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July 31Thursday's News

 

iOS 9 tips: Disconnect from a Bluetooth accessory without making your iPhone forget it

iOS 9 tips: Disconnect from a Bluetooth accessory without making your iPhone forget it

Starting with iOS 9, Apple has made it possible to disconnect an iPhone from a Bluetooth device without the need to "forget" the wireless accessory, making it easier to reconnect without going through the pairing process again. -- AppleInsider.

Apple seeds second OS X 10.10.5 Yosemite beta to developers with minor changes

Apple seeds second OS X 10.10.5 Yosemite beta to developers with minor changes

Apple on Thursday released a second beta build of its upcoming OS X 10.10.5 Yosemite update to developers for testing, including what appears to be only minor tweaks and bug fixes. -- AppleInsider.

The audiophile's dilemma: strangers can't identify $340 cables, either

The audiophile's dilemma: strangers can't identify $340 cables, either

"Vegas again," I thought, as the noisy A320 plonked down onto the runway at McCarran. I was in the front, thanks to a plethora of reward miles on United, and across the row through the portal I could see the Vegas Strip--hungry, pulsing. It was only a few months since I'd last been here for CES, and coming back to the city felt a lot like putting back on that dirty, comfortable sweater you just can't seem to bring yourself to throw away.

But this time I wasn't here to report on gadgets or meet vendors or anything else quite like I'd done before--this time, I was going up on stage myself. After calling out the audiophile cable gods, I'd come to settle the score. I'd brought a $340 "audiophile grade" Ethernet cable, and I was ready to put it to the test with the assistance of the James Randi Educational Foundation in front of a live audience of several hundred people. -- Ars Technica.

Apple's the No. 1 IoT company, despite not making any devices

Apple's the No. 1 IoT company, despite not making any devices

Google may have poured billions into buying smart thermostat maker Nest Labs, but according to a new piece of consumer research, Apple's the company most people think of when it comes to Internet of Things devices. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Seeds Second iOS 8.4.1 Beta to Developers

Apple Seeds Second iOS 8.4.1 Beta to Developers

Apple today seeded the second beta of iOS 8.4.1 to registered developers for testing purposes, just over two weeks after releasing the first iOS 8.4.1 beta and a month after launching iOS 8.4 with the new Apple Music service. -- MacRumors.

Can't remember passwords? Here are two ways to reveal them

Can't remember passwords? Here are two ways to reveal them

If you're browsing the Web and need to either create a new account or log into an existing one, then you will likely need to enter your password. To help with this, OS X will prompt you to store your password in the OS X keychain, which will encrypt and assign the password to the site you have just accessed. This is similarly applied to programs you may use, such as e-mail clients, which will attempt to access secured resources like your e-mail accounts or social media pages. However, the convenience this provides may result in your inability to remember your passwords, even for sites you regularly frequent. -- MacIssues.

Mac Basics: Stacks are your shortcut in the Dock

Mac Basics: Stacks are your shortcut in the Dock

In OS X parlance, those folders for Downloads and Documents on the right side of the Mac's Dock are called Stacks. When you click on a Stack, it opens to reveal the folder's contents. As a timesaver, you can open a file directly from the Stack, instead of having to open the folder, find the file and then open the file.

The system gives you several ways to see the contents of your Stacks. The vertical column you had before is called the Fan view, but you can also display the folder's contents in the space-consuming Grid view of icons, or as a List of file names.

To change back to the Fan view from the Grid view, right click on the Downloads folder in the Dock; if you do not have a two-button mouse, hold down the Mac's Control key while clicking. In the menu that appears, go to the View Content As area and select Fan.

Other menu options here let you choose to display the Downloads folder as a generic folder icon or as a Stack, which shows a thumbnail of the first item in the folder. You can also have the Stack display files by the name, kind, date added, date created or date modified. Once you adjust your preferences here, the Downloads folder should behave as it did before. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Here's how to keep Apple's Lightning cables working with your iPad, iPhone + iPod

Here's how to keep Apple's Lightning cables working with your iPad, iPhone + iPod

Less than two years after they each went into service, only one of the three Lightning cables pictured above is actually working properly. It's not the big Belkin cable on the left, which is visibly pretty wrecked, or the thick, no-name 6-foot cable on the right, which looks fine on the surface but can't properly supply power to a connected device. The one that works without problems is, amazingly, Apple's official Lightning cable -- the one that has been pilloried by numerous dissatisfied users, notably including our own Zac Hall, for coming apart after months or years of use. -- 9to5mac.

How to install Windows 10 on your Mac

How to install Windows 10 on your Mac

Windows 10 is now officially available to PC users across the globe, launching in 190 countries on July 29. But Microsoft's latest operating system can also be experienced on Macs, requiring even less effort to get it up and running on your Apple-branded device. And here is how you can join the Windows 10 bandwagon right now. -- BetaNews.

Parallels Desktop 10.1.4 improves Windows 10 support, simplifies installation

Parallels Desktop 10.1.4 improves Windows 10 support, simplifies installation

Shh, don't Apple, but Mac users can now test the next version of Windows quickly and easily with the release of Parallels Desktop 10.1.4 for Mac.

That's because the latest update promises "experimental" support for the latest version of the Windows 10 Technical Preview, along with support for Office Preview for Windows 10 too. -- BetaNews.

Why you should use Apple Pay on the London Underground

Why you should use Apple Pay on the London Underground

Now that HSBC finally turned on support for Apple Pay in the UK, I finally had the chance to use it on a recent two-day jaunt to the capital.

London has been accepting contactless payment on its transport network for some time now, with Apple Pay just the latest progression. Oyster, the pre-paid contactless card and contactless credit cards are alternative payment methods.

But if you can use Apple Pay, I think you really should. -- iMore.

Understanding Apple Music

Understanding Apple Music

Could Apple have done Music differently?

Some people whose opinions I could not value more highly have wondered out loud why Apple Music, the new Music app for iOS, and latest version of iTunes on the Mac turned out the way that they did. I've not spoken to anyone at Apple about the development process but I've spent years trying to understand the company, have a background in design and product marketing, and been thinking about exactly this. A lot. -- iMore.

Why Doesn't Apple Turn On The FM Radio That's Already In Your iPhone?

Why Doesn't Apple Turn On The FM Radio That's Already In Your iPhone?

It's true confession day at Mac360. The truth is, Apple's iPod and iPhone have killed traditional radio, which has retreated to the internet.

Also true, I don't listen to radio anymore, preferring to time shift my entertainment via a mixture of playlists on my iPhone in my car, a number of podcasts to supplement talk radio, and Maps and Waze to handle my traffic needs. Who needs radio? If it's not needed, then why does an iPhone have an FM radio receiver already built in? And why doesn't Apple turn it on? -- Mac 360.

July 30Thursday's News

 

Windows 10 launches to favorable reviews, cautions about bugs and feature gaps

Windows 10 launches to favorable reviews, cautions about bugs and feature gaps

Early reviews of Microsoft's latest operating system -- released on Wednesday -- have been generally positive, suggesting that it solves problems with Windows 8 while advancing the Windows platform towards the future. -- Appleinsider.

Apple promotes Beats 1 Radio in behind-the-scenes Snapchat story

Apple promotes Beats 1 Radio in behind-the-scenes Snapchat story

Apple Music on Wednesday published a series of short videos to social media platform Snapchat showing behind-the-scenes looks at Beats 1 Radio stations in Los Angeles, London and New York, illustrating the audio division's willingness to embrace alternative forms of promotion its parent company has yet to explore. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents stylus capable of simulating onscreen textures through haptic feedback

Apple invents stylus capable of simulating onscreen textures through haptic feedback

According to a filing with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Apple is investigating an advanced tablet stylus design capable of simulating the texture of onscreen graphics as it moves across a display surface. -- AppleInsider.

Trackpad gestures and keyboard shortcuts, or: Windows 10 for the Mac user

Trackpad gestures and keyboard shortcuts, or: Windows 10 for the Mac user

My primary computers are Macs and their primary operating system is OS X, so one of the things I disliked the most about going back to Windows was its window management. Features like Snap were handy, but it was hard to live without features like Mission Control. And once you get used to OS X's trackpad gestures, it's hard to move to a platform where basic things like "two-finger scrolling" can be flaky and inconsistent.

Windows 10 catches up in some important ways--it's got a Mission Control replacement in Task View, can give you multiple virtual desktops to work with, and implements Mac-like trackpad gestures (alongside keyboard shortcuts) to help you use it all.

If you're new to Windows 10, here's your guide to using these shortcuts and gestures, and what kind of hardware you'll need to use them. -- Ars Technica.

Alympus is the newest best reason to jailbreak your iPhone right now

Alympus is the newest best reason to jailbreak your iPhone right now

iOS engineers must keep their eyes on the jailbreak scene. In the past, popular jailbreak tweak Auxo showed what iOS's approach to multitasking should be like years before Apple made its best ideas part of the core operating system.

Let's hope this pattern holds with Alympus. It's a new tweak that radically improves, for the better, iOS 8 multitasking. -- Cult of Mac.

iFixit can now help you repair more broken gadgets than ever

iFixit can now help you repair more broken gadgets than ever

iFixit has made repairing broken iPhones as simple as setting up Ikea furniture thanks to the site's easy-to-follow guides and excellent repair tools Apple doesn't really want you to use. Now the company is about make it easier to fix even more broken gadgets by partnering with Electronic Recyclers International. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple still determined to bring sapphire displays to iPhone

Apple still determined to bring sapphire displays to iPhone

It would be easy to think that Apple's sapphire iPhone dreams went down the pan when GT Advanced Technologies went bust, but Apple's nothing if not persistent.

Today, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple describing a new method for manufacturing sapphire displays by irradiating the sapphire crystal and then using a laser and "second gas medium" to slice it into the super-thin sheets Apple requires. -- Cult of Mac.

Who is your IT outsourcing firm working for?

Who is your IT outsourcing firm working for?

While the U.S. Government has been remarkably opaque about the recently discovered security breach at the Office of Personnel Management (OPM), we know that personal information on at least 21.5 million present, former, and prospective federal employees was lost. The Feds claim Chinese hackers are at the bottom of it, which is disputed by the Chinese government. This, to me, raises a number of questions, especially about the possible role of IT outsourcing firms and implications for organizations beyond OPM. Does IT outsourcing make your data more vulnerable? Yes, I believe it does. -- I, Cringely.

iOS: Deleting Siri's Training Data

iOS: Deleting Siri's Training Data

If you're getting frustrated with Siri's inability to understand your commands, then you might want to try resetting the service on your iOS device. Siri learns how to better interpret your voice the more you use it, but if that training has gotten messed up (by, say, your kids playing around with your phone), then that could cause problems. We'll tell you how to wipe Siri clean in today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Releases FaceTime Camera Driver Update for All 2015 MacBooks

Apple Releases FaceTime Camera Driver Update for All 2015 MacBooks

Apple has released a FaceTime Camera Driver Update for all 2015 MacBook, MacBook Air and MacBook Pro notebooks that improves FaceTime camera compatibility with Windows. Apple recommends that all Boot Camp users install the software update (1.4MB) from the Apple Support website.

The software update was released for the following notebooks:

  • MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 13-inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook Air (11-inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook Air (13-inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook Pro (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015)

Putting the Soccer Pitch in the Palm of Your Hand

Putting the Soccer Pitch in the Palm of Your Hand

Whether you call it football or soccer, the sport is well represented in a host of apps that deliver scores, footage and more.

The championship won by the United States women's soccer team in the World Cup this month has made the sport a hot topic. To that end, there is already a big list of apps to help people learn more about soccer and to follow news about the game on their phones. -- New York Times.

Many Surprised to Learn that HomeKit Requires Custom ID Chip

Many Surprised to Learn that HomeKit Requires Custom ID Chip

According to a new report published late yesterday, Apple requires anyone making a device compatible with its HomeKit environment to buy and use a special identity chip. -- Patently Apple.

Messaging App Weaves Smartphones Into an Alternative Internet

Messaging App Weaves Smartphones Into an Alternative Internet

FireChat can link Android and Apple phones into a long-range communications network even when the cell network is down.

What do people in Manila watching the Pope give Mass, Russian and Hong Kong protesters, and U.S. festivalgoers have in common? They have all turned to FireChat, an app that creates hyperlocal chat rooms that work even when cell networks are down by connecting phones within Wi-Fi range of one another. -- MIT Technology Review.



Using the Apple system font in your web content

Using the Apple system font in your web content

Coming with iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan is the new Apple system font, San Francisco (technically the SF branch). If you make web apps or use web views and want to make sure they match, there's some good news coming your way.

Web content is sometimes designed to fit in with the overall aesthetic of the underlying platform which it is being rendered on. One of the ways to achieve this is by using the platform's system font, which is possible on iOS and OS X by using the "-apple-system" CSS value for the "font-family" CSS property. On iOS 9 and OS X 10.11, doing this allows you to use Apple's new system font, San Francisco. Using "-apple-system" also correctly interacts with the font-weight CSS property to choose the correct font on Apple's latest operating systems.

Browsers that don't support -apple-system will simply grab the next font specified in the property list.

San Francisco is gorgeous, and a more consistent way to display it throughout apps and the web is just terrific. -- Surfin' Safari.

Running Windows 10 on a Mac: Frequently asked questions

Running Windows 10 on a Mac: Frequently asked questions

Adrian Kingsley-Hughes has been running Windows 10 on his Macs since the earliest builds were made available.

You've got questions, and because I've been running Windows 10 on my Macs since the earliest builds were made available, I've got answers for you. [Parallels Desktop 10 will run Windows 10 now and Parallels is working on an updated which will allow Parallels Desktop 9 to as well.] -- ZDNet.

Why I'm not ready to switch from Mac to Windows 10

Why I'm not ready to switch from Mac to Windows 10

I've been using a Mac laptop almost every day for the past decade. For as long as I've been in a position to choose a computer for myself, the Mac has seemed like the best choice. But because Microsoft has been making such a big push to herald the arrival of Windows 10, I've felt obligated to give it a shot. I've been trying to figure out if was something I could see myself, and many other dedicated Mac users, adopting. -- Venture Beat.

Hands-on with Maps in iOS 9: Introducing public transit and more accurate data

Hands-on with Maps in iOS 9: Introducing public transit and more accurate data

Apple's native Maps app currently sits in a folder called Junk on the second page of my home screen, where I banished it as soon as it launched close to three years ago.

With the addition of public transit info and nearby recommendations, Apple Maps is finally catching up to its biggest competitor: Google Maps. -- Macworld.

How to Disable Automatic Renewal in Apple Music

How to Disable Automatic Renewal in Apple Music

It is hard to believe, but Apple Music has been streaming songs for a month already. During that time, the service has been much maligned, with critics, many of whom say that it has a long way to go before it catches up with competitors like Spotify. Still, in just four short weeks Apple has managed to already garner more than 10 million subscribers, many of whom are no doubt taking advantage of the generous three-month free trial period. If you're one of the early adopters who singed up to see what Apple Music is all about, you've probably already made up your mind as to whether or not it is something you'll be willing to pay for when your free trial ends. Here's how to avoid continuing to pay for the service by disabling its automatic renewal feature. -- Apple Gazette.

Trackpad gestures and keyboard shortcuts, or: Windows 10 for the Mac user

rackpad gestures and keyboard shortcuts, or: Windows 10 for the Mac user

Window management gets much better, at least if you have the right hardware.

My primary computers are Macs and their primary operating system is OS X, so one of the things I disliked the most about going back to Windows was its window management. Features like Snap were handy, but it was hard to live without features like Mission Control. And once you get used to OS X's trackpad gestures, it's hard to move to a platform where basic things like "two-finger scrolling" can be flaky and inconsistent. -- Ars Technica.

Tip of the Day: How to Use Your iPhone Camera's HDR Setting

Tip of the Day: How to Use Your iPhone Camera's HDR Setting

HDR stands for High Dynamic Range and it works by capturing three different exposures of the same image and then combining them into a single image. This can be really helpful when your subject includes a large range of lights and darks and you want the details in the darker parts of the photo to be visible without overexposing the lighter sections. -- iPhone Life Magazine.

Memo to Apple: How About Better Release Notes for Public Beta Testers?

Memo to Apple: How About Better Release Notes for Public Beta Testers?

An unknown number of beta testers are now eligible to receive prerelease versions of OS X El Capitan and iOS 9. So far, there have been three releases of the OS X public beta and two releases of the iOS public beta, compared to five betas of El Capitan and four betas of iOS 9 for registered developers. The process is clearly moving quickly, and it's reported by some developers that beta five fixes a number of serious glitches with the next OS X. -- The Tech Night Owl.

Is Anything Safe Online?

Is Anything Safe Online?

This week another critical flaw in Apple's App Store and iTunes invoice system was made public; a problem which could affect many millions of Apple's customers. An earlier update in July patched a number of other vulnerabilities in OS X and iOS. Microsoft releases patches for Windows on a regular basis due to bug fixes and security problems. It seems as if these headlines are never-ending, and with all major technology players asking customers to store files online, it might be wise to answer the question in the title above. -- NoodleMac.

Apple On Fear And Greed

Apple On Fear And Greed

Everyone knows that large organizations tend to take on a life of their own and become self perpetuating.

It happens in business, government, and almost any organization. What happens to a successful young company is an age old, time honored transformation that often goes from the scrappy upstart with ideals and ethics, which changes over time to become a fear-mongering, greedy corporate entity which will do anything to survive. -- Mac 360.

The case against SSDs

The case against SSDs

Flash-based SSDs have revolutionized enterprise storage. But SATA SSDs have serious problems that show that after more than 50 years of disk-based storage, our ancient I/O stack must be rebuilt. Here's why. -- ZDNet.

July 29Wednesday's News

 

Inside iOS 9: Notification Center streamlined with app alerts sorted by date, Apple Watch battery widget, new iPad view

Inside iOS 9: Notification Center streamlined with app alerts sorted by date, Apple Watch battery widget, new iPad view

A number of small but significant tweaks to the Notification Center in iOS 9 have made Apple's catch-all drop down menu more useful and efficient, including an easier way to remove all app notifications on a daily basis. -- AppleInsider.

Intel and Micron's new '3D XPoint' memory is 1000x faster, more durable than NAND

Intel and Micron's new '3D XPoint' memory is 1000x faster, more durable than NAND

Semiconductor technology giants Intel and Micron on Tuesday announced 3D XPoint memory, the fruits of a joint endeavor into non-volatile memory technology the companies claim is the first major breakthrough in the space since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989. -- AppleInsider.

Review: Windows 10 is the best version yet--once the bugs get fixed

Review: Windows 10 is the best version yet--once the bugs get fixed

I'm more conflicted about Windows 10 than I have been about any previous version of Windows. In some ways, the operating system is extremely ambitious; in others, it represents a great loss of ambition. The new release tries to walk an unsteady path between being Microsoft's most progressive, forward-looking release and simultaneously appealing to Windows' most conservative users. -- Ars Technica.

Options for quickly opening recent documents in OS X

Options for quickly opening recent documents in OS X

When you want to open a document in OS X that you have recently edited, you might find yourself locating it on your hard drive, or searching for it in Spotlight. Along these lines, you can also create a smart folder that only shows files that were recently edited; however, OS X contains several approaches to opening recent documents that may make this far easier to do. -- MacIssues.

A Steady Percentage of Americans Still Do Not Go Online, Study Says

A Steady Percentage of Americans Still Do Not Go Online, Study Says

Fifteen percent of Americans do not use the Internet -- essentially the same portion of the population that did not go online in 2013 -- according to a new Pew Research Center study. -- New York Times.

iTunes is now so clunky the only safe solution is to nuke it from orbit

iTunes is now so clunky the only safe solution is to nuke it from orbit

I've complained before about the massive missed opportunity of Apple failing to properly integrate both owned and streamed music within iTunes. I got over that enough to use and enjoy Apple Music, and I'm confident I'll be continuing my subscription once Apple starts charging my card, despite the raw deal we get on pricing in the UK. -- 9to5Mac.

Windows 10 or OS X? A Mac User Falls For the PC Again

Windows 10 or OS X? A Mac User Falls For the PC Again

With a simpler interface and new features, Microsoft's Windows is more like Apple's OS X than ever before.

You can blame Vista and the constant pounding of Ctrl+Alt+Del that came with it. Or you can blame those clever Mac vs. PC ads. But about eight years ago, after growing up with Windows computers and countless games of "Solitaire," I bought my first Mac. And I never looked back.

Until now. -- Wall Street Journal.

How To Wipe Your Mac Before Selling or Donating It

How To Wipe Your Mac Before Selling or Donating It

If you're one of the lucky folks who have purchased a new Mac, you may be considering selling or donating your old Mac. Before getting rid of your beast, you'll want to wipe the data from it, and slap on a fresh installation of OS X. Here's how. -- MacTrast.

Where to Set Environment Variables in Mac OS X

Where to Set Environment Variables in Mac OS X

At the command line, environmental variables are defined for the current shell and become inherited by any running command or process. They can determine anything from the default shell, the PATH, the users home directory, to the terminal emulation type, current working directory, where a history file is located, language and localization settings, and going further to include shell variables, which include everything from customizations to the bash prompt, colorized ls output, and changes to terminal appearance, to aliases, and much more. -- OS X Daily.

How To Backup Your iOS Device to Your Mac Using iTunes

How To Backup Your iOS Device to Your Mac Using iTunes

While it's likely that the majority of iOS users are backing up their device via a Wi-Fi connection to iCloud, some users still want to kick it old school, and keep the backup on their Mac or PC. Here's how. -- MacTrast.

Do More With Finder for Mac: Batch Rename and AirDrop

Do More With Finder for Mac: Batch Rename and AirDrop

Finder is arguably the most central element of the OS X user experience. It helps you navigate, access files and folders, and helps you organize them.

It's been extensively revised over the years and, with OS X Yosemite, Finder has had a complete visual makeover; translucent sidebar, new-style toolbar buttons, and a new application icon. -- Tuts+.

OS X Snake Oil

OS X Snake Oil

All personal computing platforms get their share of snake oil. Windows certainly had a rich collection. Many were based on Unix code hastily ported; others exploited false impressions about how the platform worked. This is not to say that all purveyors were scheming charlatans, but at some level, even the most honest of them were at least fooling themselves (and you, the customer, as a consequence). -- Rixstep.

July 28Tuesday's News

 

Inside iOS 9: Apple's Maps app gets smarter with automatic directions based on user habits

Inside iOS 9: Apple's Maps app gets smarter with automatic directions based on user habits

A major focus for Apple in building iOS 9 is making it even easier to access the information you need, in part by predicting what you want before you unlock your phone. One way the upcoming operating system update will do that is by knowing when you get into your car, and predicting where you're probably planning to drive. -- AppleInsider.

Apple-owned micro-LED display technology earns high praise, seen as potential OLED replacement

Apple-owned micro-LED display technology earns high praise, seen as potential OLED replacement

Before Apple acquired low-power display maker LuxVue, micro-LED technology was relatively unknown. But now the display industry is paying close attention, and one expert believes micro-LED could disrupt current LCD screens, as well as OLED displays like on the Apple Watch. -- AppleInsider.

Leak reveals Parallels Desktop 11 will support Windows 10's Cortana across OS X

Leak reveals Parallels Desktop 11 will support Windows 10's Cortana across OS X

The next version of Parallels' Desktop for Mac virtualization software will improve its Windows 10 support, enabling Cortana voice commands at any time -- as long as Windows is still running in the background, according to a leaked product page. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases fifth OS X 10.11 El Capitan beta to developers

Apple releases fifth OS X 10.11 El Capitan beta to developers

Apple on Monday issued the fifth OS X 10.11 El Capitan beta to developers for testing ahead of an expected release later this fall.

Today's El Capitan beta version, build 15A235d, comes less than one week after Apple seeded its last round of prerelease software for developer assessment, a round that included iOS 9 and watchOS 2 builds.

Today's beta 5 build carries over the same areas of focus from Apple's previous beta version as well as known issues with Photos, Apple ID and Language localization and formatting. Many problems can be traced back to iCloud syncing, likely due to incomplete or incompatible backend assets also in testing. [And this beta fixes NONE of the issues I have reported in this space previously. --mam] -- AppleInsider.

Merely receiving a phone notification is enough to distract a driver

Merely receiving a phone notification is enough to distract a driver

Infotainment systems are a big focus of the auto industry right now. The advent of the connected car means large screens are replacing the traditional car stereo, bringing the Internet into our vehicles. Tech companies like Apple and Google are getting in on the act, too. -- Ars Technica.

Even former heads of NSA, DHS think crypto backdoors are stupid

Even former heads of NSA, DHS think crypto backdoors are stupid

Michael Chertoff, the former head of the Department of Homeland Security and a former federal prosecutor, made some surprising remarks last week, coming out strongly against cryptographic backdoors that could be provided to the government upon request. -- emptywheel.

Myers-Briggs Test Used to Classify Gamers

Myers-Briggs Test Used to Classify Gamers

The folks at Quantic Foundry seem to have developed a more detailed way of breaking down different gaming subgroups. The "game behavior analytics" consultancy has developed a five-minute online quiz intended to narrow down a person's gaming tastes to a "gamer motivation profile." Participants are rated on a percentile basis along six different axes identifying what game design elements they find interesting. -- Quantic Foundry.

Woz and other big thinkers call for ban on AI weapons

Woz and other big thinkers call for ban on AI weapons

Autonomous weapons that have the power to track and kill targets with Terminator-like efficiency aren't just a Hollywood fantasy anymore.

Steve Wozniak, Elon Musk, Stephen Hawking and hundreds of AI and robotics researchers say the technology to build autonomous weapons that select and engage targets without human intervention is feasible within years, not decades. And we need to ban it now. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple is a Large Company - it Has Large Ambitions

Apple is a Large Company - it Has Large Ambitions

Paraphrasing Star Trek's Mr. Spock: "Small companies have small ambitions. Large companies have large ambitions." Given that fact of our technical life, many observers expect Apple to act like a small company and grumble when it doesn't. In fact, as Apple grows, so must its customers (and observers) in their perspective. Apple Watch and Apple Music are cases in point. -- The Mac Observer.

Fix the inability to move files around in your Mac

Fix the inability to move files around in your Mac

While OS X includes password security to prevent unauthorized changes to both system settings and access to your Mac, these features should not intrude on your standard workflow. When you log in to your Mac, for the most part you should be able to work password free, so if you are constantly met with requests to authenticate when managing files, or are denied access to an action you are attempting to perform, then something is likely wrong. -- MacIssues.

How Algorithms Determine Our Character

How Algorithms Determine Our Character

It's set to be another busy week in technology news, with Twitter and Facebook reporting earnings, but before then, read stories about how algorithms determine if you will pay back a loan or stay in a job and how native advertising is supporting the podcast boom. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 47 Patents Today Covering Biometrics with Tactile Feedback, the Apple Watch Charger & More

Apple Granted 47 Patents Today Covering Biometrics with Tactile Feedback, the Apple Watch Charger & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 47 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover one of Apple's original biometric patents that describe adding a tactile feedback feature to future iDevices like the iPhone. Our report also covers a granted patent for the Apple Watch charger and beyond. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Theft-deterrence of Activation Lock lower than expected in some cities, shows police data

Theft-deterrence of Activation Lock lower than expected in some cities, shows police data

While Activation Lock has dramatically reduced iPhone thefts in some cities, with reductions as high as 50%, police data collated by the WSJ shows that the effect isn't as great as expected in others. iPhone thefts fell by only 11% in Oakland, by 17% in Austin and actually increased by 32% in Seattle... -- 9to5Mac.

A Mac's longevity is its biggest unsung selling point

A Mac's longevity is its biggest unsung selling point

Apple can't advertise Macs as having ten-year lifespans for legal reasons, and reviewers rarely write about their old computers ten years later -- they're typically focused on each year's latest and greatest machine. But the average person buys a computer and keeps using it until it stops working, something I note every time a friend or family member "finally" upgrades from an old Mac to a new one. -- 9to5Mac.

UK Bank HSBC now on Board with Apple Pay -- That Just Works

UK Bank HSBC now on Board with Apple Pay -- That Just Works

A new UK report states that while the iPhone wasn't the first handset that could work like a contactless credit card, it's definitely taken off in the way rival smartphones have not. That's mostly due to the fact that Apple Pay is so easy to use. The good news today is that you can now use HSBC cards. The bank was expected to be a part of Apple Pay from the start, but it's joined two weeks in. Since HSBC is such a big bank -- it will be a welcome development for many customers. -- Patently Apple.

Why Apple Inc.'s Mac Demand Might Be Even Better Than the Sales Numbers Suggest

Why Apple Inc.'s Mac Demand Might Be Even Better Than the Sales Numbers Suggest

While other PC vendors struggle with clearing inventory, Apple's channel inventories levels are very lean.

Apple recently reported that both unit shipments and revenues of its Mac personal computers rose by 9% year over year in the company's most recent quarter. These results, as CEO Tim Cook noted on the company's earnings call, are extremely impressive given that the overall PC market is said to have declined by 12% in the quarter.

But what is even more impressive is that, on the call, Apple CFO Luca Maestri said the company ended the quarter with Mac channel inventory "slightly below" the company's targeted four-week range. -- The Motley Fool.

How Did Macs Become Such Dirty Devices That They Need Dozens Of Cleaner Apps?

How Did Macs Become Such Dirty Devices That They Need Dozens Of Cleaner Apps?

How did Macs become such dirty devices that they need dozens of cleaner apps? The answer is, 'They didn't.' OS X usually takes care of itself, and has since inception. As the Mac has become more popular among the masses of formerly Windows PC users who expect such utilities, app developers have found a way to market apps that perform what seems to need to be done without actually having to justify the need. -- noodlemac.

Time Machine is one of OS X's best features

Time Machine is one of OS X's best features

OS X has many great features, but one of them rarely gets much attention in the media: Time Machine. Time Machine is Apple's backup tool and it comes with every Mac. But you hardly ever hear about it in the media, and that's a real shame because Time Machine makes backing up and restoring your data incredibly easy and fast. -- CIO.

Apple Music Basics

Apple Music Basics

Learn the basics of starting with Apple Music. With Apple's streaming music service, you can access nearly all of Apple's music library at any time. You can add songs and albums to your music library and create playlists. You can also access the music offline for situations when you don't have an Internet connection. -- MacMost.

iPhone Kill Switch: How Effective Is It?

iPhone Kill Switch: How Effective Is It?

A new report shows that the iPhone kill switch may not be as effective as first thought. What does this mean for other smartphone kill switches? -- InformationWeek.

Are Mac Customers Treated As Second Class Citizens By Apple?

Are Mac Customers Treated As Second Class Citizens By Apple?

The rule regarding headlines remains as it always has. "If a headline ends in a question mark, the answer is 'no'" so go ahead and apply it to today's offering if you will, but hear me out.

The fact that more than 70-percent of Apple's bread is buttered by iPhone should tell us something. Apple has perhaps 700-million iOS customers, but only 10-percent of that number are Mac users. Are there ways that Mac users are treated as second class citizens? Yes. -- Mac 360.

Your E-mail Font Is Ruining Your Life

Your E-mail Font Is Ruining Your Life

Typeface designers ditch Helvetica and Arial (Helvetica's 'ugly bastard son'). You should, too.

Well, maybe not your life. But certainly your reputation with people of good taste. -- Bloomberg.

Sorry for being out Friday. i had some personal business I had to take care of.

July 27Monday's News

 

First Look: The ONE Smart Piano

First Look: The ONE Smart Piano

Aspiring musicians looking to learn to play piano should check out The ONE, a unique digital piano that uses iPad to offset the learning curve associated with mastering the instrument. -- AppleInsider.

The Amiga turns 30--'Nobody had ever designed a personal computer this way'

The Amiga turns 30--'Nobody had ever designed a personal computer this way'

Journalism is prone to hyperbole, but on July 23, 1985 technology genuinely changed forever. At New York's Lincoln Center, as a full orchestra scored the evening and all its employees appeared in tuxedos, Commodore unveiled the work of its newly acquired Amiga subsidiary for the first time. The world finally saw a real Amiga 1000 and all its features. A baboon's face at 640x400 resolution felt life-changing, and icons like Blondie's Debbie Harry and Andy Warhol came onstage to demo state-of-the-art technology like a paint program. -- Ars Technica.

What amateurs can learn from security pros about staying safe online

What amateurs can learn from security pros about staying safe online

With the non-stop stream of zero-day exploits, website breaches, and criminal hacking enterprises, it's not always easy to know how best to stay safe online. New research from Google highlights three of the most overlooked security practices among security amateurs--installing security updates promptly, using a password manager, and employing two-factor authentication. -- Ars Technica.

We had no idea! An appreciation of science's discoveries

We had no idea! An appreciation of science's discoveries

New Horizons got me thinking about all the different ways science has changed what we know about the world in the 35 or so years between the Voyagers reaching Jupiter and the present. So, I put together a completely arbitrary list of some of the discoveries that have happened in the intervening years. -- Ars Technica.

They grow up fast: Apple quietly bulks up Swift and Xcode in year two

They grow up fast: Apple quietly bulks up Swift and Xcode in year two

While most people tune in to Apple's WWDC keynote to figure out what's coming in the next version of the company's operating systems, the event is a developer's conference. Apple genuinely uses WWDC to introduce a lot of new technologies that end users will never experience directly. So with the exception of big news like Swift, the company generally does this in later, non-public talks and through the software released via its Developer Connection. -- Ars Technica.

Siri vs. Google Now: Who wins the AI cat fight?

Siri vs. Google Now: Who wins the AI cat fight?

Every mobile platform now ships with its very own virtual assistant, and while they all offer a similar set of basic features, Google Now and Siri are way ahead of their rivals. Google Now knows what you want and when you want it, but Siri has sass and personality, and is about to get a whole lot better with the help of Proactive. -- Cult of Mac.

Controversial Steve Jobs documentary gets its first trailer

Controversial Steve Jobs documentary gets its first trailer

The first trailer for Steve Jobs: Man in the Machine, the controversial documentary by Sir Alex Gibney, debuted online today, giving us our first extended glimpse at a film that supposedly pulls no punches when it comes to the late Apple CEO"s life and legacy. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple loves this new security cam and its 1TB of storage

Apple loves this new security cam and its 1TB of storage

Home security system manufacturer Uniden just released a swanky new system that can store 120 days" worth of data and, if you want one, you"ll have to go directly through the manufacturer or Apple. -- Cult of Mac.

Senator Franken thinks Apple is a Streaming Music Bully

Senator Franken thinks Apple is a Streaming Music Bully

Apple is using its market dominance to cut consumer choice in the streaming music space, or so thinks Senator Al Franken (D-MN). The Senator has asked the Federal Trade Commission to look into Apple's deals with record labels for Apple Music content over concerns that the iPhone and iPad maker may violating antitrust laws. -- The Mac Observer.

iTunes Needs To Break Up... With Itself

iTunes Needs To Break Up... With Itself

With each evolution of Apple, it seems a new section gets bolted on to iTunes, making it even more complex and complicated. It's been made even worse with the advent of Apple Music. This seems out of character for a company that built a reputation on clean straightforward design. Kelly proposes shelving the current version of iTunes, the Weasley's House of Apple software. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X Photos: Using Split View

OS X Photos: Using Split View

Today we've got another Quick Tip for you about the Photos program, and in this one, we'll discuss how to use what's called Split View. This feature makes it easy as pie to view all of the images taken at the same time and place, so if you need to apply the same adjustments to a bunch of pictures at once, it's simple! -- The Mac Observer.

How to Find Your Lost Fitbit with Your iPhone

How to Find Your Lost Fitbit with Your iPhone

Losing your Fitbit really sucks, but it doesn't have to stay lost forever. With a little patience and an iPhone you can track yours down. This is something TMO's Jeff Gamet experienced first hand, and then detailed so you can find your lost Fitbit-or other Bluetooth device-too. -- The Mac Observer.

10 Things the Digital Crown and Side Button Do on Apple Watch

10 Things the Digital Crown and Side Button Do on Apple Watch

The Digital Crown and Side buttons have a few additional uses that you may not already know about. We've got a list of 10 important actions that the Apple Watch's external controls activate. -- MacRumors.

Quick maintenance tips for your iOS device

Quick maintenance tips for your iOS device

While for the most part performing regular maintenance on your computing devices is not needed, periodically you might want to check a few settings out and ensure your device and the programs on it are in optimal working order. For some platforms there are third-party tools you can use (though these are not necessarily required) for these purposes, but no such tools exist for iOS. However, there are only a few practices and settings you can tweak in iOS, that will give you the most out of your device. -- MacIssues.

How to use Smart Folders on your Mac

How to use Smart Folders on your Mac

If you haven"t yet used Smart Folders in OS X, then you may be missing out on a critical time-saving feature of the OS X Finder. Smart Folders are essentially canned searches, where you can save custom search queries and quickly restore them. They are relatively simple concept, so the real question of how to use smart folders really boils down to: How do you search your Mac? -- MacIssues.

Apple reveals their Apple Music and Future Apple TV User Interfaces for Media Playback on iDevices

Apple reveals their Apple Music and Future Apple TV User Interfaces for Media Playback on iDevices

On July 23, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals their iTunes and Apple Music invention as it relates to new interfaces for media playback for music or future TV streaming services from Hulu, Netflix, Apple TV and more. Apple's Trent Reznor is listed as one of the inventors of the new design. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents Motion-Detected Tap Inputs for the iPhone & Apple Watch

Apple Invents Motion-Detected Tap Inputs for the iPhone & Apple Watch

On July 23, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals one or more novel motion-detected, tap-input methods for initiating one or more particular operations on a device such an iPhone and/or Apple Watch. In one example a user could set an iPhone in front of them and use the tap motion on an Apple Watch to snap the photo. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Invents New Image Editing Tools for iPad

Apple Invents New Image Editing Tools for iPad

On July 23, 2015, the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals new image editing tools in the works that could be a part of a new image editing app or that could be used with future versions of apps like Photoshop and others. Apple shows that users will be able to easily crop and straighten images and much, much more. Apple also shows us that there will be multiple methods of achieving various effects. If you dabble in graphics at all, this invention could be of interest to you. -- Patently Apple.

Deep Neural Nets Can Now Recognize Your Face in Thermal Images

Deep Neural Nets Can Now Recognize Your Face in Thermal Images

One problem with infrared surveillance videos or infrared CCTV images is that it is hard to recognize the people in them. Faces look different in the infrared and matching these images to their normal appearance is a significant unsolved challenge.

Matching an infrared image of a face to its visible light counterpart is a difficult task, but one that deep neural networks are now coming to grips with. -- MIT Technology Review.

How to Replace a Cracked iPhone 5c Screen with Screasy

How to Replace a Cracked iPhone 5c Screen with Screasy

With his wife"s iPhone 5c suffering from a broken screen, Josh Centers had the perfect opportunity to test out the Screasy iPhone Screen Repair Kit. -- TidBITS.

Apple highlighting Accessibility apps to celebrate anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act

Apple highlighting Accessibility apps to celebrate anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act

Apple today has launched a new page on the App Store dedicated to showcasing apps that take advantage of the Accessibility features on iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Apple says that the section is meant to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The Accessibility featured page on the App Store is further broken down into sections for Vision, Hearing, Speech, Learning and Literacy, and Physical and Motor Skill.

Should Apple Music be labeled as beta until the "nightmare" issues get resolved?

Should Apple Music be labeled as beta until the

It"s been almost a month since Apple Music first launched, and reception seems to be largely critical despite the music streaming service being completely free to use for the first three months after signing up. -- 9to5Mac.

Rare cases of corruption strike Apple

Rare cases of corruption strike Apple

Apple has warned owners of 2015 MacBook Pros that they're at risk of data corruption.

Cupertino says those in possession of "Retina, 15-inch, mid 2015" models have firmware installed that might do nasty things to the laptops' on-board solid state disks (SSDs).

There's therefore a recommended update owners of the relevant machines are urged to contemplate before something unpleasant befalls their data.

Apple says corruption will only happen "in rare cases". But you don't want to be that case, do you, so get patching!

Revitalizing an old iPod with OWC's iFlash adapter

Revitalizing an old iPod with OWC's iFlash adapter

Our family minivan came with a USB connector in the glove compartment, and so for years I"ve kept a 60GB fifth-generation iPod Classic in there, loaded up with as much music as I could fit. But lately it"s been showing signs of age that made me fear for the life of its internal spinning hard drive, and I haven"t been able to load our entire music library onto it for years. -- Six Colors.

How to stop Apple and Google tracking your every move using location-based data

How to stop Apple and Google tracking your every move using location-based data

You might not know it, but Apple and Google are keeping an eye on your every move. Yes, right now. Wait, they saw that, stop, keep still.

Like Jurassic World's Indominus Rex, they've been watching without you knowing, with both companies using the geo-location data from your respective iOS and Android-powered smartphones to keep tabs on you. -- Digital Spy.

A parent's dilemma: Replacing the family iPad on the cheap

A parent's dilemma: Replacing the family iPad on the cheap

What's a busy working mama to do when the family iPad suddenly has to be returned to the office? The first thing is not to panic.

The reality is that children are among the heaviest users of tablets. From occupying a toddler in a restaurant so mom and dad can finally get a decent meal to entertaining elementary-age kiddos on a long flight or car trip, parents see tablets as a useful tool to help preserve their sanity. -- CNET.

This simple trick vastly improves Apple Pay

This simple trick vastly improves Apple Pay

One of the slight criticisms raised about Apple Pay when using the cashless system to commute is that it takes a fraction longer at the ticket barriers than swiping your Oyster card.

But this issue can easily be fixed, or rather avoided altogether, by "pre-arming" Apple Pay our your iPhone -- an underreported but neat little feature buried within Apple Pay. -- Wired UK.

I got my music back. At least most of it

I got my music back. At least most of it

It"s been an interesting and confusing day. I arrived at Apple this morning to talk to them about my issues with Apple Music and to hopefully fix my problems. The good news is that I have about 99 percent of my music back. -- The Loop.

10 jailbreak myths debunked

10 jailbreak myths debunked

Over the years, there have been lots of misconceptions about jailbreaking, the type of people that jailbreak, and the overall purpose of jailbreaking. What"s true, and what"s not? Does jailbreaking void your warranty? Is it hard to do? Is it even necessary nowadays?

In this post, I"ll break down and debunk 10 jailbreaking myths. I"ll show you why I still jailbreak, and why jailbreaking may be quite different than you perceived it to be. -- iDownload Blog.

July 23Thursday's News

 

HomeKit market held back by Apple's high encryption demands

HomeKit market held back by Apple's high encryption demands

The slow trickle of HomeKit-compatible accessories is reportedly linked to a high level of encryption mandated by Apple, said to be generating unusable levels of lag in prototype Bluetooth products. -- AppleInsider.

Apple fixes 2015 MacBook Pro flash storage issue in firmware update

Apple fixes 2015 MacBook Pro flash storage issue in firmware update

Apple on Wednesday pushed out a MacBook Pro firmware update to address issues users of 2015 models were seeing with corrupted data.

Apple recommends mid-2015 MacBook Pro owners download and install the MacBook Pro Flash Storage Firmware Update 1.0, as the problem, while rare, is a real threat to critical data stored locally on the laptop's internal SSDs. Interestingly, Apple does not specify if the update applies only to the 15-inch version, which is assigned the "mid-2015" moniker, or the 13-inch model considered an "early-2015" model as well. -- AppleInsider.

How to enable Home Sharing in iOS 9 beta

How to enable Home Sharing in iOS 9 beta

With the latest iOS 9 beta restoring full support for Home Sharing, here's how to toggle on the feature that allows streaming music and video from computers connected to the same local Wi-Fi network. -- AppleInsider.

Apple investigating automated ad system for podcasts

Apple investigating automated ad system for podcasts

Your next podcast listening session could be interrupted by dynamically placed, constantly refreshed and targeted content -- read advertisements -- served up by iAd, if Apple deploys technology described in patent application published Thursday. -- AppleInsider.

Apple envisions Apple TV remote with fingerprint sensor for custom profiles, child proofing

Apple envisions Apple TV remote with fingerprint sensor for custom profiles, child proofing

A trio of Apple patent filings relating to biometric input devices could reveal plans for a remote control, potentially destined for Apple TV, capable of distinguishing multiple users for association with custom profiles on a second device. -- AppleInsider.

Great gadget, small audience: The sixth-generation iPod Touch reviewed

Great gadget, small audience: The sixth-generation iPod Touch reviewed

The iPod Touch was long overdue for a refresh. Three years is a long time for any smartphone- or tablet-class device to stick around, even if the last decade has seen the iPod slide from Apple's mainstream halo product to being dumped into the "other" section on the company's earnings reports. The 2012 iPod Touch, for all its good qualities, wasn't even a cutting-edge gadget at the time. -- Ars Technica.

Bug in latest version of OS X gives attackers unfettered root privileges

Bug in latest version of OS X gives attackers unfettered root privileges

A bug in the latest version of Apple's OS X gives attackers the ability to obtain unfettered root user privileges, a feat that makes it easier to surreptitiously infect Macs with rootkits and other types of persistent malware. -- Ars Technica.

We tear apart a $340 audiophile Ethernet cable and look inside

We tear apart a $340 audiophile Ethernet cable and look inside

We're still writing up the results of last weekend's James Randi Educational Foundation audiophile Ethernet challenge, and we should have it finished soon. While that's in progress, we wanted to share some good old-fashioned cable porn with you all. We purchased two 1.5 meter AudioQuest Vodka cables, since you always want to have a spare for any kind of on-stage demonstration. Rather than simply return them used to Amazon--which doesn't feel terribly ethical--we decided that at least one of the cables could better serve the public interest by sacrificing itself to undergo a methodical evisceration by my handy-dandy iFixit toolkit. -- Ars Technica.

Apple Music and Why it Rocks My World

Apple Music and Why it Rocks My World

On June 30, 2015 Apple introduced Apple Music to the world and, in Dr. Mac's humble opinion, the music industry will never be the same.

Apple Music has many features, but first and foremost, it's a streaming music service with over 30 million songs available for your listening pleasure at any time on any Apple device. But it also includes a new Internet radio station called Beats 1, dedicated to music and music culture 24/7; human-curated playlists; new music recommendations tailored to your musical preferences; and my favorite feature of all: Siri is woven deeply into the fabric of Apple Music. -- The Mac Observer.

Which Data Recovery Software Should I Use on my Mac?

Which Data Recovery Software Should I Use on my Mac?

Two years ago, Mac Geek Gab listener John had a hard disk gone bad and needed to recover some files off it before he moved on to a newer, more reliable disk. With that, he has asked for help deciding which data recovery software to use, in part because there are no good reviews of any options out there. Our advice from two years ago stands, and now has been further enhanced by some fantastic discussion in the article comments, as well. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Stop Apple Music from Burning Through Your iPhone Data Plan

How to Stop Apple Music from Burning Through Your iPhone Data Plan

If you're loving Apple Music but hating how it's eating through your cellular data plan, there's a fix for that. You can stop Apple Music from streaming over iPhone's wireless data connection, although there are some strings attached. -- The Mac Observer.

Jim Dalrymple Is Done with Apple Music

Jim Dalrymple Is Done with Apple Music

Jim Dalrymple-one of the most respected voices in the Mac Web-is done with Apple Music. In a passionate piece, Mr. Dalrymple said that numerous problems with Apple Music and his music library-including the loss of 4,700 songs ripped from CDs-has made him give up on the service. "I trusted my data to Apple and they failed," Mr. Dalrymple wrote. It's a damning piece. Apple should take notice. In the screenshot below is an example of Apple Music adding a song to an album twice, while playing them both at the same time. -- The Loop.

Chrome 44 for iOS brings beacon-powered Physical Web closer to reality, new gestures

Chrome 44 for iOS brings beacon-powered Physical Web closer to reality, new gestures

The Physical Web is an open source web specification from Google released last year with the aim to make interacting with smart devices in the real world as easy as clicking a link, just as we do on the web. Now with the company having released its Eddystone beacon technology and APIs for making this communication between devices in the same proximity easier, it's integrating Physical Web directly into Chrome for iOS. -- 9to5Mac.

How the Apple store took over the world

How the Apple store took over the world

'Sorry, Steve: Here's Why Apple Stores Won't Work,' proclaimed a headline in BusinessWeek in May 2001. Published the day after Apple opened its first retail store in Tyson's Corner, Va., the opinion piece argued that Apple's focus on a few products and a 'perfectionist attention to aesthetics' would limit the company's appeal. -- Washington Post.

How to configure a cheap, secure RAID backup system

How to configure a cheap, secure RAID backup system

Sure, your standard Time Machine backup is a good start, but a mirrored RAID setup will keep your data doubly backed up. Here's how to get started.

We usually store our photos, documents, and more on a single hard disk--or, increasingly these days, a solid state drive (SSD)--but there's always the nagging worry that the disk will fail, taking all your work and memories with it. Backing up using Time Machine, Super Duper!, or CrashPlan, say, is a good way of reducing this risk, but there is another: RAID. -- Macworld.

Create, Manage, Merge, Switch Photo Libraries In The Mac's Photos App

Create, Manage, Merge, Switch Photo Libraries In The Mac's Photos App

One of the most popular and most used of all of the Mac's built-in applications was iPhoto, which now has become Photos. Built in to Photos are all sorts of hidden tricks but you need a utility to get them out. -- BohemianBoomer.

Why a strong password doesn't help as much as a unique one

Why a strong password doesn't help as much as a unique one

While it's important to have a well-chosen password to avoid it being cracked, unique passwords for every site and service are critical.

The conclusion that I draw from seemingly endless series of attacks, and especially the recent LastPass account information compromise, is that we may be focusing too much on a strong password and not enough on unique passwords. -- Macworld.

July 22Wednesday's News

 

New tech bonds fingerprint sensors under Gorilla Glass, could allow button-free iPhones

New tech bonds fingerprint sensors under Gorilla Glass, could allow button-free iPhones

Security technology firm Sonavation on Tuesday announced a technology allowing ultrasonic fingerprint sensors to be embedded under Corning Gorilla Glass, potentially paving the way for anticipated iPhone designs without home buttons. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases fourth betas of iOS 9, OS X El Capitan, watchOS 2 to developers

Apple releases fourth betas of iOS 9, OS X El Capitan, watchOS 2 to developers

Apple's three forthcoming software updates were given new beta releases on Tuesday, allowing developers to test the latest builds of iOS 9, OS X El Capitan, and watchOS 2. -- AppleInsider.

Apple reinstates Home Sharing in latest iOS 9 beta, tweaks Handoff interface

Apple reinstates Home Sharing in latest iOS 9 beta, tweaks Handoff interface

Apple made good on a promise to return music Home Sharing to iOS with the release of its fourth iOS 9 beta on Tuesday, a build which also came with a few minor user interface adjustments including a new way of displaying Handoff panes in the app switcher. -- AppleInsider.

Beta testers can no longer post app reviews in prerelease iOS versions

Beta testers can no longer post app reviews in prerelease iOS versions

It appears that Apple is disallowing iOS 9 beta users to submit app reviews -- positive or negative -- with the latest build released on Tuesday, a feature that was becoming an increasingly irritating thorn in the side of developers since Apple opened its public beta program earlier this year. -- AppleInsider.

Apple and IBM reveal 10 new enterprise apps for iOS and Apple Watch

Apple and IBM reveal 10 new enterprise apps for iOS and Apple Watch

Apple and IBM have been collaborating on creating an excellent suite of apps for the iPhone and iPad over the past year, but starting today, IBM's MobileFirst apps are adding support for Apple Watch. -- Cult of Mac.

IBM is so screwed

IBM is so screwed

I've been working on a big column or two about the Office of Personnel Management hack while at the same time helping my boys with their Kickstarter campaign to be announced in another 10 days, but then IBM had to go yesterday and announce earnings and I just couldn't help myself. I had to put that announcement in the context you'll see in the headline above. IBM is so screwed. -- I, Cringely.

Startup Attempts to Reinvent the CPU to Make Computers Less Power-Hungry

Startup Attempts to Reinvent the CPU to Make Computers Less Power-Hungry

Rex Computing's 19-year-old founder has a plan to dramatically cut the energy used by powerful computers.

Every fairy-tale giant has a weakness, and Thomas Sohmers thinks the same is true of Intel, which ships hundreds of millions of chips every year. To his mind, Intel's chips guzzle too much electricity. At his startup, Rex Computing, Sohmers is working on an alternative way to architect chips that he says will use a 20th of the power that Intel's use. -- MIT Technology Review.

Opinion: Here's why I'm still jailbreaking my iPhone on iOS 8.4

Opinion: Here's why I'm still jailbreaking my iPhone on iOS 8.4

With iOS 9 coming out later this year, there will once again be a number of articles proclaiming that jailbreaking is now unnecessary because so many of the most popular tweaks have been added as native features. While jailbreaking may not be as popular as it was in the iOS 4 days, there are still a lot of great reasons to give it a try. -- 9to5Mac.

Here's what our readers think of OS X Yosemite

Here's what our readers think of OS X Yosemite

The public beta of OS X El Capitan might be out now, but plenty of users will continue using OS X Yosemite through the fall and beyond. And at first glance that's just fine: In our own review we called Yosemite "a solid update for Mac users" that offered a "clean new design" and close integration with iOS devices. However, quite a few of our readers disagreed. Almost 30 of you chimed in on Yosemite's product database page to give this iteration of OS X a user score of 4.8 out of 10, possibly making it the most contentious product on our site. What is it about Yosemite that makes it more shaky than solid for many users? -- Engadget.

Three months with the Apple Watch convinces me it's the [best] Apple product I've ever purchased

Three months with the Apple Watch convinces me it's the [best] Apple product I've ever purchased

Yesterday ZDNet's Kevin Tofel wrote that 97 percent of Apple Watch customers are satisfied with their purchase. I bought mine right when it was released, see my full review, and after three months I am confident in stating it is the best smartwatch I have ever tried. -- ZDNet.

Corrupt iPad Backup? Here's How to Delete It

Corrupt iPad Backup? Here's How to Delete It

The other day, I came to obvious conclusion that running iOS 9 beta on my iPad Air, one of my daily drivers, was a bad idea. As I had a pre-iOS 9 iPad backup in iTunes, I chose to restore iOS 8.4.

That went well with one slight hiccup. My previous iPad backup was iOS 9 and since restoring iOS 8.4 iTunes' attempts to backup thereto have failed. -- FairerPlatform.

Turning Off Apple Pay on Your Lost Apple Watch

Turning Off Apple Pay on Your Lost Apple Watch

OK, so you lost your Apple Watch or had it stolen. That's bad enough, but what do you do if you've added a bunch of cards to Apple Pay on the device? Since the Watch requires a passcode if you've got Apple Pay on, you're in the clear, right? Well, maybe, but if you've set a passcode like "1234" or "1111," then, uh…well, let's just say it's a good idea to remove your cards. Better safe than sorry, especially since a thief could use your Watch to make purchases without needing your iPhone. -- The Mac Observer.

One Man's Opinion: Baby Steps

One Man's Opinion: Baby Steps

After installing the latest beta version of OS X 10.11 yesterday, Apple has fixed only one issue I mentioned in my previous article.

Safari is now working everywhere I use it. Including SharePoint. And my cursor has not hung up any. That is pretty much the only good news.

Restart seems to be taking a lot longer than before.

OUTLOOK 2010 also crashes on startup as does Apple Mail (still.) You would think Apple would see to it that their own software ran?

The only mail client that works is OUTLOOK 365.

And even OUTLOOK 365 has bugs, itemized below (but at least it doesn't crash and is usable.):

  • First, OUTLOOK 365 may say it has crashed and needs to restart. And after you let it restart it works fine. (??) It only gives me that message after the first time I run OS X and Mail. After that it works fine.
  • You cannot use your cursor to click on a mail message or on a column without finding yourself at the end of your mailbox. To get around this and keep it from happening you have to learn to use you keyboard again (geeky hun?) The HOME key is the fix if you have bottomed out.
  • Clicking on a message at least three messages from the top of your mailbox window you use your up and down arrows to select a message and Command/o to open it. Once you are in the mailbox widow you can use page up/page down to select a message and home to get back to the top. These are all VERY important. You can click on send, etc. in the message's window once the email message is open.
  • You can use your mouse to operate all the items in your mail's finder window as well as its tabs.
  • I have been able to adapt very well and find it easy to use but it was hell until I figured out about using the keyboard and where to click in the mailbox window.
  • Search does not work.

So my opinion on OS X 10.11 is still, Caveat Emptor! And as always your mileage may vary.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

July 21Tuesday's News

 

Apple faces new class-action suit over refurbished AppleCare+ hardware replacements

Apple faces new class-action suit over refurbished AppleCare+ hardware replacements

A newly-filed class action lawsuit accuses Apple of breaching contract by failing to provide new -- or "equivalent to new" -- devices when offering up replacement hardware under AppleCare+ warranties. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents natural tap-based gesture input for nudging onscreen objects, selecting text

Apple invents natural tap-based gesture input for nudging onscreen objects, selecting text

A patent granted to Apple on Tuesday reveals a novel mode of mobile device gesture input that turns taps detected on non-touchscreen surfaces, like the side of an iPhone, into granular on-screen controls. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Granted 38 Patents Covering 3D Biometric ID, a new iPhone Tapping Feature for Games and More

Apple Granted 38 Patents Covering 3D Biometric ID, a new iPhone Tapping Feature for Games and More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 38 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover three inventions including a new iPhone tapping feature for games and other applications along with a design patent for an "audio listening system. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Some Big App Makers Aren't Feeling the Apple Watch

Some Big App Makers Aren't Feeling the Apple Watch

In the months surrounding the much-ballyhooed release of the Apple Watch, Apple managers courted Facebook in the hopes that the social networking giant would make a software application for the new gadget.

Is the Apple Watch in trouble? Facebook, Google and others haven't rolled out their most popular apps for the device. -- New York Times.

Details on OS X 10.11 El Capitan's System Integrity Protection

Details on OS X 10.11 El Capitan's System Integrity Protection

Glenn Fleishman offers details on the new System Integrity Protection (SIP) feature in OS X 10.11 El Capitan. The good news is that SIP will make it tough for malware to take hold on your Mac. The bad news is that it will cripple many power-user utilities, such as SuperDuper, Default Folder, and TotalFinder; however, you will be able to disable SIP. Also, users will no longer be able to repair disk permissions manually in 10.11 -- rather, the system will do it automatically whenever a system update is installed. -- MacWorld.

Five More Apple Music Tips

Five More Apple Music Tips

We have more Apple Music tips to share: how to create and share playlists, sorting out Apple Music tracks from the rest of your collection, catching up on Beats 1 shows, using Apple Music songs for alarms, and playing sound effects with Siri. -- TidBITS.

Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's picturess

Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's picturess

History will remember the early 21st Century as a turning point for photography -- the point at which mainstream photos transitioned from chemical to digital, thereby becoming "print optional" for the first time. Although digital photography has taken small annual steps for 20 years, those steps have collectively evolved early, uselessly low-resolution digital cameras into superior alternatives to their film-based predecessors. Even the tiny cameras built into iPhones take much better-quality photos than Kodaks and Polaroids, and more of them, too: the days of 12-, 24-, or 36-exposure film cartridges and fading exposures are long gone, replaced by all but infinite burst-mode photos that can live on your computer forever.

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Richard Howarth and Alan Dye get all the credit for Apple's iconic brand

Richard Howarth and Alan Dye get all the credit for Apple's iconic brand

Adweek has released its Creative 100 list, honoring the people it views as the "current masters of the creative idea" across advertising, branded content, technology, products, and pop culture.

While it's no surprise that Apple would make such a list, what is interesting is that none of the usual suspects appear. There's no sign of Jony Ive, Angela Ahrendts, or even Tim Cook. Instead, the people Adweek claim are driving Apple's creativity today are Richard Howarth and Alan Dye. -- Cult of Mac.

The mobile web sucks: It's going to get worse before it gets better

The mobile web sucks: It's going to get worse before it gets better

I hate browsing the web on my phone.

I do it all the time, of course -- we all do. Just looking at the stats for The Verge, our mobile traffic is up 70 percent from last year, while desktop traffic is up only 11 percent. That trend isn't going back; phones are just too convenient, beckoning us to waste more and more of our time gazing at their ever-larger screens.

But man, the web browsers on phones are terrible. -- The Verge.

Public keys, trusted hardware, block chains

Public keys, trusted hardware, block chains

The Internet is a pit of epistemological chaos. As Peter Steiner posited -- and millions of chuckles peer-reviewed -- in his famous New Yorker cartoon, there's no way to know if you're swapping packets with a dog or the bank that claims to safeguard your money,' Wayner writes. 'We may not be able to wave a wand and make the Internet perfect, but we can certainly add features to improve trust on the Internet. To that end, we offer the following nine ideas for bolstering a stronger sense of assurance that our data, privacy, and communications are secure.' -- InfoWorld.

July 20Monday's News

 

New iPod touch teardown shows power optimizations, no sapphire camera lens cover

New iPod touch teardown shows power optimizations, no sapphire camera lens cover

A teardown of the sixth-generation iPod touch published on Friday exposed new details about the device, including the presence of a marginally bigger battery, the lack of a sapphire lens cover, and which chipmakers are involved in supplying parts. -- AppleInsider.

Apple makes it easier than ever to request a desktop site in Safari

iOS 9 tips: Apple makes it easier than ever to request a desktop site in Safari

Users beta testing iOS 9 can access a new, somewhat hidden feature in the mobile Safari browser, making it easier than ever to request the desktop version of a site when browsing on an iPhone or iPad. -- AppleInsider.

Access Apple Pay's Wallet without unlocking your iPhone

iOS 9 tips: Access Apple Pay's Wallet without unlocking your iPhone

Those users testing out iOS 9 beta, and who own an iPhone 6 or 6 Plus, can now access non-default credit, debit and loyalty cards in their Apple Pay Wallet directly from the lock screen with just two taps of the home button. -- AppleInsider.

How iPad Educates

How iPad Educates

The fact that the iPhone is contributing over 90% of the operating profits in mobile phone sales has penetrated even as far as the Wall Street Journal. However, it's not yet commonly known that the Mac captures a majority of personal computer operating profits, at least when considering the sale of hardware. -- Asymco.

Apple management answers questions on the market performance of Apple Watch

Apple management answers questions on the market performance of Apple Watch

Katy Huberty (Analyst -- Morgan Stanley): You've said in the past that the watch may take longer to ramp given the new category and new interface to customers. Is that, in fact, playing out? Is the watch ramping slower than past product categories?

Tim Cook (CEO): Katy, when you use the word ramp, do you mean from a -- I assume you're talking about supply? -- Asymco.

App Store vs. Google Play: Is it time Apple stopped being a control freak?

App Store vs. Google Play: Is it time Apple stopped being a control freak?

You can't choose between Android and iOS without taking Google Play and the App Store into account. They're the largest mobile marketplaces on the planet, and they both have their strengths and weaknesses -- especially when it comes to control. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X Pages: Using Sections to Delete Document Pages

OS X Pages: Using Sections to Delete Document Pages

If you've ever tried to delete a single page within a Pages document, you may have been confused to find that you couldn't do so without removing additional pages (or maybe your whole document!). In this Quick Tip, we'll go over why this is happening and what you can do to get those stubborn pages out of there. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple IIgs System 6.0.2 Update Rolls Out After 22 Years - No Kidding

Apple IIgs System 6.0.2 Update Rolls Out After 22 Years - No Kidding

Only 22 years after its last update Apple IIgs System 6.0.1 is getting a new update. The version 6.0.2 update added support for Apple's Ethernet for Appletalk card, fixed an HFS bug that could lead to file corruption, fixed PASCL.FST and DOS33.FST bugs, addressed bugs in TextEdit, Font Manager, and Window Manager, and the list goes on. What makes this so cool is that it's Apple IIgs fans who created the update. The IIgs was a great cross-over machine in its time because it also supported Apple IIe software and offered multimedia support you couldn't find on other computers. Thanks to A.P.P.L.E, you can break out your dusty old IIgs and give it a spiffy OS update. It's a free download at the A.P.P.L.E. website. -- Call-A.P.P.L.E..

Important New Features Make OS X El Capitan Not Just a Tune-up

Important New Features Make OS X El Capitan Not Just a Tune-up

OS X Yosemite has been a bit of a problem for some users, especially with networking, and so the WWDC announcement of El Capitan was greeted with enthusiasm. Apple's stated focus was on the experience and performance, but, in time, we've learned that important changes under the hood will also contribute to security and better networking. Here's a look at how El Capitan is going to affect you for the better. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Outsmart Browser Scareware on in OS X and iOS

How to Outsmart Browser Scareware on in OS X and iOS

Your web browser has popped up a dialog telling you that it's all kinds of infected with viruses and malware and you have huge security risks. Just call this number and pay a small fee and you'll be back on your feet. Kelly calls shenanigans and helps you escape the popup cycle. -- The Mac Observer.

Fix your Mac showing generic icons for files

Fix your Mac showing generic icons for files

Identifying files by their icon is perhaps more important than being able to locate the programs you use, since for the most part you will likely be browsing your files when using the Finder on your Mac. However, there are some instances where the icons for your files will just appear as generic white documents, leaving you unable to distinguish them and less likely to identify them. This may happen for a number of reasons, including using incompatible third-party cleaner tools for your Mac, or problems with restoring from backups. If you are finding yourself in this situation, then there are several things you can do to restore your icons. -- MacIssues.

An App to Help You Win the Parking-Ticket War

An App to Help You Win the Parking-Ticket War

Driving in New York City is known to be difficult, but it only gets worse when you have to find a place to park. In a memorable episode of "Louie," Louis C.K. ultimately gives up on deciphering a group of contradictory parking signs. When he comes back later, his car is being destroyed by city workers. -- New York Times.

U.S. vs. Hackers: Still Lopsided Despite Years of Warnings and a Recent Push

U.S. vs. Hackers: Still Lopsided Despite Years of Warnings and a Recent Push

Officials and experts acknowledge that the computer networks of many federal agencies remain highly vulnerable to sophisticated cybercriminals, who are often sponsored by other countries. -- New York Times.

Dozens of popular apps found 'vulnerable to password cracking'

Dozens of popular apps found 'vulnerable to password cracking'

Popular iOS and Android apps from companies like Walmart, ESPN, Slack and SoundCloud have been found vulnerable to password cracking, according to a recent report from AppBugs. The security firm found that dozens of the most popular apps are lacking, in that they allow you to make any number of attempts to login without restriction. These clearly opens up a gap for attackers who have the means to guess those passwords and gain access to your accounts. -- 9to5Mac.

Troubleshooting Photos: Syncing, deleting, organizing albums, and more

Troubleshooting Photos: Syncing, deleting, organizing albums, and more

With the release of El Capitan's public beta, those with the desire to engage in a bit of risk have gotten a glimpse of Photos 1.1, a release that isn't just an extension of the original version, but also seems to fix bugs. We still don't know if 1.1 will be made available for Yosemite--it seems unlikely. But it's also extremely likely most Yosemite users will migrate to El Capitan, rendering it moot for most, since Photos is exclusive to Yosemite anyhow. -- Macworld.

OS X public beta: The ultimate guide

OS X public beta: The ultimate guide

Apple has released a public beta for the upcoming version of OS X El Capitan. That means you can now register to try it out, enroll your Mac, download it, and start to experience what's coming this fall. It's a real beta, though. So you shouldn't put it on your primary Mac, and you should know how to downgrade back to Yosemite if you need to. That's where this guide comes in! -- iMore.

How to activate 'Dark mode' in OS X

How to activate 'Dark mode' in OS X

While a seemingly minor addition, Apple's inclusion of a so-called "Dark Mode" in OS X, which basically flips the translucent menu bar and dock from light gray to black, answers the call of many longtime Mac users. -- AppleInsider.

Hands On With Microsoft Word 2016 (OS X)

Hands On: Microsoft Word 2016 (OS X)

If you have to use Microsoft Word at work, go get this now and be delighted with it. If you don't have to, if you're looking for a great word processor, it's just a little harder to recommend Word quite so readily. It's harder, and it's also very unfair, as 30 years of using various versions of Word have left us with biases against it. Word earned those biases, it's just difficult to think about going back to relying on it, even though Microsoft Word 2016 is the best and the shiniest version ever. -- MacNN.

Here's what people are saying about Beats 1, Apple's new global radio station

Here's what people are saying about Beats 1, Apple's new global radio station

It's been more than two weeks since the launch of Apple Music -- and with it, Beats 1, a new global radio station.

Headed up by former BBC DJ Zane Lowe, it broadcasts 24/7 around the world, with British DJ Julie Adenuga and New Yorker Ebro Darden also on hand to help out. -- Business Insider.

First computers recognized our faces, now they know what we're doing

First computers recognized our faces, now they know what we're doing

We haven't designed fully sentient artificial intelligence just yet, but we're steadily teaching computers how to see, read, and understand our world. Last month, Google engineers showed off their "Deep Dream," software capable of taking an image and ascertaining what was in it by turning it into a nightmare fusion of flesh and tentacles. The release follows research by scientists from Stanford University, who developed a similar program called NeuralTalk, capable of analyzing images and describing them with eerily accurate sentences. -- The Verge.

In praise of the iPod shuffle: It doesn't do much, but it's really good at what it does

In praise of the iPod shuffle: It doesn't do much, but it's really good at what it does

Apple updated what's left of the iPod line earlier this week. They bumped the processor and improved the camera on the iPod touch, and added some new colors. And they also added new colors to the iPod nano and iPod shuffle. -- Macworld.

How to save money when you buy a Mac

How to save money when you buy a Mac

If you're in the market for a new Macintosh, you might want to consider shopping at Apple's own refurbished store before you plunk down money on a brand new machine. Though you're not getting Macs straight from the assembly line, they're about as good as new, and you'll save you a lot of dough. -- iMore.

Why Buy A New Mac, When You Can Buy Refurbished?

Why Buy A New Mac, When You Can Buy Refurbished?

Mac computers are generally regarded as stable machines that will last a long time if properly used and maintained. I have owned eight different Macs over the last twenty years. One was a refurbished eMac and another one, a PowerBook G4, was a used model. Only the PowerBook ended up needing significant repairs after four years of use. So in my view, Macs are pretty stable. -- MakeUseOf.

Siri Can Call Emergency Services For You with iPhone if Need Be

Siri Can Call Emergency Services For You with iPhone if Need Be

Obviously nobody wants to be in an emergency situation, but if the need ever arises, Siri can come to your aid with a quick ability to dial the local emergency service line, and it works practically wherever you are in the world with the iPhone so long as it has a cellular connection. -- OS X Daily.

I renounce Apple and all its works

I renounce Apple and all its works

I've had it in for Apple since the Ridley Scott "1984" commercial, which purports to show Apple as the champion of free-spirited individualism against the conformist world of IBM. Steve Jobs became a business legend by pitching to the Bobos, the bourgeois Bohemians in David Brooks' canny phrase. Apple computers perform better in graphic arts applications, to be sure, but if better performance in a niche business was all the company had to offer, no-one would have heard of him. -- Asia Times.

Whatever happened to 'It Just Works?'

Whatever happened to 'It Just Works?

The smart money said if anything were going to go wrong, it would be Beats 1: something live is automatically the most likely to fall over in some way. If someone had already taken that bet, you'd settle for guessing that massive demand would overload the streaming servers. Yet instead, the bit of the Music app and Apple Music launch that caused problems -- and continues to cause them -- is good old iTunes for OS X. We've had iTunes for nearly 15 years, and every thing else in Apple Music for a fortnight but it's iTunes for the Mac that has fallen down and can't seem to get up. -- MacNN.

Pluto's Secrets

Pluto's Secrets

Internal NASA restricted enhanced imagery of the ice mountains of Pluto has been uncovered by GeekCulture. They remain classified to avoud panic. -- GeekCulture.

July 17Friday's News

 

Apple releases first public beta of upcoming OS X 10.10.5 update

Apple releases first public beta of upcoming OS X 10.10.5 update

Apple on Thursday released the first public beta of OS X 10.10.5, following quickly on the heels of a matching developer beta, which was issued on Tuesday.

Both betas share the same build number, 14F6a, implying identical code. Apple is typically more cautious about releasing public betas however, presumably because developers need the absolute latest code and are more prepared if something goes wrong.

In notes for the update, Apple says only that 10.10.5 fixes stability, compatibility, and security issues with OS X Yosemite. -- AppleInsider.

Lawsuit over Apple Store employee bag checks becomes class action covering over 12,000 workers

Lawsuit over Apple Store employee bag checks becomes class action covering over 12,000 workers

A long-running lawsuit over bag searches of Apple Store workers was certified as a class action on Thursday, broadening the potential impact to over 12,000 past and present retail staff. -- AppleInsider.

Dozens of phone apps with 300M downloads vulnerable to password cracking

Dozens of phone apps with 300M downloads vulnerable to password cracking

Smartphone apps from Walmart, CNN, ESPN, and dozens of other organizations put user accounts at risk of compromise because they allow attackers to make an unlimited number of login attempts, according to recently published research. -- Ars Technica.

Ars prepares to put "audiophile" Ethernet cables to the test in Las Vegas

Ars prepares to put

Back in February, we ran a piece discussing a hyper-expensive "audiophile-grade" Ethernet cable, the Audioquest Diamond. An 8-meter version of the Audioquest Diamond costs about $4,500, and a 12-meter version will run about $10,000; proponents (like Audiostream reviewer Michael Lavorgna) say that the Audioquest Ethernet cables have a meaningful and positive impact on sound when you use them to listen to audio files hosted on a NAS. -- Ars Technica.

How to avoid fake iOS crash scam that wants to steal your cash

How to avoid fake iOS crash scam that wants to steal your cash

An iOS scam designed to cheat people out of money is being reported by users in both the United States and the U.K.

A number of iPhone and iPad users have received pop-up notifications on their devices informing them that iOS has crashed, that their personal data is being stolen by a third party, and that the only way to solve the problem is (surprise!) to pay between $19 and $80 for a fix.

Sounds legit. Where do we send our money? -- Cult of Mac.

Asking Siri to charge your phone could one day save your life

Asking Siri to charge your phone could one day save your life

From subtly dissing Rihanna to teaching you math with a Cookie Monster reference, Siri is packed full of offbeat Easter eggs. But here's one that could actually one day prove useful, and even life-saving. Maybe.

If you're ever in a situation where you need to phone the police but -- for whatever reason -- aren't able to, asking Siri to "charge my phone 100 percent" will automatically dial emergency services. Neat, huh? -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Blocks Flash Again, Fixes Mac mini Sleep Issue

Apple Blocks Flash Again, Fixes Mac mini Sleep Issue

Apple rolled out two updates on Thursday to address Mac security and performance issues. The first update blocks older versions of Flash from running in Safari, the second addresses an issue where the late 2012 model Mac mini wouldn't recognize USB keyboards after waking from sleep. -- The Mac Observer.

How to quickly look up maps, movies, and more in OS X

How to quickly look up maps, movies, and more in OS X

Often when you need to look up some details about a topic at hand, you open a Web browser and search for it using your preferred search engine; however, there are a few services in OS X that give you quick access to information about words you might be thinking about, or words that you might be reading. For instance, if a friend sends you an iMessage about watching a specific movie, then you might find that you can look up information about the movie, without needing to switch to any browser. -- MacIssues.

Ancestry Moves Further into Consumer Genetics

Ancestry Moves Further into Consumer Genetics

The company that began as a source of genealogical data now hopes to marry that information with DNA data--and sell it for research.

With the Thursday launch of its AncestryHealth website, Ancestry continues to play Microsoft to 23andMe's Apple. It may not be as innovative in the burgeoning field of consumer genetics, but it's an able competitor nonetheless. -- MIT Technology Review.

Office 2016 for Mac 15.11.2

Office 2016 for Mac 15.11.2

Microsoft has officially launched Office 2016 for Mac after offering a free public preview for the last several months. However, the latest version of Office is currently available only for Office 365 subscribers, with a one-time purchase option coming available in September, 2015. The lineup of Office 2016 is a familiar one, with stalwarts Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Excel now joined by the OneNote digital notebook (though it is still available as a standalone free app from the Mac App Store.) -- TidBITS.

Researchers are developing apps to diagnose coughs, sleep apnea, & detect bipolar episodes

First pitched by Steve Jobs in 2007 as "an iPod, a phone, and an Internet communicator," the iPhone has since evolved into a medical device of sorts as software has gotten smarter and sensors have become more advanced in recent years.

Apple embraced this with iOS 8 and the rollout of HealthKit, a framework which allows medical and health apps to share data with each other and your doctors with your permission. Apple's open source ResearchKit took it a step further by allowing developers to turn apps into scientific health and medical research tests.

Scientific American recently profiled three smartphone apps in development that point to how the iPhone could become even better at monitoring our health. The apps in development aim to determine what a patient's cough means, diagnose sleep apnea, and even predict a bipolar episode before it starts… -- 9to5Mac.

FDA approves St. Jude's iOS-based spinal cord stimulation trial system

FDA approves St. Jude's iOS-based spinal cord stimulation trial system

St. Jude medical announced today in a press release that its new wireless spinal cord stimulation trial system has been approved by the FDA. The system uses Bluetooth and pairs with iOS devices to provide control to the patient and doctor.

Apple patent hints at potential solar cell embedded touch screens

Apple patent hints at potential solar cell embedded touch screens

Keeping our MacBooks and other devices charged is always a priority and Apple has a new invention that could use solar cells integrated into trackpads, the Magic Mouse, Magic Trackpad, Apple's wireless keyboard and into parts of the iPhone that could provide added stored power. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Lost Its Simplicity With iOS 9, But So Has Google

Apple Lost Its Simplicity With iOS 9, But So Has Google

Forbes' Theo Priestley wrote an earnest argument about Apple's latest mobile OS losing its trademark simplicity earlier this week. He's right, iOS 9 adds more features and moves further away from its humble, simplistic beginnings. But so has every other mobile OS. It's an unavoidable progression as technology rapidly develops and new ways of communicating and interacting emerge. -- Forbes.

Apple is working on a new e-commerce system based on your credit card balance

Apple is working on a new e-commerce system based on your credit card balance

For a company whose CEO has repeatedly asserted that it is not interested in selling its customer data to advertisers, Apple sure is putting a lot of effort into developing new products that sell customer data to advertisers. -- Business Insider.

How to use Apple Pay

How to use Apple Pay

Apple Pay launched in the UK on 14 July, and we've been trying out the mobile payment system to see how easy it is to use, and whether it really has the ability to be a game-changer in our move towards a cashless society. -- The Inquirer.

July 16Thursday's News

 

Apple Introduces The Best iPod touch Yet

Apple Introduces The Best iPod touch Yet

Apple Wednesday introduced the best iPod touch yet and unveiled a new lineup of colors for all iPod models, including space gray, silver, gold, pink and blue. The ultra-portable iPod touch features a new 8 megapixel iSight camera for beautiful photos, an improved FaceTime HD camera for even better selfies, the Apple-designed A8 chip with 10 times faster graphics performance for a more immersive gaming experience, and even better fitness tracking with the M8 motion coprocessor. With the newly launched Apple Music service, members can enjoy playlists curated by the most talented music experts from around the world, stay in-the-know on music culture with a global 24/7 broadcast on Beats 1℠ radio, and comment on or like backstage photos and videos shared directly by their favorite artists on Connect. -- Apple PR.

New iPod touch vs. iPhone 5s: Apple's latest iPod packs surprising power

New iPod touch vs. iPhone 5s: Apple's latest iPod packs surprising power

Apple surprised on Wednesday by including its latest-generation A8 processor in the latest iPod touch -- a decision that makes it a formidable and highly affordable opponent to the company's mid-range iPhone 5s. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases Mac mini EMI firmware update to fix USB keyboard issue

Apple releases Mac mini EMI firmware update to fix USB keyboard issue

Apple on Wednesday released an EMI update for Mac mini, addressing an issue that could in some cases prevent a USB keyboard from being recognized when waking from sleep. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's new iPod touch debuts under-clocked but powerful A8 SoC, Bluetooth 4.1

Apple's new iPod touch debuts underclocked but powerful A8 SoC, Bluetooth 4.1

Wednesday's iPod touch release marked a number of firsts for Apple, including two major modifications to existing technologies in an under-clocked A8 system-on-chip silicon and a communications package boasting the Bluetooth 4.1 Core Specification. -- AppleInsider.

Apple investigating solar-powered wireless mice and trackpads

Apple investigating solar-powered wireless mice and trackpads

An Apple patent application published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday reveals continued research into alternative energy solutions, specifically as it applies to a lineup of wireless computer peripherals with embedded solar cells. -- AppleInsider.

Once-theoretical crypto attack against HTTPS now verges on practicality

Once-theoretical crypto attack against HTTPS now verges on practicality

Almost a third of the world's encrypted Web connections can be cracked using an exploit that's growing increasingly practical, computer scientists warned Wednesday. They said the attack technique on a cryptographic cipher known as RC4 can also be used to break into wireless networks protected by the Wi-Fi Protected Access Temporal Key Integrity Protocol. -- Ars Technica.

Neil Young pulls his albums from Apple Music 'cause they sound soooo bad

Neil Young pulls his albums from Apple Music 'cause they sound soooo bad

Canadian singer-songwriter and musician turned high-fidelity music spokesman, Neil Young, announced that he's fed up with music streaming service. Sure, there's a lot less money in streaming than selling albums, but Young revealed to fans that he's pulling his albums from Apple Music and other services today because the music just sounds too horrible for him to tolerate. -- Cult of Mac.

Why you should never buy an iPod ever again

Why you should never buy an iPod ever again

Today's iPod refresh came as an odd surprise to some and maybe even a long-awaited update to others. Now that the iPod line is finally up-to-date after being dormant for a few years, you might even be considering buying one.

Regardless of how you feel, do yourself a favor: Don't buy one. -- Cult of Mac.

Photos: Using the Tilt Wheel to Straighten

Photos: Using the Tilt Wheel to Straighten

Today we're going to discuss how to fix an image with an off-kilter horizon. It's pretty simple to do, but if what you like are big, obvious buttons that say "Straighten," well, then, you're gonna miss iPhoto on this one. Deciphering "interesting" Apple design choices is what we're gonna do in today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

How to See What's Killing Your iPhone Battery

How to See What's Killing Your iPhone Battery

This morning my iPhone battery went from a full charge to completely dead in a little over four hours without me using it for anything at all. That's not at all what I expect from a smart phone that's doing little more than laying on my desk, so I wondered exactly what was eating all the juice in my iPhone's battery. Thanks to a tip TMO's own Melissa Holt wrote almost a year ago I was able to solve the mystery. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Encrypt Your iOS Device's iTunes Backup

How to Encrypt Your iOS Device's iTunes Backup

If you connect your iOS device to your computer to back up your data instead of using iCloud, some of your most private data is not backing up. For security reasons, by default, an iTunes backup will not include saved passwords, Wi-Fi settings, website history, or Health data. -- MacRumors.

How to isolate output in the OS X Console

How to isolate output in the OS X Console

As programs run on your Mac, they will output their activity either to the system log or to specific log files, both of which can be viewed using OS X's Console utility, so if some aspect of your Mac appears to not be working correctly, often the system console is a great tool to use for narrowing down the problem. However, when you open the console you will by default be hit with a barrage of information that can be tough to narrow down, especially if you want to follow the activity of one or more processes. -- MacIssues.

Apple Breathes New Life into their Headset Display Invention

Apple Breathes New Life into their Headset Display Invention

Earlier this year we posted a report titled "Apple is definitely working on a Top Secret VR Project." The report pointed to Apple's string of job posting for a Sr. Display Systems Engineer related to VR Environments. Today the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals that they've breathed new life into a 2008 invention that was granted to them this past February. -- Patently Apple.

Java updates available for OS X on July 15, 2015

Java updates available for OS X on July 15, 2015

Java updates address a recently identified Java web plug-in vulnerability. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Guess Who?

Guess Who?

Yesterday I reported on the DataCamp offering online courses in R programming, Apache Spark, and other topics.

Well guess who is teaching the R courses? OIT's own Bob Muenchen, R expert and author.

For more on R you can go to Bob's website, r4stats or get his book, R for SAS and SPSS Users.

As Apple desktop use grows, IT adapts: Mac adoption grows in enterprise with assist from iOS devices

As Apple desktop use grows, IT adapts: Mac adoption grows in enterprise with assist from iOS devices

Widespread iPhone and iPad adoption is influencing broader use of Apple products in the enterprise, namely desktops and laptops. One enterprise seeing this is the University of Nevada at Reno, where academic freedom at the research university also means the freedom to choose an OS. -- Computerworld.

Mystery of the unmovable mail (and how to sync iOS email folders across all your devices)

Mystery of the unmovable mail (and how to sync iOS email folders across all your devices)

If you're using email on your iOS devices it's likely you've encountered the following scenario: You're going through your inbox, try to delete an email when the following message appears, "Unable to Move Message -> The message could not be moved to the mailbox Trash." -- Macworld.

Private I: El Capitan's System Integrity Protection will shift utilities' functions

Private I: El Capitan's System Integrity Protection will shift utilities' functions

A new protection mechanism in OS X increases security, but prevents some low-level activities that utilities rely on. They'll have to find new paths.

iOS is so locked down that disabling protections in order to install your own modifications is called "jailbreaking." But OS X has remained free and easy--until now. El Capitan adds some security improvements that should make OS X more resistent to exploitation by malware, but it will also mean a change or end to some software utilities on which you may rely. -- Macworld.

Done with the El Capitan public beta? Here's how to revert your Mac back to Yosemite

Done with the El Capitan public beta? Here's how to revert your Mac back to Yosemite

It's all fun and games until someone gets hurt. Sure, installing a beta operating system can be fun and games--you get to try out the new features and see the improvements. But there is always the possibility of getting hurt, like if your software doesn't work or your Mac crashes. That's the risk of using a beta operating system. -- Macworld.

6 Workarounds for the Biggest Apple Music Annoyances

6 Workarounds for the Biggest Apple Music Annoyances

Apple Music went live two weeks ago. While much of the service works well, there are a few annoyances. In some cases, there are workarounds that allow you to avoid the most exasperating issues, but some are intractable. Here are the 6 most irksome Apple Music annoyances and what you can do to work around them. -- Intego.

Apple News is seriously good and might become your only news app

Apple News is seriously good and might become your only news app

While everyone's panicking about Facebook Instant Articles, I've seen something much more terrifying and exciting: Apple News.

The app, which will be installed on every iPhone that upgrades to iOS 9, is a new centralized home for content. -- The Next Web.

Here's what it's REALLY like to work in an Apple store

Here's what it's REALLY like to work in an Apple store

In the US alone, Apple has 265 retail stores across 44 states. Each of those locations employs over 100 people -- totalling about about 30,000 full- or part-time retail workers.

Most of those employees agree that the 39-year-old Cupertino, California-based tech giant is a great place to work.

Of course, every employee's experience is different -- but we recently spoke with former Apple "specialist" Albert Adolphus to find out what it was really like for him. -- Business Insider.

July 15Wednesday's News

 

Talks with major networks for Apple streaming TV service making rapid progress

Talks with major networks for Apple streaming TV service making rapid progress

After being mired for months, talks with major networks regarding an Apple streaming TV service are finally making major advancements ahead of an anticipated launch this fall, according to a new report. -- AppleInsider.

Apple issues first betas of iOS 8.4.1, OS X Yosemite 10.10.5 to developers

Apple issues first betas of iOS 8.4.1, OS X Yosemite 10.10.5 to developers

While iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan aren't set to launch to the public until this fall, there will be interim updates in the forms of iOS 8.4.1 and OS X Yosemite 10.10.5 to address bugs and security issues. -- AppleInsider.

Firefox blacklists Flash player due to unpatched 0-day vulnerabilities

Firefox blacklists Flash player due to unpatched 0-day vulnerabilities

There's some drama going down in the Flash camp. Yesterday, because of two unpatched Hacking Team zero-day vulnerabilities, Mozilla blacklisted Adobe Flash Player 18.0.0.203, meaning Flash was disabled by default in Firefox. This morning, just a few moments ago, Adobe rushed out version 18.0.0.209, plugging the two vulnerabilities. -- Ars Technica.

MS kills critical IE 11 bug after exploit was shopped to Hacking Team

MS kills critical IE 11 bug after exploit was shopped to Hacking Team

Microsoft has killed at least two security bugs linked to the compromised malware developer Hacking Team, including a critical remote-code execution hole that worked against people using the latest version of Internet Explorer on Windows 7 and 8 machines. -- Ars Technica.

Facebook's Internet Challenge: Let's Kill Flash

Facebook's Internet Challenge: Let's Kill Flash

Adobe's Flash has gone from the darling of the Internet party to creepy crasher everyone wishes would leave. Apple turned its back on Flash years ago, Google and YouTube aren't fans any more, Firefox now blocks Flash content automatically, and the latest nail in the coffin is coming from Facebook's Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos is calling for a kill date where all Web browsers drop support for the multimedia platform at the same time. -- The Mac Observer.

Just Say No Thank You (to Apple's Public Betas)

Just Say No Thank You (to Apple's Public Betas)

Dr. Mac thinks you should just say "no thank you" to the iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan public betas. Find out why in this week's Dr. Mac's Rants & Raves Episode 132.

So first I'll tell you how to join the Apple Beta Software Program, then I'll spend the rest of the column explaining why I think it's a bad idea for most users to install them. -- The Mac Observer.

Everything You Need to Know: Survive Without Flash on Your Mac

Everything You Need to Know: Survive Without Flash on Your Mac

Adobe's Flash Internet Browser plug-in has had so many security issues over the years, especially recently, that many are calling for it to fade into the sunset. Here's a concise FAQ on how check for what version you have installed, how to restrict how Flash is used, and how to delete it for good. -- The Mac Observer.

Three quick tips for managing the Dock in OS X

Three quick tips for managing the Dock in OS X

If you use OS X, then you likely make fairly decent use of the Dock for storing common applications, or switching between them. While you can somewhat adjust the Dock's default behaviors, overall it is a fairly static element of OS X. However, there are some neat features of the Dock that might give you another level of utility for it. -- MacIssues.

Self-Charging Phones Are on the Way, Finally

Self-Charging Phones Are on the Way, Finally

A handful of companies are coming up with ways to extend your phone's battery life when you're far from a power outlet.

The case that Will Zell slides onto his iPhone doesn't look that unusual, but it's doing something pretty out of the ordinary: capturing some of the radio waves that the phone transmits when connecting to cell-phone towers and Wi-Fi routers, converting them to electricity, and feeding that power back to the phone's battery. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple Maps vs Google Maps comparison review: Apple's public transport directions in iOS 9 might give it the edge

Apple Maps vs Google Maps comparison review: Apple's public transport directions in iOS 9 might give it the edge

Back in September 2012, Apple released its Apple Maps service as part as iOS 6. In the following months, hundreds of reports came flooding in about various inaccuracies with the service, with some leading people into potentially dangerous locations. This meant that Google were still the kings of the mapping world, but fast forward to today and ask yourself "is it still the case?" -- Macworld UK.

Hands-on with News in iOS 9: Apple's response to Facebook and Snapchat's content platforms

Hands-on with News in iOS 9: Apple's response to Facebook and Snapchat's content platforms

Like Facebook and Snapchat, Apple has partnered with news publishers to deliver a beautiful and fast-loading editorial experience on its home turf.

On Thursday, the iOS 9 public beta introduced a completely new native app: News. Similar to Flipboard, News uses RSS feeds to deliver stories from different publishers together in a magazine-style layout. News, however, does away with Flipboard's built-in social capabilities, like incorporating a feed of just links shared by your Twitter network. -- Macworld.

How do I slay the Apple Music DRM dragon?

How do I slay the Apple Music DRM dragon?

Apple Music offers something similar to the $24.95 per year iTunes Match, a feature described by Cupertino as "Wherever your music comes from -- purchased in the iTunes Store, ripped from a rare import CD, or downloaded from your favorite music blog -- everything you've collected lives in one place." Unfortunately, there's a chink in this feature's armor.

The problem is that Apple Music incorrectly labels your own songs as Apple Music tracks, and wraps them in Digital Rights Management (DRM). This means the music you've accumulated over the years outside of iTunes becomes unplayable if you ever cancel your Apple Music subscription and don't have iTunes Match to keep it with you.

Thanks to a recent update to iTunes and the folks at iDownloadBlog, we now know a way to recover your songs if they incorrectly show up as DRM-protected Apple Music tracks. -- AppAdvice.

Play it again, Siri--no, the other one!

Play it again, Siri--no, the other one!

In launching its music-streaming service, Apple also expanded what Siri can do with music. But the intelligent agent is hardly perfect; in particular, I've run into a recurring annoyance when I ask Siri to play a song by name. -- Six Colors .

iOS 9 public beta: The ultimate guide

iOS 9 public beta: The ultimate guide

For the first time, Apple is making the iPhone and iPad software available as a public beta. That means you can register and download iOS 9 right now if you really want to. But should you? What can you do if you don't like it and want to go back? What if you finds bugs or glitches? How are you even supposed to know what's in iOS 9? -- iMore.

The truth about HackingTeam, jailbreaking and iOS -- and how to keep your device safe

The truth about HackingTeam, jailbreaking and iOS -- and how to keep your device safe

There has been a lot of mixed information and speculation in the media recently in regards to the HackingTeam leak and what it all means for iOS users. Do the surveillance tools the group has reportedly provided to governments and law enforcement present a risk to the average iPhone and iPad user? That's a question we've been getting a lot, so I will attempt to present all of the facts based on the recently leaked documents detailing the HackingTeam's tools, as well as my opinion on the impact of certain aspects for iOS devices. -- 9to5Mac.

What Apple's app analytics tool means for marketers

What Apple's app analytics tool means for marketers

It's only been a few short weeks since Apple launched its app analytics tool, but for mobile developers and marketers, it's a whole new era.

With statistics showing that less than half of app developers track user behavior, we can expect to see major changes in the app economy once developers explore the world of data that awaits them in the App Store. Even analytics veterans who have previously been using third-party tools to track performance will find a few exciting features on Apple's new platform. Apple's tool is free, more accurate, and comes with the company's legendary slick UI. What's still unclear at this point is whether the company will soon start blocking third-party tools, making its own tool the only option. -- VentureBeat.

2 Months With Watch, 2 Big Conclusions

2 Months With Watch, 2 Big Conclusions

Watch turned two months old this weekend. The model I chose was based upon two factors. The first, Watch 1.0 likely is an interim product, and second, money is an object, so no expensive stainless steel or expensive watchband. -- Mac 360.

As Big Data Plateaus, Data Science Education Grows

As Big Data Plateaus, Data Science Education Grows

Even as the hype around big data has died down, opportunities for data scientists are expanding. Johns Hopkins, NYU, and MIT are among the schools offering courses in data science, and IBM and other big companies are investing heavily in training programs. Now a startup called DataCamp has raised $1 million to expand online courses in R programming, Apache Spark, and other topics. The deal speaks to the opportunity that venture capitalists see in training the next generation of data scientists and business analysts. It also shows online education is specializing beyond platforms like Codecademy, Coursera, and Udacity. -- Xconomy.

July 14Tuesday's News

 

It's time to uninstall Adobe's Flash from your Mac - here's how

It's time to uninstall Adobe's Flash from your Mac - here's how

The recent tidal wave of critical vulnerabilities in Adobe's Flash Player has prompted many security professionals to call for the much-maligned software's demise, and we agree. AppleInsider shows you how to uninstall Flash from your Mac, and what to do if you can't live without it. -- AppleInsider.

iTunes 12.2.1 solves problem with iTunes Match tracks converted to Apple Music DRM

iTunes 12.2.1 solves problem with iTunes Match tracks converted to Apple Music DRM

Apple on Monday released iTunes 12.2.1, fixing a critical problem that would cause tracks matched via iTunes Match to be converted to Apple Music content instead. -- AppleInsider.

Stringent Apple HomeKit certification cause of slow market acceptance, report claims

Stringent Apple HomeKit certification cause of slow market acceptance, report claims

According to a report on Monday, the slow pace at which devices compatible with Apple's HomeKit are trickling in can be attributed to last-minute security changes, including a modified hardware certification process and tweaks to the networking ecosystem. -- AppleInsider.

Future Apple devices might boast personalized Maps imagery, turn audio into haptic vibrations

Future Apple devices might boast personalized Maps imagery, turn audio into haptic vibrations

A pair of patents awarded to Apple on Tuesday illustrates research running the gamut of mobile tech, with one invention detailing an advanced mapping system with customizable and shareable image data, and another covering ways to convert audio data into haptic vibrations for the hearing impaired. -- AppleInsider.

Java and Flash both vulnerable--again--to new 0-day attacks

Java and Flash both vulnerable--again--to new 0-day attacks

Internet users should take renewed caution when using both Adobe Flash and Oracle's Java software framework; over the weekend, three previously unknown critical vulnerabilities that could be used to surreptitiously install malware on end-user computers were revealed in Flash and Java. -- Ars Technica.

Selling Watch Sales Data

Selling Watch Sales Data

There is no reliable information on Apple Watch sales. None of the analysts which follow Apple or the phone, computer or watch markets have any insight into this. The only source of information is Apple itself and they have made it clear that they don't intend to provide watch sales data for competitive reasons. I did not and do not expect any information from Apple on watch sales. They have placed the product within the "Other" category specifically to make unit data hard to discern and have explained why they do so. -- Asymco.

Turn your iPhone into a Super 8 camera

Turn your iPhone into a Super 8 camera

The iPhone is the gold standard for modern design -- and that sometimes gets in the way of some of its amazing functions.

Take photo and video. Even the most serious photographers and filmmakers can create high art with an iPhone, but conventional cameras, no matter how clunky they seem today, were designed with grip and stability that is missing from an iPhone.

A startup company has created an iPhone 6 case that converts the iPhone into a retro-looking handheld movie camera, complete with cinematic lenses, a viewfinder, film trigger and a mount for mics and lights. -- Cult of Mac.

iPhone video lighting made easy

iPhone video lighting made easy

Lighting is a crucial part of any video shoot, whether you're filming a scene for an indie movie with an expensive camera or using your iPhone to capture video of your kid's soccer game.

Chances are, though, you're not going to have a professional lighting kit along with you when you use your iPhone to shoot video (unless you're actually an indie film auteur -- this tip isn't for you).<\p>

We spoke with Alaskan filmmaker Scott Slone about the best way to get great lighting for your videos without resorting to expensive and complicated equipment. -- Cult of Mac.

Remember when technology was exciting?

Remember when technology was exciting?

Al Mandel used to say "the step after ubiquity is invisibility" and man was he right about that. Above you'll see a chart from the Google Computers and Electronics Index, which shows the ranking of queries using words like "Windows, Apple, HP, xBox, iPad" -- you get the picture. The actual terms have changed a bit since the index started in 2004 as products and companies have come and gone, but my point here is the general decline. -- I, Cringely.

Best Revival Ever: Bloom County Returns After 25 Year Hiatus

Best Revival Ever: Bloom County Returns After 25 Year Hiatus

Berkeley Breathed has given us all some hope for the future: "Bloom County" is back. The series is now called "Bloom County 2015," and was announced by Mr. Breathed through his Facebook page, and the first strip is already up. The original "Bloom County" was a Pulitzer prize winning strip that ran from 1980 to 1989 and ended with Donald Trump running for President after his brain was transplanted into Bill the Cat, one of his main characters. The new series starts with Opus the penguin in all his underpants-laden glory, just as it should. Mr. Breathed hasn't said if the strip will run in papers, so for now you'll have to check out his Facebook page to get your fix. Welcome back, Berkeley.

Fix Mail's smart mailboxes not working properly

Fix Mail's smart mailboxes not working properly

If you use Apple Mail as your e-mail client, then you might find its Smart Mailbox feature useful for organizing your messages. As with the Finder's smart folders, the smart mailboxes in Mail give you a quick way to access canned searches so you can only see messages from specific dates, from specific people, or in specific accounts. However, while useful, there may be times when smart mailboxes do not work properly, and may not show the contents you expect. -- MacIssues.

Conspiracists Concur: Climate Change Is a Colossal Cover-Up

Conspiracists Concur: Climate Change Is a Colossal Cover-Up

Why science denialism and conspiracy theory walk together, suspiciously.

A group of social scientists headed by Stephan Lewandowsky has released a study of online blog comments, concluding that climate-change deniers are strongly prone to conspiratorial thinking. That climate deniers are also conspiracy buffs might seem like one of those dog-bites-man findings for which social scientists are often ridiculed ("People in love do foolish things, study concludes"). But the background to this study is actually more interesting than its conclusion. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple Opens Public Betas of OS X 10.11 El Capitan and iOS 9

Apple Opens Public Betas of OS X 10.11 El Capitan and iOS 9

Apple has released public betas of OS X 10.11 El Capitan and iOS 9. Josh Centers explains how to get them, but recommends caution if you choose to install them.

[One Man's Opinion: I cannot speak to iOS 9 but as far as OS X 10.11 goes, based on my experience, do NOT install it on any production system.

If you have a clean partition away from you production system that is fine. But under no circumstances install it on any production system. Anyway, that is one man's opinion.] -- TidBITS.

Internet's new addressing system now mainstream, says Apple -- prioritized in iOS 9 & OS X 10.11 betas

Internet's new addressing system now mainstream, says Apple -- prioritized in iOS 9 & OS X 10.11 betas

With the Internet running out of standard 32-bit IP addresses (known as IPv4), the switch to IPv6 -- which offers 128-bit addresses -- has been quietly underway for some time. Apple says this work has now progressed sufficiently for IPv6 to be considered mainstream, and it is prioritizing the use of the new addressing system in the public betas of both iOS 9 and OS X 10.11. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Granted 40 Patents Today Covering a New Maps App Feature, an Automatic Vehicle Location App & more

Apple Granted 40 Patents Today Covering a New Maps App Feature, an Automatic Vehicle Location App & more

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 40 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover a new maps app feature, a future vehicle location app and more, including a design patent for a headphone microphone boom. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

What's new in Office 2016 for Mac?

What's new in Office 2016 for Mac

I remember when the release of a new Microsoft Office platform was a significant event. Technology professionals typically attended regional events, as much for swag and prerelease CDs (and later, DVDs) as to witness new features. In the 2015 business environment, Office releases no longer generate the same fanfare. Considering the role productivity applications fulfill, a new Office release actually serves as one of the few technical innovations that impacts professionals' daily lives. Fortunately for Apple users, there are several new features packed in Office 2016 for Mac, making the new release a compelling upgrade. -- TechRepublic.

One Man's Opinion: Apple Mail

One Man's Opinion: Apple Mail

Could someone please tell me what happened to Apple Mail? How is it that the company that gave us MacWrite, MacDraw, Mac Paint and the Apple Remote, could hate its customers so much as to create Apple Mail?

It is, in my opinion, the worst mail client on the planet. Even though I don't love it, Microsoft Office Mail is much better. If the reviews can believed, Office 2016 is very good. I think Microsoft is designing better software for the Mac because of the historic bias against it. They have to be better to overcome the bias.

There is nothing about the Apple Mail interface or function that is Mac like and it doesn't make it easier to manage my mail.

I hoped that in some new version of OS X, Apple would fix it, but nada. I am running the latest beta of OS X 10.11 and it is the same piece of junk.

I have worked on Mac's and with Apple software for 30 years, this is not Apple's best work.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

Microsoft Office For Mac 2016: 'Good Grief, This Is Microsoft's Best

Microsoft Office For Mac 2016: 'Good Grief, This Is Microsoft's Best

It remains to be seen whether the new company strategy will pay off, but the new guy running the show at Microsoft doesn't mind doing things different than his predecessor.

Different? Yes, Microsoft's new line of software is made up of apps you'll actually want to use. That's different. Regular readers know I'm forced into a life of Microsoft and Adobe servitude thanks to the need to be compatible with the rest of the business world. The new Office suite for Mac makes it a pleasure. It's that good. -- Mac 360.

Quick Notes About the iOS and OS X Public Betas

Quick Notes About the iOS and OS X Public Betas

Last year, Apple announced that the first one million people who applied for the OS X public betas would get into the program, but it doesn't seem as if those numbers were ever confirmed, or anyone was actually blocked from signing up. Regardless, iOS was eventually added to the mix, ahead of Apple's decision to merge all developer programs into one.

The long and short of it is that anyone who is interested in getting iOS and OS X betas can sign up, download copies and install them. It's sort of like the Windows Insider program, where, if you are still taking a breath, you can apply and be assured of getting the final version when it's released. -- The Tech Night Owl.

How I learned to stop worrying and embrace the iOS 9 beta on my old iPad

How I learned to stop worrying and embrace the iOS 9 beta on my old iPad

Everyone knows that putting beta software on your primary device is a huge risk, especially if you haven't backed up in a long time (or ever). But I like to live dangerously, so I plan to put the iOS 9 beta on my iPhone 6--yes, the one I carry every day. To prepare, I decided to use my third-generation iPad, a sometimes temperamental but always available workhorse, as a guinea pig. -- Macworld.

July 13Monday's News

 

Upcoming iTunes U Change at UT

Upcoming iTunes U Change at UT

On July 2nd Apple announced a major change in the iTunes U service. Apple will be discontinuing the iTunes U private sites on September 1st, 2015. -- IT Weekly.

Retina MacBook Pro owners plagued by supposed screen coating damage, call on Apple to take action

Retina MacBook Pro owners plagued by supposed screen coating damage, call on Apple to take action

A small cadre of Retina MacBook Pro owners are calling for Apple to replace or repair their laptops after discovering what appears to be irreparable damage to an antireflective screen coating layer, a problem the group has dubbed "staingate." -- AppleInsider.

Apple's App Store policies for streaming music apps under FTC scrutiny, report says

Apple's App Store policies for streaming music apps under FTC scrutiny, report says

Apple's content and media operations are once again under scrutiny by the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, which is studying claims that iOS App Store policy is illegally stifling competition in the music streaming market, a report said Friday. -- AppleInsider.

How to restore your iPhone from an iCloud backup

How to restore your iPhone from an iCloud backup

Since the introduction of iOS 5 in 2011, Apple has provided a simple, yet powerful way to restore your iPhone from a previous iCloud backup via either iTunes on a Mac or directly on the device itself. AppleInsider takes you through the process step-by-step. -- AppleInsider.

Video: iOS 9 multitasking on the iPad Air 2

Video: iOS 9 multitasking on the iPad Air 2

If you've read our overview of the iOS 9 Public Beta, you already have some idea how the iPad's new Slide Over and Split View multitasking features work. At this point, those of you with newer tablets may have installed the beta and tested them out yourselves. But if you have an older iPad or if you're waiting for a more stable build of iOS 9 to use, we've put together a quick video to show the features in action. -- Ars Technica.

iOS v. Windows and Immunity to Disruption

iOS v. Windows and Immunity to Disruption

The pattern of Mac growth exceeding Windows PC growth (and overall PC growth which includes the Mac) is old news. It has been observed for at least 20 years. So can we pinpoint with any accuracy the moment when the tipping point has been reached? -- Asymco.

How iCloud could save your Mac from El Capitan's destruction

How iCloud could save your Mac from El Capitan's destruction

As you may have heard, Apple released the public beta for OS X El Capitan yesterday. Since I tend to ignore the risks of beta software in favor of all the new features, I downloaded it on my mid-2011 MacBook Air. Do yourself a favor: don't be like me. Understand and acknowledge the risks of beta software. It'll save you time and data. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Music: Make Your Own Mixtape

Apple Music: Make Your Own Mixtape

If you'd like to send your friends and family your custom Apple Music playlists, it's really easy to do. It's sort of like creating a mixtape for them! Now that a ton of people have signed up for the service's free trial, it's also the perfect time to share playlists-everyone using Apple Music can listen to the music you choose. We're all about sending digital mixtapes to each other in today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

Mac Basics: The Finder organizes all of your files

Mac Basics: The Finder organizes all of your files

The Finder is the app that helps you navigate all of the files and folders on your Mac. The Finder lets you browse your apps, disks, files, and folders in a variety of ways. You can use the Finder to organize these items the way you want. You can also use the Finder to search for items, delete files you no longer want, and more. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

First look at the OS X El Capitan public beta

First look at the OS X El Capitan public beta

Apple announced OS X 10.11 El Capitan at its annual Worldwide Developer Conference, due to ship in the fall but with a public beta release to follow this summer. If you're just too excited about El Capitan to wait for fall, your chance to try out the next generation of OS X is coming this morning. Today, Apple will release the first El Capitan beta to users who have joined its public beta program.

Here's a first look at what to expect from the Public Beta, keeping in mind that El Capitan is still a work in progress and a lot can (and will) change between now and the release of the full, finished version in the fall. -- Macworld.

How to use iTunes Match: The ultimate guide

How to use iTunes Match: The ultimate guide

Apple has two music subscription services available for you: iTunes Match, and Apple Music. Let's talk about iTunes Match.

iTunes Match isn't the same as Apple Music. With Apple Music, for $9.99 a month, you can stream Apple's song catalog. With iTunes Match, for $24.99 a year, you can upload up to 25,000 songs from your iTunes music library to iCloud, where you can then stream and download them--DRM-free--to up to ten other registered devices in your possession. Here's how it works, how you can subscribe, and how you can get the most out of it! -- iMore.

I Learned the Hard Way: Don't Install iOS 9 Beta on Your Primary iPhone

I Learned the Hard Way: Don't Install iOS 9 Beta on Your Primary iPhone

I must have been taunting the software-update gods yesterday when I wrote that Apple advises people to install beta software on a secondary device, then promptly turned around and tried to install the iOS 9 beta on my primary device.

Don't do what I did. -- Re/code.

HTML5: 10 Tips That Will Change Your Life

HTML5: 10 Tips That Will Change Your Life

HTML5 is the future of the Web. Whether you're a developer or a power user, there are things you should know about the Web's new programming foundation. -- InformationWeek.

July 10Friday's News

 

Microsoft releases all-new Office 2016 for Mac to Office 365 subscribers

Microsoft releases all-new Office 2016 for Mac to Office 365 subscribers

Microsoft on Thursday announced that Office 2016 for Mac — a totally revamped version of its venerable productivity suite — is now available to any Mac user with an Office 365 subscription. -- AppleInsider.

Big pharma exploring Apple ResearchKit integration in for-profit efforts

Big pharma exploring Apple ResearchKit integration in for-profit efforts

Two pharmaceutical titans, GlaxoSmithKline and Purdue Pharma, are looking for ways to implement Apple's open-source ResearchKit framework into clinical testing and research and development operations, a report said Thursday. -- AppleInsider.

How to resolve Mail SMTP errors in OS X 10.10.4 and iOS 8.4

How to resolve Mail SMTP errors in OS X 10.10.4 and iOS 8.4

A change in the way OS X 10.10.4 and iOS 8.4 handles security keys has caused a number of users -- specifically those using Gmail -- to see SMTP send failures and even app crashes. Luckily, there's an easy fix for both users and system admins looking for a permanent server-side solution. -- AppleInsider.

This is the most outrageous government tirade against iOS 8 encryption

This is the most outrageous government tirade against iOS 8 encryption

Following the leaks by National Security Agency whistleblower Edward Snowden that began in the summer of 2013, encryption and encryption backdoors have become hot-button topics of discussion.

That's because many companies, including Apple and Google, have been going out of their way to encrypt products after the public learned that the US had embarked on a massive, legally and morally suspect electronic spying operation against its own citizenry and the global community at large. Fearing encryption is undermining their surveillance capabilities, government officials from the US and across the pond in the UK have been increasingly decrying encryption or at least demanding a government-accessible backdoor to unlock said encryption.

One of the latest rants against encryption occurred Wednesday. -- Ars Technica.

A quick hands-on with Office 2016 for Mac

Hs-on with Office 2016 for Mac

The first major update of Microsoft Office for Mac since the 2011 edition was released today and is available as a download for consumer and business customers of Office 365 with the proper subscription level. Home users of Office 365 can get the software from office.com/myaccount, while business users should navigate to the Web interface, click the settings gear, then click "Office 365 settings" and "Install and manage software." [My initial testing says that SEARCH in Outlook for OS X sucks rocks.] -- Ars Technica.

iPhone's encryption is so good, not even cops can get past it

iPhone's encryption is so good, not even cops can get past it

Law enforcement has a love-hate relationship with the iPhone. Features like Activation Lock have helped crack down on smartphone thefts, but there's always the lurking threat of someone asking Siri about 9/11 and accidentally dialing 911 in the process. -- Cult of Mac.

Fix your broken iPhone without breaking the bank with this easy-to-use DIY repair kit

Fix your broken iPhone without breaking the bank with this easy-to-use DIY repair kit

Too many of us are familiar with the resonant thud as our iPhone takes a faceplant onto the ground, letting us know without even looking that it's been busted. It's a huge inconvenience and expensive to get fixed properly, not to mention the psychological ache at having something we rely on taken out of commission. All of those issues are soothed with iCracked's iPhone 6 DIY Screen Repair Kit, available now for $114.99, a meaty 36% off of the normal price. -- Cult of Mac.

Toyota radio ad shuts down iPhones because drivers won't

Toyota radio ad shuts down iPhones because drivers won't

Let's be clear: It is incredibly dangerous to do anything with your phone while you're driving. You shouldn't be texting, checking your mail, or swiping through Tinder when you should be focused on all of the people and giant, dangerous machines around you.

But Toyota knows that despite all of the warnings and common sense, some people are just going to chance it anyway. So a new radio ad it's running in Sweden is taking the choice out of their hands. -- Cult of Mac.

Your hard drive is crowded with freeloading files, let this app help kick them out

Your hard drive is crowded with freeloading files, let this app help kick them out

Having a computer with a lot of storage space is just like having a house with a gigantic attic. After a couple years, the thought of actually sorting through your collection of long-forgotten items packed into the nooks and crannies becomes more and more frightening. Even the most diligent among us end up with forgotten heaps of digital detritus.

Disk Analyzer Pro is a great way to get your digital house in order, especially since Apple hasn't seen fit to make this task simple for Mac users. -- Cult of Mac.

How to prevent OS X from replacing text you type

How to prevent OS X from replacing text you type

There may be times in OS X where in typing an e-mail, paper, or other body of text, you may find some characters you type be immediately replaced by some alternative text. While useful in some instances, such behaviors can be a burden in others. For instance, if you write papers and find the system is automatically switching the sequence "^2" into a superscript 2, this may be to your liking but this will also prevent you from using Spotlight as a quick way to calculate the square of a value. In other situations you might similarly find yourself deleting the substitution. -- MacIssues.

Hidden Bias: When Algorithms Discriminate

Hidden Bias: When Algorithms Discriminate

Recent research has shown how some websites can produce results that perpetuate bias.

The online world is shaped by forces beyond our control, determining the stories we read on Facebook, the people we meet on OkCupid and the search results we see on Google. Big data is used to make decisions about health care, employment, housing, education and policing.

But can computer programs be discriminatory? -- New York Times.

Apple Invents Touch Screen Drop-Down Menus for all iDevices including Apple TV

Apple Invents Touch Screen Drop-Down Menus for all iDevices including Apple TV

Today, a new patent application published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office shows that Apple has invented a simpler drop down menu for future iDevices like an iPad Pro, iPhone and/or Apple TV. -- Patently Apple.

Cmd-Number Shortcuts For Safari 9

Cmd-Number Shortcuts For Safari 9

If you're a Safari user and you've updated to the Safari 9 or OS X 10.11 beta, you may have noticed a minor change in the default keyboard shortcuts for the app.-- Red Sweater Software.

Folderizing Office 2016

Folderizing Office 2016

In case you missed it, Microsoft just released Office 2016 for Mac. Well, released if you're an Office 365 customer. I am, so I downloaded the release version today. I'd been playing with the betas, and one thing bugged me: the installer wouldn't let you pick an install folder. -- The Robservatory.

One Man's Opinion: OS X El Capitan Beta Should Be Avoided

OS X El Capitan Beta Should Be Avoided

I cannot of course speak for everyone, but my experience with OS X El Capitan Beta has not been a positive one. Safari and Mail are both broken in different ways. Mail hangs when you launch it and you have to use Force Quit to get out. Safari hangs when you go to the second level on some SharePoint sites and in general behaves so badly I have had to switch to FireFox. My cursor got hung up for about 10-20 seconds this morning when I started-up. And it just may BBEdit go blank and I had to quit the application and open it again. At least I did not have to force quit or reboot. Caveat Emptor! Your mileage may vary. Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

The truth is just a download away: Why we need open source more than ever

The truth is just a download away: Why we need open source more than ever

Benchmarks are usually the way vendors lie to us. But there are plenty of ways. Sometimes we call it "marketing," but really it's just fraud, as Dilbert concisely captures.

Given the importance of technology, what with software eating the world, it's never been more important to make smart technology decisions. Unfortunately, we also live in a world that has become ever smarter about using big data to drive us to think and do things that may not be best for us or our companies.

This is why open source has never been more important. By making truth just a download away, open source dramatically changes how technology decisions are made. -- TechRepublic.

July 09Thursday's News

 

Apple issues third betas of iOS 9, Watch OS 2 & OS X 10.11 El Capitan to developers

Apple issues third betas of iOS 9, Watch OS 2 & OS X 10.11 El Capitan to developers

Testing of Apple's next-generation software platforms continues to move along, as developers on Wednesday were provided with the third beta releases of iOS 9, WatchOS 2 and OS X 10.11 El Capitan, ahead of their anticipated release this fall. -- AppleInsider.

iPad home screen folders now display 16 apps per page in Apple's new iOS 9 beta 3

iPad home screen folders now display 16 apps per page in Apple's new iOS 9 beta 3

In another move intended to take advantage of greater screen real estate on the iPad, folders in the latest beta of iOS 9 are now a larger four-by-four design, accommodating 16 apps per page. -- AppleInsider.

First look: Apple's News app debuts in latest iOS 9 beta

First look: Apple's News app debuts in latest iOS 9 beta

The newest pre-release version of Apple's next-generation mobile operating system brought the first public release of the company's News app, an app and cloud service unveiled at WWDC and designed to act as an aggregator for news and commentary. -- AppleInsider.

Flash Player update closes vulnerability identified by Hacking Team

Flash Player update closes vulnerability identified by Hacking Team

Adobe on Wednesday updated Flash Player to fix a number of security vulnerabilities, including one in the hands of Hacking Team, a company that infamously sold snooping tools and services to government agencies around the world -- potentially including harsh authoritarian regimes. -- AppleInsider.

Latest iOS 9 beta includes separate Photos folders for selfies, screenshots

Latest iOS 9 beta includes separate Photos folders for selfies, screenshots

With its latest iOS 9 beta, Apple introduced separate Photos folders for selfies and screenshots, a small but useful addition that could go a long way in cleaning up users' libraries. -- AppleInsider.

Hacking group that targeted Apple, others reportedly operating independently for profit

Hacking group that targeted Apple, others reportedly operating independently for profit

A hacking group that previously targeted Apple, Twitter and Facebook appears to be operating independently and for the explicit purpose of turning a profit on corporate secrets, according to a Symantec research paper released on Wednesday. -- AppleInsider.

Option for high-quality Apple Music streaming over cellular shows up in iOS 9 beta

Option for high-quality Apple Music streaming over cellular shows up in iOS 9 beta

It appears Apple is planning to give on-the-go Apple Music users the option to stream tunes at high bitrates when iOS 9 debuts later this year, as the latest beta released Wednesday includes a toggle switch for high quality audio streaming over cellular networks. -- AppleInsider.

Apple to remove Recovery Key from iOS 9, OS X 10.11 two-factor authentication process

Apple to remove Recovery Key from iOS 9, OS X 10.11 two-factor authentication process

Apple on Wednesday confirmed that the removal of a pesky Recovery Key security mechanism will be one of the changes coming to its two-factor authentication solution when iOS 9 and OS X 10.11 El Capitan are released this fall. -- AppleInsider.

Apple invents continuous handwriting input method, magnetically linkable earphones

Apple invents continuous handwriting input method, magnetically linkable earphones

A pair of Apple patent filings published Thursday reveal ongoing work on perfecting the mobile computing experience, including an intuitive continuous handwriting recognition system and a pair of earphones that snap together magnetically for easy stowage. -- AppleInsider.

Misunderstanding the genome: A (polite) rant

Misunderstanding the genome: A (polite) rant

A recent Ars feature story about genetic screening generated quite a lively debate in the discussion thread. However, it also underlined just how many misconceptions people have when it comes to genetics. Public perception hasn't been helped by scientists overhyping their findings or by inaccurate portrayals in the media (GATTACA, anyone?). So today, I'm going to try to clear some common confusions. -- Ars Technica.

DARPA on health tracking: 'Who cares about that stuff?'

DARPA on health tracking: 'Who cares about that stuff?'

If you think it's amazing that your iPhone can recognize your thumbprint and take your pulse, apparently you're in for some future shocks.

Dr. Justin Sanchez, program manager of the Biological Technologies Office at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency says that these basic biometrics are just the beginning for how our bodies could one day interact with technology. -- Cult of Mac.

Terminal: Viewing Your Command History in OS X

Terminal: Viewing Your Command History in OS X

Today's Quick Tip is about finding and looking through your command history in the Terminal program. Did you change the way your Dock looks (for example) through Terminal and then forget how you did it? This'll let you find out exactly what you typed in so you can reverse it easily. For those of us who like to tweak OS X, that's pretty darned useful! -- The Mac Observer.

OS X El Capitan Beefs Up Security with New Two-factor Authentication System

OS X El Capitan Beefs Up Security with New Two-factor Authentication System

Apple wants to make OS X El Capitan and iOS 9 less susceptible to attackers, so it's introducing a new two-factor authentication system to both operating systems. The new authentication system will be available in the public betas for both operating systems. -- The Mac Observer.

Serif's Image Editing App 'Affinity Photo' Launches for Mac

Serif's Image Editing App 'Affinity Photo' Launches for Mac

Professional image editing app Affinity Photo, created by the same team that's behind the award-winning Affinity Designer app, is today launching in the Mac App Store. Affinity Photo is designed to allow photographers to enhance, edit, and retouch images and is the culmination of five years of work. -- MacRumors.

Manage OS X always asking to use your keychain passwords

Manage OS X always asking to use your keychain passwords

The keychain in OS X should run seamlessly in the background to store and retrieve passwords for the various services you use. At most it should ask you for a password once or twice when you initially access a service, but there may be times when you regularly see messages pop up on your Mac that indicate a certain program or service is trying to access your keychain. When this happens, a dialogue box will appear with the words "PROGRAM_NAME wants to use the 'login' keychain' with an option to supply your password and confirm or deny the request. -- MacIssues.

About AirPrint

About AirPrint

With AirPrint, it's easy to print full quality photos and documents from your Mac, iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch without having to install additional software. AirPrint is built into most popular printer models, like the ones listed in this article. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Use iPad accessibility and assessment settings in education

Use iPad accessibility and assessment settings in education

Learn to use the iPad accessibility and assessment features so teachers can make the most of lessons and tests.

With Single App Mode and Autonomous Single App Mode, you can limit a student's access to a single application, and turn off any applications that you don't want them to access during a test. You can also limit a student's use to a single iPad application with Guided Access, but you can't manage the feature remotely.

We'll help you understand how these features work with accessibility settings like Speak Selection that might be appropriate for classroom instruction, but not during tests. For more information about iPad assessment features, see the Assessment with iPad guide. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to Configure OS X to Protect Your Privacy

How to Configure OS X to Protect Your Privacy

Setting up a new computer is hard enough, but if you're privacy minded, things are even more complicated. This is especially the case with a Mac, which keeps all kinds of stuff behind the scenes. Whether you're setting up a new system or installing a new version of OS X, now's a good time to check your privacy settings. -- Lifehacker.

How to use a VPN to keep your network data safe

How to use a VPN to keep your network data safe

We've spent the last two weeks looking at applications you can use to protect your computer from unauthorized access: Apple's built-in firewall for incoming access and Little Snitch for monitoring both inbound and outbound network access. But how do you keep people from looking at your network traffic while you're on public Wi-Fi networks, such as those provided by your ISP, your favorite coffee shop, or the local library? -- Macworld.

A Mac, A Movie, And The GIF Controversy

A Mac, A Movie, And The GIF Controversy

Way back in the day, back before Intel Macs, Safari, Firefox, or even Netscape, one of the two major graphic file formats for the newly minted public internet was GIF (the other being .JPG).

GIFs, the graphic interchange format, is a bitmap image format dating back to the 1980s. It supports up to 8 bits per pixel, up to 256 different colors, as well as animation frames. GIFs are everywhere even though newer formats like .PNG are improvements over the original. GIFs are not dead. They've been resurrected in a most unusual way. -- Bohemian Boomer.

What you need to know about Accessibility in iOS 9

What you need to know about Accessibility in iOS 9

With iOS 9, Apple continues to push forward its support for the accessibility community.

As Apple famously did with Snow Leopard on the Mac, this year's version of iOS primarily focuses on better stability and more polish. While there may be fewer "big" features in iOS 9, that doesn't mean that there are zero new things. If you're anything like me and Federico Viticci, champions of iPad productivity, then the tablet's new multitasking capability is headlining in itself. And, as I recently wrote for TechCrunch, Apple continues to push forward in its support for the accessibility community. -- iMore.

How to swap Apple Music Connect button for Playlists

How to swap Apple Music Connect button for Playlists

The new iOS Music app has five buttons of For You, New, Radio, Connect, and My Music. Connect is Apple's latest effort to use social media to connect fans and artists.

Poking around, I found you can disable Connect, which then will put Playlists in that space. This is the same Playlists feature that's was found as a tab in My Music. Once switched, My Music only shows songs without the Playlists tab. -- Insanely Great Mac.

Restoring tracks removed from My Music

Restoring tracks removed from My Music

While investigating the album view in My Music, I decided to see what would happen if I removed from My Music the one track I did own from the aforementioned album.

As promised, the track--and the associated album--disappeared from my Music app entirely. Not so helpful. No matter, I figured, I'll just go re-download the track from the Purchased list in the iTunes Store. Except it wasn't there. When I viewed the album itself in the store, however, it told me that I had in fact purchased the track--and I was pretty sure there was no way Apple was going to make me buy it again, as that would probably cause a full-fledged revolt. -- Six Colors.

More About the Cord-Cutting Scam

More About the Cord-Cutting Scam

As some of you know, I've been a customer of cable TV since the 1970s. Yes, the 1970s (cable actually dates back to 1940), when it was all about delivering decent signals from far-away stations in small towns. Things didn't begin to change until the FCC mandated that cable systems deliver original programming. In fact, I became host of a weekly press conference, a local variation of "Meet the Press," at a cable station near Philadelphia. But I stupidly failed to follow up on an invitation from a Philadelphia TV executive to drop in and talk, and so I never made the transition from radio. -- The Tech Night Owl.

July 08Wednesday's News

 

Apple touts 'tested to the limit' iPhone & iPad cases in new online store campaign

Apple touts 'tested to the limit' iPhone & iPad cases in new online store campaign

Apple on Tuesday updated its virtual retail outlet with a new section that describes the company's approach to testing and approving the third-party cases it stocks for the iPhone and iPad. -- AppleInsider.

Apple stops signing iOS 8.3 just one week after 8.4 release

Apple stops signing iOS 8.3 just one week after 8.4 release

On Tuesday, Apple quietly stopped signing the code for iOS 8.3, preventing people from downgrading to the release from iOS 8.4 using iTunes. -- AppleInsider.

Penn State researchers to investigate Apple Watch as learning tool

Penn State researchers to investigate Apple Watch as learning tool

An upcoming research program to be conducted by Penn State University staff is exploring the effect wearables like Apple Watch have on human behavior, with an eye on turning the device into a learning tool. -- AppleInsider.

Apple fixes VoiceOver bugs in update to iWork suite for iOS

Apple fixes VoiceOver bugs in update to iWork suite for iOS

Apple in a rare overnight update on Tuesday issued what appears to be critical fixes to accessibility features in all three iOS iWork apps, returning full VoiceOver navigation and editing functionality to Pages, Numbers and Keynote. -- AppleInsider.

Hacking Team leak releases potent Flash 0-day into the wild

Hacking Team leak releases potent Flash 0-day into the wild

Researchers sifting through the confidential material stolen from spyware developer Hacking Team have already uncovered a weaponized exploit for a currently unpatched vulnerability in Adobe Flash, and they also may have uncovered attack code targeting Microsoft Windows and a hardened Linux module known as SELinux. -- Ars Techinca.

Scary Internet Scam Becoming Disturbingly Common

Scary Internet Scam Becoming Disturbingly Common

Infected Web sites are trapping users by apparently freezing their browsers, making it hard to escape. These sites offer release either by offering help that is dangerously invasive or by demanding a ransom. Not actually malware, this social engineering attack has been called "scareware" or "ransomware." -- TidBITS.

Apple Music diary one week in: A massive missed opportunity, but I think I'm sold

Apple Music diary one week in: A massive missed opportunity, but I think I'm sold

I gave my first impressions of Apple Music on day two, and my main disappointment remains: despite putting both owned and streamed music into a single app, there is absolutely no real integration between the two. All the evidence suggests that Apple Music has no awareness of my owned music. -- 9to5Mac.

How To Mix Photos And Videos In A Collage

How To Mix Photos And Videos In A Collage

Photo collages are all the rage for iPhone users, and the iTunes App Store must have over 100 photo collage apps. There are plenty to choose from on the Mac App Store, too, but this new one caught my eye because it lets you drag and drop both photos and videos in the collage frames. -- McSolo.

Apple Watch sales may have fallen by 90 percent since launch

Apple Watch sales may have fallen by 90 percent since launch

Consumer interest in the Apple Watch may have dwindled significantly since the wearable was launched in April, claims new market research data.

According to a new market research report by Slice Intelligence shared with MarketWatch, US-based sales of the Apple Watch have fallen from 200,000 per day during the launch week to around 5,000 a day for the first few days of July. -- ZDNet.

Is Your Shirt Smarter Than You?

Is Your Shirt Smarter Than You?

Hats, shirts, socks: if you can wear it, there's a good chance it eventually will read your vital signs, show your stress levels and even tell you to cut back on your Thanksgiving turkey. -- CNET.

Your essential Siri and Apple Music guide

Your essential Siri and Apple Music guide

Using Apple Music on a compatible iPad or iPhone? Siri can help.

I've pulled together a short collection of Apple Music tricks for Siri. -- Computerworld.

BBC Reveals Its New Microcomputer Design

BBC Reveals Its New Microcomputer Design

The BBC has revealed the final design for its Micro Bit computer, a programmable board the size of a credit card they hope will inspire the same love of technology that the BBC Micro did in 1981. The Micro Bit includes an array of LEDs, buttons, and a motion sensor. It can be powered via USB, or by an add-on pack with AA batteries. It's not intended as a competitor to devices like the Raspberry Pi or the Arduino -- it is intended to complement them while remaining simple for educational purposes. In October, the BBC will begin distributing the Micro Bit to students in grade 7. They expect to give away about a million of them. Afterward, the device will go on sale, and its specs will be open sourced.

July 07Tuesday's News

 

How to make Apple Music do more with Siri voice commands

How to make Apple Music do more with Siri voice commands

While Apple Music has drawn a lot of comparions with other streaming services, like Spotify and Google Music, on iOS it does have at least one special trick: Siri voice commands. -- AppleInsider.

Apple looks to reinstate Home Sharing with iOS 9, Eddy Cue says

Apple looks to reinstate Home Sharing with iOS 9, Eddy Cue says

Following revelations that Apple disabled the popular music Home Sharing feature with its latest iOS 8.4 update, SVP of Internet Software and Services Eddy Cue on Monday said the company is working to restore services for iOS 9. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent adds magnetic drive actuation to UK-style foldable pin USB adapter

Apple patent adds magnetic drive actuation to UK-style foldable pin USB adapter

Continuing a seemingly never ending quest for smaller form factor products, Apple engineers dreamed up a compact folding pin USB adapter design with the convenience of push-button magnetic actuation, as detailed in a patent granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Tuesday. -- AppleInsider.

How to listen to Apple Music without burning your data

How to listen to Apple Music without burning your data

Apple Music is at heart a streaming solution, designed so that you can listen to any of the tens of millions of songs in its library at any time, assuming you have a data connection.

These days, though, unlimited data plans are the exception rather than the rule, so you might want to be a little less profligate with your use of such a data-heavy solution.

Apple Music allows you to save your songs, albums and playlists to your iPhone or Mac for offline listening, which could be a boon if you're watching your data cap.

Here's how to make that happen. -- Cult of Mac.

Future iPhones could be unlocked with a selfie

Future iPhones could be unlocked with a selfie

Apple may have banned selfie sticks at WWDC, but the company was today granted a patent revealing how future iPhones could be unlocked by snapping a quick photo of yourself. -- Cult of Mac.

How to Customize Apple TV to Show Only the Channels You Use

How to Customize Apple TV to Show Only the Channels You Use

We've been waiting for the fourth-generation Apple TV for at least two years now, and we've been teased with vague comments, leaks from the supply chain, and analyst predictions for several years running. We thought we'd get a look at it this year at the Worldwide Developers Conference, but Apple was still not ready to show it off. -- MacRumors.

'Hacking Team' Data Breach Confirms Firm's Ability to Infiltrate Jailbroken iPhones

'Hacking Team' Data Breach Confirms Firm's Ability to Infiltrate Jailbroken iPhones

Cybersecurity firm Hacking Team experienced a data breach earlier today, resulting in 400 GB of its documents being leaked onto the Internet, reports The Guardian. The documents confirm Hacking Team's ability to infiltrate and monitor jailbroken iPhones on behalf of government law enforcement agencies like the NSA, as noted by Macworld.

Fix Mail not sending or receiving messages after updating OS X

Fix Mail not sending or receiving messages after updating OS X

After having updated OS X to the latest version (currently version 10.10.4), you may find that while Mail will launch and display messages, it may not send or receive new ones. In some cases this problem is only in one direction, where you might be able to send messages but not receive them or perhaps receive messages but not be able to send them. These behaviors in Mail might seem a bit perplexing, but generally can be fixed with a few steps. -- MacIssues.

Apple Granted a Patent for an iPhone Dock with a Flexible Lightning Connector

Apple Granted a Patent for an iPhone Dock with a Flexible Lightning Connector

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 47newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's granted patent for an iPhone dock with a moveable connector. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Granted Patent 47 Today Covering a Secure Identity Service for iMessage and Power Adapter with Magnetic Actuator

Apple Granted Patent 47 Today Covering a Secure Identity Service for iMessage and Power Adapter with Magnetic Actuator

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 47 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's invention relating to a secure identity service for iMessage and FaceTime as well as a patent for a magnetic rotation actuator for a power adapter. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Artificial Intelligence That Makes Your Smartphone Smarter

Artificial Intelligence That Makes Your Smartphone Smarter

Startup Weave.ai is building an alternative to Google Now on Tap that can mine tweets for context and bring up relevant data in other apps on your phone.

Despite their ubiquity, smartphones are still not very helpful at getting you information based on what you're already doing. For instance, if you get an e-mail from a friend asking if you want to check out a new restaurant in town, you have to leave the app behind and go conduct a Web search to learn more. -- MIT Technology Review.

Google's Deep Learning Machine Learns to Synthesize Real World Images

Google's Deep Learning Machine Learns to Synthesize Real World Images

Give Google's DeepStereo algorithm two images of a scene and it will synthesize a third image from a different point of view.

Google Street View offers panoramic views of more or less any city street in much of the developed world, as well as views along countless footpaths, inside shopping malls, and around museums and art galleries. It is an extraordinary feat of modern engineering that is changing the way we think about the world around us. -- MIT Technology Review.

Google Could Reinvent Commuting

Google Could Reinvent Commuting

Google's Waze navigation app could slash commuting traffic if a carpooling service it is testing catches on.

Google became an Internet giant by reinventing how we get around the Web. Now it seems to be trying to reinvent how we get to work, and perhaps moving to compete with Uber. -- MIT Technology Review.

Finding Clues to the Next Apple TV in iOS 9

Finding Clues to the Next Apple TV in iOS 9

"Take Control of Apple TV" author Josh Centers hasn't given up hope on the device yet. He explains why the Apple TV isn't dead, reveals clues about the upcoming model, and weighs in on whether you should buy one now or wait for a new model. -- TidBITS.

Apple's MacBook SSD OEM Samsung, takes wraps off pair of monstrous 2TB internal solid-state drives

Apple's MacBook SSD OEM Samsung, takes wraps off pair of monstrous 2TB internal solid-state drives

Samsung today has announced that it will be adding a 2TB option to its 850 EVO and PRO 2.5-inch internal solid-state drive offerings. Previously, the largest sized capacity was 1TB for both models, which have been on the market since last year. These new models will ship with a hefty price tag to match the larger storage capacity. -- 9to5Mac.

Review: Apple Music offers great discovery & radio features, but has room for improvement

Review: Apple Music offers great discovery & radio features, but has room for improvement

Apple Music was a service that I was incredibly excited about when Apple announced it last month at WWDC. I've written a lot about music here at 9to5Mac and every time I explain how big of a music fan I am. When I'm in my office, I always have music playing, whether it be radio or a specific artist or album. For the past two years, I've been using Spotify for all of my streaming music needs. I never had a problem with the service, especially recently as it has upped the quality of both its iOS and Mac apps to be both more stable and feature-rich. A combination that is hard to come by nowadays.

Being the Apple fanboy that I am, however, I obviously had to give Apple Music a try. For the past week, I've been using the service as my exclusive source for music. How does it compare to Spotify? Is it enough to make me permanently switch? -- 9to5Mac.

Solving OS X problems: Finding old utilities, removing a partition, and migrating data

Solving OS X problems: Finding old utilities, removing a partition, and migrating data

This week, Mac 911 focuses on OS X and things that are missing or migrating. I answer questions about deauthorizing software on a Mac before a migration, where to find old Wi-Fi utility software and firmware, deleting a Fusion drive's extra partition, and a small array of Migration Assistant questions. -- Macworld.

Are you 'Colour blind' or is your brain tricking you?

Are you 'Colourblind' or is your brain tricking you?

How quickly can you tap the black square if the word shown is "black"? Probably pretty fast, right? Adversely, how fast do you think you can tap that black square if the word shown is "red"? This is what the new game Colourblind challenges you to do. -- AppAdvice.

How to override the Apple Music default features on your iPhone

How to override the Apple Music default features on your iPhone

Apple's new Apple Music app now defaults to recommending playlists curated to your taste. Here's how to bypass the recommendations and get straight to your music. -- Business Insider.

Wozniak Says 'Lot of Things Wrong' With Jobs Movie

Wozniak Says `Lot of Things Wrong' With Jobs Movie

Steve Wozniak, co-founder of Apple Inc., talks about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs and the movie "Jobs." He speaks with Emily Chang on Bloomberg Television's "Bloomberg West." -- Bloomberg Business.

July 06Monday's News

 

The state of the 64-bit transition in iOS, and what's left to be done

The state of the 64-bit transition in iOS, and what's left to be done

July just started, but the Apple rumor mill is already looking forward to September, the month when we tend to get new iPhones, a new iOS, and other refreshed Apple devices. Right now, the usual sources seem to think we're getting new iPhone 6Ses that add Force Touch and faster modems but are physically identical to the current models, none of which should be particularly surprising. Yesterday, people digging through the iTunes 12.2 release found some evidence of new iPods, which would be a surprise--the lineup's last significant update came in September of 2012. -- Ars Technica.

Vinyl records are still riding that big comeback wave, sales up 38% in a year

Vinyl records are still riding that big comeback wave, sales up 38% in a year

On Thursday, Nielsen Music released its 2015 US mid-year report, finding that overall music consumption had increased by 14 percent in the first half of the year. What's driving that boom? Well, certainly a growth in streaming--on-demand streaming increased year-over-year by 92.4 percent, with more than 135 billion songs streamed, and overall sales of digital streaming increased by 23 percent. -- Ars Technica.

The best consumer-grade Wi-Fi extender

The best consumer-grade Wi-Fi extender

After spending a total of 110 hours researching 25 different Wi-Fi extenders (and testing 10 of them), plus analyzing reviews and owner feedback, we found that the $100 Netgear EX6200 is the best Wi-Fi extender for most people right now. It costs as much as a great router and it shouldn't be the first thing you try to fix your Wi-Fi range, but it has the best combination of range, speed, flexibility, and physical connections of any extender we tested. -- Ars Technica.

How To Add Nickname, Photo to Apple Music Profile

How To Add Nickname, Photo to Apple Music Profile

Apple's new streaming Apple Music service has the option to include your nickname and even a user image as part of your profile. Kelly has the scoop on how to update that information and personalize your profile. -- The Mac Observer.

iTunes 12.2 and iCloud Music Library: A Disaster for Your Music Collection

iTunes 12.2 and iCloud Music Library: A Disaster for Your Music Collection

iCloud Music Library was introduced with this week's iTunes 12.2 and Apple Music release, and it's turning out to be a big bag of hurt. Instead of giving us a unified music library across all our devices, it's scrambling albums and tracks, and even adds DRM to songs you already own which will lock you out of albums you ripped from CD if you ever drop your Apple Music subscription. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Earns a Black Eye for Apple Music

Apple Earns a Black Eye for Apple Music

Any sufficiently large software project will have significant failure points. This is a lesson Apple has steadfastly refused to learn. It's not as if there weren't any warning signs. -- The Mac Observer.

iCloud Music Library and DRM: Now with Slightly Less Disaster

iCloud Music Library and DRM: Now with Slightly Less Disaster

Yesterday I called iTunes 12.2 and iCloud Music Library a disaster for your music collection, and part of my reasoning for that was the way copy protection is applied to tracks through the service. It turns out the rules for when that DRM gets applied aren't quite as draconian as I originally thought. But you know what? They're still pretty confusing for most people, and iCloud Music Library is still screwing up music collections when it shouldn't. -- The Mac Observer.

How Apple Music's Liking System Works to Customize 'For You' Recommendations

How Apple Music's Liking System Works to Customize 'For You' Recommendations

Apple Music's main draw is its focus on curation and its ability to learn about your music preferences to provide recommendations that suit your tastes. Apple's new Music app focuses heavily on content discovery, with an entire "For You" section dedicated to recommendations. -- MacRumors.

Apple Music Connect's 'Clunky' Posting Process Detailed by Indie Artist

Apple Music Connect's 'Clunky' Posting Process Detailed by Indie Artist

After the launch of Apple Music earlier in the week, many users began searching and following their favorite artists on Apple's new social platform Connect, which aims to showcase new songs, videos, and pictures to fans of artists like Pharrell, Dr. Dre, and more, directly within the app. The process that artists have to take to create content for their fans was unknown, until today, when app developer and indie musician of the band Airplane Mode, Dave Wiskus, posted a detailed summary on his blog of the steps needed to make a post on Apple's new social platform.

How to fix corrupted iTunes libraries after enabling Apple Music

How to fix corrupted iTunes libraries after enabling Apple Music

Apple's new Apple Music service offers new and exciting ways to get streaming music on your Mac and iOS devices; however, after enabling it a number of people are finding their music libraries becoming corrupted. While songs will still play, their titles, artist names and other metadata information have become switched around and are no longer associated with the proper song files. In some cases, the problem has affected thousands of songs, undoing extensive work users have put into organizing their libraries. -- MacIssues.

Safari 9 brings Responsive Design preview mode

Safari 9 brings Responsive Design preview mode

With the advancement of Web content towards mobile platforms, if you are a developer then you may need to test various sites on different devices to ensure compatibility. With Safari 9.0, Apple has introduced a new mode that allows you to view any Web page as if you are using a different device, such as an iPad, or an iPhone. -- MacIssues.

A Look at Apple's War on Big Data and Far Beyond

A Look at Apple's War on Big Data and Far Beyond

A new report published today notes that Tim Cook has launched an assault on Google and Facebook's Big Data model, even as most consumers remain in the dark about how companies use their personal information. Two different reports and two different privacy centric surveys were recently conducted on the matter with results that provide us with an insightful overview of the matter. -- Patently Apple.

Live Streaming: Social Control from Afar

Live Streaming: Social Control from Afar

Apps like Periscope will create a complex new relationship between broadcaster and audience.

Live broadcasts have been a staple of TV since its earliest days. But with Meerkat, Periscope, and other "live-streaming" apps, we have taken another step in reducing the barrier that distance poses to our interactions. We need to be prepared for the new dynamics that more participatory audiences bring. -- MIT Technology Review.

Why Wikipedia + Open Access = Revolution

Why Wikipedia + Open Access = Revolution

The way scientific information diffuses through the knowledge economy is changing, and the first evidence from Wikipedia shows how. -- MIT Technology Review.

Everything you hate about Apple Music & what needs improving before converting switchers

Everything you hate about Apple Music & what needs improving before converting switchers

Many have praised Apple Music's launch this week, although the focus has largely been on the free component of the service, a 24/7 streaming radio station called Beats 1. But how are users reacting to the rest of the Apple Music service? It received a lot of positive reviews in the media, but users have noticed some user experience issues and technical hiccups with Apple Music that might keep them from making a switch from the competition when the service's free three month trial is up. Since the issues aren't getting a lot of attention from the main stream media, I wanted to share everything we hate about Apple Music so far and what Apple needs to fix before converting potential switchers. -- 9to5Mac.

How To Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's pictures

How-To: Go beyond OS X Photos + make amazing wall art from your Mac's pictures

Apple knew it had something special to share with the world when it released iPhoto in 2002: in addition to printing 20″ by 30″ poster-sized photos, the original iPhoto's "most stunning feature" (according to Apple) was a page layout tool that quickly turned digital photo collections into printed hardcover books. These were Apple's acknowledgements that tangible photos still had value in a digital era, and it subsequently added calendars, greeting cards, softcover books, and letterpress cards to iPhoto. Apple's newer app Photos for Mac hides these options under the File menu at the top of the screen, and hasn't expanded on them, a shame considering how nice the results look. -- 9to5Mac.

OS X: Manually migrating data from another Mac

OS X: Manually migrating data from another Mac

If your computer is too old to work with Migration Assistant, you can manually copy your data from one computer to another using these steps.

Migration Assistant is the easiest way to move users, documents, computer settings and other items from an older computer to your new Mac. You can use it to migrate data from another Mac, or even from a Windows PC. If your original computer is too old to work with Migration Assistant, you can use the steps in this article to manually copy many of your documents to your newer computer. -- AppleCare Knowledge BAse.

Resolving Mail Problems After OS X 10.10.4 Update

Resolving Mail Problems After OS X 10.10.4 Update

Some Mac Mail users have discovered that Mail app misbehaves after updating to OS X 10.10.4 (and some with OS X 10.11 El Capitan betas) particularly with Exchange and Gmail accounts, but it can happen with other email provider services as well. Typically the problem manifests in one of a few ways; eMail logins suddenly stall or fail, Mail app fails to check for new email, Mail app fails to send emails, or Mail app just doesn't do anything at all and will basically hang on launch as a never-ending server connection is attempted but fails to establish. -- OS X Daily.

iTunes: How to Determine Where Your Music Is in the Cloud, and Whether it Belongs to You

iTunes: How to Determine Where Your Music Is in the Cloud, and Whether it Belongs to You

Because of the problem of iTunes adding DRM to your music files if you have an Apple Music subscription, iTunes users need a way to determine which files are theirs, which they have downloaded from Apple Music, which are matched, which are uploaded, and so on.

You can do this with a smart playlist. -- Kirkville.

How to Disable Force Click on MacBook Trackpads

How to Disable Force Click on MacBook Trackpads

Force Touch is an impressive haptic feedback technology that is rolling out through updated Apple hardware, with all of the newest model Mac laptops having a Force Touch trackpad included. The basic click functionality of Force Touch is often not even noticed by MacBook users, but one thing that is frequently discovered is Force Click, which is the secondary firm press that happens once a user has initially clicked on the trackpad but then presses a little harder. That second firm press Force Click functionality performs a variety of functions on the Mac, ranging from data detector lookups like dictionary and thesaurus, to Quick Look, to scrubbing video, it's multi-use and what exactly it does varies throughout different aspects of OS X and its applications. -- OS X Daily.

Free Ways To Encrypt Files On A Mac

2 Free Ways To Encrypt Files On A Mac

Who among the Mac faithful are not concerned about security and privacy? If you're not, then Google has a bunch of free apps you might like to use.

First if FileVault. You can use FileVault to protect the files on your disk from being seen or copied. FileVault disk encryption encodes the information stored on your disk so it can't be read unless the login password is entered.

This article also talks about using Disk Utility. Be aware that while the function sill exists in the latest verion of Disk Utility (15.1083) the interface has changed. -- BohemianBoomer.

Five hidden shortcuts in the new Music app you need to know

Five hidden shortcuts in the new Music app you need to know

Is your iPhone's Music app giving you a headache? Here are five hidden shortcuts that will make your life easier.

The new Music app packs a lot of functionality into itty bitty viewing space. As such, there are a lot of features in hidden in small and unusual corners that you might not have been able to find off the bat. Here are five quick tips for navigating the Music app a little bit smarter and faster, no headaches necessary. -- iMore.

14 (more) Apple Music tips

14 (more) Apple Music tips

Off to a great start -- most people love it, some slam it and competitors grouse about it, here are some hints to make better use of it. -- Computerworld.

Your Wi-Fi Network's Soft Underbelly

Your Wi-Fi Network's Soft Underbelly

You probably don't spend much time thinking about your wireless router--until it stops working, that is. Our inattention to routers has been a security problem for years, most recently last week when Brian Krebs reported that researchers at the Fujitsu Security Operations Center had discovered hundreds of routers were being used to spread a financial fraud malware called Dyre. -- Slate.

Network of Eyes

 Network of Eyes

Be My Eyes is an app that connects blind people with volunteer helpers from around the world via live video chat. Download now and start helping blind people see.

Dartmouth Contests Showcase Computer-Generated Creativity

Dartmouth Contests Showcase Computer-Generated Creativity

A series of contests at Dartmouth College will pit humans versus machines. Both will produce literature, poetry and music which will then be judged by humans who will try and determine which selections were computer made. "Historically, often when we have advances in artificial intelligence, people will always say, 'Well, a computer couldn't paint a sunset,' or 'a computer couldn't write a beautiful love sonnet,' but could they? That's the question," said Dan Rockmore, director of the Neukom Institute for Computational Science at Dartmouth. -- ABC News.

MacVolPlace will not be updated tomorrow because, as you know, tomorrow is the observance of the 4th, so we have a holiday. See you Monday and have a happy 4th.

July 02Tuesday's News

 

How to follow and get updates from your favorite artists in Apple Music Connect

How to follow and get updates from your favorite artists in Apple Music Connect

Connect, a Tumblr-like social network for musicians and their fans, is a tentpole feature of Apple's new streaming music service. AppleInsider takes a look at how easy it is to follow and get updates from your favorite artists using Connect. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's iOS 8.4 kneecaps Home Sharing, music streaming now limited to Apple TV

Apple's iOS 8.4 kneecaps Home Sharing, music streaming now limited to Apple TV

While Apple introduced an array of new music features with its latest iOS 8.4 update featuring Apple Music, it also quietly nerfed content serving functionality by apparently limiting Home Sharing to videos. -- AppleInsider.

Apple investigating ways to embed health sensors, fingerprint readers, chargers into iPhone logos

Apple investigating ways to embed health sensors, fingerprint readers, chargers into iPhone logos

In a seemingly never-ending quest to make thinner, lighter mobile devices, Apple is researching methods by which heart rate monitors, skin conductivity sensors and more can be directly incorporated into an iPhone's product logo. -- AppleInsider.

Did iCloud Music Library break your collection? Here's a fix

Did iCloud Music Library break your collection? Here's a fix

Several iTunes users have taken to the Apple Discussion forums to complain about iCloud Music Library -- part of the iTunes 12.2 update -- has destroyed their music libraries.

If this is happening to you, another Discussions user may have found a solution. -- Cult of Mac.

iCloud Music Library adds DRM without buying you dinner first

iCloud Music Library adds DRM without buying you dinner first

Well iCloud Music Library is pissing people off already. The new service almost identical to iTunes Match has a DRM problem. Turned on, iCloud Music Library is taking the music you rightfully own and place in your iTunes library and automatically adding DRM protection to it. In essence, it's placing a lock on music that's already yours. -- Cult of Mac.

If you live in one of these states, Apple may owe you some money

If you live in one of these states, Apple may owe you some money

This week, Apple lost its appeal on the antitrust case that the federal government and several state attorneys general filed on it concerning price fixing on ebooks. And now that that's out of the way, it's time for the company to pay up.

The green states in the map below were listed as plaintiffs on the class-action lawsuit, which means that if you live in one of them and have bought anything from iBooks, you may be entitled to a cut of the settlement. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple TV vs. Roku 3: May the Best Little Streaming Box Win

Apple TV vs. Roku 3: May the Best Little Streaming Box Win

It's no secret that Apple TV (Apple's streaming media device) is a bit long in the tooth. Many Apple aficionados, including yours truly, expected Apple to announce an update to the venerable little black box at its Worldwide Developer Conference last month. -- The Mac Observer.

OS X: How to Create Custom Radio Stations in iTunes 12.2

OS X: How to Create Custom Radio Stations in iTunes 12.2

In iTunes 12.2, which supports Apple Music, you can still create your own custom radio station. There are several ways to do it, and you can create a station from the song or the artist. John shows you how. -- The Mac Observer.

Fix the OS X Finder not displaying the contents of specific folders

Fix the OS X Finder not displaying the contents of specific folders

While rare, you might experience a problem in OS X where the Finder will not display the contents of specific folders. When this happens, you can usually browse other folders and open files and applications, but when you try to load the affected folders, the Finder will just sit with an empty window and display a revolving indicator at the lower-right corner (note that this is no the notorious spinning color wheel that commonly indicates hangs and other problems in OS X). -- MacIssues.

How to enable TRIM on third-party SSDs in OS X

How to enable TRIM on third-party SSDs in OS X

TRIM is a service that runs in your operating system and works with SSD hardware to track what blocks on the drive are unused, and then prepares them for writing. When put in use, TRIM can optimize SSD performance, especially on drives that are relatively full or used for storing and deleting large amounts of data. Until now TRIM support in OS X was reserved for Apple-supplied hard drives, but with the release of OS X 10.10.4, Apple has included a tool that allows for TRIM on third-party SSD devices. -- MacIssues.

A Mac-to-iPhone Handoff

A Mac-to-iPhone Handoff

How to set up hardware so that Macs and iOS devices share some tasks like phone calls and text messages from applications like Mail, Safari and Maps. -- New York Times.

Apple Music Is Strong on Design, Weak on Social Networking

Apple Music Is Strong on Design, Weak on Social Networking

The service brags that its playlists are curated by people not algorithms; on the other hand, its social network app needs retooling. -- New York Times.

Apple Music diary: Day 1, first impressions

Apple Music diary: Day 1, first impressions

I'm not expecting here to replicate my rather extensive Apple Watch diary series -- I doubt this one will run to four pieces. I'm also not starting out here as an Apple Music skeptic. I've been using Spotify for years, and -- from a brief trial of Beats Music -- started out pretty confident I would be jumping ship once Apple Music launched. -- 9to5Mac.

This Online Anonymity Box Puts You a Mile Away From Your IP Address

This Online Anonymity Box Puts You a Mile Away From Your IP Address

In the game of anonymity-versus-surveillance online, the discovery of the user's IP address usually means game over. But if Ben Caudill has his way, a network snoop who successfully hunts a user through layers of proxy connections to a final IP address would be met with a dead end--while the anonymous user remains safe at home more than a mile away. -- Wired.

Turning off Connect makes Apple Music better

Turning off Connect makes Apple Music better

Here's how to hide the Connect tab from Apple Music on your iPhone, iPad, and even iTunes on your Mac.

Connect is the part of Apple Music where you'll supposedly enjoy a close, personal relationship with the artists and bands you care about. But just artists, not your friends--unlike Spotify and Rdio, you can't build a list of your friends, see what they're listening to and enjoying, subscribe to each other's handmade playlists, or collaborate on a shared playlist, say, for an upcoming road trip or party. -- Macworld.

Apple Music has an iCloud problem: I don't trust it, so I can't get the most from Apple's new service

Apple Music has an iCloud problem: I don't trust it, so I can't get the most from Apple's new service

There's one fundamental problem with Apple Music that's crippling its potential for me and keeping it from becoming my one and only music destination -- exactly the thing Apple wants it to be. It's the way the service heavily leans on iCloud. Or more specifically, "iCloud Music Library." -- The Verge .

July 01Wednesday's News

 

Apple Music & Beats 1 launches hyped by Eddy Cue, Jimmy Iovine & Trent Reznor

Apple Music & Beats 1 launches hyped by Eddy Cue, Jimmy Iovine & Trent Reznor

To promote this week's launch of the subscription Apple Music streaming service, as well as the 24/7 Beats 1 worldwide radio station, the faces of Apple's music business -- Eddy Cue, Jimmy Iovine, and Nine Inch Nails frontman Trent Reznor -- stepped into the limelight once again, to explain how their new services are intended to stand out from the rest. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Music service goes live with redesigned app, out now in iOS 8.4

Apple Music service goes live with redesigned app, out now in iOS 8.4

Apple on Tuesday released iOS 8.4 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, officially debuting the Apple Music subscription streaming service, as well as the Beats 1 live radio station set to start broadcasting at 9 a.m. Pacific, noon Eastern. -- AppleInsider.

Apple releases OS X 10.10.4 with Mail, Photos improvements, 'discoveryd' fix

Apple releases OS X 10.10.4 with Mail, Photos improvements, 'discoveryd' fix

In addition to iOS 8.4 and Apple Music, Apple on Tuesday released OS X 10.10.4, making a variety of bugfixes including one solving problems caused by the infamous "discoveryd" service. -- AppleInsider.

Everything you need to know about Apple Music, Connect, Beats 1 radio, and more

Everything you need to know about Apple Music, Connect, Beats 1 radio, and more

Apple on Tuesday launched Apple Music, as well as companion services Connect, Beats 1, and Apple Music Radio. Together, the platforms represent a major push into the streaming music world. Here's everything you need to know about Apple Music. -- AppleInsider.

Apple SIM goes global: GigSky brings iPad data plans to more than 90 countries & territories

Apple SIM goes global: GigSky brings iPad data plans to more than 90 countries & territories

iPad toting travelers can now use their Apple SIM card in many more places internationally thanks to GigSky, which announced on Tuesday that it has struck a deal with Apple to provide high-speed wireless connectivity in more than 90 countries and territories across the world. -- AppleInsider.

How to hide the Apple Music subscription service & get back Playlists parent menu in iOS 8.4

How to hide the Apple Music subscription service & get back Playlists parent menu in iOS 8.4

Though heavily hyped, Apple Music subscriptions may not be for everyone. Those who want to remove the streaming service from their iOS 8.4 Music app, and gain back easy access to custom playlists in the process, can easily do so --?here's how. -- AppleInsider.

GarageBand 10.1 for Mac adds Force Touch, Apple Music Connect publishing

GarageBand 10.1 for Mac adds Force Touch, Apple Music Connect publishing

Apple on Tuesday released GarageBand 10.1 for the Mac, adding a number of features including Force Touch support and the ability to publish directly to Apple Music Connect. Accompanying it was a minor iOS app update. [Updated] -- AppleInsider.

How to save Apple Music songs, albums & playlists for offline listening

How to save Apple Music songs, albums & playlists for offline listening

Like Spotify and some other streaming music services, an important feature of Apple Music is the ability to temporarily save songs for when an Internet connection is unreliable -- or simply to avoid data caps imposed by cellular carriers. -- AppleInsider.

Apple adds TRIM support for aftermarket SSDs in OS X 10.10.4

Apple adds TRIM support for aftermarket SSDs in OS X 10.10.4

Some four years after adding TRIM support for first-party solid state drives to OS X, Apple incorporated the command for aftermarket drives as part of Tuesday's OS X 10.10.4 update. -- AppleInsider.

A quick tour of iOS 8.4's new Music app and the Apple Music setup process

A quick tour of iOS 8.4's new Music app and the Apple Music setup process

iOS 8.4 is here, and aside from fixing a few nasty bugs, its biggest new feature is a redesigned Music app. Music hasn't gotten any major tweaks since being redesigned for iOS 7, and the gallery above will walk you through the changes. In general, it's a visual and functional improvement, especially on the iPad, where it makes better use of the screen space. -- Ars Technica.

Apple releases iOS 8.4 with new Music app, fix for crashing bug

Apple releases iOS 8.4 with new Music app, fix for crashing bug

Apple has just released iOS 8.4, the latest update to its mobile operating system. The update isn't as wide-ranging as iOS 8.3, but it does add a few notable things--chief among them are a revamped Music app and a fix for a bug where a specific set of characters could crash the operating system. iOS 8.4 is available for the iPhone 4S and newer, the iPad 2 and newer, and the fifth-generation iPod Touch. -- Ars Technica.

Apple dumps 'discoveryd' and fixes Photos and Mail bugs in OS X 10.10.4

Apple dumps discoveryd and fixes Photos and Mail bugs in OS X 10.10.4

The next major release of OS X looms like some kind of mountain over some kind of park, but Yosemite isn't done yet. Today Apple released the final version of OS X 10.10, a bugfix update that comes almost three months after 10.10.3. -- Ars Technica.

Op-ed: Safari is the new Internet Explorer

Op-ed: Safari is the new Internet Explorer

Last weekend I attended EdgeConf, a conference populated by many of the leading lights in the Web industry. It featured panel talks and breakout sessions with a focus on technologies that are just now starting to emerge in browsers, so there was a lot of lively discussion around Service Worker, Web Components, Shadow DOM, Web Manifests, and more. -- Ars Technica.

A focus on discovery makes Apple Music a serious contender

A focus on discovery makes Apple Music a serious contender

I'm a streaming music junky. I gave up collecting, owning, and maintaining music files on my own Mac years ago and I've never looked back. It's the only sensible way to have access to millions of songs without having to worry about storing them. -- Cult of Mac.

A day with Beats 1: Eclectic, star-studded, but slightly meh

A day with Beats 1: Eclectic, star-studded, but slightly meh

Open your iOS 8.4 Music app and start listening. Beats 1 radio went live today at 9 a.m. Pacific time or 12 p.m. Eastern time, one hour after the launch of Apple Music itself. But is it any good? I'm your fellow music lover here to answer that question in as much depth as possible based on some first impressions. -- Cult of Mac.

Take a video tour around the iOS 9 beta

Take a video tour around the iOS 9 beta

The iOS 9 beta has been out long enough for me to give it a fair test drive and discover all that it has to offer. So in today's video, I'm going to give you a rundown of all the new features coming to your iPhone this fall. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Patches 45 Security Flaws in OS X Yosemite, Mavericks and Mountain Lion

Apple Patches 45 Security Flaws in OS X Yosemite, Mavericks and Mountain Lion

Apple patched some 45 security OS X Yosemite v10.10.4, which was released earlier on Tuesday. The company also released Security Update 2015-005 Mavericks and Security Update 2015-005 Mountain Lion. The security holes and bugs fixed services and technologies throughout the operating systems, and many of them allow the bad guys to take over your Mac. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Says iTunes 12.2 'Coming Soon' for Mac and Windows

Apple Says iTunes 12.2 'Coming Soon' for Mac and Windows

Apple's iTunes download page for Mac and Windows continues to offer iTunes 12.1.2, but the company added an "iTunes 12.2 coming soon" note. Apple Music, which launched earlier on Tuesday with iOS 8.4, requires iTunes 12.2 on Mac and Windows, and its absence has been greeted with annoyance and snark on the Interwebs. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple Music First Impressions: Convenient All-in-One Experience With Overwhelming Design

Apple Music First Impressions: Convenient All-in-One Experience With Overwhelming Design

As Apple Music gears up to launch in the next few hours this morning -- 9 AM Pacific to be exact, following iOS 8.4 at around 8 AM Pacific -- a few publications have posted some detailed first impressions of the the music streaming service. Getting to mess around with the app for the first time, Mashable, Re/code, The Loop and Rolling Stone came away with largely positive reactions to Apple's first foray into the music streaming game, although the large consensus hanging over it all was a tentative negativity regarding the app's overwhelming amount of content and the somewhat confusing UI that is used to navigate it all. -- MacRumors.

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind

Network scientists have discovered how social networks can create the illusion that something is common when it is actually rare.

One of the curious things about social networks is the way that some messages, pictures, or ideas can spread like wildfire while others that seem just as catchy or interesting barely register at all. The content itself cannot be the source of this difference. Instead, there must be some property of the network that changes to allow some ideas to spread but not others. -- MIT Technology Review.

Apple Music is Here, and It's Already Confusing Me

Apple Music is Here, and It's Already Confusing Me

The Apple Music strategy has worked in the past for Apple, most notably with the iPod, iPhone, and iPad, it's less clear to me out of the gate whether it will fare as well with Apple Music, which it built after acquiring Beats Music. -- MIT Technology Review.

How Ads Follow You from Phone to Desktop to Tablet

How Ads Follow You from Phone to Desktop to Tablet

Advertisers are increasingly using technology that targets users across multiple devices, and it's working.

Imagine you slack off at work and read up online about the latest Gibson 1959 Les Paul electric guitar replica. On the way home, you see an ad for the same model on your phone, reminding you this is "the most desirable Les Paul ever." Then before bed on your tablet, you see another ad with new details about the guitar. -- MIT Technology Review.

How to cancel/stop Apple Music subscriptions from automatic renewal after free trial

How to cancel/stop Apple Music subscriptions from automatic renewal after free trial

Apple Music officially launched today in iOS 8.4 alongside an integrated radio service featuring the 24/7 live streaming station known as Beats 1. Everyone is getting a free three month trial, but once that ends, Apple will start charging the credit card on your Apple ID with either the $9.99/month plan or the $14.99/month family plan (depending on what you selected when first signing up). If you want to cancel your subscription, or just keep it from auto-renewing so you can go month-to-month and manually activate it when you want, below we've put together a quick guide on how to do so across platforms: -- .

Apple seeds first developer build of Safari 9.0

Apple seeds first developer build of Safari 9.0

Apple has released the first developer preview of Safari 9.0. This update is available to developers via the Mac App Store on OS X Yosemite, in the Updates section.

Safari 9.0 is expected to be available later this year, and will contain a number of enhancements to the Safari experience. This includes better performance, as expected, but users will also be able to pin tabs, mute all of your tabs or specific tabs, and AirPlay web video without sharing your whole screen.

Hands-On With Apple's OS X El Capitan: Tiny Tweaks Make a Big Difference

Hands-On With Apple's OS X El Capitan: Tiny Tweaks Make a Big Difference

After the visual overhaul Apple gave to Yosemite, it's perhaps no surprise that this year's desktop and laptop refresh is altogether more muted. This is a step rather than a leap forward, but there are still a lot of little improvements that are worth the upgrade.

I've been working with OS X El Capitan for a couple of weeks now--the public beta opens up in July if you want to get involved, but I wouldn't recommend installing it on a primary machine just yet. Here are my first impressions of this almost-finished update to Mac OS X. -- Gizmodo.

Apple Music first look: It's all about curation, curation, curation

Apple Music first look: It's all about curation, curation, curation

Apple's long-awaited streaming music service, Apple Music, will launch on Tuesday.

Replacing the official music app on iOS, Apple Music combines your iTunes library and uploads with on-demand streaming, live radio and a new artist-centric social network.

There is a lot to uncover in Apple Music. In full disclosure, I had less than a day to play with the shipping version of Apple Music with iOS 8.4. Expect a full, complete review later in the week.

That said, here are my first impressions after using Apple Music. -- Mashable.

Tip: Want less Apple in your Music?

Tip: Want less Apple in your Music?

If you're finding Apple Music a little bit too much to take in, and would rather just go back to your habit of listening to your own music, well, there is some recourse, but not a whole lot. (You can't, however, go back to iOS 8's previous Music app--but let's all agree that's probably a good thing.) -- Six Colors.

iPhone Evolution: Photos Taken With Every iPhone Prove Apple Was Right

iPhone Evolution: Photos Taken With Every iPhone Prove Apple Was Right

In case you think a camera phone is all about the number of megapixels it packs, then a simple comparison between all iPhones released to date will show you that's not the case. The comparison also suggests Apple was right to stick to that 8-megapixel shooter on the iPhone 6 and use other means to enhance its photo and video performance, while competitors continued to fight in the megapixel war. -- BGR.

Apple Music Is For People With No Clue What To Stream

Apple Music Is For People With No Clue What To Stream

You're no DJ. That's the biggest problem with streaming services. A search box connected to the history of recorded music can be discouraging. You constantly have to know what to play next.

That's why Apple was so smart to make Apple Music all about telling you what to play next. -- TechCrunch.

June 30Tuesday's News

 

Apple Camp 2015 enrollment begins with moviemaking, e-book creation workshops for kids

Apple Camp 2015 enrollment begins with moviemaking, e-book creation workshops for kids

For the 2015 summer season, Apple is again inviting children aged 8 through 12 to participate in Apple Camp, a series of three-day retail store workshops designed to teach inquisitive young minds how to create rich digital content on iPad and Mac. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Music supports iTunes Match-like song uploads, 100k song limit in iOS 9

Apple Music supports iTunes Match-like song uploads, 100k song limit in iOS 9

We've known most of the big details about Apple Music since Apple officially announced it at WWDC earlier this month: it launches on June 30, it costs $10 per month or $15 per month for families of up to six people, and it comes with a three-month free trial that up until recently was causing some grief for Taylor Swift and other independent artists. But questions about how it would interact with other paid Apple services, most notably iTunes Match, remained. -- Ars Technica.

Find your way out of the subway faster with Apple Maps

Find your way out of the subway faster with Apple Maps

If you've ever taken a ride on an unfamiliar city's subway or transit system, you know how confusing it can be to know which specific exit to use to find the right above ground location you need to get to where you're going. -- Cult of Mac.

How to reset and re-pair your Apple Watch

How to reset and re-pair your Apple Watch

If your Apple Watch stops responding to your iPhone, you can reboot it or you can turn the Bluetooth connection off and on. If that doesn't work to reconnect your Watch, you might need to reset it, and then you'll need to re-pair it. -- Cult of Mac.

iOS 8.4 Coming Tuesday at 8AM Pacific Time Ahead of Apple Music Launch

iOS 8.4 Coming Tuesday at 8AM Pacific Time Ahead of Apple Music Launch

Apple will be releasing iOS 8.4 at 8AM pacific time on June 30, an hour ahead of the official Apple Music launch. The update will include support for Apple's new streaming music and Internet radio service. -- The Mac Observer.

How the USB-C Port on the New MacBook Helps the Battery Life

How the USB-C Port on the New MacBook Helps the Battery Life

There have been vociferous complaints about Apple's new MacBook thanks to its single USB-C port. However, it turns out that having only one port helps the MacBook in a very important way. How's that? John Martellaro explains. -- The Mac Observer.

Three useful workflow tips for OS X Terminal users

Three useful workflow tips for OS X Terminal users

Whether you are a seasoned Terminal user or just getting your feet wet, you may find yourself somewhat limited by the text based interface of the Terminal. Though powerful, the single line entry point, fixed font size, and scrolling history behavior of the Terminal's output may have you squinting, scrolling, and otherwise jumping through some hoops to see what you are working on. However, there are a few built-in tricks in the OS X Terminal that may help you overcome these frustrations. -- MacIssues.

Don't buy these overpriced knock-off Apple Watch charging cables

Don't buy these overpriced knock-off Apple Watch charging cables

Knock-offs of Apple's official Apple Watch magnetic charging cables are now available to purchase from Amazon, but with a twist: unlike the real cables, which Apple sells for $29 to $39, the knock-offs from companies such as "Reiko," "Somoder" and "WL" are going for $45 to $58. The $58 version is shipping now with delivery this week, while the $45 ones promise to ship at various times directly from China. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple patent details AirDrop-like sharing for Apple Watch using handshake/hugging gestures

Apple patent details AirDrop-like sharing for Apple Watch using handshake/hugging gestures

In a new patent application, Apple details an idea it's experimenting with that would have Apple Watch users shake hands to exchange data (via PatentlyApple). The idea is simple. The patent application imagines two Apple Watch wearers exchanging data, such as contact information, for example, by performing common gestures like a handshake or a hug. -- 9to5Mac.

How To Move your playlists from Spotify, Rdio, and more to Apple Music

How To Move your playlists from Spotify, Rdio, and more to Apple Music

With the launch of Apple Music just around the corner, music lovers currently subscribed to competing services like Spotify and Rdio may be looking to jump ship and give Apple's offering a try. Apple first confirmed in a Beats Music FAQ that there will be a Beats Music update that allows users to import their libraries to the newer service, but users with music collections elsewhere seem to be out of luck without any official migration tool. -- 9to5Mac.

About Mac notebook batteries

About Mac notebook batteries

Learn more about the battery in your Mac notebook including how to optimize the battery life, troubleshoot, and get service. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Determining battery cycle count for Mac notebooks

Determining battery cycle count for Mac notebooks

Use of your Mac notebook battery accrues in the form of charge cycles. A charge cycle means using all of the battery's power, but that doesn't necessarily mean a single charge. For instance, you could use your notebook for an hour or more one day, using half its charge, and then recharge it fully. If you did the same thing the next day, it would count as one charge cycle, not two, so it may take several days to complete a cycle.

Batteries have a limited amount of charge cycles before they are considered to be consumed. Once consumed, a replacement battery is recommended. You can use your battery after it reaches its maximum cycle count, but you may notice a reduction in your battery life. Knowing how many charge cycles are on your battery and how many are left can help you determine when a battery replacement is required. For optimal performance, replace your battery when you reach the maximum cycle count. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Apple Granted 45 Patents Today Covering Technologies behind the iPad Smart Cover, the iPhone 5 Design and more

Apple Granted 45 Patents Today Covering Technologies behind the iPad Smart Cover, the iPhone 5 Design and more

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 45 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we briefly cover two granted patents relating to Apple's iPad Smart Cover accessory and the iPhone 5 design. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Mac 911: A potpourri of OS X questions

Mac 911: A potpourri of OS X questions

We're taking a break from your hundreds of questions about Photos to answer a variety of OS X riddles. As always, please let us know if our answers helped or failed to solve the same or a related problem. -- Macworld UK.

Hands On: iOS 9 Preview for iPad Air 2: New multitasking features inject new life into iPad

Hands On: iOS 9 Preview for iPad Air 2: New multitasking features inject new life into iPad

Although there have been some clues that Apple has been planning to introduce split-screen multitasking on the iPad, it was still something of a surprise to see the feature finally debut at WWDC. The feature will make its debut in iOS 9, which is due to officially land sometime in the fall, likely around the time we see the next generation of iPhones and iPads. Similar functionality can be found in Windows tablets and some Android tablets, so what is it like on the iPad Air 2? -- MacNN.

Review: Apple's HomeKit needs more work, shows promise

Review: Apple's HomeKit needs more work, shows promise

One year after Apple announced plans to launch its home automation platform HomeKit, the company's first certified products are now being shipped to customers around the world.

The tech company's new smart home system isn't reliable, and needs more time to reach its full potential. -- Fortune.

June 29Friday's News

 

Rising number of T-Mobile iPhones hit with 'blue screen of death' reboots

Rising number of T-Mobile iPhones hit with 'blue screen of death' reboots

In recent days a growing number of iPhone owners on T-Mobile U.S. have been impacted by seemingly random crashes and reboots, without any clear indication as to why or how to solve the problem, according to reports and comments on social media. -- AppleInsider.

AppleCare+ battery coverage more generous for iPhones, iPads, Apple Watch

AppleCare+ battery coverage more generous for iPhones, iPads, Apple Watch

Apple on Friday made a slight adjustment to the terms of its AppleCare+ warranty for iPhones, iPads, iPods, and the Apple Watch, allowing people to get a free repair or replacement if their battery holds less than 80 percent of its original charge. -- AppleInsider.

Apple acquires dozens of biometric authentication patents from Virginia-based Privaris

Apple acquires dozens of biometric authentication patents from Virginia-based Privaris

Evidence that Apple is planning significant overhauls to its Touch ID fingerprint recognition system continues to mount, with the company reportedly acquiring more than two dozen biometric authentication patents from privately-held Virginia firm Privaris. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's iTunes U course on Swift is watershed in high school computer science education

Apple's iTunes U course on Swift is watershed in high school computer science education

In a groundbreaking first, Apple at this year's WWDC conference in June published an iTunes U course that provides educators with first party tools to teach the Swift programming language to high school students. -- AppleInsider.

OS X El Capitan beta references possible 4K Mac with quad-core Broadwell

OS X El Capitan beta references possible 4K Mac with quad-core Broadwell

The 27-inch 5K iMac was introduced in October and got a price cut in May, but it still hasn't been joined by a smaller, cheaper 4K iMac. According to references found in the latest OS X El Capitan developer beta, we may have one coming soon, and it could be using the quad-core Intel Broadwell processors that were introduced earlier this month. -- Ars Technica.

New "corner cloak" directs light around sharp bends

New

From fun-house mirrors to holograms, we have all experienced incredible optical illusions. Right now, scientists are fascinated by the prospect of finding a way to perform an even more challenging trick: hiding things in plain sight. -- Ars Technica.

Galaxy S6 beats iPhone 6 and everything else in 'real-world' speed test

Galaxy S6 beats iPhone 6 and everything else in 'real-world' speed test

Samsung's new Galaxy S6 has beaten out the iPhone 6 and other flagship rivals in a "real-world" performance test. The device came first in six out of nine challenges, which tested for things like Wi-Fi speed, camera load time, gaming performance, and video editing. -- Cult of android.

Lessons from having my MacBook stolen

Lessons from having my MacBook stolen

I want to spare you some of the pain that recently greeted me after a night out with friends. I returned to my car to find the rear window smashed out and my backpack gone. It contained my brand new MacBook and iPad. -- Cult of Mac.

OS X: Why You Need a Hard Drive Clone

OS X: Why You Need a Hard Drive Clone

We here at TMO are serious about backups, and we think you should be, too. Redundancy is one of your best protections against data loss! To help you make sure your backup scheme is bulletproof, this Quick Tip is all about clones, why you might need one, and how to set one up. -- The Mac Observer.

Several Ways to Create Space On Your Mac

Several Ways to Create Space On Your Mac

With platter/spinning drives on the way out, the days of easily getting a terabyte of storage in a laptop or even an iMac are perhaps not over, but you can certainly see the end from here. This means even if you do buy a new lighter laptop with a better processor and screen, it still might feel like a downgrade. Where can you put all your stuff? There are a few ways you can "create" more space on your machine without having to pay an arm and a leg for more storage. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Safely Disable iCloud Photo Library and Reclaim Space for iCloud Backups

How to Safely Disable iCloud Photo Library and Reclaim Space for iCloud Backups

Sick and tired of having your iOS devices tell you you're out of iCloud storage and can't backup? Disabling iCloud Photo Library can free up gigabytes of space, but it must be done with care so as to be sure you don't miss anything. -- The Mac Observer.

Hidden Features in iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan

Hidden Features in iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan

iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan have been available to developers for two weeks now, giving us time to discover all of the little features in both operating systems that weren't discussed during the keynote event. We've created two videos that highlight some of the small but neat additions to iOS 9 and OS X El Capitan, which you can watch below. -- MacRumors.

Applied Science: The Mouth Is Mightier Than the Pen

Applied Science: The Mouth Is Mightier Than the Pen

The written word may not be the best way to impress, a new study shows. A better bet: Use your voice.

Few methods beat email for sending communication blasts, getting a note in front of a far-flung sales prospect or employer, or attaching pictures and documents.

Too bad about the downside: You may not sound your smartest. -- New York Times.

Why content-blocking on iOS means advertisers, ad networks, publishers & readers all need to up their games

Why content-blocking on iOS means advertisers, ad networks, publishers & readers all need to up their games

Ads are things we all love to hate. While some can be amusing, and others can be useful, drawing our attention to products or services we weren't aware of, mostly we view them as things to tolerate at best -- and to be profoundly irritated by at worst. -- 9to5Mac.

Mac Basics: Multi-Touch gestures

Mac Basics: Multi-Touch gestures

Tap, scroll, pinch, and swipe your way through your Mac with Multi-Touch gestures, directly controlling what's on your screen in a more fluid, natural, and intuitive way. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

Make a call over Wi-Fi

Make a call over Wi-Fi

Learn about making a voice call over Wi-Fi using the Wi-Fi Calling feature on your iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, or iPhone 6 Plus.

Wi-Fi Calling is available for T-Mobile and Sprint in the United States and EE in the United Kingdom. You need an iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s, iPhone 6, or iPhone 6 Plus. Your device needs to be using the latest version of iOS 8 and have a Wi-Fi Internet connection. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

You're doing it wrong: A negative Watch review, hold the hate

You're doing it wrong: A negative Watch review, hold the hate

The Macalope's been blasting his anti-Watch diatribe zone pretty hard over the last few months and it's really starting to show. He's never looked more fit.

But his personal trainer and life coach, Esteban, recently suggested he's been neglecting his logicus maximus. It lacks tone and groans at the slightest strain. Fortunately, it turns out there are opinion pieces about the Apple Watch that are negative without being completely jacktastic. -- Macworld.