iDevice controls including special ones for gaming. -- Patently Apple.

Smartphones Will Soon Learn to Recognize Faces and More

Smartphones Will Soon Learn to Recognize Faces and More

Smartphone apps will be able to perceive objects and perform other intelligent tricks thanks to Qualcomm's newest mobile chips.

Smartphone camera apps could soon do more than just capture images. Software integrated with a new line of smartphone chips will be capable of recognizing, say, a cat or city skyline in a photo, and tagging pictures of your friends with their names. -- MIT Technology Review.

CIA has waged 'secret campaign' to crack Apple's iOS security

CIA has waged 'secret campaign' to crack Apple's iOS security

Classified documents released by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveal that the Central Intelligence Agency has been engaged in a multi-year coordinated effort to crack the security of Apple's iOS platform, which powers and protects the iPhone and iPad. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Granted 41 Patents today covering the Apple Watch Design, an Oleophobic Coating on Sapphire & More

Apple Granted 41 Patents today covering the Apple Watch Design, an Oleophobic Coating on Sapphire & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 41 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover the first Apple Watch design patent to surface. We cover two other specific patents and wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Poking fun at the Apple Watch begins in 3 ... 2 ... 1

Poking fun at the Apple Watch begins in 3 ... 2 ... 1

Joy of Tech created a helpful flowchart for working out which Apple Watch is right for you. -- Joy of Tech.

How To Display your iPhone or iPad on your Mac

How To Display your iPhone or iPad on your Mac

I get this question all the time when I release a video tutorial or app review where I feature an iPhone or iPad or both. People want to know what technology I'm using to display my iPad or iPhone on my Mac. Originally I only had one way of doing it with Reflector. Now I've got another way to do it that's built-in to Mac OS X 10.10 Mavericks. Check out my video to see how it's done. -- MacNews Blog.

A Few Words On Dropbox, iCloud, And Cloud Services For Mac, iPhone, And iPad

A Few Words On Dropbox, iCloud, And Cloud Services For Mac, iPhone, And iPad

Cloud services are all the rage these days. If it's not cloud storage from Dropbox or iCloud, there's similar services from Google Drive, Microsoft OneDrive, Box, Amazon, and many, many others, most of which offer a limited amount of online storage for free, with tiered pricing after the entry level amount. -- NoodleMac.

Hands-On With the Unbelievably Thin, Strange New MacBook

Hands-On With the Unbelievably Thin, Strange New MacBook

Apple's latest MacBook isn't a spec update. It's not an incremental upgrade. It's a totally different machine, for a different kind of person. It's also kind of ridiculous. -- Wired.

How to keep your connected home safe: 7 steps you can take to boost home security

How to keep your connected home safe: 7 steps you can take to boost home security

The Internet of Things is based on sensors and controls in all sorts of devices. When those types of devices are used to create a smart home, they can give residents unprecedented control and insight. The proliferation of smart devices, however, also opens the door to new dangers and threats. -- Macworld.

March 09 Monday's News

 

Jony Ive's publicity tour continues as he discusses Apple Watch design in new interview

Jony Ive's publicity tour continues as he discusses Apple Watch design in new interview

Continuing his evolution from behind-the-scenes design czar to company-fronting rock star, Apple's Jony Ive granted an interview to one of his hometown newspapers this week and revealed his reasons for joining Apple, touched on his friendship with Steve Jobs, and discussed the design of the Apple Watch. -- AppleInsider.

Opinion: Apple Pay finds frauds reporting

Opinion: Apple Pay finds frauds reporting

When Apple rolls out a rare new product--rather than canceling it internally--you'd have to be naive to think it was rushed to market without much consideration and therefore probably doomed to failure. But you'd be equally naive to think that the incumbents positioned in the path of Apple's next potential juggernaut wouldn't desperately seek to defend their turf, bending the truth to the breaking point if necessary. -- AppleInsider.

Oracle Java is now installing adware on Macs. Here's how to avoid it

Oracle Java is now installing adware on Macs. Here's how to avoid it

Mac users have had it pretty good when compared to Windows users, at least on the adware and nuisanceware front. Even Oracle, who has bundled the Ask.com search toolbar with Java for Windows for years, has abstained from infecting its Mac users with adware.

Sadly, though, that era now seems to be an end, with Oracle opting to bundle its most recent versions of Java for Mac with the Ask.com search toolbar. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Photos Beta: Scrubbing Through Thumbnails

OS X Photos Beta: Scrubbing Through Thumbnails

You want another 10.10.3 Photos beta tip, right? Sure you do. Well, it's your lucky day, because this Quick Tip is all about scrubbing through the thumbnails in your library, just like you can do with the Photos app in iOS. It's a quick and easy way to find the exact image you're looking for! -- The Mac Observer.

What programs are forcing the use of your MacBook's high-power GPU?

What programs are forcing the use of your MacBook's high-power GPU?

Apple's high-end MacBook Pro systems have two Graphics processors: an "onboard" one that uses less energy, and a "dedicated" one that is optimized for advanced graphics processing. In normal cases, your Mac will dynamically switch between them based on the demands of applications you use, but this means that any program may spur the system to keep the advanced graphics processor active, and thereby drain your battery life. -- MacIssues.

How to set up and use Apple Pay with an Apple Watch

How to set up and use Apple Pay with an Apple Watch

The Apple Watch's release date is expected to be announced today, and while you might have reservations on when to get one, if you have decided to, then you might be interested in using it for Apple Pay, especially if you are the owner of an iPhone 5, 5C, or 5S, and so far have not been able to take advantage of Apple Pay. The Apple Watch's NFC chip will allow you to take advantage of Apple Pay at vendor terminals that support it, so when you get your watch, you will have several steps to take in order to use Apple Pay. -- MacIssues.

Betting Against the Cable Bundle

Betting Against the Cable Bundle

As the television industry transitions in the digital age, cable profits are increasingly tied to broadband rather than video.

An email from a lobbyist landed in Eric Rouse's inbox one afternoon last December, catapulting Mr. Rouse, a commissioner of rural Lenoir County in North Carolina, into the middle of one of the fiercest battles being waged across the media business. -- New York Times.

Apple Watch Event: What to Look For

Apple Watch Event: What to Look For

At 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time today, Apple will hold an event in San Francisco to talk about the important features in the Apple Watch and share more details about the product. -- New York Times.

Original Mac Icon Sketches Archive Bought By MOMA

Original Mac Icon Sketches Archive Bought By MOMA

Susan Kare is the artist responsible for many of the classic Mac icons that are universally recognized. Now her impact as a pioneering and influential computer iconographer has been recognized by the Museum of Modern Art in New York. She designed all of her early icons on graph paper, with one square representing each pixel. Now this archive of sketches has been acquired by MoMA, jointly with San Francisco's Museum of Modern Art, and has gone on show as part of a new exhibition, This is for Everyone: Design Experiments For The Common Good. So now you can think of the smiling Mac, the pointing finger and scissors as high art. -- I Programmer.

Apple planning iPad in education improvements, removing Apple ID requirement for apps & books

Apple planning iPad in education improvements, removing Apple ID requirement for apps & books

Here's the full letter, which we received following the original report and confirmed is legit. It appears to be an email sent out to Apple's education partners. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS 8: How To Use Siri to return a lost iPhone to their owner

iOS 8: How To Use Siri to return a lost iPhone to their owner

What happens if you are out and about and happen to find an iPhone? You happen to be a good person and want to return the iPhone to the original owner, but the phone is locked with a passcode. You might think you are stuck, but actually you can use Siri to find out who owns the device. -- 9to5Mac.

California's hot, dry winters tied to climate change

California's hot, dry winters tied to climate change

Climate change is one of the most prominent public health issues currently on the CDC's radar. The organization's Climate and Health Program attempts to help state and city health departments to prepare for the health impacts of climate change, which can come in the form of things like temperature extremes, air pollution, allergens, and changes in disease patterns; they can also be felt indirectly through issues like food security. -- Ars Technica.

How to watch Apple's Spring Forward event livestream on Windows (and Android)

How to watch Apple's Spring Forward event livestream on Windows (and Android)

Officially, Apple's event livestream only works with Safari on Mac OS X, iPhones, iPads, Apple TV (where the channel just appeared) and iPod touch. However, if you are on Windows (or even Android) -- there is a workaround if you want to follow along with the announcements. (This trick will also work if you happen to be using an older version of OS X or iOS 6 that QuickTime Player doesn't support) -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Pay Fraud Cases Caused by Sloppy Bank Credit Card Tracking

Apple Pay Fraud Cases Caused by Sloppy Bank Credit Card Tracking

The recently reported Apple Pay fraud cases aren't due to security flaws, but to lax bank credit account tracking and approval procedures.

The story that Apple Pay had been breached and was being used to commit fraud surged like lighting through Web news pages and social networks. But like many stories that go viral on the Web, the early accounts were less than fully accurate. Apple Pay and its security are just fine. -- eWeek.

Microsoft Updates OneDrive Client for Mac OS X with Improved File Sync Performance

Microsoft Updates OneDrive Client for Mac OS X with Improved File Sync Performance

If you're one of those people who like to mix multiple technologies, you should know that Microsoft has updated earlier today, March 7, its OneDrive client application for the Mac OS X computer operating system to version 17.3.4724 build 0224. -- Softpedia.

OS X 10.10 (Yosemite): Preview fails to keep up with fast window resizing

OS X 10.10 (Yosemite): Preview fails to keep up with fast window resizing

Here's a typical example of the many things that are wrong in Yosemite in terms of performance and responsiveness. When you first upgrade to Yosemite, you might notice all kinds of different responsiveness issues and it can be all quite confusing, giving you a general impression of unresponsiveness even though you cannot quite clearly pinpoint what is wrong. -- Betalogue.

How to keep your Mac safe for your kids

How to keep your Mac safe for your kids

Keeping your kids safe while using the computer is paramount in many parents' minds. Fortunately Apple gives you the resources you need to keep your Mac safe for little ones. So today I'm going to give you some tips on the parental control features that are available to you in OS X Yosemite. -- iMore.

How to Bypass a FileVault Password On a Per Boot Basis with OS X

How to Bypass a FileVault Password On a Per Boot Basis with OS X

Using FileVault full disk encryption is one of the better ways to protect your Mac and personal documents from prying eyes and password resets, but if you're troubleshooting a Mac with FileVault, either your own or someone else's, it's kind of annoying to have another layer of passwords necessary to enter before you'll be able to get in. Additionally, for situations where you're performing remote management or administration tasks through SSH or Remote Login, if you were to need to reboot the remote Mac to install an OS X update, you wouldn't be able to enter the necessary FileVault password, right? Well, yes, unless you temporarily bypass FileVault with an authorized restart. -- OS X Daily.

Apple not among Fortune's 100 Best Companies to Work For

Apple not among Fortune's 100 Best Companies to Work For

Sorry, Apple, but according to Fortune you're not among the best companies to work for. The magazine has revealed its 18th annual list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For, detailing the perks, opportunities and benefits that make for happy employees in corporate America. -- Fortune.

Don't trust your phone, don't trust your laptop -- this is the reality that Snowden has shown us

Don't trust your phone, don't trust your laptop -- this is the reality that Snowden has shown us

Edward Snowden's astute revelations show that no electronic communications device -- from hard disks to sim cards -- is trustworthy.

Back in July 2013, a few weeks after Edward Snowden's revelations about internet and mobile-phone surveillance began, I wrote a column that began: "Repeat after me: Edward Snowden is not the story. The story is what he has revealed about the hidden wiring of our networked world." -- The Guardian.

March 06 Friday's News

 

First look: Microsoft's all-new Office 2016 for Mac public preview

First look: Microsoft's all-new Office 2016 for Mac public preview

Half a decade after Microsoft's last major update to Office for Mac, the venerable productivity suite returns anew with a Retina redesign, a modern codebase, and a host of new features -- and it's available today as a public preview. AppleInsider was given early access to the new apps and brings you a close-up view of Redmond's latest. -- AppleInsider.

Apple extends iPhone 5 battery replacement program into 2016

Apple extends iPhone 5 battery replacement program into 2016

Apple has pushed back the expiration date of its iPhone 5 battery replacement program, which was originally scheduled to end on March 1, to provide owners of faulty equipment a full three years of component coverage. -- AppleInsider.

DNS enhancement catches malware sites by understanding sneaky domain names

DNS enhancement catches malware sites by understanding sneaky domain names

A researcher at OpenDNS Security Labs has developed a new way to automatically detect and block sites used to distribute malware almost instantaneously without having to scan them. The approach, initially developed by researcher Jeremiah O'Connor, uses natural language processing and other analytics to detect malicious domains before they can attack by spotting host names that are designed as camouflage. Called NLPRank, it spots DNS requests for sites that have names similar to legitimate sites, but with IP addresses that are outside the expected address blocks and other related data that hints at sketchiness. -- Ars Technica.

It's about time: Microsoft releases free Office for Mac 2016 preview

It's about time: Microsoft releases free Office for Mac 2016 preview

For the last 12 months, Microsoft has focused on getting its flagship Office suite on screens where it's never been before--iPhones, iPads, and Android tablets. The Office for OS X apps were left behind, though. Microsoft released a new version of Outlook and an official OneNote client, but the core Word, Excel, and PowerPoint apps were stuck back in 2010. -- Ars Technica.

The Best Wi-Fi Router (for Most People)

The Best Wi-Fi Router (for Most People)

After spending a total of 200 hours researching and testing more than 20 Wi-Fi routers, plus analyzing reader comments and feedback, the $100 TP-Link Archer C7 (v2) is the router we recommend for most people right now. This dual-band, three-stream wireless-ac router usually costs between $80 and $100--the same price as many older, slower routers. But unlike those slower routers, the C7 supports the fastest connections of every major device you can buy today (or already own). -- The Wirecutter.

The weak link in Apple Pay's strong chain is bank verification. Who's to blame?

The weak link in Apple Pay's strong chain is bank verification. Who's to blame?

Earlier this week, a February blog post by mobile payments consultant Cherian Abraham captured the attention of the media and set off a flurry of articles about rampant fraud on Apple Pay. But despite headlines declaring that Apple Pay sees 60 times more fraud than magnetic stripe credit cards, the details are a bit more nuanced. It turns out that Apple Pay as a platform appears quite secure--it hasn't yet seen any man-in-the-middle or other hacking attacks (that we know of) that could result in the loss of thousands of credit card numbers, like the Target breach did. But Apple Pay as a service, offered to customers in conjunction with bank issuers, might be struggling to keep up with the persistence of identity thieves. -- Ars Technica.

Stop the presses: HTTPS-crippling "FREAK" bug affects Windows after all

Stop the presses: HTTPS-crippling

Computers running all supported versions of Microsoft Windows are vulnerable to "FREAK," a bug disclosed Monday that for more than a decade has made it possible for attackers to decrypt HTTPS-protected traffic passing between vulnerable end-users and millions of websites.

Microsoft confirmed the vulnerability in an advisory published Thursday. A vulnerability-scanning service at FREAKAttack.com, a site that offers information about the bug, confirmed the advisory, showing that the latest version of IE 11 running on a fully patched Windows 7 machine was susceptible. Previously, it was believed that the Windows system was immune to the attacks.

FREAK attacks--short for Factoring attack on RSA-EXPORT Keys--are possible when an end-user with a vulnerable device connects to a vulnerable HTTPS-protected website. Vulnerable sites are those configured to use a weak cipher that many presumed had been retired long ago. In analyses immediately following Monday's disclosure of FREAK, it was believed Android devices, iPhones and Macs from Apple, and smartphones from Blackberry were susceptible. The addition of Windows dramatically increases the number of users known to be vulnerable. -- Ars Technica.

Office for Mac 2016 hands-on: a vital upgrade, with some kinks to work out

Office for Mac 2016 hands-on: a vital upgrade, with some kinks to work out

Office for Mac has often played second fiddle to the flagship Windows version that powers Microsoft's productivity software empire, but it's important for plenty of computer users nonetheless.

It's thus good to see Microsoft nearly finished with a long-awaited update that brings the OS X and Windows versions of Office closer together in style, while adding integrations with Microsoft's OneDrive cloud storage. A preview version of Office for Mac 2016 was released today, and there's enough to give Mac users reason to look forward to the final bits, and reminders of bugginess that can afflict Microsoft software for the Mac. -- Ars Technica.

Apple's OS X Gatekeeper Leaves Hole Open for Malware and Adware - Here's How to Protect Your Mac

Apple's OS X Gatekeeper Leaves Hole Open for Malware and Adware - Here's How to Protect Your Mac

While investigating a nefarious (and fake) Flash installer for the Mac, John F. Braun found a way malware can bypass OS X's Gatekeeper security mechanism. Here's what you can do about it. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Will Pull Aperture this Spring, But It Will Continue to Work

Apple Will Pull Aperture this Spring, But It Will Continue to Work

Apple told customers Thursday that Aperture will no longer be available for sale in the App Store once Photos for OS X and iOS is released "this spring." The company stipulated, however, that Aperture will continue to work in OS X Yosemite. -- The Mac Observer.

Oracle Now Bundling Ask.com Adware with Java for Mac

Oracle Now Bundling Ask.com Adware with Java for Mac

For years, Oracle has been bundling an Ask.com search toolbar with Java for Windows, relying on what some call deceptive methods to get users to install the add-on to their browsers. Now, the company has extended its adware strategy to Java for Mac, according to ZDNet.

Multiple ways of accessing your user library folder in OS X

Multiple ways of accessing your user library folder in OS X

Do you need to access your "user library" folder? If you come across instructions that direct you to do so, or if you otherwise develop the need to modify items within your library folder, then unless you are familiar with OS X's library structures, you might end up being either being unable to locate your library, or using the wrong one. -- MacIssues.

Will your Mac run Microsoft Office 2016?

Will your Mac run Microsoft Office 2016?

Microsoft has released a preview of Office 2016, which you can download from the Office Web site (a 2.66GB download) and install on any Mac that supports it. The latest version of Office offers an interface that is optimized for OS X Yosemite, bringing a flatter look, and better integrates Office with Microsoft's cloud services. As with any new software suite, you might be wondering whether or not you can install and use it on your Mac. -- MacIssues.

Smartphone Theft Drops After Spread of Kill Switches

Smartphone Theft Drops After Spread of Kill Switches

Thefts involving smartphones have declined dramatically in three major cities since manufacturers began implementing 'kill switches (Activation Lock on iOS)' that allow the phones to be turned off remotely if they are stolen, authorities said on Tuesday. The number of stolen iPhones dropped by 40 percent in San Francisco and 25 percent in New York in the 12 months after Apple added a kill switch to its devices in September 2013. In London, smartphone theft dropped by half, according to an announcement by officials in the three cities. -- Reuters.

How To Use Your Mac To Re-date, Re-name And Re-organize Photos Based On EXIF Data

How To Use Your Mac To Re-date, Re-name And Re-organize Photos Based On EXIF Data

Mac users who are also photographers come in all shapes, sizes, and capabilities. If you have 30,000 photos stuffed into iPhoto, Aperture, or Lightroom, then you're more serious than most folks with a camera and a Mac, and you can spell EXIF.

Most cameras today spit out plenty of EXIF data with each photo. Exchangeable Image File Format is important because it carries detailed information about the camera, file format, date and time, and much more inside the photo file. With the right Mac app that data can be used to change dates and rename photos for easier organization. All you need is shootShifter on your Mac. -- McSolo.

How to manage cellular data usage on your iPhone and iPad with iOS 8

How to manage cellular data usage on your iPhone and iPad with iOS 8

When Apple introduced the iPhone, it also managed to get AT&T and then other carriers to offer unlimited data plans in the United States and in a few other countries. That didn't last, especially as networks became congested with heavy data use. -- Macworld.

Here's how to delete your prior destination history in Maps

Here's how to delete your prior destination history in Maps

If you'd rather not risk your prior destination history getting snooped on in maps, you can easily clear it out.

Whenever you search for a place in Apple's Maps app for iPhone or iPad, your search queries are saved. The next time you tap on the search field, you'll see all the locations and places you've searched for in reverse chronological order. In other words, most recent on top. What if you don't like your prior searches to show up? That's the issue we're going to tackle today! -- iMore.

How Apple Technology Causes Brain Rot

How Apple Technology Causes Brain Rot

Can't recall a friend's phone number? Press the speed dial on your mobile. Don't know the way to their house? Use a satnav. Modern technology has taken the strain off our brains with the answers to so many problems available at the click of a button.

But is there a dark side to all this convenience? Growing scientific evidence suggests a future where our brains may prematurely fail in later life through under-use, thanks to Mother Nature's rule that we 'use it or lose it'.

You might describe this new threat to our mental health as 'e-mentia' - memory-related problems, and even depression, linked to our overuse of new technology. -- Daily Mail.

March 05 Thursday's News

 

Apple in talks to become launch partner for cable-free HBO Now service

Apple in talks to become launch partner for cable-free HBO Now service

Apple is in negotiations to make the Apple TV a launch destination for HBO's standalone streaming service reportedly called "HBO Now," which could launch in time for the fifth season of Game of Thrones premiering April 12, according to a new report. -- AppleInsider.

Apple researching device waterproofing via vapor deposition, silicone seals

Apple researching device waterproofing via vapor deposition, silicone seals

A U.S. patent application published on Thursday reveals Apple is actively researching ways to make its products resistant to moisture, a feature sometimes attributed to "active" smartphone models marketed by competing smartphone manufacturers. -- AppleInsider.

Put your Apple TV into sleep or standby mode

Put your Apple TV into sleep or standby mode

You don't need to turn off your Apple TV. It will go into sleep or standby mode automatically when you're not using it. You can also put it into sleep or standby mode using your Apple TV remote. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Editing with Photos for OS X, Apple's iPhoto (and Aperture) replacement

Editing with Photos for OS X, Apple's iPhoto (and Aperture) replacement

The writing has been on the wall for Apple's older photo editing apps for some time now. Apple announced back in June of 2014 that both the consumer-level iPhoto app and the pro-level Aperture app would be replaced by a new app called Photos for OS X (which may have begun life as iPhoto X). The app is an offshoot of the Photos app for iOS, and early demos of the app showed that it used the same icon and a similar interface. -- Ars Technica.

Report: iOS 9 will focus mainly on stability and performance

Report: iOS 9 will focus mainly on stability and performance

Longtime Apple users speak fondly of the Snow Leopard (10.6) release of OS X. Even though it came with "no new features," it won users over by reducing the footprint of the OS and focusing mostly on refinement. A report from 9to5Mac's well-sourced Mark Gurman claims that Apple is taking a similar approach with iOS 9, focusing on fixing bugs and optimizing performance rather than adding another big stack of new features to the pile.

'Silver' brings Apple's Swift language to the .NET and Java worlds

'Silver' brings Apple's Swift language to the .NET and Java worlds

Fans of Apple's Swift language can now use their newly developed skills to write software for systems supporting both .NET and Java, including Android.

The Silver compiler, currently in beta, compiles Swift programs to run in the .NET and Java runtimes. It can also produce native binaries to run on OS X. With Silver, Swift developers can share their business logic and non-interface code across the different platforms.

Silver won't, however, permit full cross-platform apps to be developed. The company behind Silver, RemObjects, promotes the use of native development: iOS apps should use iOS user interface libraries so that they feel right on iOS. Similarly, .NET apps should use Windows' user interface libraries, and Java apps should use the Android or Java libraries as appropriate. The justification is that this will produce interfaces that are familiar to the users of the various platforms.

Apple increases the maximum size of iOS app binaries for the first time ever

Apple increases the maximum size of iOS app binaries for the first time ever

For the first time since the introduction of the App Store in 2008, Apple is increasing the maximum size of the app binaries that developers can upload to iTunes Connect. The company announced today that the cap would increase from 2GB to 4GB, though this doesn't affect the 100MB limit imposed on apps downloaded on cellular networks. -- Ars Technica.

Apple extends two-factor authentication to FaceTime and iMessage

Apple extends two-factor authentication to FaceTime and iMessage

Back in September, Apple enabled a two-factor authentication (2FA) security option for iCloud in the wake of a celebrity photo hacking scandal. While this helped protect backups, photos, and other personal data stored using Apple's cloud service, it didn't extend to some other commonly used Apple services. According to a Guardian report, Apple is turning on 2FA for the iMessage and FaceTime services starting today. -- Ars Technica.

Office for iOS picks up support for iCloud Drive, all other cloud services

Office for iOS picks up support for iCloud Drive, all other cloud services

When the new Office for iOS apps launched, the only way to sync files across multiple devices was to store them in Microsoft's own OneDrive service. In November, Microsoft and Dropbox partnered up, giving the third-party service most of the same features as OneDrive (absent real-time collaborative editing). -- Ars Technica.

Why iOS 8 may seem slow even on modern devices

Why iOS 8 may seem slow even on modern devices

Accusations that iOS 8 is slower than Apple's previous mobile operating systems have circulated since the software debuted in 2014. Although it works great most of the time on my iPhone 6 Plus, you don't have to look far to find people complaining that the latest version of iOS slows down to a sluggish crawl. -- Cult of Mac.

Considerations Before Purchasing an Apple Watch

Considerations Before Purchasing an Apple Watch

The Apple Watch is just around the corner, and has gained so much buzz that it has won some notable awards even before it has hit the shelves (one can only guess at how that happens). Given that Apple's marketing department is in high gear for this new device, we are left wondering whether it will take off, or flop. From this, the big question really boils down to: will you buy one? Even though a new slick watch looks and sounds neat, unless it fits your lifestyle you might end up with a device you either do not use, or find little utility for. -- MicIssues.

Researchers Find New 'FREAK' Security Flaw, Apple Says Fix Coming Soon

Researchers Find New 'FREAK' Security Flaw, Apple Says Fix Coming Soon

apple_lock_faceResearchers have recently uncovered a major security flaw in software created by companies like Google and Apple, leaving many devices vulnerable to hacking attempts, reports The Washington Post. Called "FREAK" (Factoring Attack on RSA-EXPORT Keys), the vulnerability stems from a U.S. government policy that once prevented companies from exporting strong encryption, requiring them to instead create weak "export-grade" products to ship to customers outside of the United States. -- MacRumors.

Apple Still Tweaking iTunes Music Store Algorithms, Restored Editorial Focus Pleases Indies

Apple Still Tweaking iTunes Music Store Algorithms, Restored Editorial Focus Pleases Indies

Following several months of experimentation with how it curates the music portion of its iTunes Store, Apple has rolled back some of those changes to restore an emphasis on editorial rather than sales-based criteria, according to Billboard.

Apple's new Maps patent guides your car around cell phone dead spots

Apple's new Maps patent guides your car around cell phone dead spots

Every day when I drive over the Bay Bridge, I lose my wireless signal, just briefly. This is the firstest of first-world problems, and some days I don't notice, but often I'm streaming music on a shuffle, and the track tries to change, and it just...can't. It's super annoying. -- MacWorld.

How To Boost your Mac's speed and prolong its useful life with easy RAM upgrades

How To Boost your Mac's speed and prolong its useful life with easy RAM upgrades

As I've spotlighted over the past month, the best way to dramatically speed up an older Mac is to replace its old hard drive with a new solid state drive (SSD). The process is super-easy on MacBooks and Mac Pros, surprisingly manageable on iMacs, and challenging on Mac minis, yielding 3X to 5X speed boosts. But there's another option that can speed things up with relatively little effort or expertise: upgrading your Mac's RAM. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS 8: How to Set Up Your New iPad or iPhone - Those Questions!

iOS 8: How to Set Up Your New iPad or iPhone - Those Questions!

When you take that new iPhone or iPad out of box, it's very exciting. The device is amazingly thin and beautiful. But then, when you first turn it on, you'll face a multitude of possibly perplexing questions. John Martellaro walks us through each question with explanations for the beginner. -- The Mac Observer.

David Sparks Debuts 'Workflow Video Field Guide' for iOS Automation

David Sparks Debuts 'Workflow Video Field Guide' for iOS Automation

David Sparks, the newly indie author and co-host of Mac Power Users has announced his latest endeavor: Workflow Video Field Guide, available now for US$9.99. This is a one hour (well bookmarked) tour of Workflow, the $6.99 universal app that lets you build workflows and automate some iOS tasks. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X Photos Beta: Adding to Existing Albums

OS X Photos Beta: Adding to Existing Albums

Hey, did you hear that Apple released the new Photos app as part of the 10.10.3 beta? Well, that program is what today's Quick Tip is about, so all of you early adopters can get a jump on using Apple's neat new image-organization application. Melissa Holt's got the scoop! -- The Mac Observer.

Intuit Hoses Quicken (Mac) Users... Again

Intuit Hoses Quicken (Mac) Users.. Again

Last November I told you I finally found a suitable replacement for Intuit's Quicken personal finance software, after nearly 15 years of searching. That replacement was iBank and I'm still totally happy with it.

In the meantime, Intuit is up to its old tricks again. As you may recall, Intuit discontinued Quicken for the Mac for the first time in 1998, when Apple was moribund and its future was hazy. A decade later, when Apple released Mac OS X 10.7 (Lion), Quicken 2007 ceased to function, making it difficult for users like me to upgrade. -- The Mac Observer.

Find your missing Wi-Fi adapter and free up that 'Other' storage space

Find your missing Wi-Fi adapter and free up that 'Other' storage space

Apple has built in a Wi-Fi adapter in most models of Macs for a decade, and the remaining ones for several years. Thus it was a surprise to tweeter Jeremy when his Mac, after a crash, displayed an X in the Wi-Fi menu which, when clicked, revealed a gray label: "Wi-Fi: No hardware installed." -- Macworld.

Got Sleepy Disks Connected To Your Mac? Fix The Sleepers With This Free App

Got Sleepy Disks Connected To Your Mac? Fix The Sleepers With This Free App

Here's a problem I do not have at work or while I'm on the road with my Mac, but it's an annoying bugaboo when I'm working on my Mac at home.

Not all external disk drives are created equal. Some sleep, some don't, but when they sleep it's always at the wrong time so when I hit Command-O to open a file, the dialog box just sits there on my Mac's screen while the external disks-- backups, clones, Time Machine-- spin up to speed from their slumber. -- BohemianBoomer.

Tim O'Reilly: Silicon Valley is massively underestimating the impact of IoT (interview)

Tim O'Reilly: Silicon Valley is massively underestimating the impact of IoT (interview)

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a scenario in which objects, animals or people are provided with unique identifiers and the ability to transfer data over a network without requiring human-to-human or human-to-computer interaction.

Smart forks. Smart tennis rackets. Smart toothbrushes. Smart teddy bears. Smart fitness bands.

The Internet of Things hype is inspiring an endless stream of connected gadgets that light up Kickstarter campaigns and pack the halls of consumer electronics conferences.

But Tim O'Reilly, the technology publisher and Silicon Valley guru, is worried that these products have hijacked the conversation about IoT and distracted people by making them focus on what amount to novelty items. -- VentureBeat.

How to block calls and texts on your iPhone

How to block calls and texts on your iPhone

Sometimes you might get a call from a person you'd prefer not to hear from, like a telemarketer or someone who's bothering you at odd hours of the day. Fortunately, iOS 8 can block calls as well as iMessages from annoying contacts and non-contacts. Read on and we'll show you how it works. -- Mac|Life.

There will be no news tomorrow as I have doctor's appointment. See you back here on Thursday

March 03 Tuesday's News

 

Tim Cook discusses Steve Jobs, personal privacy, and Apple's role as a social leader

Tim Cook discusses Steve Jobs, personal privacy, and Apple's role as a social leader

Apple CEO Tim Cook waxed nostalgic about his relationship with the late Steve Jobs, reiterated the company's commitment to its customers' privacy, and discussed his thoughts on Apple's ability to influence social change during a sit-down with German tabloid BILD earlier this week. -- AppleInsider.

Apple, IBM debut three new iOS apps for enterprise

Apple, IBM debut three new iOS apps for enterprise

Apple and IBM have unveiled three more MobileFirst enterprise apps for iPhones and iPads, covering a range of industries and uses: Advisor Alerts, Passenger Care, and Dynamic Buy. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases public beta of OS X 10.10.3, gives the masses a first taste of new Photos app

Apple releases public beta of OS X 10.10.3, gives the masses a first taste of new Photos app

Members of the public OS X Beta Program can now experience Apple's forthcoming Photos app for Mac, thanks to the release of the first OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 public beta. -- AppleInsider.

The Analyst's Guide to Apple Category Entry

The Analyst's Guide to Apple Category Entry

Understanding Apple's intentions seems to be a popular parlor game and there are many attempts at divining intention from data and market study. These attempts at market research for answers are futile because Apple does not compete in existing markets but rather it creates new markets. For instance, the market for the Apple II could not have been assessed from research into the computing market of 1974. The intention for Apple to enter into music devices and services could not have been predicted through an analysis of MP3 player market in 2000. The iPhone was also not predicated on the market for "Internet Communicators" in 2006 or 2002 when the iPad was first contemplated. -- Asymco.

Lust List: Killer gear for iPhone lovers, bike riders and ax wielders

Lust List: Killer gear for iPhone lovers, bike riders and ax wielders

Each month, Cult of Mac's Lust List has a date with the hottest gear in the world. This time around we're talking impressive audio experiences, fantastic bicycling equipment and awesome accessories for iPhone users (which basically means everybody, right?). -- Cult of Mac.

iCloud Photo Library: What You Need to Know

iCloud Photo Library: What You Need to Know

With today's launch of the public beta of OS X 10.10.3 and the new Photos app for Mac, a number of users are now getting their first tastes of Apple's replacement for iPhoto and Aperture. The release will also complete the rollout of Apple's cross-platform iCloud Photo Library service, offering users an easy way to keep all of their photos stored in the cloud and synced across their devices. Various pieces of the service have been in beta since iOS 8.0 was made available to developers last June. -- The Mac Observer.

Personal OS X Yosemite 10.10.3 (14D87h) Benchmarks

NovaBench 1.1(2) benchmarking of my Intel iMac (2.9 GHz Intel Core i5, 16GB 1600 MHz DDR3 SDRAM, Graphics NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660M 512 MB, 1TB Fusion Drive). Your mileage may vary.

Intel iMac
10.9.5 10.10 10.10.1 10.10.2 10.10.3
Over All Score: 1003 Score: 944 Score: 927 Score: 904 Score: 894
CPU Tests
Floating Point Operations/Sec:
Integer Operations/Sec:
MD5 Hashes Calculated/Sec:
Score: 503
155296352
315012928
1256680
Score: 505
152557232
314994976
1290712
Score: 494
155858688
300096800
1243131
Score: 469
141053824
288540096
1219919
Score: 469
141339840
288440544
1254642
Ram Test
RAM Speed:
Score: 224
9331 MB/s
Score: 224
9398 MB/s
Score: 223
9087 MB/s
Score: 223
9077 MB/s
Score: 221
8817 MB/s
Graphics Test
3D Frames Per Second:
Score: 243
877
Score: 190
624
Score: 187
611
Score: 187
612
Score: 180
580
Hardware Tests
Primary Partition Capacity:
Drive Write Speed:
Score: 33
889 GB
127 MB/s
Score: 25
145 GB
87 MB/s
Score: 23
889 GB
78 MB/s
Score: 25
889 GB
88 MB/s
Score: 26
1035 GB
93 MB/s

Is there anyone out there that has not figured out why the benchmark scores for OS X keep going down (or at least are getting no faster)?

The reason is feature bloat. Apple keeps adding more code to support all the "other" devices and features it keeps coming out with. There is no way for OS X to get faster. (I only wish there was.)

Your only option it to buy a faster Mac. Hmmm, maybe it's a strategy?

Workaround for Numbers not evaluating odd roots

Workaround for Numbers not evaluating odd roots

Numbers is intended to be an intuitive alternative to Microsoft Excel and other popular spreadsheets, but as a calculation program it is perhaps not much to expect it to perform calculations properly. However, there are instances where the program may incorrectly calculate values you enter. One of these is if you attempt an odd-root (e.g., the cube root) of a negative number, where there is a mathematical answer, but which causes Numbers to give an error when attempted. -- AppleIssues.

Apple Granted a Patent for a Robotic Wireless Testing System for iPhones

Apple Granted a Patent for a Robotic Wireless Testing System for iPhones

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 52 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a granted patent for a robotic arm system for testing iPhones. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted a Patent for a New Wireless Antenna System that's Targeted for Future Macs & Apple Watch

Apple Granted a Patent for a New Wireless Antenna System that's Targeted for Future Macs & Apple Watch

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 52 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a single granted patent relating to a new magnetic antenna mounting system that could one day bring cellular connectivity to the iMac and Apple Watch. One of Apple's top iPhone antenna managers worked on this invention proving that bringing cellular connectivity to other Apple products is a serious project at Apple. -- Patently Apple.

Apple puts Environment VP Lisa Jackson in charge of boosting accessibility efforts

Apple puts Environment VP Lisa Jackson in charge of boosting accessibility efforts

Apple told employees during a week at the flagship Berlin Apple Store in Germany that the company will increase its focus on product accessibility by putting executive Lisa Jackson in charge of the efforts, according to people in attendance. -- 9to5Mac.

Opinion: Apple TV should get these 10 updates at next week's event, but probably won't

Opinion: Apple TV should get these 10 updates at next week's event, but probably won't

Nearly eight years have passed since Apple released the first-generation Apple TV, a product originally hyped as "something really special" but quickly demoted to a "hobby" after initial sales fizzled. The second-generation version arrived with much less fanfare in late 2010, and the modestly tweaked third-generation model got a mere five-minute launch at a March event three years ago. Since then, there's been plenty of evidence that Apple was working on updated hardware, a major partnership with cable companies, and major new content deals, but apart from the quiet addition of new channels, nothing's actually happened. -- 9to5Mac.

Obama weighs in as China demands access to data services provided by U.S. companies

Obama weighs in as China demands access to data services provided by U.S. companies

President Obama has publicly criticized China's plans to expand 'security' policies that would effectively prevent U.S. tech companies like Apple selling their products in China without completely compromising data security. -- 9to5Mac.

iTunes Stream Rebuffering

iTunes Stream Rebuffering

You may remember that last week i wrote about iTunes Stream Rebuffering.

I found that the settings I shared with you did not work for me as I had hoped. My issue was radio stations dropping out. After a lot of testing I have found that, FOR ME, smaller is better.

I am now running these settings:

defaults write com.apple.iTunes stream-buffer-size 264

defaults write com.apple.iTunes file-buffer-size 264

More as I learn more. Watch this space.

Obviously if you are NOT having problems, change nothing.

How to take charge of Apple's Mac App Store

How to take charge of Apple's Mac App Store

While you wait for iOS 8.2 later today, I thought you may enjoy these seven Mac App Store secrets. -- Computerworld.

How to keep your email private with PGP encryption on your Mac

How to keep your email private with PGP encryption on your Mac

In our last episode of Private I, I explained the basics of public-key (PK) cryptography, a way to scramble messages in a way that only someone possessing a particular key can decrypt, without that key ever having to be publicly disclosed or shared. It's an effective system that has no known theoretical exploits, and currently deployed implementations are considered robust. -- Macworld.

Solving all your playlist problems in iTunes 12

Solving all your playlist problems in iTunes 12

Playlists are one of the best, and most creative ways to organize music in iTunes, and to listen to music on your iOS devices. But sometimes, it can be hard to figure out how to make complex playlists. In this week's column, I look at three questions about playlists, both standard and smart. And I also look at an issue where album art, for some albums, changes on iOS devices. -- Macworld.

Record FaceTime And Skype Calls

Record FaceTime And Skype Calls

Someone needs to explain to me why call recording isn't built-in to FaceTime and Skype by default. "Ring, ring! 'Hello? Oh, yes. Liability. I understand. Thanks.'"

Apple owns FaceTime and Microsoft owns Skype so having a way default way to record audio and video from a call might have legal consequences. If that bothers, you ignore this. If you're interested in how to record audio and video from both FaceTime and Skype, here's how. -- Mac 360.

Apple Pay: a new frontier for scammers

Apple Pay: a new frontier for scammers

Apple's mobile payment system has provided a method for US criminals to make fraudulent transactions -- and banks are rushing to stem the tide.

The crooks have not broken the secure encryption around Apple Pay's fingerprint-activated wireless payment mechanism. Instead, they are setting up new iPhones with stolen personal information, and then calling banks to 'provision' the victim's card on the phone to use it to buy goods. -- The Guardian.

How to filter spam messages in Facebook for iPhone and iPad

How to filter spam messages in Facebook for iPhone and iPad

If you use Facebook for iPhone and iPad on a regular basis in conjunction with the Facebook Messenger app, you are probably already familiar with the amount of spam messages you can receive. Just like email, Facebook has become a great place for advertisers and marketers to troll. However, Facebook does have a setting that lets you take a little more control over what messages end up in your inbox. Here's how to access it! -- iMore.

Does Anyone Besides Apple's Customers Care About Security, Privacy, And Malware?

Does Anyone Besides Apple's Customers Care About Security, Privacy, And Malware?

Every now and again we're treated to a headline that claims OS X or iOS are at the top of the list for reported vulnerabilities. That might scare some people to believe that Macs, iPhones, and iPads are just like their Windows and Android cousins (distant cousins, second class, once removed, non-kissing variety). -- BohemianBoomer.

Protection: It's What Apple Offers

Protection: It's What Apple Offers

There was a time, and it's not that long ago, when Apple was synonymous with the Mac, when Windows and Office ruled the world of computers.

That was then and this is now. While Windows and Office gave the enterprise a single platform to conduct business today the cloud is the platform for data, and the device to access data has a new winner in the corporate arena. -- Mac 360.

March 02 Monday's News

 

Tim Cook says Apple Watch will replace electronic car keys, confirms Apple Store revamp

Tim Cook says Apple Watch will replace electronic car keys, confirms Apple Store revamp

Apple is already attempting to eliminate the need for consumers to carry a wallet and may soon extend its assault to the second pat of the venerable three-pat technique, as Apple chief executive Tim Cook said this week that the company designed its forthcoming Apple Watch to replace electronic car keys and fobs. -- AppleInsider.

Future batteries need to triple capacity, cut price by 67%

Future batteries need to triple capacity, cut price by 67%

Battery research is one of the hottest areas of materials science, with a steady stream of promising ideas emerging from research labs. But even though battery performance has steadily climbed, a lot of that progress is due to an evolution of existing technology rather than an adoption of more radical ideas floating around in labs.

At the recent meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, two of the people who run some of these labs gave good descriptions of why it has been so difficult to translate promising results into revolutionary products. -- Ars Technica.

We honor Mr. Nimoy, the man who has been--and always shall be--our friend

We honor Mr. Nimoy, the man who has been--and always shall be--our friend

Like a lot of people who were kids in the late '80s and early '90s, I was introduced to the Star Trek franchise by way of The Next Generation. But I didn't become a fan of the franchise until the (then) Sci-Fi Channel started showing reruns of the original series in the '90s.

Those old shows could be an order of magnitude cheesier than TNG and its direct spin-offs ever were, but there was something captivating about the tense, slow burn of "The Doomsday Machine," the pathos of "The City on the Edge of Forever," or the science-fiction fun of "Mirror, Mirror." And then, of course, there's The Wrath of Khan, which is the only one of the many Trek films that's actually a great movie and not just a great Star Trek movie. -- Ars Technica.

QuickTime & Yosemite: Recording Your iPhone or iPad Screen with iOS 8

QuickTime & Yosemite: Recording Your iPhone or iPad Screen with iOS 8

Did you know that you can use your Mac to record a video of your iOS device's screen, making it easy to show an inexperienced user how to access an app or change a setting? That's the subject of today's Quick Tip, and we think it's a pretty darned cool feature of Yosemite. We're happy to do anything we can to make you seem more like a wizard to your friends and family! -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Showcases 'Shot on iPhone 6' World Photo Gallery on Homepage

Apple Showcases 'Shot on iPhone 6' World Photo Gallery on Homepage

Apple has refreshed its homepage to showcase a gallery of photos taken with iPhone 6 across the world, unsurprisingly coinciding with today's announcements of the Samsung Galaxy S6 and HTC One M9 at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. The gallery shows photos taken by iPhone 6 users in several countries, including the United States, Canada, Japan, Iceland, South Korea, China, Scotland, Indonesia, Thailand and New Zealand.

How to quickly manage messages on iOS's lock screen

How to quickly manage messages on iOS's lock screen

When you receive a new e-mail message on your iPhone or iPad, if your device is currently locked then the message will show up in Notification Center and display on your home screen. If you want to access your message directly, then instead of unlocking your device and going to Mail, you have several options available to you right on the home screen. -- MacIssues.

How to use the OS X Dock as a Command-Tab replacement

How to use the OS X Dock as a Command-Tab replacement

When switching between open Apps in OS X, you might generally use Command-Tab; however, you can do similar switching, and far more, directly in the Dock. Even though the Dock is intended to be managed primarily with your mouse, Apple supports accessing it via the keyboard. The default action for this is to press Control-F3, but since some of its features are quite similar to Command-Tab, I recommend changing it to Option-Tab or something similar. -- MacIssues.

Tim Cook says terrorism should not scare people into giving up their privacy

Tim Cook says terrorism should not scare people into giving up their privacy

In the second half of The Telegraph's interview with Tim Cook, Apple CEO Tim Cook has reaffirmed his position on privacy. Cook says that whilst currently consumers do not understand the ramifications of sharing their data with third-parties, "one day they will".

Moreover, Cook openly objects to governments that say data sharing is required to combat crime and terrorism. There has been pressure for tech companies to offer back-doors into encryption mechanisms, but a clear implication of this interview is that Apple will strongly oppose this view. Cook describes privacy as a 'basic human right'.

How-to Set up and Use Find My iPhone, iPad and iPod touch

How-to Set up and Use Find My iPhone, iPad and iPod touch

Find My iPhone was first released in June 2010 initially for the iPhone. Now, Find My iPhone allows you to track the location of your device, be it an iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch, in case it gets lost or stolen. This is a great benefit because when you locate your device using Find My iPhone, the device makes noise until it is found and will show you were it is located using Apple Maps. Recently, the police used Find My iPhone to track and save a woman's life. However, Find My iPhone did require the device to be turned on and connected to the internet in order for it to work completely. New with iOS 8, you have the option to automatically send the location of the device to Apple when the battery is critically low. In this how-to I will discuss how to set up Find My iPhone, and how to use Find My iPhone. -- 9to5Mac.

If you can't send or receive messages on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

If you can't send or receive messages on your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

You might see an exclamation mark next to a message you try to send, or you might not receive messages that someone sends to you. These steps can help. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

If Lion Server has share points and privileges you want to re-create on OS X Server (Mountain Lion), make a note of them.

If Lion Server has share points and privileges you want to re-create on OS X Server (Mountain Lion), make a note of them.

When migrating data and settings from Lion Server to OS X Server (Mountain Lion), previously configured share points will not be retained. Make note of any existing share points prior to migration. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Ease Mac migration with OS X net sharing

Ease Mac migration with OS X net sharing

Have a MacBook Air, and looking to transfer it using Apple's Migration Assistant? If so, you may have found yourself in a conundrum -- as the MacBook Air doesn't have FireWire or Ethernet (Unless you have Apple's $29 USB Ethernet adapter).

Later MacBook Air models have Apple's Thunderbolt port, which Migration Assistant supports -- but as of this post it would be rare to use Migration Assistant to another Mac with Thunderbolt.

Transferring a non-Thunderbolt MacBook Air with Migration Assistant requires a Mac-specific trick: creating a personal WiFi / Airport network, with Internet Sharing enabled. -- Marcus Hesse.

Sorry. Scratch That. My Bad. Personal Database Apps Are Not Quite Dead

Sorry. Scratch That. My Bad. Personal Database Apps Are Not Quite Dead

Well, this has been a busy week. Earlier (Tuesday) in the week I declared that personal databases on the Mac were all but dead (here and here). Most traditional database apps have become behemoths or died off.

Apple's FileMaker Pro is still around, but the Bento personal database for Mac, iPhone, and iPad is mostly dead and gone. Why? Databases are difficult to build for personal use. Well, a few Mac users pointed out that Mac, iPhone, and iPad users still have personal database choices. Here's a good one. -- Mac 360.

8 Tips to Help Your Mac Run More Efficiently

8 Tips to Help Your Mac Run More Efficiently

Today's Macintosh computers are unquestionably the very best that Apple has ever made, combining elegant design with impressive technology under the hood. When paired with the latest version of OS X, a Mac is not only easy to use, but extremely powerful and productive too. But from time to time, even the best computers can become slow and unresponsive. Here are 8 tips for helping your Mac run more efficiently. -- Apple Gazette.

The latest Mac mini is low-priced, but doesn't skimp on power

The latest Mac mini is low-priced, but doesn't skimp on power

Desktop computers aren't dead. Plenty of people use those anchored computers day in and day out, and for good reason: They're more powerful and less expensive than their mobile counterparts.

The Mac mini has been Apple's on-again off-again de facto low-budget desktop, but recently it hasn't received the love many have hoped for. Then for the holiday season Apple upgraded the processor, chipset, hard drive, and everything else. That includes the price. The Mac mini now starts at $499. Full stop. -- Mashable.

iPhone slow? Here's how to speed up iOS 8

iPhone slow? Here's how to speed up iOS 8

No matter which generation iPhone you have, there are ways to help keep scrolling smooth, apps launching fast, and the system snappy.

Whether you're still worried about updating to iOS 8 on your iPhone 4s, or you simply want to make sure your brand-new iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus stays as quick as the day you bought it, here's how to both reverse slow down and maintain speed.

Note: We're staging these from easier to most involved. Go through the list, try each one in turn, and do as many as you feel comfortable with. The older your iPhone, the more you'll likely have to do. -- iMore.

How to avoid long waits at the Genius Bar before you get there

How to avoid long waits at the Genius Bar before you get there

Cracked screens, dead batteries and water damage -- sometimes you simply can't avoid a trip to the Genius Bar to get your broken Apple device back in working order. You may have heard the rumors that Apple is in the process of overhauling the way that Genius Bar appointments are managed. Some of the changes will help streamline the process by introducing more communication about your appointment -- like pinpointing exactly when and where to meet your Genius in the store. Other changes, like Apple prioritizing walk-in appointments so that more serious issues take precedence over less serious issues, may be less welcome -- like not having a FastPass at Disney. -- Gigaom.

How to turn off predictive text in iOS 8

How to turn off predictive text in iOS 8

Apple calls its iOS 8 keyboard the "smartest ever." As you type, you'll see words and phrases pop up that "you'd probably type next, based on your past conversations and writing style."

Clever as this QuickType feature may be, it can be annoying if the suggestions aren't actually what you were going to type next, and you need to keep deleting words. -- Mashable.

No-Brainer Repairs for No Brainer Day

No-Brainer Repairs for No Brainer Day

Today, my friends, is a holiday. A holiday for you. A holiday for me. A holiday for people who need to take a little mental breather. Today is No Brainer Day. No, seriously, it's a real holiday--or at least that is what the internet says. And you can't lie on the internet.

How does iFixit plan on celebrating the day? With some no-brainer repairs. These fixes are so simple, anyone can do them. -- iFixit.

How to export Apple Health data as a document to share

How to export Apple Health data as a document to share

Apple's Health app helps you gather valuable insights into your personal health, actionable data that should help you, or a medical pro, take better care of you. But there's a problem we can solve while we wait for Apple Watch. -- Computerworld.

How to Stop Checking Your iPhone Like an Addict

How to Stop Checking Your Phone Like an Addict

On December 16, 2013, a Taiwanese tourist was walking along St. Kilda pier in Melbourne, Australia. The pier offers a beautiful scenic view of the ocean, inviting tourists to snap photos to share with friends.

As expected, this female tourist had her phone out too, except she wasn't saving precious memories -- she was checking Facebook. She walked along the pier staring at her phone, and it proved to be too much of a distraction. KERPLOP. She fell right into the ocean. -- The Next Web.

Wireless charging: everything you need to know

Wireless charging: everything you need to know

Wireless charging is set to be a major theme at this year's Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, with many of the big smartphone manufacturers including Samsung, LG, Motorola, Nokia and Apple investing in the technology. But what is it and how does it work? -- Telegraph.