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July 29Friday's News


Apple's security chief to go behind the scenes of iOS security during upcoming BlackHat USA 2016 briefing

Apple's security chief to go behind the scenes of iOS security during upcoming BlackHat USA 2016 briefing

Apple is planning on discussing various aspects of iOS 10 security in "unprecedented detail" at the upcoming BlackHat USA 2016 security conference. Ivan Krstic, head of Apple Security Engineering and Architecture, will give a 50-minute briefing to discuss cryptographic design, the Secure Enclave found in Touch ID-enabled devices, and a new JIT hardening mechanism in iOS 10. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Xcode 8 beta now secured with digital signatures in .xip format

Apple Xcode 8 beta now secured with digital signatures in .xip format

Article Image Apple has implemented the .xip file compression protocol with digital signatures for its newest Xcode 8 beta distribution, instead of the unsecured .zip format, guaranteeing that the contents have not changed since initial creation. -- AppleInsider.

Apple patent filing shows future potential of Touch ID not tied to a button

Apple patent filing shows future potential of Touch ID not tied to a button

Article Image A patent filing made public today stems directly from the Apple purchase of biometric company AuthenTec, and could lead to future iPhones and iPads using part or all of the touchscreen to act a Touch ID sensor. -- Appleinsider.


Apple updates iMovie for iOS with easy project creation, new sharing options

Apple updates iMovie for iOS with easy project creation, new sharing options

Article Image In an update to its iMovie consumer level video editing software for iOS released on Thursday, Apple introduced a method of quickly creating projects from batch selected photos and video, as well as a new suite of content sharing options. -- AppleInsider.


Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they're all over the Web)

Dark Patterns are designed to trick you (and they're all over the Web)

It happens to the best of us. After looking closely at a bank statement or cable bill, suddenly a small, unrecognizable charge appears. Fine print sleuthing soon provides the answer--somehow, you accidentally signed up for a service. Whether it was an unnoticed pre-marked checkbox or an offhanded verbal agreement at the end of a long phone call, now a charge arrives each month because naturally the promotion has ended. If the possibility of a refund exists, it'll be found at the end of 45 minutes of holding music or a week's worth of angry e-mails.

Everyone has been there. So in 2010, London-based UX designer Harry Brignull decided he'd document it. Brignull's website, darkpatterns.org, offers plenty of examples of deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces. These dark patterns trick unsuspecting users into a gamut of actions: setting up recurring payments, purchasing items surreptitiously added to a shopping cart, or spamming all contacts through prechecked forms on Facebook games. -- Ars Technica.

The most popular product of all time

The most popular product of all time

The following is a list of the best-selling products across several categories:

  1. Car model: VW Beetle 21.5 million
  2. Car brand: Toyota Corolla 43 million
  3. Music Album: Thriller 70 million
  4. Vehicle: Honda Super Cub 87 million
  5. Book Title: Lord of the Rings 150 million
  6. Toy: Rubik's Cube 350 million
  7. Game console: Playstation 382 million
  8. Book series: Harry Potter Series 450 million
  9. Mobile Phone: iPhone 1 billion

The iPhone is not only the best selling mobile phone but also the best selling music player, the best selling camera, the best selling video screen and the best selling computer of all time.

It is, quite simply, the best selling product of all time.

It is that because it is so much more than a product. It is an enabler for change. It unleashed forces which we are barely able to perceive, let alone control. It changed the world because it changed us.

And it did all that in less than nine years. One has to wonder what it will enable in the next nine. -- Asymco.

How to use Tabs in MacOS Sierra to get your docs in a row

How to use Tabs in MacOS Sierra to get your docs in a row

Imagine if every time you opened a new tab in your web browser it instead opened an entirely new window on your desktop. It would basically mean living like an animal, right?

However, while we have long since gotten used to being able to easily switch between tabs while browsing the internet, things aren't always so straightforward if you're using other apps -- be it Maps, Keynote, Pages, or some other third-party app.

Fortunately that's all changing thanks to the new tabs feature on macOS Sierra. Here's what you need to know if you're running the new operating system, which is currently in public beta and will be released this fall. -- Cult of Mac.

Protecting Your Privacy in Safari for iOS

Protecting Your Privacy in Safari for iOS

Safari iOS iconEvery time you visit a website on your iPhone or iPad, you are sharing information about yourself with the outside world. This guide runs through a number of methods you can use to gain more control over what gets shared, and who it gets shared with, whenever you use Apple's Safari browser to access the web on an iOS device. -- MacRumors.

Apple Advances Work on Quantum Dot Displays for Future Macs, iOS Devices & Possible TV

Apple Advances Work on Quantum Dot Displays for Future Macs, iOS Devices & Possible TV

While we know that Apple's next display shift will be to OLED for their 2017 Anniversary edition iPhone, Apple is always looking to the next wave technology just on the horizon. So what's beyond OLED? At the moment, many think the next trend points to Quantum Dot LED or QDLED. -- Patently Apple.

OS X Preview: Clipping Out Backgrounds Using Instant Alpha

OS X Preview: Clipping Out Backgrounds Using Instant Alpha

Today's Quick Tip is on how to use Preview's Instant Alpha tool, so if you've got an image on a colored background, for example, you can clip that baby right out. Better-looking graphics with no Photoshop required? We love it. -- The Mac Observer.

My Year With the Stellar 2015 MacBook and Life With USB-C

My Year With the Stellar 2015 MacBook and Life With USB-C

John has had his 2015 MacBook with its single USB-C port for a little over a year now. Here's his complete first report on life with that Macintosh notebook and daily life with USB-C. Did he regret an early engagement with USB-C? Read on. -- The Mac Observer.

Apple issues urgent iPhone update to fix security flaw

Apple issues urgent iPhone update to fix security flaw

Apple has an urgent message for iPhone and iPad owners: Make sure you download the newest iOS update for your device.

The latest updates -- iOS 9.3.3 on iPhones and iPads, as well as OS X 10.11.6 for computers, tvOS 9.2.2 for Apple TV and watchOS 2.2.2 -- patches a hole that could let a hacker steal information from your device. -- WPVI Philadelphia.

Comparing iPad Pro Technologies and Intangibles

Comparing iPad Pro Technologies and Intangibles

Apple's emphasis with the iPad Pro is on productivity, an angle I've embraced with gusto. Though I have long been fond of writing and doing other work on an iPad, the iPad Pro has taken over for an Apple laptop as my preferred workhorse while on the go.

The question is, which iPad Pro? There's the rub. -- TidBITS.

iOS 10 Has Two Underrated Features That Will Come In Handy

iOS 10 Has Two Underrated Features That Will Come In Handy

When Apple announced iOS 10 last month, some of the highlights included updates being made to the lock screen, the Photos app, the Maps app, the Messages app, a new Home app for controlling Internet of Things devices and voicemail transcriptions. But there are several nifty features that Apple AAPL +1.27% did not announce on stage. Two of those features were recently discovered by developers that tested betas of iOS 10: warnings about unsecured Wi-Fi networks and wet Lightning cables. -- Forbes.

July 28Thursday's News


How to use Messages to play videos and preview links in MacOS Sierra

How to use Messages to play videos and preview links in MacOS Sierra

MacOS Sierra has a ton of neat features that'll change the way you work using your Mac. The ability to play videos inside Messages probably isn't one of them, but it's certainly a nice touch that makes chatting to your friends and sharing content that much better. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Maps will help you find open parking spots

Apple Maps will help you find open parking spots

Finding a parking garage with plenty of empty spaces is about to get a whole lot easier in Apple Maps.

To give Apple Map users more data about parking lots and garages around the world, Apple has partnered up with Parkopedia which provides detailed info on more that 40 million parking spots in 75 countries around the world, making the hassle of parking a bit more bearable. -- Cult of Mac.

'Microsoft Pix' for iOS Introduces Smart AI to Automatically Adjust Photos

'Microsoft Pix' for iOS Introduces Smart AI to Automatically Adjust Photos

Microsoft today launched a new camera app for iOS devices called Microsoft Pix, which uses an artificial intelligence to adjust settings, choose the best photos, and automatically enhance each picture you take. The app will work on the iPhone 5s or newer, running iOS 9.0 or newer, with the company planning an Android release in the future. It did, however, remain curiously silent on introducing the new app's features into its own Windows Phone line. -- MacRumors.

Become a Maestro of Mac Macros

Become a Maestro of Mac Macros

The OS X (soon to be macOS) Dictionary defines a maestro as, "a great performer, especially a musician." The application Keyboard Maestro from Stairways Software isn't a musician, but it's a great performer, especially when it comes to creating macros that save time and effort. I'd be hard-pressed to name another Mac app that saves me as much time or as many keystrokes every day.

Simply put, Keyboard Maestro makes macros, but to call it a mere macro-maker is a disservice. Yes, it's a macro-maker, but it's much more than that. -- The Mac Observer.

New York DA Wants Apple, Google To Roll Back Encryption

New York DA Wants Apple, Google To Roll Back Encryption

Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus Vance Jr. called on Apple and Google to weaken their device encryption, arguing that thousands of crimes remained unsolved because no one can crack into the perpetrators' phones. -- Tom's Guide.

Apple is spending a ton of money on products we haven't seen yet

Apple is spending a ton of money on products we haven't seen yet

Apple is now spending more on research than most major car companies, and only a little less than companies like Google and Facebook, both of which are building drones, and working on other zany, expensive projects, like household robots, internet-beaming weather balloons, and virtual reality. All of these likely cost a fair bit more than the research required to revamp the next iPad. -- Quartz.

An Early Look At macOS Sierra Photo Searching

An Early Look At macOS Sierra Photo Searching

A very exciting new feature of the Photos app in macOS Sierra is the ability to search your Photos library for objects. For instance, you can search for 'boat' and it will show you pictures in your library that have a boat. Take a look at how this feature works. -- MacMost.

Apple And The Future Of Email

Apple And The Future Of Email

Email is alive and well and still remains the killer app of the internet era. Alright, not so much alive and well as it is barely tolerated. But there are plenty of email apps these days. -- Mac360.

Now More Ways To Hack Your Mac

Now More Ways To Hack Your Mac

Hardly a day goes by when online technology websites reveal yet another sizable hack of personal data from government, education, hospitals, banks, credit card companies, and even the Mac itself. -- BohemianBoomer.

What I saw at the SigGraph computer graphics fair

What I saw at the SigGraph computer graphics fair

Held across the street from Disneyland, the trade show is the holy grail of computer graphics and, increasingly, for mobile graphics, virtual reality and augmented reality. -- Recode.

Using a wireless keyboard? Your passwords can easily be spied on

Using a wireless keyboard? Your passwords can easily be spied on

People using low-cost wireless keyboards are at risk of having their passwords read, according to researchers.

Eight major keyboard brands accounting for millions of devices in use across the world were shown to have a security hole that could let hackers up to 100m away read every letter a victim types. -- Telegraph.

Notebook players less keen to adopt USB Type C

Notebook players less keen to adopt USB Type C

Currently, Apple has decided to adopt the USB Type-C interface for its MacBook Air, while Asustek Computer and Hewlett-Packard (HP) are upgrading one of their notebooks' regular USB port to the Type-C. Lenovo, Acer and Dell are still evaluating the option. -- DigiTimes.

Why Your Phone Battery Dies When It Still Has Juice

Why Your Phone Battery Dies When It Still Has Juice

You're plugging along with 3 percent battery and that Snorlax is one block away. Then, less than a minute later your phone is dead, the Snorlax is gone, and you are miserable. There are a two reasons for this. One: you're playing Pokémon Go and need to stop. Two: figuring out how your battery holds a charge is less science and more witchcraft. -- Gizmodo.

Why You Should Really Buy a Laptop With an SSD (Really!)

Why You Should Really Buy a Laptop With an SSD (Really!)

You wouldn't buy a brand-new car with a Ford Model T engine. So why would you merge onto the information superhighway with a laptop that uses an old-school mechanical hard drive? If you want a fast, responsive notebook ─ and why wouldn't you ─ you have to get a solid-state drive (SSD). -- LAPTOP Magazine.

This is the best way to upgrade your MacBook's storage without having to take it apart

This is the best way to upgrade your MacBook's storage without having to take it apart

Since Apple started to focus on making their products thinner and lighter, they've become significantly more difficult to upgrade. Laptops have always been less user-friendly in this way, but up until a few years ago, you could easily upgrade a MacBook's hard drive and RAM. -- Business Insider.


Why email is dead to me: I have 110,000 unread messages, and I don't care.

Why email is dead to me: I have 110,000 unread messages, and I don't care.

How do you lose control of an email inbox? "Two ways. Gradually, and then suddenly," as Ernest Hemingway once wrote.

For me, the latter part happened early this year, when I realized I was seeing second and third email reminders from friends or tech contacts I wanted to follow. The incoming flow of email had become so overwhelming that it was pushing down important messages past the bottom of the screen before I could even mentally register them. -- CNET.

Your Email Is Never Going to Be Safe

Your Email Is Never Going to Be Safe

There is only one way for you, or Microsoft, or the government to really make communications private.

I give Microsoft some credit for fighting the government over access to its customers' accounts. This battle is not over, but suffice it to say the government will always win and get what it wants in an era of ever-increasing terrorism. -- PC Magazine.

July 27Wednesday's News


New guidelines may push Apple to switch away from SMS for two-factor authentication

New guidelines may push Apple to switch away from SMS for two-factor authentication

Article Image Newly-published guidelines could lead Apple and other companies to find an alternative to SMS for two-factor authentication, such as dedicated apps, according to reports.,

The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology has published a public preview of upcoming documents which specifically recommend against using SMS as an "out of band authenticator," TechCrunch noted. Such systems -- in Apple's case used to authenticate Apple IDs -- can send a verification code to a smartphone, which then has to be entered on the original device a person is trying to use. -- AppleInsider.

Microsoft Office 365 gains machine learning writing style assistant, research tool

Microsoft Office 365 gains machine learning writing style assistant, research tool

Article Image New updates are coming to Microsoft's Office 365, including artificial intelligence driven writing style coaches and research assistants in Word, plus the addition of "Focused Inbox" email management to macOS.

The Microsoft Word Researcher is a new service announced today intended to assist users in locating sources for scientific papers, and other similar works. The forthcoming addition to Word implements Microsoft's Bing Knowledge Graph to corral relevant content, with proper accreditation. -- AppleInsider.

New attack bypasses HTTPS protection on Macs, Windows, and Linux

New attack bypasses HTTPS protection on Macs, Windows, and Linux

A key guarantee provided by HTTPS encryption is that the addresses of visited websites aren't visible to attackers who may be monitoring an end user's network traffic. Now, researchers have devised an attack that breaks this protection. -- Ars Technica.

California closes the Steve Jobs license plate loophole

California closes the Steve Jobs license plate loophole

One of the many things Steve Jobs was famous for was his refusal to put a license plate on the back of his car, a Mercedes-Benz SL55 AMG. Jobs--or someone close to him--spotted a loophole in California DMV regulations allowing six months of grace before a license plate had to be attached to a new car. As a result, the Apple supremo maintained a rolling six-month lease on a series of new SL55 AMGs, replacing one with another just before the grace period ran out. -- Ars Technica.

Redesigned Firefox for iOS Claims Faster Load Times, Less Battery Drain

Redesigned Firefox for iOS Claims Faster Load Times, Less Battery Drain

Firefox has released an update for its iOS browser that offers interface improvements and a faster browsing experience.

Firefox v5.0 promises faster web page loading times combined with significant battery savings, according to the browser's development team. Mozilla claims up to a 40 percent reduction in CPU usage and up to a 30 percent reduction in memory usage, although it notes results may vary between users. -- .

Easy Editing for Mac Photos

Easy Editing for Mac Photos

Like other image-editing programs that include a "one-click fix" or "auto-correct" type of button, the Enhance feature in Apple's Photos for OS X (and iOS) analyzes the photo and adjusts the color and contrast to hopefully improve the overall look. The changes may work better on some photos than others, but increasing color and contrast often brightens up pictures. [Double click on a photo and then click on the EDIT button to see the tools.] -- New York Times.


iOS Messages: Leaving Group Conversations

iOS Messages: Leaving Group Conversations

This Quick Tip is all about a neat Messages feature called "Leave this Conversation." Melissa Holt will discuss why you need it and why you might not be able to use it in certain situations. -- The Mac Observer.

Tim Cook: 'Think of Apple TV as a Foundation for Broader Business'

Tim Cook: 'Think of Apple TV as a Foundation for Broader Business'

It might be tempting to think about the Apple TV as a hardware device, and its associated revenue combined with apps that deliver content and the associated revenue collected by Apple. But, during Apple's 2016 Q3 earnings report, CEO Tim Cook said that we should think about the Apple TV in a different way. -- The Mac Observer.

Why Your Phone's Battery Meter Is Wrong

Why Your Phone's Battery Meter Is Wrong

Has your iPhone ever died, even though it claimed to have charge left? The Wirecutter goes over the complex reasons why mobile device battery meters are often so inaccurate. The article describes the disparate variables that go into computing remaining battery charge and concludes that battery meters can, at best, provide only a guess of charge remaining. -- The Wirecutter.

Personal Mac Databases Are Alive And Well

Personal Mac Databases Are Alive And Well

Way back in the day, back when personal computing was more or less the domain of wannabe geeks and certified technologists, personal databases were a big deal.

Through FileMaker Pro, Apple provides database power and convenience in a cross platform package that encourages customizable databases for businesses, but not for the masses. Bento, FileMaker's foray into a more personal database product, failed, and when it did, personal Mac databases seems to have died, too. Almost. But not quit -- Mac360.

Apple Music's big iOS 10 redesign fails to impress: Thought Apple Music couldn't get any more cluttered or complicated? Think again.

Apple Music's big iOS 10 redesign fails to impress: Thought Apple Music couldn't get any more cluttered or complicated? Think again.

One of the most anticipated features in iOS 10 was the redesign of Apple Music, but don't hold your breath.

When Apple Music first launched just over a year ago, it received mixed reviews because of its cluttered user interface. So, in iOS 10, Apple promised for a more streamlined experience with bold text, a cleaner look, and the demotion of the Connect tab. But was it enough? -- Macworld.

How To Enable Screen Filters To Compensate For Color Blindness In iOS 10

How To Enable Screen Filters To Compensate For Color Blindness In iOS 10

Smartphones have played an incredible, possibly even unpredictable role in helping people with disabilities live a more normal life. Technology on a whole has played a key role in this regard but personal devices like smartphones and smartwatches provide incredible support where compensating options simply aren't available. Smartphones, either through apps or through built-in features of the OS they run, are one of the key tools that help people with disabilities. Apple is no stranger to this concept and it actively works to make its devices easier to use for everyone. With iOS 10, a new screen filter feature has been added to compensate for color blindness. The feature tints the screen according to the type of color blindness the user has and makes it much easier to interact with the device. Here's how to enable it. -- AddictiveTips.

Make your iPhone read aloud to you: Turn iBooks into audiobooks

Make your iPhone read aloud to you: Turn iBooks into audiobooks

You don't need to pay for an Audible subscription to have your iPhone read books to you. By enabling an accessibility setting, you can make your iPhone read the text of whatever it is you have open, from a book in iBooks to an article you have open in Safari or another app. This setting is also available on iPads. -- CNET.

The easiest way to sign documents on iOS

The easiest way to sign documents on iOS

I'm often asked, "what's a simple way I can sign a PDF without having to print the document out?" Many times, the person is trying to live the paperless lifestyle. There are a number of great PDF apps that can wrangle all sorts of text for editing and signatures. Some of my favorites are PDF Expert and Documents 5, both from Readdle, and some of the offerings from Adobe. However, after having tried many of these apps, I've stuck with PDFpen from Smile Software, makers of another favorite of mine, TextExpander. -- App Factor.

Building the superhuman, one A.I. routine at a time

Building the superhuman, one A.I. routine at a time

The term "artificial intelligence" was first coined in 1955 by John McCarthy, widely known as the father of A.I. Think about what the world was like then, and where we are now. A.I. has evolved, but its premise is still the same: Researchers and technologists are creating software that operates systems and machines built to understand and simulate human tasks and mimic our thought process. -- VentureBeat.

After All These Years, Email Is Still A Killer App

After All These Years, Email Is Still A Killer App

The public internet era brought a growing deluge of technology and communication options to the masses. Today's premium smartphones are much like mini-supercomputers in your pocket, capable of doing much of what desktop and notebook PCs did exclusively in the past, yet available to more than a billion people worldwide. -- PixoBebo.

July 26Tuesday's News


New WebKit policies in iOS 10 to allow autoplay of silent videos in Safari, pause those with audio

New WebKit policies in iOS 10 to allow autoplay of silent videos in Safari, pause those with audio

Article Image In a bid to improve user experience, Apple's mobile Safari web browser in iOS 10 will autoplay silent videos and pause those with sound, a change that enables automatic playback of GIFs -- at least those converted to video -- while halting potentially disruptive content like ads. -- AppleInsider.

Transistors will stop shrinking in 2021, but Moore's law will live on

Transistors will stop shrinking in 2021, but Moore's law will live on

Transistors will stop shrinking after 2021, but Moore's law will probably continue, according to the final International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

Final semiconductor industry roadmap says the future is 3D packaging and cooling. -- Ars Technica.

Safari in iOS 10 Offers Improved Animated GIF Viewing and Stops Noisy Autoplay Videos

Safari in iOS 10 Offers Improved Animated GIF Viewing and Stops Noisy Autoplay Videos

In iOS 10, Apple plans to make some changes to the way videos are handled, putting a stop to irritating autoplay videos and offering improvements to animated GIFs. The changes will come in the form of updated policies for "video" elements, as outlined today by Apple software engineer Jer Noble on the Webkit blog -- MacRumors.

Suspect Required To Unlock iPhone Using Touch ID in Second Federal Case

Suspect Required To Unlock iPhone Using Touch ID in Second Federal Case

A second federal judge has ruled that a suspect can be compelled to unlock their iPhone using their fingerprint in order to give investigators access to data which can be used as evidence against them. The first time this ever happened in a federal case was back in May, following a District Court ruling in 2014. -- 9to5Mac.

Opinion: 5 reasons why you shouldn't jailbreak your iPhone

Opinion: 5 reasons why you shouldn't jailbreak your iPhone

Most people know that I've been a staunch jailbreak proponent over the years, but my enthusiasm for jailbreaking has been waning as of late. Much of this has to do with the amount of features, jailbreak-inspired or not, that Apple stuffs into new iOS software each summer. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple Granted 32 Patents Today Covering Force Touch, Invisible Buttons & Design Patents for iOS Devices

Apple Granted 32 Patents Today Covering Force Touch, Invisible Buttons & Design Patents for iOS Devices

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 32 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. Earlier today we covered granted patents relating to an iPhone projector and the Apple Pencil working with Apple's next-gen Magic Trackpad-3. Some of the other patents worth noting today cover force touch for the MacBook's trackpad and beyond, disappearing buttons... -- Patently Apple.

Installing OS X: What to do when 'this copy of the install OS X application cannot be verified

Installing OS X: What to do when 'this copy of the install OS X application cannot be verified

If you encounter an error when trying to install a fresh operating system, it could be a problem with the date and time. -- Macworld.


10 Finder Tricks

10 Finder Tricks

Take a look at 10 Finder tricks that will help you get the most from your Mac. Learn how to batch rename files, move files with copy and paste, skip the Trash and much more. -- MacMost.

Make Your Mac's Speakers Louder

Make Your Mac's Speakers Louder

If ever there was a Mac app perfectly aimed at the Mac-loving baby boomer generation it's Boom. Those of us who attended too many rock concerts without ear protection, who drove for hours with the 80track, cassette tape player, and then the CD player booming through 500-watt speakers, who love headphones with the volume cranked up to vibrate mode, fully appreciate anything that boosts the sound from our Mac's seemingly feeble sound system. -- NoodleMac.

What makes a Mac a Mac?

What makes a Mac a Mac?

What makes a Mac a Mac?

Is it a computer made by Apple?

Does it need to run the Mac OS?

For a Mac to be a Mac does its hardware, does its design sit heads above the rest? -- 512 Pixels.

How my Apple Watch's heart rate monitoring saved my life

How my Apple Watch's heart rate monitoring saved my life

Chuck La Tournous has a scary story with a happy ending. Whew.

I'll begin this story the same way I began the phone call to my wife: "I'm OK, but..."

The "but" began on a Tuesday morning, after I started walking from the parking lot to the front door of my office building. I began feeling short of breath. No matter how deeply I inhaled, it felt like my lungs weren't filling up completely. At first, the feeling just seemed odd--nothing serious, just...weird. -- Macworld.

iOS 10's built in magnifying glass

iOS 10's built in magnifying glass

One of my favorite features of iOS 10 is the built-in magnifying glass, super useful if you need to read some small print or get a close-up look at something tiny. -- The Loop.

The Most Essential Apple TV Tips Everybody Needs

The Most Essential Apple TV Tips Everybody Needs

This short collection of essential tips features all the most useful ones we think Apple TV users will need to use every day. -- About Tech.

Apple And Intel's 6-core CPUs

Apple And Intel's 6-core CPUs

More cores means faster Macs, right?

Not quite, but in a way multi-core CPUs are like televisions and radios of yesteryear that bristled with more tubes. They're nice, but for most of us they don't do much more than we get done already with a couple of cores. -- BohemianBoomer.

Verizon: 'All Your iPhone Are Belong To Us'

Verizon: 'All Your iPhone Are Belong To Us

There is a generational gap that has occurred in recent years. Those of us who hide our gray hair and look for bathroom scales that weigh five pounds light also use cable TV. A generation or two below my age stratosphere there are massive sea changes brewing and your local phone company wants to be a part. -- TeraTalks.

What's the point of Twitter? Twitter explains...

What's the point of Twitter? Twitter explains...

Twitter is worried. It's worried that while it is a well-recognized brand, a disturbingly large number of people have no idea what Twitter is actually for. What is the point? Getting slightly meta, the company today explains its raison d'être and tries to clear up some common misconceptions. -- BetaNews.

Evolution

Civilization As We Know It


IT Developed A Movie Screen That Brings Glasses-Free 3D To All Seat

IT Developed A Movie Screen That Brings Glasses-Free 3D To All Seat

3-D movies immerse us in new worlds and allow us to see places and things in ways that we otherwise couldn't. But behind every 3-D experience is something that is uniformly despised: those goofy glasses.

Fortunately, there may be hope. In a new paper, a team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) and Israel's Weizmann Institute of Science have demonstrated a display that lets audiences watch 3-D films in a movie theater without extra eyewear. -- MIT News.

July 25Monday's News


Apple's Touch ID blocks feds--armed with warrant--from unlocking iPhone

Apple's Touch ID blocks feds--armed with warrant--from unlocking iPhone

A Dallas, Texas man accused of prostituting underage girls was secretly ordered by a federal judge to unlock his iPhone using his fingerprint, according to federal court documents that are now unsealed. -- Ars Technica.


iPhones Without Headphone Jacks Are Here... and They're Extremely Annoying

Phones Without Headphone Jacks Are Here... and They're Extremely Annoying

A few weeks ago, we had an intense discussion on what would happen if Apple's next iPhone doesn't have a headphone port -- and what that means for the rest of the industry, as well as the pros and cons of ditching the legacy port. Over the past few months, we have seen many smartphone manufacturers launch new handsets that don't have a headphone jack. Mashable has a report today in which it says that it is already causing frustration among users. -- Mashable.

After Initial Euphoria, Then Letdown, iPad is Poised for Glory

After Initial Euphoria, Then Letdown, iPad is Poised for Glory

The iPad launched with great enthusiasm, and just about everyone had to have one. It was boldly declared to be the harbinger of the Post-PC era. But then it faltered. Now, Apple is positioning the iPad to take up its long-intended role as the PC replacement. Here's how Apple is going to return the iPad to glory. -- The Mac Observer.

Opinion: 2016 MacBook -- two months later

Opinion: 2016 MacBook -- two months later

During my first few weeks with the 2016 MacBook, this machine could do no wrong. I gladly looked past its shortcomings, because it was beautiful -- highly functional, even.

Two months in, and the infatuation stage has predictably elapsed and reality has started to set in. Was it a mistake to make the 12″ ultra-portable machine my full-time work rig? -- 9to5Mac.

Apple is taking its first steps towards a more comprehensive post-PC world

Apple is taking its first steps towards a more comprehensive post-PC world

Hands up if you've heard of Swift Playgrounds? No, it's not some new start-up providing quick playdates for bedraggled parents, although that might be interesting. -- PC & Tech Authority.


How To Block A Number From Messaging You In iOS 10

How To Block A Number From Messaging You In iOS 10

iOS lets you block people from messaging and calling you. Up until iOS 9, the feature was pretty easy to use. Anytime you received a call from someone you didn't want to talk to, or received an iMessage or text message, you could go to the details screen for the message or call and find a 'Block' option on there. With iOS 10, blocking a number that keeps calling you works pretty much the same way but the process for Messages has changed. To block a number from messaging you, you have to first add it to your contacts and then block it from the Settings app. Here's how. -- AddictiveTips.

How to speed up a slow iPhone: Tips to make older iPhones run faster

How to speed up a slow iPhone: Tips to make older iPhones run faster

Want to speed up a slow iPhone? Here's how to spring-clean an older or just slower iPhone model, and restore the speed of an iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, iPhone 5, iPhone 5c, iPhone 5s running iOS 6, iOS 7, iOS 8 or iOS 9. -- Macworld UK.


How to Downgrade from iOS 10 Beta and Remove It Completely

How to Downgrade from iOS 10 Beta and Remove It Completely

Downgrading from iOS 10 beta is easier than you think. I take you through how to complete the process and return to the latest official version. -- Low End Mac.

7 things Windows users can do that Mac users can only dream of

7 things Windows users can do that Mac users can only dream of

It's a debate that has rumbled on for years -- which is better, PC or Mac?

Almost from the day the two first saw the light of day, arguments have raged in the technology space as to which platform is better: Microsoft's Windows or Apple Mac.

Most of us will have grown up with family, friends or co-workers who profess that their machine is the best, and how you're missing out on some great features by refusing to switch.

Both operating systems have enjoyed swift progress over the last decade, and come with millions of loyal fans, but what are some of the unique features that Windows users can lord over their Mac cousins? -- Express UK.

7 things Mac users can do that Windows users can only dream of

7 things Mac users can do that Windows users can only dream of

Your personal preference between an Apple Mac or a Windows PC might be completely subjective, but it is cold hard fact that there a number of things you can do on Apple's OS X that Microsoft fans can only dream of. Here are seven. -- Express.co.uk.

If You're Online, You're Not Safe

If You're Online, You're Not Safe

Security researchers found an open backdoor access to Dell's highly touted Sonicwall Global Management System which monitors enterprise network devices. That led me to this conclusion. If you're online in any capacity, you're not safe. -- Bohemian Boomer.

Transistors Will Stop Shrinking in 2021, Moore's Law Roadmap Predict

Tansistors Will Stop Shrinking in 2021, Moore's Law Roadmap Predict

Moore's Law, an empirical observation of the number of components that could be built on an integrated circuit and their corresponding cost, has largely held strong for more than 50 years, but its days are really numbered now. The prediction of the 2015 International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, which was only officially made available this month, says that transistor could stop shrinking in just five years. [I am not user if they are taking this article "How to grow electronics that are one atom thick" I published last week or not? Of course once they get to atom size that may be it.] -- IEEE.

Homeland Security Border Agents Can Seize Your Phone

Homeland Security Border Agents Can Seize Your Phone

A Wall Street Journal reporter has shared her experienced of having her phones forcefully taken at the border -- and how the Department of Homeland Security insists that your right to privacy does not exist when re-entering the United States. Indeed, she's not alone: Documents previously released under FOIA show that the DHS has a long-standing policy of warrantless (and even motiveless) seizures at the border, essentially removing any traveler's right to privacy.

July 22Friday's News


Apple invention could lead to glasses-free 3D on mobile devices

Apple invention could lead to glasses-free 3D on mobile devices

Article Image An Apple patent application published early on Thursday could theoretically set the stage for iPhones and other devices with "autostereoscopic" displays, simulating 3D without the need for special glasses. -- AppleInsider.

Single-atom-thick sheets efficiently extract electricity from salt water

Single-atom-thick sheets efficiently extract electricity from salt water

It's possible to generate energy using nothing but the difference between fresh and salt water. When fresh and salt water are separated by a membrane that blocks the passage of certain ions, there is a force that drives the freshwater into the salt water to even out the salt concentration. That force can be harvested to produce energy, an approach termed "osmotic power." -- Ars Technica.

Facebook tests full-scale solar-powered Internet drone

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Facebook's Connectivity Lab announced today that the company has for the first time test-flown a full-scale version of Aquila, the solar-powered high-altitude drone that Facebook hopes to use to deliver Internet connectivity to the remotest populated corners of the Earth. The test flight took place June 28 but was only announced today by Facebook. -- Ars Technica.

Researchers want to turn your iPhone into a mood ring

Researchers want to turn your iPhone into a mood ring

Your Apple devices might be able to help you track steps, workouts and more, but as of yet no iPhone, Apple Watch (or, let's face it, any other gadget out there) has been able to accurately measure mental and emotional conditions.

That could be changing due to the so-called "Mood Challenge" program from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The program calls for researchers and technologists to come up with a way of convincingly tracking mood using an iPhone and ResearchKit -- and it's just announced its five semi-finalists. -- Cult of Mac.

Police 3-D print murder victim's finger to unlock iPhone

Police 3-D print murder victim's finger to unlock iPhone

Instead of running to Apple to unlock iPhones involved in criminal case, cops may have found a new path to get past Touch ID's security: 3D printing fingers.

Police officers asked for aid from the lab of professor Anil Jain at the University of Michigan this year to help them recreate a murder victim's fingerprints by 3D printing each digit so they can attempt to unlock the device, which they think may contain clues that would help solve the case. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Patent Reveals Audio Assembly that Blocks EMI in Latest MacBook & Potentially iPhone 7

Apple Patent Reveals Audio Assembly that Blocks EMI in Latest MacBook & Potentially iPhone 7

Today, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office published a patent application from Apple that reveals methods and apparatuses for shielding an audio assembly having an antenna coupled to an exterior surface of a housing of the audio assembly. The patent applies to Apple's latest MacBook and potentially the iPhone 7. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Patches Stagefright-Like Bug In iOS

Apple Patches Stagefright-Like Bug In IOS

Apple has fixed a series of high-risk vulnerabilities in iOS, including three that could lead to remote code execution, with the release of iOS 9.3.3. One of those code-execution vulnerabilities lies in the way that iOS handles TIFF files in various applications (Alternate source: Fortune ). Researchers at Cisco's TALOS team, who discovered the flaw, said that the vulnerability has a lot of potential for exploitation. -- On The Wire.

'Take Control of Preview' Reveals Even More Features

'Take Control of Preview' Reveals Even More Features

Earlier this year, Josh Centers and I wrote "The Power of Preview," a series of TidBITS articles about Preview that proved extremely popular, so much so that readers asked us for a book version. "No problem," we thought. However, while exploring features that had merited only brief mention in the articles and responding to queries from Tonya and ex-Macworld editor Scholle McFarland, we discovered that Preview was even more capable than we'd realized. -- TidBITS.

Apple ID leads Homeland Security to alleged owner of the biggest pirate site on the net

Apple ID leads Homeland Security to alleged owner of the biggest pirate site on the net

The use of an Apple ID for a perfectly legal purchase was the key piece of evidence that has enabled the Department of Homeland Security to identify the man they suspect to be the owner of the biggest pirate website on the net, KickAssTorrents.com (KAT). -- 9to5Mac.

Technology Is Monitoring the Urban Landscape

Technology Is Monitoring the Urban Landscape

Much technical change in American cities will involve monitoring, which can make life easier but poses troubling questions about privacy and control.

It will do it with camera-equipped drones that inspect municipal power lines and robotic cars that know where people go. Sensor-laden streetlights will change brightness based on danger levels. Technologists and urban planners are working on a major transformation of urban landscapes over the next few decades. -- New York Times.

Use Creative Kit On Mac Photos, Forget About Photoshop

Use Creative Kit On Mac Photos, Forget About Photoshop

Color me as one photographer wannabe who does not appreciate Adobe's subscription software plan. Yes, I admit that I used and faithfully upgraded Adobe's Creative Suite every few years. Why not more often? Hello? Money doesn't grow on trees. -- TeraTalks.

How to erase a Mac that seems to lack erasure options

How to erase a Mac that seems to lack erasure options

Older Macs don't have a Recovery partition, so what should you do?

It's admirable to erase your system before you sell--especially with secure erasure--to avoid leaking personal data to someone who buys it or obtains the disk drive. While the odds are likely very low someone would be able to extract data (or be interested in it), you can try to reduce those odds to what is effectively zero. -- Macworld.

Three reasons to run your own Mac server

Three reasons to run your own Mac server

When it comes to technology, the word "server" might bring to mind, for some, a warehouse-sized room not unlike the end of Raiders of the Lost Ark, but with fewer crates and more racks of computers. For others it might be the cause of sweaty palms and glazed-over eyes.

Running a server isn't as scary as you'd think. Here are three reasons why you should consider it, too. -- Macworld.

If You're Online, You're Not Safe

If You're Online, You're Not Safe

Security researchers found an open backdoor access to Dell's highly touted Sonicwall Global Management System which monitors enterprise network devices. That led me to this conclusion. If you're online in any capacity, you're not safe. -- Bohemian Boomer.

July 21Thursday's News


Corning unveils Gorilla Glass 5, evolutionary successor for iPhone screens

Corning unveils Gorilla Glass 5, evolutionary successor for iPhone screens

Article Image A new version of the Corning Gorilla Glass used in iPhone screens since launch promises better impact resistance for equipped devices, with the improved glass panels surviving falls from greater heights than previous versions. -- AppleInsider.


Hands-on: Ubiquiti's Amplifi covers the whole house in a Wi-Fi mesh

Hands-on: Ubiquiti's Amplifi covers the whole house in a Wi-Fi mesh

Back in May, networking OEM Ubiquiti announced its new Ubiquiti Labs division and that division's first product: a home mesh Wi-Fi system called Amplifi. With Amplifi, Ubiquiti intends to stretch its reach out of SMB/enterprise "lite" networking and into home territory--and not just the homes of crazies like me, either. Amplifi is targeted at the plug-and-play crowd for whom a single, central Wi-Fi base station doesn't quite cut the mustard. It's a market squarely occupied by Eero, Luma, and a few other players--home mesh Wi-Fi, where you throw down a few devices and every nook and cranny of your home gets solid coverage (in theory, at least). -- Ars Technica.

How to use Optimized Storage in macOS Sierra to make more space

How to use Optimized Storage in macOS Sierra to make more space

With macOS Sierra, Apple makes it easier to free up space on our computers without having to undergo the time-wasting indignity of trawling through files and deleting them manually.

The new "Optimized Storage" feature helps you deal with junk like duplicates, old email attachments and downloads -- and automatically sifts through them to delete the files or move them to the cloud. It's one of macOS Sierra's best features. -- Cult of Mac.

Critical flaw leaves all Apple devices open to password thieves

Critical flaw leaves all Apple devices open to password thieves

If you haven't already installed Apple's latest round of software updates, go do it now.

A flaw in earlier versions of iOS, OS X, tvOS and watchOS makes it possible for hackers to remotely steal saved passwords from your Apple devices without your knowledge. -- Cult of Mac.

Firefox will auto block unnecessary Flash for better browsing

Firefox will auto block unnecessary Flash for better browsing

Mozilla is to begin automatically blocking unnecessary Flash content within its Firefox browser to provide users with a better web browsing experience. The move should boost browser performance and reduce the impact Firefox has on notebook battery life. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 9 With Bug Fixes and Feature Tweaks

Apple Releases Safari Technology Preview 9 With Bug Fixes and Feature Tweaks

Apple today released a new update for Safari Technology Preview, the experimental browser Apple first introduced on March 30, 2016. Apple designed the Safari Technology Preview to test features that may be introduced into the release version of Safari. -- MacRumors.


Technology Is Monitoring the Urban Landscape

Technology Is Monitoring the Urban Landscape

Much technical change in American cities will involve monitoring, which can make life easier but poses troubling questions about privacy and control.

It will do it with camera-equipped drones that inspect municipal power lines and robotic cars that know where people go. Sensor-laden streetlights will change brightness based on danger levels. Technologists and urban planners are working on a major transformation of urban landscapes over the next few decades. -- New York Times.

iOS: Fixing Color Casts on Pictures

iOS: Fixing Color Casts on Pictures

If you've never played around with the photo-editing tools available on your iPad or iPhone, you really should check them out! Today's Quick Tip is about one of the easiest to use. We'll talk about how you can adjust for unwanted color cast in your images, so you can make 'em cooler and warmer as needed! -- The Mac Observer.

How to Apply for Twitter Account Verification

How to Apply for Twitter Account Verification

Previously only available by private invitation, Twitter now allows users to apply for account verification. Note that you still need to be noteworthy or otherwise provide a compelling reason for Twitter to approve your verification, but at least now you can ask instead of having to sniff around at cocktail parties and coffee shops for someone who knows someone. To get verified your account must first be in proper shape. Read along and we'll help get you there. -- The Mac Observer.

Learn Preview's Secret Image Editing and PDF Manipulation Powers in Take Control of Preview

Learn Preview's Secret Image Editing and PDF Manipulation Powers in Take Control of Preview

Did you know that Apple makes a powerful image editing and PDF manipulation app? And bundles it for free with every Mac? That's right, I'm talking about Preview, the unassuming Clark Kent of your Mac's bundled utilities. -- Kirkville.


Mossberg: I just deleted half my iPhone apps. You should too

Mossberg: I just deleted half my iPhone apps. You should too.

Pokémon Go may be a sensation, but the novelty of the App Store is over.

Over the past few days, I've methodically deleted 165 apps from my iPhone, about 54 percent of the 305 apps I had on the phone when I started culling the herd. When I was done, I had significantly decreased the phone's clutter: I'd gone from 15 home screens to eight, and reclaimed nearly eight gigabytes of free space, about a 24 percent gain in my case. -- Recode.

The Best Wi-Fi Routers: No More Dead Zones

The Best Wi-Fi Routers: No More Dead Zones

The newest home mesh networks from Eero, Luma, Ubiquiti and Linksys use teams of access points to bathe your home in Wi-Fi. Geoffrey A. Fowler picks the best. [Thanks to MacGuru Bill Jones for tipping us off abou this article. --mam] -- Wall Street JournaL.

July 20Wednesday's News


New Apple invention would allow for complex, multi-axis haptic feedback

New Apple invention would allow for complex, multi-axis haptic feedback

Article Image An Apple patent application published on Tuesday suggests interest in a haptic feedback motor that could vibrate in different directions, depending on a device's orientation. -- AppleInsider.


Software flaw puts mobile phones and networks at risk of complete takeover

Software flaw puts mobile phones and networks at risk of complete takeover

A newly disclosed vulnerability could allow attackers to seize control of mobile phones and key parts of the world's telecommunications infrastructure and make it possible to eavesdrop or disrupt entire networks, security experts warned Tuesday. -- Ars Technica.


Can we trust peer review? New study highlights some problems

Can we trust peer review? New study highlights some problems

Peer review is intended to act as a gatekeeper in science. If working researchers deem a paper fit to be published, it should mean that the research is sound, rigorous, and accurate. But an experimental analysis of peer review suggests that it might also end up rejecting high-quality material. The analysis points to high levels of competition as the source of the problem. -- Ars Technica.

How to send an emergency SOS on Apple Watch

How to send an emergency SOS on Apple Watch

When Apple launches watchOS 3 to the public later this fall, Apple Watch wearers will be able to automatically call for help if they find themselves in an emergency situation.

The new SOS feature in watchOS 3 will make Apple Watch even more of a lifesaver for wearers by placing a 911 call within 10 seconds, even if they don't have their iPhone. -- Cult of Mac.

All the iOS 10 beta 3 changes that make iPhone even better

All the iOS 10 beta 3 changes that make iPhone even better

Apple's jam-packed iOS 10 update has gotten even better in its third beta, which brings a bunch of tiny new features that start to make iOS 10 feel like a polished product. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Stores will now pay you to sign up for Apple Pay

Apple Stores will now pay you to sign up for Apple Pay

The next time you make a purchase at your local Apple Store, expect to be asked if you want to buy your items with Apple Pay.

Apple is launching a new promotion for its contactless payment system this week that will emphasize paying with your iPhone or Apple Watch rather than busting out a credit card. And those that haven't signed up for Apple Pay yet will get some free money. -- Cult of Mac.

Apple Releases Safari 10 Developer Beta 3 for OS X Yosemite and El Capitan

Apple Releases Safari 10 Developer Beta 3 for OS X Yosemite and El Capitan

Apple today released the third developer beta of Safari 10 for OS X Yosemite and OS X El Capitan users, allowing those who don't yet want to install the macOS Sierra operating system to test out the upcoming Safari update. -- MacRumors.

Apple Watch: Using Notification Privacy

Apple Watch: Using Notification Privacy

This Quick Tip is on a nifty feature of the Apple Watch, one that'll prevent a wrist raise from showing off any recent notifications you've gotten. You might spend all day texting with your friends, but no one else needs to know what those conversations are about, do they? -- The Mac Observer.

Safari Browser May Soon Be Just As Fast As Chrome With WebP Integration

Safari Browser May Soon Be Just As Fast As Chrome With WebP Integration

The Safari browser included in Apple's iOS 10 and macOS Sierra software is testing WebP, technology from Google that allows developers to create smaller, richer images that make the web faster. -- c|net.


Apple granted a further patent for MacBooks with built-in LTE connectivity

Apple granted a further patent for MacBooks with built-in LTE connectivity

Apple has been toying with the idea of MacBooks with built-in cellular connectivity since 2007. Although Steve Jobs said a year later that the company had 'considered' it but decided against it at the time, the company continues to file patents for the idea, the latest one filed last year and granted today. -- 9to5Mac.

PSA: Scrivener for iOS is out now, check out our full review

PSA: Scrivener for iOS is out now, check out our full review

It's been a long time coming, but the iOS version of the popular writing app Scrivener is now available in the App Store.

While many had expected it to be merely a companion app to the Mac version, Scrivener for iOS is actually a full-featured edition, capable of acting as a standalone app. -- 9to5Mac.

iOS 10 Music: All the New Features and How to Use Them

iOS 10 Music: All the New Features and How to Use Them

At first glance, the major change to Music in iOS 10 centers around a redesign, suggesting that Apple focused on solving only cosmetic issues. But the people behind Apple's streaming music service have quietly tackled Music's other major problems, such as uploading your library to iCloud. -- Tom's Guide.

The Never-Ending Mechanical Hard Drive

The Never-Ending Mechanical Hard Drive

When I brought a Mac into my home in 1989, after using one for several years at the office, I thought I had a truly high-end computer. It had chosen a Macintosh IIcx. Released that year, it sat just below the Macintosh IIx in the lineup, but was relatively affordable as Macs went, at least in those days. I equipped it with a 100MB Rodime hard drive which cost, all by its lonesome, $1,200. In passing, I see you can still buy one, in 2016, for $126.95 from a dealer. I suppose there are people with ancient computers who need new drives.

The entire system, with an Apple laser printer, came to $14,000 even with a discount. I leased the system, but how things have changed! -- The Tech Night Owl.

Your Guide to Online Privacy: No foil hat or thermal-image-cloaking hoodie required

Your Guide to Online Privacy: No foil hat or thermal-image-cloaking hoodie required.

Should you tape over your webcam? Is it OK to use your computer's operating system, or do you have to run Tails? And what the hell is Tails? Unless you're a high-profile target--and you're probably not--you can take some simple steps to block hackers. Etc. asked one of Bloomberg's cybersecurity reporters to outline your options below on a scale from "sane" to, with apologies to the former National Security Agency contractor, "Snowden," who recently and perhaps understandably took tweezers to his phone. -- Bloomberg.

July 19Tuesday's News


Apple releases finished iOS 9.3.3, OS X 10.11.6, tvOS 9.2.2 & watchOS 2.2.2 updates

Apple releases finished iOS 9.3.3, OS X 10.11.6, tvOS 9.2.2 & watchOS 2.2.2 updates

Article Image Apple on Monday issued the completed versions of iOS 9.3.3, OS X 10.11.6, tvOS 9.2.2, and watchOS 2.2.2 to the public, making various maintenance updates to each platform.

iOS 9.3.3 can be downloaded as an over-the-air update or through iTunes, while OS X 10.11.6 can be downloaded through the Mac App Store. Apple TV owners must update tvOS through the System section of the Settings app -- watchOS 2.2.2 can be downloaded and installed through the companion Apple Watch app for the iPhone.

All four updates appear to be minor releases, simply cleaning up various glitches and security holes. The iOS and OS X updates were nevertheless put through several beta incarnations.

They may be Apple's final updates to the platforms ahead of this fall, when Apple is due to release iOS 10, macOS Sierra, watchOS 3, and a major tvOS update.

Apple issues third betas of iOS 10, tvOS 10, and watchOS 3

Apple issues third betas of iOS 10, tvOS 10, and watchOS 3

Apple on Monday provided developers with the third pre-release betas of three of its four upcoming platform updates, squashing bugs and addressing issues with iOS 10 and tvOS 10, as well as watchOS 3. A new macOS Sierra build, however, did not arrive. -- AppleInsider.

Apple Music shifting to iTunes Match 'acoustic fingerprinting' method of song ID

Apple Music shifting to iTunes Match 'acoustic fingerprinting' method of song ID

Article Image Changes are being made behind the scenes to iTunes Music's library matching and streaming algorithms, allowing for more accurate determination of what songs the user owns, and preventing inadvertent destruction of music libraries. -- AppleInsider.


Apple releases iTunes 12.4.2 with fix for Apple Music short song playback issues

Apple releases iTunes 12.4.2 with fix for Apple Music short song playback issues

Article Image Apple on Monday released a minor update to the iTunes application to address bugs, including Apple Music "up next" problems with songs less than a minute long.

According to Apple's release notes, iTunes version 12.4.2 for OS X fixes the issue that prevented iTunes Music songs less than a minute long from buffering properly, causing iTunes to stop playback.

Apple issues third macOS Sierra beta to developers

Apple issues third macOS Sierra beta to developers

Article Image Completing Monday's batch of beta software seeds, Apple this afternoon issued a third beta version of its upcoming macOS Sierra desktop operating system to developers ahead of an expected public release this fall. -- AppleInsider.

Apple squashes FaceTime bug that facilitated eavesdropping on calls

Apple squashes FaceTime bug that facilitated eavesdropping on calls

Article Image Apple in a pair of security updates for iOS and OS X on Monday addressed a FaceTime vulnerability that allows attackers to surreptitiously maintain audio connectivity in a seemingly terminated FaceTime call. -- AppleInsider.

How to grow electronics that are one atom thick

How to grow electronics that are one atom thick

The features we're making in current semiconductor materials are shrinking to the point where soon, they will be just a handful of atoms thin. Unfortunately, the behavior you get from bulk materials is often different from what you see when there are just a few atoms present, and quantum effects begin to dominate. There is an alternative, however: start with a material that is already incredibly small and has well-defined properties. Graphene, for example, is a sheet of carbon just one atom thick, and it's an excellent conductor; a variety of similar materials have been also developed. -- Ars Technica.

Criminals plant banking malware where victims least expect it

Criminals plant banking malware where victims least expect it

A criminal gang recently found an effective way to spread malware that drains online bank accounts. According to a blog post published Monday, they bundled the malicious executable inside a file that installed a legitimate administrative tool available for download. -- Ars Technica.

A PayPal Mystery

A PayPal Mystery

PayPalMysteryA loyal reader of this column has come to me with a problem that I, in turn, am submitting to all of you. He sells downloadable software over the Internet but lately some customers have been ordering, paying, downloading, yet not requesting the required unlocking key to use their software. Money is piling-up in the reader's PayPal account and he is starting to worry this is some kind of scam. But if it is, it's a scam that's new to me. -- I, Cringely.

Reasons to Believe the A.I. Boom Is Real

Reasons to Believe the A.I. Boom Is Real

To determine why artificial intelligence is booming now, it's helpful to look at the recent growth of search engines, social media and mobile technology.

Artificial intelligence is booming. But why now?

Move over, social media and mobility: Silicon Valley has a next big thing, John Markoff writes , and it's A.I. and robots. It is useful to think of them as part of the same thing, since many robots are autonomous machines programmed for decision making based on A.I. -- New York Times.

Making Siri Spell Your Name Right

Making Siri Spell Your Name Right

Apple's virtual assistant has the ability to learn as it works, but you have ways to correct some of its common mistakes to speed up the process. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 43 Patents Today Covering Cellular MacBooks, Mac Pro Architecture and More

Apple Granted 43 Patents Today Covering Cellular MacBooks, Mac Pro Architecture and More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 43 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's latest cellular MacBook invention relating to specialized antennas along with Apple's overview of the Mac Pro's internal architecture. Apple was granted several Apple Watch related design patents and one for a MacBook Pro. We wrap up this week's granted patent report with our traditional listing of the remaining granted patents that were issued to Apple today. -- Patently Apple.

Apple Customers Seeking 'iPhone Stress Relief'

Apple Customers Seeking 'iPhone Stress Relief'

Despite the evolution of the iPhone, with its ever increasing sophistication, the replacement rate by customers is systematically stretching out. Why is this happening? It's likely based more on economics, technical maturity and customer stress analysis than a waning appetite for technology. A research chart shows the reality. -- The Mac Observer.

Behind the scenes of human curation at Apple Music, as company ups the ante on licensing

Behind the scenes of human curation at Apple Music, as company ups the ante on licensing

Buzzfeed is provided an almost-Beats-produced behind-the-scenes look at the human curation element of Apple Music, including the surprising facts that the service already has almost three times as many playlists as Spotify, and that it has only around a dozen full-time employees generating them.

Despite Spotify's nine-year head-start on Apple Music, the long-form piece reveals that it has only around 4,500 playlists, compared to Apple's 14,000. Apple Music also beats out its rivals when it comes to the types of playlists offered … -- 9to5Mac.

A year after announcement, first big pharma study using Apple's ResearchKit goes live

A year after announcement, first big pharma study using Apple's ResearchKit goes live

It's almost exactly a year since we learned that Apple was making ResearchKit available to big pharmaceutical companies and GlaxoSmithKline would be using the platform to carry out clinical studies. GSK has now announced the first of those studies. -- GSK.


Hands-on: 15 new features in iOS 10 beta 3 [Video]

Hands-on: 15 new features in iOS 10 beta 3 [Video]

Today Apple released the third beta for iOS 10. As expected, it features several new changes when compared to the previous beta. Some of the changes reimplement features found in the original iOS 10 beta. Other changes, such as haptic feedback when manually locking an iPhone, are brand new. Have a look at our video walkthrough for the details. -- 9to5Mac.

How to manage settings for the Mail app for iPhone and iPad

How to manage settings for the Mail app for iPhone and iPad

The Mail app for iPhone and iPad helps you stay in touch and keep up-to-date with all of your emails. You can add any email account you might have and receive all your emails in one spot. You can even control more intricate settings, like how many lines of an email you see in the notification preview. -- iMore.

Apple and its partners get ready for the next generation Internet of Things

Apple and its partners get ready for the next generation IoT

Stop for just a few moments and take a look at some of the activity coming out of the "Apple & Partners" ecosystem since WWDC: -- Apple Must.


What the Heck Is Pokémon Go?

What the Heck Is Pokémon Go?

Strange things are afoot. Town squares are busy again. Kids are gathering at libraries in the middle of the night. You might wake up to find a crowd of people outside your house. Someone might even knock on your door, asking to come inside to catch a monster. What is going on? -- TidBITS.

One Man's Opinion: All Wi-Fi Extenders Suck [UPDATE]

One Man's Opinion: All Wi-Fi Extenders Suck [UPDATE]

Yesterday I expressed my frustration about trying to extend my home Wi-Fi network signal.

I have been considering what I can do and I have thought about buying a newer model Wi-Fi router as my primary hub and creating a bridge with my old one which I will move the the remote location.

No firm decision yet as I am not sure if it will solve my problem. After all there may be a better solution.

And one of those "better" solutions may be one of the following submitted by two MacGuru's (thank you.) If I get more I will of course post them, along with the results of which every solution I try.

I am posting these as it may help someone else who is having the same problem.

MacGuru Bill Jones:

I saw your note today about your wifi reception problems. I have fought with this too and while I have had some luck using 2 Apple Airport's, one as a base unit and the other as a range extender this has never solved all of my problems. For what it is worth, I have tried other brands of wifi extenders but I have generally found that the reliability of the network just wasn't there. I was continually resetting the devices to try and keep it running.

Sandra and I have a small detached studio that doesn't have wired ethernet run out to it and is also never gets decent wifi reception from the house. My best solution so far has been to use powerline ethernet adaptors to bridge the studio into the household network. This gives me a reliable connection that I then connect a small airport express for wifi in that building. I have been using the Netgear powerline adaptors but there are other brands that also get good reviews.

Another possible solution that is just hitting the market is the newer mesh wifi base stations. One called EERO has been on the market a few months and I believe that there is another competitor called LUMA that is taking preorders. These devices are meant to be used in groups. I believe that they all use 2 radios. One for the primary client connection and another for the back channel connection between devices. The second radio for communicating between the base stations is meant to help solve the classic slow down problems that range extenders have. Half or more of your bandwidth gets tied up forwarding packets between devices, leaving much less bandwidth for the clients to use.

I have been following the EERO devices for a couple of months but I have not been convinced yet to buy the system and try it out. Reviews a generally positive but some of the negative reviews on Amazon and elsewhere make some valid points about the problems that these systems can have. Just the fact that they are so new, means that the system firmware is still evolving rapidly.

MacGuru Lonnie Abelbeck:

Nothing beats CAT-5e cable. Have you explored all possible solutions there? Possibly even buried on the outside of the house and back in?

4 walls is probably too much for 5 GHz, so the back-haul needs to be over 2.4 GHz and then use 5 GHz (802.11ac) for the access point clients.

The Wirecutter recommends the "TP-Link AC1750 Wi-Fi Range Extender RE450"

And about my statement "I have not explored the fact that I have a Charter coax the runs into the bedroom and works":

No, a second cable modem would require a second Charter Internet account, you don't want to do that.

If you have a "home-run" coax from the room in question to a wired ethernet reachable location they make "MoCA" coax to ethernet bridges ... Actiontec MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter ($130 for a pair).

It seems with a coax "2-Way Splitter/Combiner" you could mix cable TV with the MoCA signals at the end with ethernet and coax available and the other end (bedroom ?) you would have cable TV and ethernet.

The main question with using MoCA is if you can identify the ends of the single coax, or is your coax daisy-chained throughout your house? It is best to identify a single coax to the room in question, but not necessarily required.

As far as using WiFi, the referenced TP-Link RE450 Range Extender looks good to my eye, provided you have a dual-band 2.4/5 GHz (802.11ac) main access point like a fairly recent Airport Extreme. Also best if your clients are 802.11ac.

Personally, I have two of the latest Airport Extreme's (2 years old) in bridge mode (Access Point) with Cat5e back-hauls connected to my main ethernet switch. For the record, I have never used WiFi extenders or MoCA bridges.

July 18Monday's News


Video: See all the best new features in Apple's macOS Sierra

Video: See all the best new features in Apple's macOS Sierra

Article Image Apple's forthcoming macOS Sierra update will focus on continuity and iCloud, further blurring the lines between the company's Mac lineup and its portable devices, like iPhone and iPad. AppleInsider offers a closer look at what's new in macOS Sierra. -- Appleinsider.

GlaxoSmithKline targets arthritis in first ResearchKit study by a drug company

GlaxoSmithKline targets arthritis in first ResearchKit study by a drug company

Apple's ResearchKit was quickly adopted by clinical studies at a series of universities and hospitals, but a new iOS app focused on rheumatoid arthritis from pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline marks the first time a drug company has made use of the framework. -- AppleInsider.


Gravity doesn't care about quantum spin

Gravity doesn't care about quantum spin

Physics, as you may have read before, is based around two wildly successful theories. On the grand scale, galaxies, planets, and all the other big stuff dance to the tune of gravity. But, like your teenage daughter, all the little stuff stares in bewildered embarrassment at gravity's dancing. Quantum mechanics is the only beat the little stuff is willing get down to. Unlike teenage rebellion, though, no one claims to understand what keeps relativity and quantum mechanics from getting along. -- Ars Technica.

China is worried Pokémon Go will uncover secret military bases

China is worried Pokémon Go will uncover secret military bases

With Pokémon Go mania running wild, did you really think the worst that might happen was some would-be Ash Ketchum stumbling across a dead body?

If so, your concerns are mild compared to those of people in China. Although the game isn't actually available there, rumors on Chinese social media claim that the game could be an attempt by Google and Nintendo to uncover details of secret military bases in the country. -- Cult of Mac.

One Man's Opinion: All Wi-Fi Extenders Suck

One Man's Opinion: All Wi-Fi Extenders Suck

I am trying to find a Wi-Fi Extender that WORKS. My dead spot is about 100 feet from my Wi-Fi base. It also goes through four walls. (No I can't move my base.)

I bought a Netgear WN3000RP. It's a piece of junk.

I need something that WORKS and that is easy to setup.

There are a lot of units advertised ranging from $30 to $200. I don't mind if is expensive (i.e., Apple Airport Extreme) as long as I KNOW that it works. And by works I mean that my signal at the end should be as good as at the base.

I know of no such device.

If you do know of such a device please share, as "She Who Must Be Obeyed" is not happy!

Results will, of course, be detailed here.

Thanks.

How to Make Pokémon Go Actually Useful

How to Make Pokémon Go Actually Useful

Maybe gaming isn't your thing, but you'd like to know what all the fuss is about Pokémon Go, the mobile game that in the second week since its release is already rivaling Twitter in popularity in the United States.

If you do decide to try it out, you may actually find it more useful than the typical diversion. -- New York Times.

Finding a Hard Drive in Just the Right Size

Finding a Hard Drive in Just the Right Size

Many lightweight laptops these days come with solid-state drives that have only 256 gigabytes or sometimes 512 gigabytes of space. Why are the drives so small? My old computer has a 500-gigabyte hard drive and I'm worried about fitting all my stuff. -- New York Times.

Artificial Intelligence Swarms Silicon Valley on Wings and Wheels

Artificial Intelligence Swarms Silicon Valley on Wings and Wheels

For more than a decade, Silicon Valley's technology investors and entrepreneurs obsessed over social media and mobile apps that helped people do things like find new friends, fetch a ride home or crowdsource a review of a product or a movie.

Now Silicon Valley has found its next shiny new thing. And it does not have a "Like" button. -- New York Times.

What's the Deal With 64-bit Office for Mac?

What's the Deal With 64-bit Office for Mac?

Microsoft Office 2016 for Mac is on the verge of moving to 64-bit. The good news is that the transition from 32-bit to 64-bit should be seamless for most users. There are, of course, still a few aspects worth knowing if you rely on Microsoft's productivity suite. Here's what longtime Office for Mac users need to know about the switch to 64-bit. -- The Mac Observer.

How-To: Understand the Wireless Diagnostics app on your Mac to analyze and improve your Wi-Fi network

How-To: Understand the Wireless Diagnostics app on your Mac to analyze and improve your Wi-Fi network

Apple ships a little-known utility app that helps you analyze and diagnose your Wi-Fi connection, called Wireless Diagnostics. Open the app by option-clicking on the Wi-Fi indicator in the menu bar and select 'Open Wireless Diagnostics …'. Although the app contains a lot of useful information, it isn't intuitively clear what you are supposed to do with it.

Frustrated by bad WiFi on Mac OS X? This guide may help you get better WiFi on your computer. -- 9to5Mac.

The end of plastic cards nears: Over 70,000 ATMs will soon support Touch ID withdrawals

The end of plastic cards nears: Over 70,000 ATMs will soon support Touch ID withdrawals

Following Bank of America's announcement that customers could withdraw cash from ATMs using Apple Pay, FIS and Payment Alliance International have today announced a new partnership that will allow users to perform cardless withdrawals using Touch ID, proving that the end of plastic cards is fast approaching. -- 9to5Mac.

How-To: Enable hands-free 'Hey Siri' voice activation on macOS Sierra

How-To: Enable hands-free 'Hey Siri' voice activation on macOS Sierra

At this year's WWDC 2016, Apple introduced the only feature I really cared about seeing making its move onto macOS: Siri. The voice assistant had finally found its way onto the next obvious platform. While I was excited to see it available, I wasn't ecstatic to see it would take a keyboard shortcut or icon click to launch it. That requirement made it feel like a step back in a world where nearly all of Apple's devices had begun moving to hands-free Siri activation. Thanks to a tip on Reddit, however, that is no longer the case if you're willing to do a little work upfront... -- 9to5Mac.

Apple, stop being stingy with the iCloud storage: Trying to make sense of Apple's approach to iCloud storage leaves you head-scratching

Apple, stop being stingy with the iCloud storage: Trying to make sense of Apple's approach to iCloud storage leaves you head-scratching

At the 2001 Macworld Expo in San Francisco, just before presenting iTunes to the world, Steve Jobs outlined Apple's Digital Hub strategy. He discussed the new digital devices that people carried around with them: cellphones, cameras, PDAs, music players, and more. Jobs' vision was that the Mac would become the digital hub, and that this would ensure the longevity of the personal computer. -- Macworld.

How to use iCloud Photo Library selectively

How to use iCloud Photo Library selectively

There are a couple of workarounds for when you want to keep a photo locally and not in iCloud.

In the past, I've said, sorry, it's all or nothing. Once you opt into iCloud Photo Library, all of your images are synced across all devices that use the same iCloud login and have iCloud Photo Library enabled, and the full-resolution versions of images and videos have to be stored in your iCloud account.

But I was being too restrictive in my thinking. There are ways around this situation, neither of which is ideal, but neither is completely a pain, either. -- Macworld.

Can You Find the iPhone on This Freaking Carpet?

Can You Find the iPhone on This Freaking Carpet?

There's an iPhone laying on this carpet. Can you see it?

You can't?

Don't worry -- you're not alone.

First spotted by Gizmodo, this photo was posted on Facebook by Jeya May Cruz. Cruz swears there's a phone in the photo, but it's nearly impossible to see at first glance. -- Gizmodo.

You've been charging your smartphone wrong

You've been charging your smartphone wrong

Yes, we know. Our smartphone batteries are bad because they barely last a day.

But it's partially our fault because we've been charging them wrong this whole time. -- Tech Insider.

Apple News is getting its own user agent analytics in iOS 10

Apple News is getting its own user agent analytics in iOS 10

Users of the Apple News service have been indistinguishable from the ones surfing through web views of in-app browsers -- until now. The Apple News User-Agent in iOS 9 was also the default for in-app browsers and didn't contain anything to separate it from other apps. It notably didn't contain the Safari component, at least setting it apart from the Safari web browser.

However, in iOS 10 Public Beta 1, a new User-Agent was introduced that, for the first time, advertises that the request is coming from the Apple News app. It seems pretty clear that iOS 10 will use a unique User-Agent for the Apple News app.

User agents are unique to every visitor on the web. They reveal a catalogue of technical data about the device and software that the visitor is using. User agents are also critical in controlling search engine robots. -- Slight Future.

How to troubleshoot an iPhone

How to troubleshoot an iPhone

Your iPhone is normally such a reliable device, you can easily forget that it's basically a complex portable computer. The telephone side rarely suffers problems, apart perhaps from the occasional signal blackspot. -- MacFormat.

First Look at Scrivener for iOS

First Look at Scrivener for iOS

Although I had various word processors available to me, I decided to use Literature & Latte's Scrivener, a Mac (and Windows) app tailored to the needs of creative writers. I had never actually used Scrivener for its intended purpose, even though I knew it quite well, having edited Kirk McElhearn's "Take Control of Scrivener 2," and this was a perfect opportunity for me to put theory into practice. -- TidBITS.

July 15Friday's News


Patent Illustrates Future iPhone having Backside Invisible 'Smart Connector' Port

Patent Illustrates Future iPhone having Backside Invisible 'Smart Connector' Port

On Tuesday new iPhone 7 Plus rumor photos surfaced supporting the notion that Apple's 'Smart Connector' will replace the bottom Lightning port for the top of the line model. One of Apple's patent applications today supports a backside iPhone 'Smart Connector' and goes one step further -- Patently Apple.


OS X: Using Safari's "Open Page With" Feature

OS X: Using Safari's

Safari's got a hidden way to help you open a page in another browser you've got installed, and this feature's really helpful for troubleshooting problems with websites. Melissa Holt's gonna give us the rundown in today's Quick Tip. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Disable the OS X Login Screen Saver

How to Disable the OS X Login Screen Saver

There may be times when you don't want the OS X login screen saver to kick in. This might apply when, for example, the screensaver engine is acting up, and you don't want it to activate, ever. John shows how. -- The Mac Observer.

How-To: Understand the Wireless Diagnostics app on your Mac to analyze and improve your Wi-Fi network

How-To: Understand the Wireless Diagnostics app on your Mac to analyze and improve your Wi-Fi network

Apple ships a little-known utility app that helps you analyze and diagnose your Wi-Fi connection, called Wireless Diagnostics. Open the app by option-clicking on the Wi-Fi indicator in the menu bar and select 'Open Wireless Diagnostics …'. Although the app contains a lot of useful information, it isn't intuitively clear what you are supposed to do with it. -- 9to5Mac.

How to run apps that are not from the App Store in macOS Sierra

How to run apps that are not from the App Store in macOS Sierra

One of the major changes in macOS Sierra isn't an obvious one, and you may not encounter it until you try to install an app that you didn't buy from the App Store. -- Macworld.

Ways of Getting Active Notifications to Your Mac

Ways of Getting Active Notifications to Your Mac

This is definitely the age of instant communications. Everyone expects you to be online and available almost all the time. Everyone has an online connection point that needs monitored and respected. Otherwise, you end up with unhappy customers and friends. -- Tuts+ .

How to Disable the OS X Login Screen Saver

How to Disable the OS X Login Screen Saver

There may be times when you don't want the OS X login screen saver to kick in. This might apply when, for example, the screensaver engine (ScreenSaverEngin) is acting up, and you don't want it to activate, ever. -- The Mac Observer.

Changing where files you download in Safari go on your Mac

Changing where files you download in Safari go on your Mac

Chances are, you download a lot of files on your Mac from day to day. Whether they're apps, work files, school files, photos, or something else you want to have on your computer, all those downloads have to go somewhere.

On the Mac, the default folder for downloads in Safari is the Downloads folder. In this tutorial, we'll show you how to change that so your downloaded files go somewhere else on your Mac. -- iDownload Blog.

OS X: Using Safari's 'Open Page With' Feature

OS X: Using Safari's 'Open Page With' Feature

Though it happens less often these days than it used to, I still occasionally run across websites that work better in Firefox or Chrome than in Safari. Luckily, Safari's got a little hidden menu option that makes trying a page in another browser a breeze! To turn this nifty feature on, what you'll do is click on the Safari menu at the upper-left corner of your screen and choose "Preferences." Then pick the Advanced tab. -- The Mac Observer.

How To Read All The Mac's Built In Manuals

How To Read All The Mac's Built In Manuals

As a certified geek and official Apple fan guy, I'm here to tell you there's more built into OS X than meets the eye. The Mac's venerable OS is built on various Unix components, and one of them is the library of manuals. -- Mac360.

Learning to code as a 30-year-old kid with Apple's Swift Playgrounds

Learning to code as a 30-year-old kid with Apple's Swift Playgrounds

If you've installed the iOS 10 public beta since it came out last week, you'll know that compatible iPads come loaded with the "Swift Playgrounds" app that Apple announced at WWDC.

A guided tour of the app and a chat with the team at Apple about its goals. -- Ars Technica.

How To Take Scrolling Screenshots On iPhone Or Android

How To Take Scrolling Screenshots On iPhone Or Android

You don't need to be a technology writer to have a need for taking screenshots, and if you have a need for taking screenshots, then it's entirely possible that you will have a need to take screenshots of something that's too long or tall to fit on a smartphone screen. Websites are a prime example of that, because sometimes, you just need to take a screenshot of an entire news article for example, and that just isn't going to fit in one screenshot. Not without help anyway. And help is exactly what the Apple's App Store for iOS and Google's Play Store for Android are full of, especially if you want to do something like take screenshots that are longer than your average. -- Redmond Pie.

Apple needs single sign-on to solve the tvOS adoption problem

Apple needs single sign-on to solve the tvOS adoption problem

Just ahead of Apple's recent annual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) held in San Francisco, we looked at the performance of tvOS apps. Analyzing activity from nearly 300,000 users, we found that tvOS apps retained poorly compared to their phone- or tablet-based sister apps.

Our conclusion was that any updates to tvOS must focus on solving this retention problem if tvOS is to be a success. -- TechCrunch.

Apple And A Definition Of Terms

Apple And A Definition Of Terms

Quick. Name the best smartphone money can buy. If you chose an Apple iPhone, why? What criteria determines the best of anything? Total sales? Number of satisfied owners? The results of an independent panel of qualified testers? -- McSolo.

How to remove your business location from Pokemon Go

How to remove your business location from Pokemon Go

Pokemon Go has taken mobile devices--and many businesses--by storm. For some it has been a boon, but if your business is suffering here's how to appeal your Gym or PokéStop status. -- Tech Republic.

July 14Thursday's News


Inside watchOS 3: Apple Watch's new 'Emergency SOS' call feature could save your life

Inside watchOS 3: Apple Watch's new 'Emergency SOS' call feature could save your life

Article Image The upcoming watchOS 3 update for Apple Watch brings a number of new functions to the wearable device's side button, including quick access to "Medical ID" data for first responders, and a new "Emergency SOS" function that can call 9-1-1 and notify loved ones. -- AppleInsider.

Latest iOS 10 beta enables support for live broadcasting

Latest iOS 10 beta enables support for live broadcasting

Article Image The latest iOS 10 beta appears to open up live streaming support for apps, as Apple originally promised during June's Worldwide Developer Conference. -- AppleInsider.

Dr. Mac's Guide to Apple Public Betas

Dr. Mac's Guide to Apple Public Betas

Apple public betas of macOS Sierra and iOS 10 came out last week. If you're not totally clear on what it means to install a beta operating system on your Mac or iOS devices, here's what you need to know. -- The Mac Observer.

A Deeper Look at Apple's 'Macintosh Problem'

A Deeper Look at Apple's 'Macintosh Problem'

Apple's overall Macintosh sales are in decline, for how long we don't know. The MacBook Pro is long over due for a refresh. Apple's Mac Pro has languished. The Mac mini, last updated in 2014, was less than intoxicating. What's happening? John takes a look. -- The Mac Observer.

Scrivener Coming to iOS July 20th

Scrivener Coming to iOS July 20th

I am all a tither! Literature & Latte announced Wednesday that Scrivener is coming to iOS on July 20th! Scrivener is the best writing environment I've found, but heretofore it's worked only on Mac and Windows. I'm not personally interested in writing on my iPad, but I am mega-interested in editing on my iPad. In fact, I do my serious read-throughs when editing fiction in iBooks. That's great, but being able to get into that reading mode with Scrivener directly in hand is going to be a big deal for me. There's no link yet, but L&L said it will be released July 20th at $19.99. -- The Mac Observer.

How to simulate tether-less 'Hey Siri' functionality on macOS Sierra like a pro

How to simulate tetherless 'Hey Siri' functionality on macOS Sierra like a pro

Apple advertises Siri as one of the headlining new features in the forthcoming macOS Sierra software update. Siri on the Mac performs in much the same way as it always has on an iPhone, iPad and iPod touch, except on the Mac tether-less 'Hey Siri' functionality is currently unsupported. -- iDownload Blog.


How do I stop Mac OS X El Capitan and the Safari browser from using my computer's location?

How do I stop Mac OS X El Capitan and the Safari browser from using my computer's location?

Apple's privacy policy states that the company collects the location data from its customers in a way that does not personally identify anyone, but if you would like to turn off the feature entirely, you can do so in the OS X system preferences. -- New York Times.


How to get Screen Sharing in Mac OS X's Messages to work again

How to get Screen Sharing in Mac OS X's Messages to work again

Mac OS X's Screen Sharing, by allowing me to view and control other people's Macs from my machine at home, has long proven to be a near-essential tool for me to help my friends and relatives with their Mac problems. Screen sharing is much more effective than attempting to address such matters via a phone call. As a bonus, screen sharing serves as a live video tutorial for the recipient. -- Ted Landau.

How to Disable (& Enable) Turbo Boost on a Mac

How to Disable (& Enable) Turbo Boost on a Mac

Many of the most modern Macs have processors which include a feature called Turbo Boost, this feature allows a processor to temporarily run above its standard clock rate when requested by the operating system. Turbo Boost can accelerate the performance of a Mac (or a PC for that matter) but it can also lead to increased energy usage, meaning the Mac may run hotter and the MacBook battery may drain faster when it is activated. Accordingly, some advanced Mac users may wish to toggle this feature themselves, manually disabling TurboBoost when they wish to prolong battery life at the expense of general computing performance. Of course, you can also re-enable Turbo Boost, which is the default state on modern Macs. -- OS X Daily.

How to set up repeating reminders on Mac and iOS

How to set up repeating reminders on Mac and iOS

Reminders are very useful for when you want to make sure you don't forget something, and all-too-often, you need a reminder for the same thing more than once at different intervals. -- iDownload Blog .

No honor among thieves: New ransomware takes your money, deletes files anyway

No honor among thieves: New ransomware takes your money, deletes files anyway

Ransomware is bad enough, but offers a sliver of hope to victims by promising to give them their files back if they obey instructions -- with the exception of a new strain which has been created for money and nothing else. -- ZDNet.


Get to know iOS 10's updated Apple News app with breaking news notifications

Get to know iOS 10's updated Apple News app with breaking news notifications

Apple first released News, its RSS-based reading app, with iOS 9. But in that year, the app has failed to impress the news junkies. In iOS 10, News gets a few new features and a subtle redesign in hopes to gain more traction as it competes with other platform publishing content like Facebook Instant Articles and Snapchat Discover. -- Macworld.

5 Tips To Make Your iPhone More Useful

5 Tips To Make Your iPhone More Useful

Apple touts iOS as the most advanced mobile operating system in the world. And there's actually a lot of truth in that claim. Apple's iOS is home to a multitude of impressive features and capabilities. In fact, a great many of these go beyond the requisite messaging, calling, browsing, picture-taking and social networking functions of iOS devices. -- AppAdvice.

Live Streaming Breaks Through, and Cable News Has Much to Fear

Live Streaming Breaks Through, and Cable News Has Much to Fear

But as they say on cable, we've just gotten word of some breaking news -- and it's not pretty. If you're watching on mute (which says something by itself, right?), you can consult this helpful Chyron: "Facebook to Swallow TV News, Just as It Has Everything Else." -- New York Times.

How to Revitalize Schools With Tech

How to Revitalize Schools With Tech

The L.A. school's tech integration problem didn't end there, according to Miller. Each new initiative seemed to meet with failure. iPads for teachers? The tablets collected dust. Laptops and projectors? The duds barely gained traction. Finally, the school brought in a local organization called PlanetBravo--and that's when everything changed. -- Fortune.

4TB SSD vs. 10MB Hard Disk Drive

4TB SSD vs. 10MB Hard Disk Drive

Technology has changed dramatically in the past few decades. Our computers-- mobile, desktop, or notebook-- are massively more powerful than devices just a few decades ago. By comparison, an iPhone is a supercomputer from another dimension when compared to DOS-based PCs of yesteryear. -- NoodleMac.

July 13Wednesday's News


macOS Sierra may expand use of Dark Mode to native app backgrounds

macOS Sierra may expand use of Dark Mode to native app backgrounds

Article Image When macOS Sierra launches this fall, it might include an improved Dark Mode which carries the theme beyond just the Dock and menu bar, according to posts by a developer on Twitter. -- AppleInsider.

For the first time, federal judge tosses evidence obtained via stingray

For the first time, federal judge tosses evidence obtained via stingray

On Thursday, a US federal judge in New York delivered a crucial rebuke to the government's warrantless use of stingrays.

In a 14-page opinion, the judge ruled that the government could not use its stingray to locate a drug suspect, asleep in his apartment. As a result of the ruling, the judge suppressed the evidence found in the man's bedroom--a kilogram of cocaine--likely effectively ending the case. -- Ars Technica.

How to install the macOS Sierra public beta the right way

How to install the macOS Sierra public beta the right way

If you've been thinking about downloading and installing the latest macOS Sierra public beta, but you're worried it might be too difficult, Cult of Mac is here to help.

Although using beta releases on your primary computer isn't recommended, a lot of people (including myself) just can't wait until the public release later this fall to try out the latest features Apple has to offer.

We've gone ahead and installed the public beta to bring you this handy step-by-step tutorial video. -- Cult of Mac.

How to install iOS 10 public beta the right way

How to install iOS 10 public beta the right way

The iOS 10 public beta is finally here! It's never a great idea to install beta releases on a primary device, but many of us just can't wait to get our hands on the latest features. Fortunately, if you update properly, there's an easy route back if you decide it's just not stable enough for you.

Our helpful step-by-step tutorial video that will walk you through the whole process! -- Cult of Mac.

Fun new iOS app is like karaoke for movie fans

Fun new iOS app is like karaoke for movie fans

A star of silver and television screens wants to help others become stars of the small screen -- their iPhone screens that is -- with an iOS app that lets users act out their favorite movie scenes. -- Cult of Mac.

The New Health Care: Using the Web or an App Instead of Seeing a Doctor? Caution Is Advised

The New Health Care: Using the Web or an App Instead of Seeing a Doctor? Caution Is Advised

Before they see a doctor, most patients turn to websites and smartphone apps.

Caution is advised. Research shows they aren't very good. -- New York Times.

Apple Granted 34 Patents Today Covering an Advanced Transit Connectivity System, the iPod Touch WiFi & More

Apple Granted 34 Patents Today Covering an Advanced Transit Connectivity System, the iPod Touch WiFi & More

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 34 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. In this particular report we cover Apple's latest transit related patent that uniquely covers subways where using GPS is close to impossible to rely on... -- Patently Apple.


In iOS 10 beta, anyone can reply to your iMessages from the lock screen even when disabled

In iOS 10 beta, anyone can reply to your iMessages from the lock screen even when disabled

At least in the current beta seed, the iOS 10 lock screen has a bit of a loophole due to the new expanded notification system that developers and public beta users should be aware of. In short: anyone can view and reply to iMessages or text messages from the lock screen without entering the device passcode or authenticating with Touch ID. This security issue persists even while the 'Reply With Message' setting is disabled and applies to other apps like Twitter as well. -- 9to5Mac.

Open casting call posted for Apple's 'Planet of the Apps' reality TV show

Open casting call posted for Apple's 'Planet of the Apps' reality TV show

Television production company Propagate on Tuesday announced the start of an open casting call for "Planet of the Apps," an original series about the app economy coproduced by Apple. -- Planet Of The Apps.


Video walkthrough: all the changes and refinements in macOS Sierra beta 2

Video walkthrough: all the changes and refinements in macOS Sierra beta 2

A second beta of macOS Sierra was released to Apple's registered developers and public beta testers last week. In addition to turning on an anticipated new feature called Auto Unlock, the second beta of Sierra (build number "16A239j") packs in iTunes 12.5, Dark Mode assets for some stock apps, a change of the Siri keyboard shortcut--which was clunky to begin with--and more.

Here's our video overview of everything that has changed in macOS Sierra beta 2 since its inaugural developer-only release at WWDC 2106. -- iDownload Blog.

How to avoid Mac malware by using Gatekeeper and common sense

How to avoid Mac malware by using Gatekeeper and common sense

Two new attacks on Mac users and a coming change in macOS Sierra show that educating users beats malware.

The best weapon against Mac malware is your mind: recognizing the key aspects of illegitimate software, and configuring your Mac correctly, go a long way toward avoiding a takeover. We've seen two new examples of OS X malware in the last week--Backdoor.MAC.Eleanor and OSX/Keydnap, both of which are blocked from executing unless a Mac's settings are too liberal. The ability to set a Mac to be vulnerable is about to change for the better in macOS Sierra, too. -- Macworld.

Mail in iOS 10: Under-the-radar changes make your inbox easier to manage

Mail in iOS 10: Under-the-radar changes make your inbox easier to manage

Mail didn't get the radical overhaul that Messages did in iOS 10, but some small tweaks are coming.

Apple didn't lavish love on Mail like it did Messages in iOS 10, but that's probably for the best. Can you imagine sending full-screen fireworks, stickers, or handwritten scrawls via email? No thanks. -- Macworld.

Apple computers are expensive -- here's how to build your own superfast Mac at a fraction of the price

Apple computers are expensive -- here's how to build your own superfast Mac at a fraction of the price

Apple computers are great, but they're often very expensive.

So what's the solution if you want a super-powerful Mac computer without paying that high price tag? Build your own, of course! -- Tech Insider.


Apple Music libraries wiped after downloading Pokémon Go - How to get your songs back

Apple Music libraries wiped after downloading Pokémon Go - How to get your songs back

iPhone owners and would-be Pokémon Go players living in countries where the game is yet to officially launch have expressed outrage after a trick to get a copy caused all of their Apple Music tracks to vanish. -- Telegraph.


How to see what's using storage on your Apple TV

How to see what's using storage on your Apple TV

Apple TV self-manages storage using on-demand resources (ODR). That means, whether you have 32 GB or 64 GB of space, tvOS will work silently in the background to unload old files and download new ones. So, in a perfect world, you'll never have to worry about it or even look at it. But we don't live in a perfect world, do we? That's why you can still go to Settings to see what exactly is using up your storage space. And, if you really want to, even delete it before ODR does! -- iMore.

The Coolest New Technology In iPhone 7

The Coolest New Technology In iPhone 7

Yes, indeed ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, guys and dolls, nobody thinks as different as Apple. Until the company falls woefully behind in the popularity of functionality the buying public thinks is best.

We all know what's coming. iOS 10. iPhone 7. We know the iPhone will have an improved camera, and iOS 10 will have some additional functionality that makes it easier to use, right? Think improved Notifications, widgets on the lock screen, and cool new technology worthy of a Kardashian. -- Mac360.

How Technology Disrupted the Truth

How Technology Disrupted the Truth

Social media has swallowed the news -- threatening the funding of public-interest reporting and ushering in an era when everyone has their own facts. But the consequences go far beyond journalism. -- The Guardian.

FBI Agent: Decrypting Data 'Fundamentally Alters' Evidence

FBI Agent: Decrypting Data 'Fundamentally Alters' Evidence

An FBI agent has brought up an interesting question about the nature of digital evidence: Does decrypting encrypted data "fundamentally alter" it, therefore contaminating it as forensic evidence?

According to a hearing transcript filed last week, FBI Special Agent Daniel Alfin suggested just that. -- Motherboard.

July 12Tuesday's News


HTTPS is not a magic bullet for Web security

HTTPS is not a magic bullet for Web security

We're in the midst of a major change sweeping the Web: the familiar HTTP prefix is rapidly being replaced by HTTPS. That extra "S" in an HTTPS URL means your connection is secure and that it's much harder for anyone else to see what you're doing. And on today's Web, everyone wants to see what you're doing. -- Ars Technica.

Now it's easy to see if leaked passwords work on other sites

Now it's easy to see if leaked passwords work on other sites

Over the past few months, a cluster of megabreaches has dumped account credentials for a mind-boggling 642 million accounts into the public domain, where they can then be used to compromise other accounts that are protected by the same password. Now, there's software that can streamline this vicious cycle by testing for reused passcodes on Facebook and other popular sites. -- Ars Technica.

iOS version of Pokémon Go is a possible privacy train wreck

iOS version of Pokémon Go is a possible privacy trainwreck

Niantic has confirmed in a statement that the Pokémon Go app requests more permissions than it needs, but that it has not accessed any user information. Google will automatically push a fix on its end to reduce the app's permissions, and Niantic will release an update to the app to make it request fewer permissions in the first place. -- Ars Technica.

Pokémon Go catches all your Google data (here's how to stop it)

Pokémon Go catches all your Google data (here's how to stop it)

Pokémon hunters that have been running around the city trying to catch 'em all are putting themselves in danger and it has nothing to do with battling a level 50 Charizard. -- Cult of Mac.

Thinking about Big Data -- Part Three (the final and somewhat scary part)

Thinking about Big Data -- Part Three (the final and somewhat scary part)

BigDataIn part one we learned about data and how it can be used to find knowledge or meaning. Part two explained the term Big Data and showed how it became an industry mainly in response to economic forces. This is part three, where it all has to fit together and make sense -- rueful, sometimes ironic, and occasionally frightening sense. You see our technological, business, and even social futures are being redefined right now by Big Data in ways we are only now coming to understand and may no longer be able to control. -- I, Cringely.

Smart Doesn't Always Mean an Easy Home

Smart Doesn't Always Mean an Easy Home

There's a reason they call them Smart Homes, not Easy Homes.

Just ask Ken Hutchinson. Mr. Hutchinson is a tech professional who wanted the option of controlling the lights at his family's century-old, eight-bedroom Brooklyn Victorian by phone, to make it look occupied when the family was away. In 2013, he bought Z-Wave wireless home automation components to control the outdoor and indoor lights, some wall outlets and a door lock. -- New York Times.

Apple Needs Supercomputer Expertise to Compete

Apple Needs Supercomputer Expertise to Compete

just over a decade ago, Apple was very much into supercomputers. Organizations were building large supercomputers and small clusters with Apple's Xserves. But Apple got out of that business and then discontinued the Xserve. One can only wonder what the impact would have been if Apple had decided to maintain its in-house expertise with supercomputers. Today, companies with the best supercomputer power will have a competitive edge. Page 2 of Particle Debris discusses. -- The Mac Observer.

Comment: Pokémon Go -- I just don't get it (but everyone else does)

Comment: Pokémon Go -- I just don't get it (but everyone else does)

Take a quick look at the landscape of the Internet since last week and it's quite apparent that Pokémon Go has taken over the planet. Nintendo's market cap jumped $9 billion since last Wednesday, at least five of the top Techmeme stories right now are about Pokémon, and my mother-in-law (!) knows where to find all the Pokéstops and gyms around town. Seriously.

The phenomenon is really impressive, but I really don't understand it. -- 9to5Mac.

How to combine two PDF files into one with Preview on Mac

How to combine two PDF files into one with Preview on Mac

PDF files are very useful for a number of reasons. They're easy to share and easy to open and read on just about any platform.

Besides the point, let's say you had two or more PDF files on your Mac that you wanted to combine into one single PDF file. How would you do that?

We'll show you how to merge two or more PDF files into a single PDF file with the Preview app on your Mac in this tutorial. -- iDownload Blog.

iOS 10 has changed the way I use my iPhone

iOS 10 has changed the way I use my iPhone

iOS 10, which launches this fall, is the biggest iPhone update in years.

I've been testing the beta version of iOS 10 for a few days, and so far my favorite new feature is the lock screen. It's already changed the way I use my iPhone. -- Tech Insider .

Toward a Smarter Software Future

Toward a Smarter Software Future

The more I think about the recent breakthroughs in machine learning and deep learning algorithms, the more I think we are finally heading toward a smarter software future. -- Tech.pinions.

A Few Words On Apple's Famous 'Lock In'

A Few Words On Apple's Famous 'Lock In'

This thing called vendor lock-in is real and we see it everywhere. Buy a new car and warranty work needs to be performed by the dealer. Buy an Apple gift card at a discount and you're stuck buying whatever from Apple and nowhere else. -- NoodleMac.

IT Says Their Anonymity Network Is More Secure Than Tor

IT Says Their Anonymity Network Is More Secure Than Tor

Following the recent vulnerabilities in Tor, researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory and the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne have been working on a new anonymity network that they say is more secure than Tor. -- PCMAG.

July 11Monday's News


iPhone 7 and Apple's next Retina Display frontier: Wide Color

iPhone 7 and Apple's next Retina Display frontier: Wide Color

Article Image In 2010, Steve Jobs introduced a new leap forward in display resolution for iPhone 4 that passed up the rest of the industry to deliver pixels virtually invisible to the human eye. For iPhone 7, Apple appears to be making a similar leap in the realm of "Retina Color." -- AppleInsider.

Profile highlights blind Apple engineer working on accessibility tech

Profile highlights blind Apple engineer working on accessibility tech

Article Image A profile published on Sunday details the experiences and work of Jordyn Castor, a blind Apple engineer now developing technologies like VoiceOver with company's accessibility design and quality team. -- AppleInsider.

HTTPS crypto's days are numbered. Here's how Google wants to save it

HTTPS crypto's days are numbered. Here's how Google wants to save it

Like many forms of encryption in use today, HTTPS protections are on the brink of a collapse that could bring down the world as we know it. Hanging in the balance are most encrypted communications sent over the last several decades. On Thursday, Google unveiled an experiment designed to head off, or at least lessen, the catastrophe. -- Ars Technica.

What is Apple's most underrated product?

What is Apple's most underrated product?

Not every Apple product has been a runaway success, but that doesn't mean those that weren't were complete failures. Products like the Newton MessagePad, the G4 Cube, the Macintosh TV, and even the iPhone 5c -- which were all considered flops -- had great features and innovations that weren't appreciated. -- Cult of Mac.

How-To: Use Final Cut Pro X's proxy media feature to edit 4K video on the MacBook [Video]

How-To: Use Final Cut Pro X's proxy media feature to edit 4K video on the MacBook [Video]

I love my 2016 MacBook for a variety of reasons, but there are still some areas where its Core M processor struggles to keep up. When it comes to exporting 4K video, the MacBook shines due to Intel Quick Sync Video hardware encoding. Editing 4K video, however, is much more taxing on the MacBook, especially when employing various effects and color correction. -- 9to5Mac.

File converter app dangerous Mac malware in disguise

File converter app dangerous Mac malware in disguise

According to an alert issued by Intego, makers of VirusBarrier, the EasyDoc Converter app is the latest in Mac malware. It's a fake Mac OS X app that's masquerading as a drag-and-drop file converter. Instead of converting your files, it drops a malicious code script onto your unsuspecting Mac. -- Canoe.com .

Photos: The ultimate guide

Photos: The ultimate guide

If your iPhone or iPad is the best camera you have with you, then the Photos app is your best camera's best friend!

The Photos app is a repository for all the pictures and videos you shoot or save with your iPhone or iPad. Not only can you use the Photos app to organize and find those special moments and memories you've captured, but you can use it to share them directly, through social networks, on the big screen, as prints, and more. -- iMore.

How to Use Siri on Your Mac

How to Use Siri on Your Mac

Five years after Siri showed up on iPhones, Apple's virtual assistant has finally come to the Mac with macOS Sierra. It's bringing a few new skills specific to your laptop or desktop, which makes Siri a useful addition.

To use make the most of Siri, you'll need to know the new skills it brings to the table. Here's how to use Siri on your Mac.

The first steps are easy. -- LAPTOP Magazine.

How to create a bootable macOS Sierra installer drive

How to create a bootable macOS Sierra installer drive

Apple uses its App Store to distribute its software, like new Mac operating systems. It's convenient, but sometimes it can take a while for a download to finish. And if you have multiple Macs, it's inefficient to download the new OS to each and every Mac. -- Macworld.

How to Add Image Editing Extensions to Apple Photos

How to Add Image Editing Extensions to Apple Photos

Apple Photos offers some image editing tools such as Enhance and red-eye removal, but you can supercharge the app's editor with extensions from third parties.

You can get extensions from apps sold in the Mac App Store such as Pixelmator (which provides distort and retouch features), Noiseless (which removes digital noise that results from photos taken in low lighting conditions) and Intensify (which helps images pop). Here's how to enable extensions. -- LAPTOP Magazine.

How to Use Memories in the Photos App on Mac

How to Use Memories in the Photos App on Mac

Apple reworked the Photos App in macOS Sierra to make photos easier to find and to showcase moments that you've captured. For example, you'll be able to search for "dog" and get all of the pictures you've taken of dogs. Photos also has facial recognition so you can search for specific people. But the biggest, most beautiful way to view your photos is with the brand new Memories features. -- LAPTOP Magazine .

How To Fix Your Mac's Screen

How To Fix Your Mac's Screen

Wait. What? There's something wrong with the Mac's screen? It depends. These days you hear about and read plenty of news which says computer screens-- Mac, iPhone, iPad-- are bad for your eyes. -- TeraTalks.

Here are the 2016 iPhone Photography Award winners

Here are the 2016 iPhone Photography Award winners

The iPhone Photography Awards (iPPA) is a yearly competition that sees some incredible photographs submitted, which were all captured on an iPhone. The winners for 2016 have been unveiled and the standard has never been higher. Submissions were received from 139 countries worldwide and awards for first, second, and third place were handed out in 19 separate categories. -- iMore.

Now the 100 individual privacy settings you need to set on your phone can be done in a single app

Now the 100 individual privacy settings you need to set on your phone can be done in a single app

When it comes to privacy controls, we may now have too much of a good thing. Smartphone owners must now make more than 100 privacy decisions about how how much data their apps can share on Apple's iOs and Google's Android operating systems. That number will only climb as privacy settings affect more of our devices and software. -- Quartz.

iOS 10's Control Center fixes Apple's longstanding mess at last: Live long and uncluttered

iOS 10's Control Center fixes Apple's longstanding mess at last: Live long and uncluttered

When Apple introduced iOS 7 in the summer of 2013, the software came with the biggest visual overhaul in the mobile OS's history. Alongside flat design icons and a more modern and Jony Ive-inspired approach was one of iOS's much-needed features: Control Center. It was a slide-up tool drawer -- enjoyed in similar form by Android users for quite some time -- to turn on and off Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, access useful stock functions like the flashlight and camera, and quickly change screen brightness. It was also a giant, complicated mess. -- The Verge.

How I learned to stop worrying and embrace the iOS 10 beta on my old iPad

How I learned to stop worrying and embrace the iOS 10 beta on my old iPad

If you're anything like me, the idea of putting beta software on the phone you rely on every day is, quite frankly, terrifying. I want to see every new iOS feature in action, but I'd rather use an older device as my sacrificial lamb for the beta gods (or…something along those lines). -- Macworld.

iOS 10 will make you love your lockscreen

iOS 10 will make you love your lockscreen

Apple is gearing up to launch iOS 10 this fall, and will deliver many changes to the software used daily by hundreds of millions of people. You can see some of these changes right now via the public beta of iOS 10 that was released this week. I wouldn't recommend installing it on your phone right now -- the beta is very unfinished and there are lots of bugs -- but it can give you an idea of what's to come. -- The Verge.

How to set up your iPhone with CarPlay

How to set up your iPhone with CarPlay

With select cars and stereos, you can use CarPlay to get directions, make calls, send and receive messages, and more. -- AppleCare Knowledge Base.

How to Reset Apple TV Before Selling It

How to Reset Apple TV

It's surprising how often I hear from people who forget to delete all their films, music and other personal data when selling or giving away an Apple TV. -- About Tech.

Your guide to secret iPhone codes

Your guide to secret iPhone codes

Your iPhone has been keeping secrets from you. But now you can learn how to use them yourself.

Every iPhone has a hidden "Field Test Mode" that will reveal helpful details like its signal strength and unique identifiers like its IMEI number. These aren't normal features that you can find in your device's Settings menu, which is where the secret codes come into play. -- The Daily Dot .

Can you wait three years to upgrade your iPhone?

Can you wait three years to upgrade your iPhone?

I've been on a two-year iPhone upgrade cycle ever since I bought my first iPhone, the iPhone 3G in 2008. Since then I've owned the 4, 5, and 6 Plus, skipping the speedier and higher specced "S" models that shared the same industrial design. This approach worked out well with my two-year contracts, allowing me to switch carriers twice without penalty over the years. Now, I'm faced with a dilemma. My phone is almost two-years old and the 2016 iPhones are said to be relatively unchanged. Apple's flagship refresh is now rumored for 2017, thus breaking the traditional two-year tick-tock release cycle. -- The Verge.

Six technological breakthroughs inspired by nature

Six technological breakthroughs inspired by nature

Biomimicry is an incredible field that seeks to unlock nature's deepest, darkest secrets and then use them to solve human problems. Many of the scientific breakthroughs in biomimicry have far-reaching applications ranging from new medical technologies, to methods of space exploration, advancements in renewable energy and better, cleaner and stronger building materials. The approach investigates nature's designs and seeks to replicate its processes to improve people's lives in the most efficient way possible. Inspiration can come from the most unlikely places, including long-extinct dinosaurs, sticky-footed geckos, deep sea creatures and even the structure of the tiniest green leaf. Read on to learn just a few examples of how scientists are mimicking the amazing abilities of plants and animals. -- Engadget.

Decision-making algorithms: Is anyone making sure they're right?

Decision-making algorithms: Is anyone making sure they're right

Data-driven algorithms are making decisions that affect many aspects of our lives, and that may be a problem.

"While there may be efficiency gains from these techniques, they can also harbor biases against disadvantaged groups or reinforce structural discrimination," writes Nicholas Diakopoulos, assistant professor of journalism, University of Maryland, in his The Conversation piece We need to know the algorithms the government uses to make important decisions about us. "The public needs to understand the bias and power of algorithms used in the public sphere." -- TechRepublic.

Has Physics Gotten Something Really Important Really Wrong?

Has Physics Gotten Something Really Important Really Wrong?

Some researchers now see popular ideas like string theory and the multiverse as highly suspect. These physicists feel our study of the cosmos has been taken too far from what data can constrain with the extra "hidden" dimensions of string theory and the unobservable other universes of the multiverse... it all adds up to muddied waters and something some researchers see as a "crisis in physics. -- NPR.

Do We Need A Better Private Browsing Mode?

Do We Need A Better Private Browsing Mode?

Many browsers have some type of 'private' browsing. The settings aren't enough, though, to offer real protection.

Many web browsers have some variation of "private" browsing mode. In that mode, websites shouldn't be able to read cookies stored on your computer, nor should they be able to place permanent cookies onto your computer. (They think they can place cookies, but those cookies are deleted at the end of the session.) -- Network World.

July 08Friday's News


How to skip the airport's US Customs line with your iPhone

How to skip the airport's US Customs line with your iPhone

Article Image An iPhone app authorized by U.S. Customs and Border Protection allows users to submit entry information over the internet after landing, allowing them to skip the line at the airport and potentially re-enter the country much faster than usual. -- AppleInsider.

Apple's new 'starter guides' help educators integrate iPad, iOS into curriculum

Apple's new 'starter guides' help educators integrate iPad, iOS into curriculum

Article Image In a bid to extend its reach into the educational technology market, Apple on Thursday released a set of guidebooks designed to help educators better implement products like iPad and iOS apps into classroom activities. -- AppleInsider.


iOS 10 preview: Apple goes back to ignoring the iPad in a wide-ranging update

iOS 10 preview: Apple goes back to ignoring the iPad in a wide-ranging update

I've spent most of the last six months buying a house, so you'll need to forgive me if I have houses and house metaphors on the brain. I've found them helpful while trying to nail down iOS 10. -- Ars Technica.

This is iOS 10 beta 2 in action

This is iOS 10 beta 2 in action

When Apple rolled out iOS 10 beta 2 earlier this week, I rushed to install it straight onto my trusty iPhone -- and I had my camera ready to give you a hands-on look at everything that's new. -- Cult of Mac.

Users locked out of Apple ID after updating to iOS 10 beta 2

Users locked out of Apple ID after updating to iOS 10 beta 2

Some users have been locked out of their Apple IDs after installing the second iOS 10 beta that was rolled out to registered developers Tuesday. The bug causes testers to be signed out of their devices "for security reasons," and then prevents them from resetting their passwords. -- Cult of Mac.

New Mac malware proves you shouldn't disable Gatekeeper

New Mac malware proves you shouldn't disable Gatekeeper

Yet another strain of malware targeted at Mac users has popped up this week to prove you shouldn't disable the Gatekeeper feature baked into OS X. "OSX/Keydnap" disguises itself as an innocent text or image file, then installs malicious code onto your Mac. -- Cult of Mac.

Thinking about Big Data -- Part Two

Thinking about Big Data -- Part Two

BigDataIn Part One of this series of columns we learned about data and how computers can be used for finding meaning in large data sets. We even saw a hint of what we might call Big Data at Amazon.com in the mid-1990s, as that company stretched technology to observe and record in real time everything its tens of thousands of simultaneous users were doing. Pretty impressive, but not really Big Data, more like Bigish Data. The real Big Data of that era was already being gathered by outfits like the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA) and the UK Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) -- spy operations that were recording digital communications even though they had no easy way to decode and find meaning in it. Government tape libraries were being filled to overflowing with meaningless gibberish. -- I, Cringely.

Some Apps Are Slow by Design

Some Apps Are Slow by Design

Mark Wilson, writing for Fast Company, reveals that many apps -- both those that run locally on your devices and Web apps -- are intentionally slowed down, because users don't trust apps that work too quickly. For instance, Facebook displays a fake loading bar when performing a security checkup, giving the impression of deep thought. Similarly, Wells Fargo had to slow down its mobile app's retinal scanner because customers didn't realize that it had worked so quickly. Wilson lists other examples of artificial waiting introduced into apps, because people have a hard time trusting things that are too fast. -- Fast Company.

Critics of Police Welcome Facebook Live and Other Tools to Stream Video

Critics of Police Welcome Facebook Live and Other Tools to Stream Video

After killings of black men by the police this week, scores of African-Americans declared on social media that they would equip themselves with tools to stream video live. -- New York Times.


How to use Auto Unlock with watchOS 3 and macOS Sierra beta 2

How to use Auto Unlock with watchOS 3 and macOS Sierra beta 2

Auto Unlock is now available in macOS Sierra Developer Preview Seed 2, and on Tuesday, we demonstrated how it works with our hands-on video. Yet, there are still many lingering questions about Auto Unlock, such as hardware requirements, range requirements, etc. In the following post, we address some of the questions that you've posted in the comments and submitted via email. -- 9to5Mac.

The Internet of Things Too Far?

The Internet of Things Too Far?


A 64-bit version of Microsoft Office is finally coming to the Mac

A 64-bit version of Microsoft Office is finally coming to the Mac

Apple hasn't supported 32-bit Macs since 2011 when Mac OS X 10.7 Lion was released. Obviously, it's been quite a while since Apple made a 32-bit Mac at all.

You might even think that Office 2016 is a 64-bit application because of this. It's not. Today, Microsoft is finally making a 64-bit build of the productivity suite available, but only to Office Insiders for the time being. -- Neowin.

A Reality Check About the Next iOS and macOS

A Reality Check About the Next iOS and macOS

As most of you know, Apple launched iOS 10 and macOS Sierra at the Worldwide Developers Conference in June. This is the norm for Apple in recent years. Joined by tvOS 10 and watchOS 3, Apple paraded a wealth of new features meant to entice you to upgrade. Or perhaps buy new gear that would put the new features to better use. -- The Tech Night Owl.

Audio Review -- Yamaha R-N301 Network Receiver, Great for Wired AirPlay Streaming

Audio Review -- Yamaha R-N301 Network Receiver, Great for Wired AirPlay Streaming

I listen to music a lot in my home office. I play music from my iTunes library and from a CD player (yes, I'm nostalgic), and I have a full stereo setup, with bookshelf speakers on my desk. I long ago realized that you can have much better sound with a real receiver than with even expensive speakers that you plug into a computer. And it's a lot more flexible too, allowing you to connect other inputs. -- Kirkville.

iOS 10 tidbit: warning message when launching apps that aren't 64-bit compliant

iOS 10 tidbit: warning message when launching apps that aren't 64-bit compliant

In April 2015, Apple reminded developers that as of June 2015 all apps and app updates submitted to the App Store must include 64-bit support. After more than a year, some apps are still stuck on 32 bits and lack support for 64-bit devices. iOS 10 takes a naming and shaming approach by including a brand new warning message that appears when you open a 32-bit app on a 64-bit iPhone, iPad or iPod touch. -- iDownload Blog.

Five security settings in iOS 10 you should immediately change

Five security settings in iOS 10 you should immediately change

Apple's latest operating system, iOS 10, is out -- albeit in a limited, public preview. Anyone can download the software for iPhone and iPad to see what's new.

These tweaks will lock down your iPhone or iPad to protect your privacy. -- ZDNet.

Is the Apple Store the worst place to buy Apple products?

Is the Apple Store the worst place to buy Apple products?

With Apple blessing discounts of its products in other stores such as Best Buy, it makes less sense to shop in Apple Stores for Apple products. -- CNET.

Your heirs may not get your digital goodies when you die

Your heirs may not get your digital goodies when you die

You may not know it but when you "buy" digital content such as books, music and movies from Apple and Amazon, you're not actually buying them but renting them. As more people realize this, it's unlikely they'll reconsider making physical purchases instead of digital ones. But this needs to change. -- Apple World Today.

July 07Thursday's News


New Mac malware can remotely access FaceTime camera, but macOS Gatekeeper users are protected

New Mac malware can remotely access FaceTime camera, but macOS Gatekeeper users are protected

Article Image A new piece of Mac-targeting malware is in the wild, potentially allowing hackers to remotely execute code and even control the FaceTime camera on a user's computer, but Apple's own Gatekeeper security prevents the unsigned app from being installed. -- AppleInsider.


Apple issues fifth betas of iOS 9.3.3, OS X 10.11.6 & tvOS 9.2.2 to developers, public testers

Apple issues fifth betas of iOS 9.3.3, OS X 10.11.6 & tvOS 9.2.2 to developers, public testers

Article Image Just a week after the fourth betas arrived, Apple has provided both developers and public testers with fifth pre-release betas of iOS 9.3.3 and OS X El Capitan 10.11.6, forthcoming maintenance and security updates. -- AppleInsider.


Apple's second iOS 10 beta includes unencrypted 32-bit bootloader, RAM Disk, more

Apple's second iOS 10 beta includes unencrypted 32-bit bootloader, RAM Disk, more

Article Image Apple turned heads in June when it released a preview version of iOS 10 containing an unencrypted kernel cache, a significant shift in software security policy meant to streamline system performance, and analysis shows the company is building on those efforts with the second beta release. -- AppleInsider.

After hiatus, in-the-wild Mac backdoors are suddenly back

After hiatus, in-the-wild Mac backdoors are suddenly back

After taking a hiatus, Mac malware is suddenly back, with three newly discovered strains that have access to Web cameras, password keychains, and pretty much every other resource on an infected machine. -- Ars Technica.

Safari Technology Preview 8 paves the way for Apple Pay

Safari Technology Preview 8 paves the way for Apple Pay

Apple rolled out Safari Technology Preview 8 for developers today, an update that paves the way for Apple Pay, which will make online shopping even easier this fall. -- Cult of Mac.

'New Way of Stealing Cars': Hacking Them With A Laptop

'New Way of Stealing Cars': Hacking Them With A Laptop

CBS and Marketwatch all lead the morning with stories about the newest method of stealing (late model) cars. No need for hacking off the ignition switch and touching the wires to create a spark (controversial during broadcasts in 1970s television crime criticized for "teaching people to steal cars"). Thieves now use the laptop to access the automobile's computer system, and voila. -- Marketwatch.

OS X: Create a One-Click Dock Folder Alias

OS X: Create a One-Click Dock Folder Alias

Today's Quick Tip is about folder shortcuts you can put in the Dock; there's actually a really easy way to use them to open folders in Finder. Since Melissa Holt's not the biggest fan of navigating through files from the Dock, she's going to walk us through this productivity trick! -- The Mac Observer.

How Not to Lose Your Apple Pencil

How Not to Lose Your Apple Pencil

I love using the Apple Pencil with my iPad Pro, but I seem to misplace it all the time. The thought of replacing it for $99 causes my heart to skip a beat every time. You'd think Apple, with its legendary attention to detail, would include a place to stash the Apple Pencil. But you'd be wrong. There's no place to store it on the iPad Pro, and no place to store it on Smart Keyboards, Smart Cases, or Smart Covers, either. -- The Mac Observer.

How to Clear Mac's Browser Cache: Chrome, Firefox and Safari

How to Clear Mac's Browser Cache: Chrome, Firefox and Safari

Sometimes it's desirable to make sure one is looking at the very latest web pages, sometimes for casual use, often for news or development work. To do that means emptying the browser's saved cache and reloading a fresh page. John shows how to do that for three popular browsers on the Mac. -- The Mac Observer.

50 new iOS 10 beta 2 features [Video]

50 new iOS 10 beta 2 features [Video]

iOS 10 beta 2 was released earlier today, and it comes with a plethora of new, often subtle, tweaks and changes. We already told you about many of the updates found in this latest iOS 10 beta, but now allow us to show you even more of the changes and tweaks via our hands-on video walkthrough. -- 9to5Mac.

Hands-on with Voicemail Transcription in iOS 10 beta 2 [Video]

Hands-on with Voicemail Transcription in iOS 10 beta 2 [Video]

Apple appears to be slowly rolling out its new voicemail transcription feature to iOS 10 beta users, as the feature just appeared on my iPhone 6s in the last few minutes.

Voicemail transcription is exactly like it sounds: it processes audio from voicemails and displays the message in text form right from within the voicemail interface inside the built-in Phone app. -- 9to5Mac.

How to downgrade from macOS Sierra back to OS X El Capitan

How to downgrade from macOS Sierra back to OS X El Capitan

If you decide the developer beta of macOS Sierra is not working out for you, you can downgrade back to OS X El Capitan.

The macOS Sierra developer beta is ready for downloading. If you've given it a whirl and decided you don't like what you see, you can go back to OS X El Capitan. Downgrading is a bit of a complex process, but it is fairly simple if you follow the steps. -- iMore.

Should You Upgrade to Apple's iOS 10 or macOS Sierra?

Should You Upgrade to Apple's iOS 10 or macOS Sierra?

This is the second in a series of reports where we dive into iOS 10 and macOS Sierra, which were both introduced during this year's Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) keynote address in June. -- AppAdvice.

How the Apple Watch is changing deafblind lives

How the Apple Watch is changing deafblind lives

Why a small charity wants to give deafblind people an Apple Watch.

I've come across a compelling story that shows how Apple Watch can make a huge difference to enable deafblind people to live more independent lives.

It's all available in this extensive post written by Usher Syndrome sufferer, Lady Usher. The author is London-based and gets around with the aid of a cane, a guide dog and an iPhone, but Apple Watch is transforming her life. -- Computerworld.

Apple patent: iPhone to send responders to emergency location

Apple patent: iPhone to send responders to emergency location

Apple has been awarded a patent that describes technology to get emergency responders to the location of the incident. The technology kicks in after a 911 call is originated.

Using satellites, this tech would determine the highest probability of an exact location to notify 911. In the event that can't be determined, subsequent attempts would be made by the phone and the most likely location of the emergency will be sent.

This technology is activated automatically when a 911 call is made so responders can locate the problem when the iPhone owner can't tell them. This could cut down response time when it matters most.

What to do when your Mac can't mount, repair, or erase a drive

What to do when your Mac can't mount, repair, or erase a drive

Reader Haris wrote with a drive problem: "My Samsung SSD stopped working suddenly earlier today. Couldn't boot and couldn't repair it in Disk Utility." Haris had kept his 2012 MacBook Pro's original hard drive, so he swapped it in place, and it wouldn't boot. He couldn't erase, it either: "The bar loads, but it just keeps loading and the 'estimated time' just keeps increasing. It's about halfway. I waited several hours and the time still keeps increasing." -- Macworld.

Apple TV: How To Cut The Cable TV Cord

Apple TV: How To Cut The Cable TV Cord

Sorry, Apple. The future of television isn't really Apple TV. It's apps. We Apple customers are a hearty lot, imbued with patience and money, but you've let us down, Apple. No Apple television. No Apple streaming television service. Until recently, about the best Apple could do was to give us network apps on Apple TV-- apps that required a cable TV account already. What's the point? -- NoodleMac.

How to Use an Older Apple TV in the Classroom

How to Use an Older Apple TV in the Classroom

An older Apple TV is a powerful tool for education. You can use it to access multimedia assets from multiple sources. Teachers and pupils can also stream their own content directly from their iPhones and iPads. This means it is a good platform for presentations, coursework and more. Here is what you need to know to set up an older (v.2 or v.3) Apple TV for use in the classroom. -- About Tech.

How to set up relationships using Siri on your iOS device

How to set up relationships using Siri on your iOS device

You can use Siri, Apple's "personal digital assistant," to establish relationships using your iPhone or iPad. It's easy. Here's how:

First, make sure that you have the contact listed in your Contacts app. For example, I want to make sure my iOS devices know that Laura Sellers is my wife. Her name, address, and phone number are listed in Contacts. -- Apple World Today.

Create custom vibrations for messages and phone calls on your iPhone

Tip: create custom vibrations for messages and phone calls on your iPhone

Your iPhone is probably your number one tool for communication between yourself and your friends or family, but out of the box, every vibration you get from a text message, whether it's an SMS or iMessage, or a phone call, vibrates exactly the same way.

In this tutorial, we'll show you how you can create a custom vibration on your iPhone and assign it to any contact(s) you may have. -- iDownload Blog.

5 ways to take charge of the iOS Home button

5 ways to take charge of the iOS Home button

The Home button on your iPhone and iPad will get a new job with arrival of iOS 10: It'll unlock your handset, replacing the old "Slide to Unlock" gesture. But you don't have to wait until fall to change the Home key's behavior. -- PCWorld.

The tyranny of messaging and notifications: Can we endure even one more communications service?

The tyranny of messaging and notifications: Can we endure even one more communications service?

Up until just a few years ago, I got around 350 emails a day, which presented me with an exhausting, time-consuming daily task that I grumbled about plenty. Now, because of social media and messaging services, that number has been cut by more than half. But things are actually worse. -- The Verge .

It's Not The iPhone Cables. It's You

It's Not The iPhone Cables. It's You

For the foreseeable future, our various and sundry electronic devices will require one or more cables to work properly.

Even the iPhone of the future-- the one where Apple ditches the analog headphone jack in favor of All Lightning, All The Time-- will be down to a single cable that performs multiple duty as charger connector, headphone connector, backup connector, and other chores that cannot be handled via Wi-Fi. -- BohemianBoomer.

How Was Your Smartphone Made? Nobody Really Knows

How Was Your Smartphone Made? Nobody Really Knows

A startup called Fairphone pulls back the curtain on an electronics supply chain plagued by forced labor and armed militias. Is a truly ethical smartphone possible? -- Wall Street Journal.

Hackers Can Use Smart Watch Movements To Reveal A Wearer's ATM PIN

Hackers Can Use Smart Watch Movements To Reveal A Wearer's ATM PIN

By gaining access to the sensors in someone's smart watch, hackers could track the person's hand movements at an ATM and figure out his/her pin. The hacker needn't be anywhere near the ATM; data can be lifted from the smart watch by either a discreet wireless sniffer or by malware on the watch that sends info to a server. This is hardly the first demonstration of the security flaws in smart watches. Last year, a research group showed that a watch's sensors can reveal keystrokes on a computer keyboard. -- Spectrum.

July 06Wednesday's News


Apple issues second developer betas of iOS 10, macOS Sierra, watchOS 3 and tvOS 10

Apple issues second developer betas of iOS 10, macOS Sierra, watchOS 3 and tvOS 10

Apple on Tuesday pushed out the second pre-release beta builds for iOS 10, macOS Sierra, watchOS 3, and tvOS 10, arriving more than three weeks after the platforms were announced at the annual Worldwide Developers Conference. -- AppleInsider.

Apple & Donate Life America Bring National Organ Donor Registration to iPhone

Apple & Donate Life America Bring National Organ Donor Registration to iPhone

Apple® and Donate Life America announced today that, for the first time ever, iPhone® users will be able to sign up to be an organ, eye and tissue donor right from the Health app with the release of iOS 10. Through a simple sign up process, iPhone users can learn more and take action with just a few taps. All registrations submitted from iPhone are sent directly to the National Donate Life Registry managed by Donate Life America. The ability to quickly and easily become a nationally-registered donor enables people to carry their decision with them wherever they go. -- Apple PR.

First look: Register as an organ donor with Donate Life America in Apple's iOS 10 Health app

First look: Register as an organ donor with Donate Life America in Apple's iOS 10 Health app

Apple's newly released second beta of iOS 10 makes it easy for iPhone users to register with Donate Life America as an organ donor. Here's where to find it and how it works. -- AppleInsider.


Dangerous new Mac malware fully compromises OS X

Dangerous new Mac malware fully compromises OS X

Apple's Mac systems have been exposed to a dangerous new piece of malware that allows attackers to take full control of OS X.

The new malware, dubbed Backdoor.MAC.Eleanor by security researchers, provides attackers with a backdoor into OS X systems by embedding a script into a fake file converter application that's found on many reputable sites that sell Mac apps. -- Cult of Mac.

Video Walkthrough of New Features and Changes in iOS 10 Beta 2

Video Walkthrough of New Features and Changes in iOS 10 Beta 2

Today's release of the second developer beta of iOS 10 brought a number of tweaks and improvements, and we'll undoubtedly see more as Apple continues through the development and testing process ahead of a full public release likely in September.

In addition to the tidbits we listed in our original coverage, we've also put together this overview video to help highlight some of the changes and new features in the second beta. It takes a look at the new Messages App Store with some sticker packs from Apple, changes to the Control Center 3D Touch actions, Apple's new organ donor signup, and more. -- MacRumors.

Apple Granted 47 Patents Today Covering Apple Watch, Lightning Dock & Web Application Architecture

Apple Granted 47 Patents Today Covering Apple Watch, Lightning Dock & Web Application Architecture

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office officially published a series of 47 newly granted patents for Apple Inc. today. Earlier today we covered patents relating to the iPhone 7's dual camera system for 3D mapping and sensing along with one covering one of Apple's initial inventions for a future video headset. In this report we cover design patents for Apple's lightning based iPhone dock and Apple's fifth Apple Watch design patent since May. A few other granted patents of interest to point out today include ... -- Patently Apple.

A Big Risk for AI Agents is the Creepy Factor

A Big Risk for AI Agents is the Creepy Factor

Paging Sarah Connor!

After decades as a sci-fi staple, artificial intelligence has leapt into the mainstream. Between Apple's Siri and Amazon's Alexa, IBM's Watson and Google Brain, machines that understand the world and respond productively suddenly seem imminent. -- Wall Street Journal.

Life? Life? What Life?

xxxxx


Why Siri Is So Important for Apple: It's crucial to the company's future

Why Siri Is So Important for Apple: It's crucial to the company's future

After Apple's WWDC keynote last month, some reporters asked me if Apple's new additions to Siri are reactionary. They assumed that since Amazon, Google and Microsoft have upped the intelligence of their voice assistants, Apple was forced to make Siri more competitive. -- Time.

Is another device using your computer's IP address? Here's the fix

Is another device using your computer's IP address? Here's the fix!

Why does my Mac's Wi-Fi keep switching to another IP Address? We have the answer!

Are you getting this message when you try to use the internet on your Mac: "Another device on the network is using your computers IP Address.If you continue to have problems, change the IP Address of this computer or the IP address of the other device"?

If so, you may need to assign a new lease or reset the location of your Wi-Fi. Here's how. -- iMore.

How To Rename, Sort, Filter, Scale, Convert, Manage, And Watermark Photos On A Mac

How To Rename, Sort, Filter, Scale, Convert, Manage, And Watermark Photos On A Mac

Just between us photographers, I loved using iPhoto on my Mac, and I don't really have a bone to pick with Apple's new Photos app. It's free. It works.

Photos is also good place to store and manage tens of thousands of photos in a library, divide up by events, and albums. The photo tweaking tools are nominal but acceptable. What's missing in Photos is a way to view and sort photos, archive photos, customize galleries, rename photos, or add a watermark to protect photos. For that, there is an easier way. -- Mac360.

It's a Bad Time to Buy an iPhone

It's a Bad Time to Buy an iPhone

Whether or not Apple's next overhaul of the iPhone meets your needs, you should still wait until September to commit to a new phone. Instead of 16GB as a starting point for the entry-level iPhone, the new starting point will be 32GB, according to a person familiar with Apple's iPhone plans. -- Wall Street Journal.

Everything you need to know about Apple's developer betas

Everything you need to know about Apple's developer betas

If you're a developer or have an Apple development account, here's what you need to know to get access to software betas. -- iMore.

How to clear an incorrect unread email badge in iOS

How to clear an incorrect unread email badge in iOS

Keith Pitman writes:

On my iPad the Mail icon constantly shows four new, unread emails, even though I actually have none. When I go into Mail and look at the list of mailboxes, it appears the four unread emails are in Junk, even after I delete all junk and then delete Trash. How can I get the unread counter to reset to zero? -- Macworld.

I Tried To Live Off Apple Pay, And It Didn't Really Work

I Tried To Live Off Apple Pay, And It Didn't Really Work

I lost my credit card last week, something which I in no way blame on the Apple AAPL -0.93% corporation. It represented an opportunity of sorts, however: I've got an iPhone 6, but had never really played around with Apple Pay before. This is great, I thought: I may have no credit card, but this is 2016, and the modern world being the technological wonderland that it is, I have several cards loaded into my phone. So I set about finding out what an Apple Pay life would be like. As it turns out, "limited" is the operative word. -- Forbes.

Developers And Customers: The Apple Revolt

Developers And Customers: The Apple Revolt

Today self-determination and democracy seem like a given in the US, even during these tumultuous times. But if you're a developer on Apple's iOS App Store, it's a completely different ballgame.

As a developer you aren't even allowed to mention to your customers that they can buy directly from you, outside the App Store. You can't even say "Visit our website for current pricing" without a link. -- ZDNET.

Pod Planes Could Change Travel Forever

Pod Planes Could Change Travel Forever

Every year we hear about people dying in plane crashes. This does not have to continue as there is a new revolutionary pod plane design [in the works via the Clip-Air project]. A passenger pod is not heavy because it does not contain fuel, engines, avionics, etc., so in case of an accident it can be ejected and land on parachutes. The obstacle to this new invention is that the whole obsolete airport and airline infrastructure must be rebuilt. So what? Shall we continue to get killed because it is easier to produce aircraft with a design from 1950s? -- CNN.

Japan Says Yes To Mirrorless Cars

Japan Says Yes To Mirrorless Cars

Last month, Japan became one of the first countries to allow vehicles to use cameras instead of mirrors. "Video mirrors" will no longer be reserved for concept cars. They will likely turn into a huge marketplace for tech businesses and suppliers now that the "Land of the Rising Sun" gave Japanese companies the green light by allowing mirrorless vehicles. While many would argue that glass mirrors work just fine, video mirrors do have some real-world advantages. They can reduce drag and improve fuel efficiency (Warning: source may be paywalled) while improving the looks of a vehicle in the process. In addition, they can capture a wide-angle view that can see blind spots, and they can improve visibility by digitally compensating for glare, darkness or even rainy weather. The first company to supply digital mirrors will be Ichikoh. Their first product will be an interior rear-view mirror named the Smart Rear View Mirror that will enter production on June 28th. -- Automotive News.

July 05Tuesday's News


Video: See how widgets in iOS 10 offer quick access to app data

Video: See how widgets in iOS 10 offer quick access to app data

Article Image A new Widgets feature will be included in iOS 10 when the operating system launches this fall, making it easier for users to quickly access snippets of app data from both lock and home screens. AppleInsider takes a closer look at the upcoming feature poised to fundamentally change the way users interact with iPhone. -- AppleInsider.

Thinking about Big Data -- Part One

Thinking about Big Data -- Part One

BigDataBig Data is Big News, a Big Deal, and Big Business, but what is it, really? What does Big Data even mean? To those in the thick of it, Big Data is obvious and I'm stupid for even asking the question. But those in the thick of Big Data find most people stupid, don't you? So just for a moment I'll speak to those readers who are, like me, not in the thick of Big Data. What does it mean? That's what I am going to explore this week in what I am guessing will be three long columns. -- I, Cringely.

Hands-On With Apple's Redesigned Maps App in iOS 10

Hands-On With Apple's Redesigned Maps App in iOS 10

Apple's Maps app received a major overhaul in iOS 10, introducing a new look and some impressive new features. Design wise, Maps looks a lot different, with easier to access controls and destination suggestions that are front and center. -- MacRumors.

Why Tech Support Is (Purposely) Unbearable

Why Tech Support Is (Purposely) Unbearable

Worse, just as you suspected, companies know the torture they are putting you through, with cable and mobile service providers the most egregious offenders.

You may consider yourself even-keeled, the kind of person who is unflappable when those around you are losing their cool. But all that goes out the window when you call tech support. Then you fume. Your face turns red. You shout things into the phone that would appall your mother.

It's called tech support rage. -- New York Times.

Why I'm resigned to my next MacBook Pro being worse than my current one

Why I'm resigned to my next MacBook Pro being worse than my current one

Regular readers will know that I still have a 17-inch MacBook Pro as my main computer. It's almost five years old now, which is a relatively long time in Mac terms, and an absolute age for someone who usually does poorly when it comes to resisting shiny new tech. -- 9to5Mac.

Apple's Thunderbolt Display is dead: These are the best 4K & 5K displays for Mac

Apple's Thunderbolt Display is dead: These are the best 4K & 5K displays for Mac

If you've been holding out for a new standalone desktop display from Apple, you're either going to take news of the Thunderbolt Display being discontinued as a sign of good things to come, or as a cue to finally purchase a new 4K or 5K display from someone else. For most, especially considering Apple itself is recommending you purchase a third-party display, the latter option is going to be the more likely. -- 9to5Mac.

You Thought iPhone Is a Cute Telephone with Internet -- Wrong

You Thought iPhone Is a Cute Telephone with Internet -- Wrong

So you thought the iPhone was just a cute, miniature telephone with a camera, music player and internet access. In 2016, that's not really the right way to think about the iPhone. John Martellaro looks at how the iPhone has affected modern culture and how Apple, in turn, has responded. The evolution of iOS is put in perspective. -- The Mac Observer.

NASA Delights Space Geeks with New Apple TV App

NASA Delights Space Geeks with New Apple TV App

NASA has released an Apple TV app that is sure to keep space geeks busy for weeks. The app for the fourth-generation Apple TV has images, video, satellite tracking, and even a radio station with a pop soundtrack. -- TidBITS.

Here's what Apple thinks about the black market for $1 million iPhone hacks

Here's what Apple thinks about the black market for $1 million iPhone hacks

The U.S. government paid a steep price to hackers earlier this year to help it break into an iPhone used by on of the San Bernardino shooters.

ΩThe most recent credible report pegs the price the government paid at "under $1 million," but comments by FBI director James Comey peg the price as being at least $1.3 million. -- Business Insider.

Why wearables will replace your smartphone

Why wearables will replace your smartphone

While we tech journalists bicker over audio jacks, something truly important is happening: Our smartphone user interfaces (UI) are becoming distributed and invisible. These trends will make the smartphone itself obsolete. -- Computerworld.

Can't save a Microsoft Office document? Look for the forward slash

Can't save a Microsoft Office document? Look for the forward slash

All of a sudden when I am trying to save a modified file with a different name in Excel in the same folder than the original, I get the attached reply [see figure] and cannot save it. -- Macworld.

How to Recreate Recovery Partition in Mac OS X

How to Recreate Recovery Partition in Mac OS X

The Recovery partition in Mac OS X is an important component of a system install in that it allows you to troubleshoot a computer, repair drives, restore from backups, and even reinstall Mac OS if need be. Nonetheless, in some specific situations you may find that a Mac does not have a Recovery partition, usually because it has either been unintentionally removed or because a drive was cloned and the Recovery partition wasn't brought along in that duplication process. -- OS X Daily.

Apple Finally Put Siri Where It Belongs: Siri feels like a true personal assistant on the Mac

Apple Finally Put Siri Where It Belongs: Siri feels like a true personal assistant on the Mac

Many aspects of my life are neat and organized. My computer is not one of them. I rarely purge my system of old files and photos. I forget to uninstall software I don't need anymore. My desktop is a mess of thumbnails and documents.

But over the past week, I've had something helping me manage that digital disarray: Siri. "Show me all the files I opened today." "Find my spreadsheets." "Get me the files I downloaded yesterday." These are just a few of the commands Apple's voice assistant can handle in macOS Sierra, Apple's new software that will bring Siri to Mac desktops and laptops when it launches this fall. -- Time.

How to Use Apple Mail Like a Pro

How to Use Apple Mail Like a Pro

Once you learn the basics of Apple Mail, it's easy to send and organize emails. With these tips and tricks, you can make Mail more than useful; you can make it powerful. We'll teach you how to make filter rules that sort your mail for you, use VIP contacts and more. See the list below and learn how to use Mail like a master. -- LAPTOP Magazine.

How to transfer a video from OS X to iOS

How to transfer a video from OS X to iOS

I'm trying to send a video from my Mac to my iPhone. I don't have cell service so I can't send through a text, only over Wi-Fi. I shared it through iCloud sharing so that I could save it to my phone and upload it on my account, but it won't allow me to save the video to the phone. Emailing doesn't work either. A 19-second video is apparently too large to send through email. -- Macworld.

Building My $1,200 Hackintosh

Building My $1,200 Hackintosh

I've wanted a new Mac for awhile now. Now I have one faster than almost any Mac that Apple can sell you. Here's how I built it. -- Mike Rundle.

The Rush to Be Obsolete

The Rush to Be Obsolete

Plugging leaks is not impossible, neither is fixing VM code or finding better frontend people.

The following comes from a leaked memory check of Safari. Safari's leaking 1920 bytes already on launch. And it only gets worse as things go on. -- Rixstep.

Google Cast Is Now Baked Into Chrome, No Extension Needed

Google Cast Is Now Baked Into Chrome, No Extension Needed

The Google Chrome 51 browser now includes a built-in 'Cast' option within the drop-down settings menu, which can also be accessed from right clicking in a tab. This will then cast the current tab to the appropriate TV or monitor. Previously, if you wanted to cast content from your computer to your Chromecast-equipped display, you needed to download a Chrome extension. Along with the new changes, Google has removed the ability to tweak settings for resolution, bitrate, and quality when casting a tab, so Chrome itself will now control such parameters automatically. Chrome 51 is now available as a stable version, and the Cast option should be rolling out to users now. This casting ability will also be baked into Chrome OS. -- Ars Technica.

One Man's Opinion: OS X Rebuild

One Man's Opinion: OS X Rebuild

This is the sad sad story of a poor misguided user that decided to install beta software on his work computer that had already been customize and running for years.

After installing the new OS X beta (Sierra) my system was not allowing me to install other software I needed to do my job. Also it would not restart or shutdown without using the power-off button. I contacted Apple Support to help fix the problems, NADA. So I had to bite the bullet and rebuild from scratch.

Why didn't I just use Recover Mode you ask? Recovery Mode is only a copy of the current system, not a new one. What good does a bad system backup do me?

The only good news was that I had the hardware to let me do it. I have two external HD's configured as an array that I use for TimeMachine. So it broke the array and erased the disks. I then used CarbonCopy Cloner to copy my current system to one of the HD's. Then I installed a brand new OS X on the other HD so I could boot from it and erase the internal HD with the bad OS.

Once that was done I erased the internal HD and installed a clean system (El Capitan 10.11.)

Then came the really fun part. Moving all my data, software, serial numbers and settings from my cloned system (external HD) to the new internal HD.

Files are easy but you do have to remember where they are. For me many were in folders other than Documents. Dig, dig, dig. Search, search, search.

The configurations and permissions for files, folders and directories were a lot of fun. There were configuration files that had been changed or were corrupted on the old system because it was necessary to do my job. Tracking all of them down as well as finding the bad code and fixing it took some digging.

Now I had to get all my applications back. Some were standalone but others needed installers. Some needed serial numbers which are saved in many different places on the system if at all. This is why on most everything I install I take a screen shot when I enter a serial number or the email that is sent that contains the serial number. Came in handy more than once. Of course with many of these applications there with configurations and preferences I wanted or needed so I had to track all them down.

There were obscure issues that required much online research to find a solution to. Even though I had solved many such issues before, there where some new ones which were very difficult.

Once everything was in place new and different behaviors poped up that i had to find solutions for (i.e., I could not make my default mail client selection stick.) I did get that fixed.

Some necessary OS X settings changed with the new install and had to be fixed. Two examples will to serve to illustrate:

  1. The Finder didn't show ALL files and folders (full file structure plus those hidden.) I tried the command line NADA! TinkerTool to the rescue.
  2. And don't get me started on SQL Developer and Java. Took forever to figure out that /Applications/SQLDeveloper.app/Contents/MacOS/sqldeveloper.sh was pointing to the wrong version of Java. The files that contained the information was deep in the unix file structure.

The good news is that my Mac is much leaner and meaner. It went from using 250GB to 175GB of space. Several years of buildup with no way to clean it out. Except the hard way.

I have been running my new system for several days to test if everything is OK so I can get my array back and turn TimeMachine back on.

Hold a good thought.

Anyway, that's one man's opinion.

July 01Friday's News


Verizon Wireless data plans might become more like T-Mobile's

Verizon Wireless data plans might become more like T-Mobile's

Verizon Wireless says it has a big announcement coming next week, and rumors suggest the mobile carrier will start offering rollover data and a "safety mode" that lets customers use slower data without paying overage fees once their monthly high-speed data allotments run out. -- Ars Technica.

Tesla's Autopilot being investigated by the government following fatal crash

Tesla's Autopilot being investigated by the government following fatal crash

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is about to take a closer look at Tesla's Autopilot, the company revealed on Thursday. In a blog post, Tesla says that it learned on Wednesday evening that the NHTSA is "opening a preliminary evaluation into the performance of Autopilot" following a fatal crash involving a Model S. -- Ars Technica.

Everything you need to know about the new Apple File System

Everything you need to know about the new Apple File System

It's hard to believe that Apple's speedy Macs are still using a file system that was developed more than 30 years ago, when floppy disks and spinning hard drives were considered cutting-edge technology.

But that's going to change in 2017 with the new Apple File System, or APFS. Here's everything you need to know about APFS and how it's going to make your life better, no matter what Apple device(s) you use. -- Cult of Mac.

A growing number of filmmakers say, 'Lights, iPhone, action!'

A growing number of filmmakers say, 'Lights, iPhone, action!'

Apple guaranteed the iPhone would reinvent the phone. But filmmaking?

Writer and director Conrad Mess said the iPhone's red record button turned him into a filmmaker. It helped another cash-strapped director win praise and wide distribution for a feature film he shot on the iPhone 5s that was the buzz of last year's Sundance Film Festival. -- Cult of Mac.

Starlight - Synclavier music by Steve Capps 2016

Starlight - Synclavier music by Steve Capps 2016

Renaissance man Steve Capps writes:

I got a new music synthesizer - a Synclavier. These cost around $200,000 to get the hardware version, but a French music company (Arturia) has just made a software version that only costs a few dollars. It's a pretty cool synthesizer!
So I played around with it some, and wrote this "techno" song, and put it up on YouTube -- it's called "Starlight".
What you see on the screen is not the Synclavier software -- that's running invisibly in the background. What's on the screen is the DAW (Digital Audio Workstation). It's Cakewalk's SONAR program for writing / recording / editing / playing

How Much Do We Love TV? Let Us Count the Ways

How Much Do We Love TV? Let Us Count the Ways

A Nielsen study on how we consume media finds people are still watching plenty of TV but services like Netflix and Amazon Prime are growing rapidly.

You still love television. You use your tablet more than ever. And now you are as likely to have paid services like Netflix or Amazon Prime as you are to have a DVR service. -- New York Times.

AppleCare+ to the rescue if you rely on Apple Watch

AppleCare+ to the rescue if you rely on Apple Watch

Fitness tracking with the Apple Watch really kicked in for me a few months ago, and now I'm obsessed with filling the Activity rings and improving my health. So when I woke up Tuesday morning and discovered what looked like a small blotch of blue ink under the glass of my Apple Watch, I sort of freaked out. I have a Move streak going and just a few days left before the Perfect Month achievement in the Activity app kicks in, so I really didn't want to go a day without my Apple Watch. -- 9to5Mac.

With iOS 10, 'Hey Siri' intelligently activates on just one nearby device at a time

With iOS 10, 'Hey Siri' intelligently activates on just one nearby device at a time [Video]

Apple is bringing some clever intelligence for Siri with iOS 10, in addition to the publicly-announced features like third-party app integration. Thanks to a reader tip, we've discovered a clever enhancement for Siri on iPhones and iPads running iOS 10. When using 'Hey Siri' voice activation in a room with multiple nearby devices, only one device will respond. For example, with iOS 10 installed, an iPhone 6s is smart enough to stop listening for voice input if an iPad Pro is also listening. -- 9to5Mac.

Parallels Desktop 11: Run Windows/Android/Linux/anything seamlessly on your Mac: $40 (50% off) shipped or less

Parallels Desktop 11: Run Windows/Android/Linux/anything seamlessly on your Mac: $40 (50% off) shipped or less

Parallels Desktop 11 is the latest version of the world's most popular virtualization software for the Mac. The software has been iterating over a decade and now makes Windows feel like part of the MacOS. You can also virtualize Linux, Android, and just about anything that runs on Intel chips including another instance of MacOS -- great for testing macOS Betas! [I have run Parallels for years. I can recommend it without reservation. -mam] -- 9to5Mac.

Ain't nobody happy if Steve ain't happy

Ain't nobody happy if Steve ain't happy

Steve Jobs was an amazing individual. Most of us remember the great product demos, awesome devices, quips like "It's about the music, stupid," and other fun things. We've also heard infamous examples of Mr. Jobs being angry on the job; but in honor of the iPhone's 9th birthday on Wednesday, former Apple PR executive Natalie Kerris reminded that Mr. Jobs got angry in public, too. The video she linked to is a compilation of Stevenote moments when that anger came out. Like everything with Steve Jobs, I love watching him in action. It's always interesting.

The story behind Apple's wheelchair Activity app

The story behind Apple's wheelchair Activity app

WWDC 2016 and Apple made many moves to improve accessibility across its products, but the introduction of a version of the Apple Watch Activity app for wheelchair users was a particularly big deal. You see, there's never been an accurate fitness tracker like this before, and Apple has been working on it for at least a year. -- Computerworld.

Macs and Malware Explained

Macs and Malware Explained

Macs, for a long time, have had a reputation of being immune to malware. This reputation isn't entirely unwarranted but the situation has gotten a little more complicated. There are two factors that have, historically, protected Macs from viruses, trojans and other malware:

  1. They have built-in security measures, and
  2. They were far less popular than Windows PCs

Tuts+.

OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard Is Still Good Enough for Me

OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard Is Still Good Enough for Me

Honestly, if they didn't keep dropping support for OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard in new versions of Chrome, Firefox, and Flash, I'd have almost no reason to have OS X 10.9 Mavericks on my Late 2008 13″ Aluminum MacBook (that's a 2013 OS on a 2008 computer). But my Mid 2007 Mac mini is limited to OS X 10.7 Lion (a 2011 OS on a 2007 Mac), so I'm sometimes left behind by new versions of software. -- Low End Mac.

OS X rebranding further marginalizes Mac

OS X rebranding further marginalizes Mac

I've always loved the Mac.

Let me put that right out there. But Apple's recent announcement that OS X has gone bye-bye in favor of "macOS" will do nothing for the Mac except accelerate its downward spiral as a fringe hardware product. -- Computerworld.

8 Simple iPhone Security Tips

8 Simple iPhone Security Tips

An iPhone contains huge amounts of detailed personal information about the owner, including emails, contact lists, banking information, personal notes, pictures, and much more, all of which most users want to keep private and secure. Fortunately the iPhone makes having a secured device pretty user friendly, and even novice users can take a few fairly simple precautions to make sure their devices are secure and locked down. -- OS X Daily.

Everything You Know About Siri Is Wrong

Everything You Know About Siri Is Wrong

It's not just a voice assistant -- it's a look into the future.

"Think different" was an iconic tagline that helped define Apple for years. "A thousand songs in your pocket" was another solid slug that sold iPods and the idea of instant digital music. And then there was "Your intelligent assistant that helps you get things done by just talking." This exhausting mouthful, used by Apple's marketing chief Phil Schiller at Siri's reveal in 2011, fell flat. And it has framed how people have viewed the world's most recognizable voice assistant ever since. -- Fortune.

It's Worse Than You Think, Apple' (or, maybe not)

It's Worse Than You Think, Apple' (or, maybe not)

These days Forbes and other digital magazines are filled with articles from ego driven contributors with opinions and perspectives on anything and everything, missives that are passed off as analysis. Recently there has been a splurge on such think-rot that Apple is in decline, that its problems are worse than you think (you have been thinking that, right? Just as BlackBerry and Nokia missed the revolution started by Apple's iconic iPhone, Apple is missing the revolution in cloud-based artificial intelligence, data driven deep machine learning, and personal assistants. Ostensibly, Apple has none of that, no cloud presence, no database tools, and nothing that will keep Apple moving forward in the 21st century as the likes of Google's Assistant, Facebook's M, Amazon's Alexa, and Microsoft's Cortana will rule an era of artificial intelligence everywhere.

Or, so the common story goes. -- McSolo.